Tag Archives: software updates

Solus 3 released

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/731121/rss

The Solus distribution project has announced
the availability of Solus 3. “This is the third iteration of
Solus since our move to become a rolling release operating system. Unlike
the previous iterations, however, this is a release and not a
snapshot. We’ve now moved away from the ‘regular snapshot’ model to
accommodate the best hybrid approach possible – feature rich releases with
explicit goals and technology enabling, along with the benefits of a
curated rolling release operating system.
” Headline features
include support for the Snap packaging format, a lot of desktop changes,
and numerous software updates. (LWN looked at
Solus
in 2016).

Blue/Green Deployments with Amazon EC2 Container Service

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/bluegreen-deployments-with-amazon-ecs/

This post and accompanying code was generously contributed by:

Jeremy Cowan
Solutions Architect
Anuj Sharma
DevOps Cloud Architect
Peter Dalbhanjan
Solutions Architect

Deploying software updates in traditional non-containerized environments is hard and fraught with risk. When you write your deployment package or script, you have to assume that the target machine is in a particular state. If your staging environment is not an exact mirror image of your production environment, your deployment could fail. These failures frequently cause outages that persist until you re-deploy the last known good version of your application. If you are an Operations Manager, this is what keeps you up at night.

Increasingly, customers want to do testing in production environments without exposing customers to the new version until the release has been vetted. Others want to expose a small percentage of their customers to the new release to gather feedback about a feature before it’s released to the broader population. This is often referred to as canary analysis or canary testing. In this post, I introduce patterns to implement blue/green and canary deployments using Application Load Balancers and target groups.

If you’d like to try this approach to blue/green deployments, we have open sourced the code and AWS CloudFormation templates in the ecs-blue-green-deployment GitHub repo. The workflow builds an automated CI/CD pipeline that deploys your service onto an ECS cluster and offers a controlled process to swap target groups when you’re ready to promote the latest version of your code to production. You can quickly set up the environment in three steps and see the blue/green swap in action. We’d love for you to try it and send us your feedback!

Benefits of blue/green

Blue/green deployments are a type of immutable deployment that help you deploy software updates with less risk. The risk is reduced by creating separate environments for the current running or “blue” version of your application, and the new or “green” version of your application.

This type of deployment gives you an opportunity to test features in the green environment without impacting the current running version of your application. When you’re satisfied that the green version is working properly, you can gradually reroute the traffic from the old blue environment to the new green environment by modifying DNS. By following this method, you can update and roll back features with near zero downtime.

A typical blue/green deployment involves shifting traffic between 2 distinct environments.

This ability to quickly roll traffic back to the still-operating blue environment is one of the key benefits of blue/green deployments. With blue/green, you should be able to roll back to the blue environment at any time during the deployment process. This limits downtime to the time it takes to realize there’s an issue in the green environment and shift the traffic back to the blue environment. Furthermore, the impact of the outage is limited to the portion of traffic going to the green environment, not all traffic. If the blast radius of deployment errors is reduced, so is the overall deployment risk.

Containers make it simpler

Historically, blue/green deployments were not often used to deploy software on-premises because of the cost and complexity associated with provisioning and managing multiple environments. Instead, applications were upgraded in place.

Although this approach worked, it had several flaws, including the ability to roll back quickly from failures. Rollbacks typically involved re-deploying a previous version of the application, which could affect the length of an outage caused by a bad release. Fixing the issue took precedence over the need to debug, so there were fewer opportunities to learn from your mistakes.

Containers can ease the adoption of blue/green deployments because they’re easily packaged and behave consistently as they’re moved between environments. This consistency comes partly from their immutability. To change the configuration of a container, update its Dockerfile and rebuild and re-deploy the container rather than updating the software in place.

Containers also provide process and namespace isolation for your applications, which allows you to run multiple versions of them side by side on the same Docker host without conflicts. Given their small sizes relative to virtual machines, you can binpack more containers per host than VMs. This lets you make more efficient use of your computing resources, reducing the cost of blue/green deployments.

Fully Managed Updates with Amazon ECS

Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) performs rolling updates when you update an existing Amazon ECS service. A rolling update involves replacing the current running version of the container with the latest version. The number of containers Amazon ECS adds or removes from service during a rolling update is controlled by adjusting the minimum and maximum number of healthy tasks allowed during service deployments.

When you update your service’s task definition with the latest version of your container image, Amazon ECS automatically starts replacing the old version of your container with the latest version. During a deployment, Amazon ECS drains connections from the current running version and registers your new containers with the Application Load Balancer as they come online.

Target groups

A target group is a logical construct that allows you to run multiple services behind the same Application Load Balancer. This is possible because each target group has its own listener.

When you create an Amazon ECS service that’s fronted by an Application Load Balancer, you have to designate a target group for your service. Ordinarily, you would create a target group for each of your Amazon ECS services. However, the approach we’re going to explore here involves creating two target groups: one for the blue version of your service, and one for the green version of your service. We’re also using a different listener port for each target group so that you can test the green version of your service using the same path as the blue service.

With this configuration, you can run both environments in parallel until you’re ready to cut over to the green version of your service. You can also do things such as restricting access to the green version to testers on your internal network, using security group rules and placement constraints. For example, you can target the green version of your service to only run on instances that are accessible from your corporate network.

Swapping Over

When you’re ready to replace the old blue service with the new green service, call the ModifyListener API operation to swap the listener’s rules for the target group rules. The change happens instantaneously. Afterward, the green service is running in the target group with the port 80 listener and the blue service is running in the target group with the port 8080 listener. The diagram below is an illustration of the approach described.

Scenario

Two services are defined, each with their own target group registered to the same Application Load Balancer but listening on different ports. Deployment is completed by swapping the listener rules between the two target groups.

The second service is deployed with a new target group listening on a different port but registered to the same Application Load Balancer.

By using 2 listeners, requests to blue services are directed to the target group with the port 80 listener, while requests to the green services are directed to target group with the port 8080 listener.

After automated or manual testing, the deployment can be completed by swapping the listener rules on the Application Load Balancer and sending traffic to the green service.

Caveats

There are a few caveats to be mindful of when using this approach. This method:

  • Assumes that your application code is completely stateless. Store state outside of the container.
  • Doesn’t gracefully drain connections. The swapping of target groups is sudden and abrupt. Therefore, be cautious about using this approach if your service has long-running transactions.
  • Doesn’t allow you to perform canary deployments. While the method gives you the ability to quickly switch between different versions of your service, it does not allow you to divert a portion of the production traffic to a canary or control the rate at which your service is deployed across the cluster.

Canary testing

While this type of deployment automates much of the heavy lifting associated with rolling deployments, it doesn’t allow you to interrupt the deployment if you discover an issue midstream. Rollbacks using the standard Amazon ECS deployment require updating the service’s task definition with the last known good version of the container. Then, you wait for Amazon ECS to schedule and deploy it across the cluster. If the latest version introduces a breaking change that went undiscovered during testing, this might be too slow.

With canary testing, if you discover the green environment is not operating as expected, there is no impact on the blue environment. You can route traffic back to it, minimizing impaired operation or downtime, and limiting the blast radius of impact.

This type of deployment is particularly useful for A/B testing where you want to expose a new feature to a subset of users to get their feedback before making it broadly available.

For canary style deployments, you can use a variation of the blue/green swap that involves deploying the blue and the green service to the same target group. Although this method is not as fast as the swap, it allows you to control the rate at which your containers are replaced by adjusting the task count for each service. Furthermore, it gives you the ability to roll back by adjusting the number of tasks for the blue and green services respectively. Unlike the swap approach described above, connections to your containers are drained gracefully. We plan to address canary style deployments for Amazon ECS in a future post.

Conclusion

With AWS, you can operationalize your blue/green deployments using Amazon ECS, an Application Load Balancer, and target groups. I encourage you to adapt the code published to the ecs-blue-green-deployment GitHub repo for your use cases and look forward to reading your feedback.

If you’re interested in learning more, I encourage you to read the Blue/Green Deployments on AWS and Practicing Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery on AWS whitepapers.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

AWS Greengrass – Run AWS Lambda Functions on Connected Devices

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-greengrass-run-aws-lambda-functions-on-connected-devices/

I first told you about AWS Greengrass in the post that I published during re:Invent (AWS Greengrass – Ubiquitous Real-World Computing). We launched a limited preview of Greengrass at that time and invited you to sign up if you were interested.

As I noted at the time, many AWS customers want to collect and process data out in the field, where connectivity is often slow and sometimes either intermittent or unreliable. Greengrass allows them to extend the AWS programming model to small, simple, field-based devices. It builds on AWS IoT and AWS Lambda, and supports access to the ever-increasing variety of services that are available in the AWS Cloud.

Greengrass gives you access to compute, messaging, data caching, and syncing services that run in the field, and that do not depend on constant, high-bandwidth connectivity to an AWS Region. You can write Lambda functions in Python 2.7 and deploy them to your Greengrass devices from the cloud while using device shadows to maintain state. Your devices and peripherals can talk to each other using local messaging that does not pass through the cloud.

Now Generally Available
Today we are making Greengrass generally available in the US East (Northern Virginia) and US West (Oregon) Regions. During the preview, AWS customers were able to get hands-on experience with Greengrass and to start building applications and businesses around it. I’ll share a few of these early successes later in this post.

The Greengrass Core code runs on each device. It allows you to deploy and run Lambda applications on the device, supports local MQTT messaging across a secure network, and also ensures that conversations between devices and the cloud are made across secure connections. The Greengrass Core also supports secure, over-the-air software updates, including Lambda functions. It includes a message broker, a Lambda runtime, a Thing Shadows implementation, and a deployment agent. Greengrass Core and (optionally) other devices make up a Greengrass Group. The group includes configuration data, the list of devices and the identity of the Greengrass Core, a list of Lambda functions, and a set of subscriptions that define where the messages should go. All of this information is copied to the Greengrass core devices during the deployment process.

Your Lambda functions can use APIs in three distinct SDKs:

AWS SDK for Python – This SDK allows your code to interact with Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), and other AWS services.

AWS IoT Device SDK – This SDK (available for Node.js, Python, Java, and C++) helps you to connect your hardware devices to AWS IoT. The C++ SDK has a few extra features including access to the Greengrass Discovery Service and support for root CA downloads.

AWS Greengrass Core SDK – This SDK provides APIs that allow local invocation of other Lambda functions, publish messages, and work with thing shadows.

You can run the Greengrass Core on x86 and ARM devices that have version 4.4.11 (or newer) of the Linux kernel, with the OverlayFS and user namespace features enabled. While most deployments of Greengrass will be targeted at specialized, industrial-grade hardware, you can also run the Greengrass Core on a Raspberry Pi or an EC2 instance for development and test purposes.

For this post, I used a Raspberry Pi attached to a BrickPi, connected to my home network via WiFi:

The Raspberry Pi, the BrickPi, the case, and all of the other parts are available in the BrickPi 3 Starter Kit. You will need some Linux command-line expertise and a decent amount of manual dexterity to put all of this together, but if I did it then you surely can.

Greengrass in Action
I can access Greengrass from the Console, API, or CLI. I’ll use the Console. The intro page of the Greengrass Console lets me define groups, add Greengrass Cores, and add devices to my groups:

I click on Get Started and then on Use easy creation:

Then I name my group:

And name my first Greengrass Core:

I’m ready to go, so I click on Create Group and Core:

This runs for a few seconds and then offers up my security resources (two keys and a certificate) for downloading, along with the Greengrass Core:

I download the security resources and put them in a safe place, and select and download the desired version of the Greengrass Core software (ARMv7l for my Raspberry Pi), and click on Finish.

Now I power up my Pi, and copy the security resources and the software to it (I put them in an S3 bucket and pulled them down with wget). Here’s my shell history at that point:

Following the directions in the user guide, I create a new user and group, run the rpi-update script, and install several packages including sqlite3 and openssl. After a couple of reboots, I am ready to proceed!

Next, still following the directions, I untar the Greengrass Core software and move the security resources to their final destination (/greengrass/configuration/certs), giving them generic names along the way. Here’s what the directory looks like:

The next step is to associate the core with an AWS IoT thing. I return to the Console, click through the group and the Greengrass Core, and find the Thing ARN:

I insert the names of the certificates and the Thing ARN into the config.json file, and also fill in the missing sections of the iotHost and ggHost:

I start the Greengrass demon (this was my second attempt; I had a typo in one of my path names the first time around):

After all of this pleasant time at the command line (taking me back to my Unix v7 and BSD 4.2 days), it is time to go visual once again! I visit my AWS IoT dashboard and see that my Greengrass Core is making connections to IoT:

I go to the Lambda Console and create a Lambda function using the Python 2.7 runtime (the IAM role does not matter here):

I publish the function in the usual way and, hop over to the Greengrass Console, click on my group, and choose to add a Lambda function:

Then I choose the version to deploy:

I also configure the function to be long-lived instead of on-demand:

My code will publish messages to AWS IoT, so I create a subscription by specifying the source and destination:

I set up a topic filter (hello/world) on the subscription as well:

I confirm my settings and save my subscription and I am just about ready to deploy my code. I revisit my group, click on Deployments, and choose Deploy from the Actions menu:

I choose Automatic detection to move forward:

Since this is my first deployment, I need to create a service-level role that gives Greengrass permission to access other AWS services. I simply click on Grant permission:

I can see the status of each deployment:

The code is now running on my Pi! It publishes messages to topic hello/world; I can see them by going to the IoT Console, clicking on Test, and subscribing to the topic:

And here are the messages:

With all of the setup work taken care of, I can do iterative development by uploading, publishing, and deploying new versions of my code. I plan to use the BrickPi to control some LEGO Technic motors and to publish data collected from some sensors. Stay tuned for that post!

Greengrass Pricing
You can run the Greengrass Core on three devices free for one year as part of the AWS Free Tier. At the next level (3 to 10,000 devices) two options are available:

  • Pay as You Go – $0.16 per month per device.
  • Annual Commitment – $1.49 per year per device, a 17.5% savings.

If you want to run the Greengrass Core on more than 10,000 devices or make a longer commitment, please get in touch with us; details on all pricing models are on the Greengrass Pricing page.

Jeff;

How to Update AWS CloudHSM Devices and Client Instances to the Software and Firmware Versions Supported by AWS

Post Syndicated from Tracy Pierce original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-update-aws-cloudhsm-devices-and-client-instances-to-the-software-and-firmware-versions-supported-by-aws/

As I explained in my previous Security Blog post, a hardware security module (HSM) is a hardware device designed with the security of your data and cryptographic key material in mind. It is tamper-resistant hardware that prevents unauthorized users from attempting to pry open the device, plug in any extra devices to access data or keys such as subtokens, or damage the outside housing. The HSM device AWS CloudHSM offers is the Luna SA 7000 (also called Safenet Network HSM 7000), which is created by Gemalto. Depending on the firmware version you install, many of the security properties of these HSMs will have been validated under Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 140-2, a standard issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for cryptography modules. These standards are in place to protect the integrity and confidentiality of the data stored on cryptographic modules.

To help ensure its continued use, functionality, and support from AWS, we suggest that you update your AWS CloudHSM device software and firmware as well as the client instance software to current versions offered by AWS. As of the publication of this blog post, the current non-FIPS-validated versions are 5.4.9/client, 5.3.13/software, and 6.20.2/firmware, and the current FIPS-validated versions are 5.4.9/client, 5.3.13/software, and 6.10.9/firmware. (The firmware version determines FIPS validation.) It is important to know your current versions before updating so that you can follow the correct update path.

In this post, I demonstrate how to update your current CloudHSM devices and client instances so that you are using the most current versions of software and firmware. If you contact AWS Support for CloudHSM hardware and application issues, you will be required to update to these supported versions before proceeding. Also, any newly provisioned CloudHSM devices will use these supported software and firmware versions only, and AWS does not offer “downgrade options.

Note: Before you perform any updates, check with your local CloudHSM administrator and application developer to verify that these updates will not conflict with your current applications or architecture.

Overview of the update process

To update your client and CloudHSM devices, you must use both update paths offered by AWS. The first path involves updating the software on your client instance, also known as a control instance. Following the second path updates the software first and then the firmware on your CloudHSM devices. The CloudHSM software must be updated before the firmware because of the firmware’s dependencies on the software in order to work appropriately.

As I demonstrate in this post, the correct update order is:

  1. Updating your client instance
  2. Updating your CloudHSM software
  3. Updating your CloudHSM firmware

To update your client instance, you must have the private SSH key you created when you first set up your client environment. This key is used to connect via SSH protocol on port 22 of your client instance. If you have more than one client instance, you must repeat this connection and update process on each of them. The following diagram shows the flow of an SSH connection from your local network to your client instances in the AWS Cloud.

Diagram that shows the flow of an SSH connection from your local network to your client instances in the AWS Cloud

After you update your client instance to the most recent software (5.3.13), you then must update the CloudHSM device software and firmware. First, you must initiate an SSH connection from any one client instance to each CloudHSM device, as illustrated in the following diagram. A successful SSH connection will have you land at the Luna shell, denoted by lunash:>. Second, you must be able to initiate a Secure Copy (SCP) of files to each device from the client instance. Because the software and firmware updates require an elevated level of privilege, you must have the Security Officer (SO) password that you created when you initialized your CloudHSM devices.

Diagram illustrating the initiation of an SSH connection from any one client instance to each CloudHSM device

After you have completed all updates, you can receive enhanced troubleshooting assistance from AWS, if you need it. When new versions of software and firmware are released, AWS performs extensive testing to ensure your smooth transition from version to version.

Detailed guidance for updating your client instance, CloudHSM software, and CloudHSM firmware

1.  Updating your client instance

Let’s start by updating your client instances. My client instance and CloudHSM devices are in the eu-west-1 region, but these steps work the same in any AWS region. Because Gemalto offers client instances in both Linux and Windows, I will cover steps to update both. I will start with Linux. Please note that all commands should be run as the “root” user.

Updating the Linux client

  1. SSH from your local network into the client instance. You can do this from Linux or Windows. Typically, you would do this from the directory where you have stored your private SSH key by using a command like the following command in a terminal or PuTTY This initiates the SSH connection by pointing to the path of your SSH key and denoting the user name and IP address of your client instance.
    ssh –i /Users/Bob/Keys/CloudHSM_SSH_Key.pem [email protected]

  1. After the SSH connection is established, you must stop all applications and services on the instance that are using the CloudHSM device. This is required because you are removing old software and installing new software in its place. After you have stopped all applications and services, you can move on to remove the existing version of the client software.
    /usr/safenet/lunaclient/bin/uninstall.sh

This command will remove the old client software, but will not remove your configuration file or certificates. These will be saved in the Chrystoki.conf file of your /etc directory and your usr/safenet/lunaclient/cert directory. Do not delete these files because you will lose the configuration of your CloudHSM devices and client connections.

  1. Download the new client software package: cloudhsm-safenet-client. Double-click it to extract the archive.
    SafeNet-Luna-client-5-4-9/linux/64/install.sh

    Make sure you choose the Luna SA option when presented with it. Because the directory where your certificates are installed is the same, you do not need to copy these certificates to another directory. You do, however, need to ensure that the Chrystoki.conf file, located at /etc/Chrystoki.conf, has the same path and name for the certificates as when you created them. (The path or names should not have changed, but you should still verify they are same as before the update.)

  1. Check to ensure that the PATH environment variable points to the directory, /usr/safenet/lunaclient/bin, to ensure no issues when you restart applications and services. The update process for your Linux client Instance is now complete.

Updating the Windows client

Use the following steps to update your Windows client instances:

  1. Use Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) from your local network into the client instance. You can accomplish this with the RDP application of your choice.
  2. After you establish the RDP connection, stop all applications and services on the instance that are using the CloudHSM device. This is required because you will remove old software and install new software in its place or overwrite If your client software version is older than 5.4.1, you need to completely remove it and all patches by using Programs and Features in the Windows Control Panel. If your client software version is 5.4.1 or newer, proceed without removing the software. Your configuration file will remain intact in the crystoki.ini file of your C:\Program Files\SafeNet\Lunaclient\ directory. All certificates are preserved in the C:\Program Files\SafeNet\Lunaclient\cert\ directory. Again, do not delete these files, or you will lose all configuration and client connection data.
  3. After you have completed these steps, download the new client software: cloudhsm-safenet-client. Extract the archive from the downloaded file, and launch the SafeNet-Luna-client-5-4-9\win\64\Lunaclient.msi Choose the Luna SA option when it is presented to you. Because the directory where your certificates are installed is the same, you do not need to copy these certificates to another directory. You do, however, need to ensure that the crystoki.ini file, which is located at C:\Program Files\SafeNet\Lunaclient\crystoki.ini, has the same path and name for the certificates as when you created them. (The path and names should not have changed, but you should still verify they are same as before the update.)
  4. Make one last check to ensure the PATH environment variable points to the directory C:\Program Files\SafeNet\Lunaclient\ to help ensure no issues when you restart applications and services. The update process for your Windows client instance is now complete.

2.  Updating your CloudHSM software

Now that your clients are up to date with the most current software version, it’s time to move on to your CloudHSM devices. A few important notes:

  • Back up your data to a Luna SA Backup device. AWS does not sell or support the Luna SA Backup devices, but you can purchase them from Gemalto. We do, however, offer the steps to back up your data to a Luna SA Backup device. Do not update your CloudHSM devices without backing up your data first.
  • If the names of your clients used for Network Trust Link Service (NTLS) connections has a capital “T” as the eighth character, the client will not work after this update. This is because of a Gemalto naming convention. Before upgrading, ensure you modify your client names accordingly. The NTLS connection uses a two-way digital certificate authentication and SSL data encryption to protect sensitive data transmitted between your CloudHSM device and the client Instances.
  • The syslog configuration for the CloudHSM devices will be lost. After the update is complete, notify AWS Support and we will update the configuration for you.

Now on to updating the software versions. There are actually three different update paths to follow, and I will cover each. Depending on the current software versions on your CloudHSM devices, you might need to follow all three or just one.

Updating the software from version 5.1.x to 5.1.5

If you are running any version of the software older than 5.1.5, you must first update to version 5.1.5 before proceeding. To update to version 5.1.5:

  1. Stop all applications and services that access the CloudHSM device.
  2. Download the Luna SA software update package.
  3. Extract all files from the archive.
  4. Run the following command from your client instance to copy the lunasa_update-5.1.5-2.spkg file to the CloudHSM device.
    $ scp –I <private_key_file> lunasa_update-5.1.5-2.spkg [email protected]<hsm_ip_address>:

    <private_key_file> is the private portion of your SSH key pair and <hsm_ip_address> is the IP address of your CloudHSM elastic network interface (ENI). The ENI is the network endpoint that permits access to your CloudHSM device. The IP address was supplied to you when the CloudHSM device was provisioned.

  1. Use the following command to connect to your CloudHSM device and log in with your Security Officer (SO) password.
    $ ssh –I <private_key_file> [email protected]<hsm_ip_address>
    
    lunash:> hsm login

  1. Run the following commands to verify and then install the updated Luna SA software package.
    lunash:> package verify lunasa_update-5.1.5-2.spkg –authcode <auth_code>
    
    lunash:> package update lunasa_update-5.1.5-2.spkg –authcode <auth_code>

    The value you will use for <auth_code> is contained in the lunasa_update-5.1.5-2.auth file found in the 630-010165-018_reva.tar archive you downloaded in Step 2.

  1. Reboot the CloudHSM device by running the following command.
    lunash:> sysconf appliance reboot

When all the steps in this section are completed, you will have updated your CloudHSM software to version 5.1.5. You can now move on to update to version 5.3.10.

Updating the software to version 5.3.10

You can update to version 5.3.10 only if you are currently running version 5.1.5. To update to version 5.3.10:

  1. Stop all applications and services that access the CloudHSM device.
  2. Download the v 5.3.10 Luna SA software update package.
  3. Extract all files from the archive.
  4. Run the following command to copy the lunasa_update-5.3.10-7.spkg file to the CloudHSM device.
    $ scp –i <private_key_file> lunasa_update-5.3.10-7.spkg [email protected]<hsm_ip_address>:

    <private_key_file> is the private portion of your SSH key pair and <hsm_ip_address> is the IP address of your CloudHSM ENI.

  1. Run the following command to connect to your CloudHSM device and log in with your SO password.
    $ ssh –i <private_key_file> [email protected]<hsm_ip_address>
    
    lunash:> hsm login

  1. Run the following commands to verify and then install the updated Luna SA software package.
    lunash:> package verify lunasa_update-5.3.10-7.spkg –authcode <auth_code>
    
    lunash:> package update lunasa_update-5.3.10-7.spkg –authcode <auth_code>

The value you will use for <auth_code> is contained in the lunasa_update-5.3.10-7.auth file found in the SafeNet-Luna-SA-5-3-10.zip archive you downloaded in Step 2.

  1. Reboot the CloudHSM device by running the following command.
    lunash:> sysconf appliance reboot

When all the steps in this section are completed, you will have updated your CloudHSM software to version 5.3.10. You can now move on to update to version 5.3.13.

Note: Do not configure your applog settings at this point; you must first update the software to version 5.3.13 in the following step.

Updating the software to version 5.3.13

You can update to version 5.3.13 only if you are currently running version 5.3.10. If you are not already running version 5.3.10, follow the two update paths mentioned previously in this section.

To update to version 5.3.13:

  1. Stop all applications and services that access the CloudHSM device.
  2. Download the Luna SA software update package.
  3. Extract all files from the archive.
  4. Run the following command to copy the lunasa_update-5.3.13-1.spkg file to the CloudHSM device.
    $ scp –i <private_key_file> lunasa_update-5.3.13-1.spkg [email protected]<hsm_ip_address>

<private_key_file> is the private portion of your SSH key pair and <hsm_ip_address> is the IP address of your CloudHSM ENI.

  1. Run the following command to connect to your CloudHSM device and log in with your SO password.
    $ ssh –i <private_key_file> [email protected]<hsm_ip_address>
    
    lunash:> hsm login

  1. Run the following commands to verify and then install the updated Luna SA software package.
    lunash:> package verify lunasa_update-5.3.13-1.spkg –authcode <auth_code>
    
    lunash:> package update lunasa_update-5.3.13-1.spkg –authcode <auth_code>

The value you will use for <auth_code> is contained in the lunasa_update-5.3.13-1.auth file found in the SafeNet-Luna-SA-5-3-13.zip archive that you downloaded in Step 2.

  1. When updating to this software version, the option to update the firmware also is offered. If you do not require a version of the firmware validated under FIPS 140-2, accept the firmware update to version 6.20.2. If you do require a version of the firmware validated under FIPS 140-2, do not accept the firmware update and instead update by using the steps in the next section, “Updating your CloudHSM FIPS 140-2 validated firmware.”
  2. After updating the CloudHSM device, reboot it by running the following command.
    lunash:> sysconf appliance reboot

  1. Disable NTLS IP checking on the CloudHSM device so that it can operate within its VPC. To do this, run the following command.
    lunash:> ntls ipcheck disable

When all the steps in this section are completed, you will have updated your CloudHSM software to version 5.3.13. If you don’t need the FIPS 140-2 validated firmware, you will have also updated the firmware to version 6.20.2. If you do need the FIPS 140-2 validated firmware, proceed to the next section.

3.  Updating your CloudHSM FIPS 140-2 validated firmware

To update the FIPS 140-2 validated version of the firmware to 6.10.9, use the following steps:

  1. Download version 6.10.9 of the firmware package.
  2. Extract all files from the archive.
  3. Run the following command to copy the 630-010430-010_SPKG_LunaFW_6.10.9.spkg file to the CloudHSM device.
    $ scp –i <private_key_file> 630-010430-010_SPKG_LunaFW_6.10.9.spkg [email protected]<hsm_ip_address>:

<private_key_file> is the private portion of your SSH key pair, and <hsm_ip_address> is the IP address of your CloudHSM ENI.

  1. Run the following command to connect to your CloudHSM device and log in with your SO password.
    $ ssh –i <private_key_file> manager#<hsm_ip_address>
    
    lunash:> hsm login

  1. Run the following commands to verify and then install the updated Luna SA firmware package.
    lunash:> package verify 630-010430-010_SPKG_LunaFW_6.10.9.spkg –authcode <auth_code>
    
    lunash:> package update 630-010430-010_SPKG_LunaFW_6.10.9.spkg –authcode <auth_code>

The value you will use for <auth_code> is contained in the 630-010430-010_SPKG_LunaFW_6.10.9.auth file found in the 630-010430-010_SPKG_LunaFW_6.10.9.zip archive that you downloaded in Step 1.

  1. Run the following command to update the firmware of the CloudHSM devices.
    lunash:> hsm update firmware

  1. After you have updated the firmware, reboot the CloudHSM devices to complete the installation.
    lunash:> sysconf appliance reboot

Summary

In this blog post, I walked you through how to update your existing CloudHSM devices and clients so that they are using supported client, software, and firmware versions. Per AWS Support and CloudHSM Terms and Conditions, your devices and clients must use the most current supported software and firmware for continued troubleshooting assistance. Software and firmware versions regularly change based on customer use cases and requirements. Because AWS tests and validates all updates from Gemalto, you must install all updates for firmware and software by using our package links described in this post and elsewhere in our documentation.

If you have comments about this blog post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about implementing this solution, please start a new thread on the CloudHSM forum.

– Tracy