Tag Archives: speaker

The AWS Cloud Goes Underground at re:Invent

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/the-aws-cloud-goes-underground-at-reinvent/

As you wander through the AWS re:Invent campus, take a minute to think about your expectations for all of the elements that need to come together…

Starting with the location, my colleagues have chosen the best venues, designed the sessions, picked the speakers, laid out the menu, selected the color schemes, programmed or printed all of the signs, and much more, all with the goal of creating an optimal learning environment for you and tens of thousands of other AWS customers.

However, as is often the case, the part that you can see is just a part of the picture. Behind the scenes, people, processes, plans, and systems come together to put all of this infrastructure in to place and to make it run so smoothly that you don’t usually notice it.

Today I would like to tell you about a mission-critical aspect of the re:Invent infrastructure that is actually underground. In addition to providing great Wi-Fi for your phones, tablets, cameras, laptops, and other devices, we need to make sure that a myriad of events, from the live-streamed keynotes, to the live-streamed keynotes and the WorkSpaces-powered hands-on labs are well-connected to each other and to the Internet. With events running at hotels up and down the Las Vegas Strip, reliable, low-latency connectivity is essential!

Thank You CenturyLink / Level3
Over the years we have been working with the great folks at Level3 to make this happen. They recently became part of CenturyLink and are now the Official Network Sponsor of re:Invent, responsible for the network fiber, circuits, and services that tie the re:Invent campus together.

To make this happen, they set up two miles of dark fiber beneath the Strip, routed to multiple Availability Zones in two separate AWS Regions. The Sands Expo Center is equipped with redundant 10 gigabit connections and the other venues (Aria, MGM, Mirage, and Wynn) are each provisioned for 2 to 10 gigabits, meaning that over half of the Strip is enabled for Direct Connect. According to the IT manager at one of the facilities, this may be the largest temporary hybrid network ever configured in Las Vegas.

On the Wi-Fi side, showNets is plugged in to the same network; your devices are talking directly to Direct Connect access points (how cool is that?).

Here’s a simplified illustration of how it all fits together:

The CenturyLink team will be onsite at re:Invent and will be tweeting live network stats throughout the week.

I hope you have enjoyed this quick look behind the scenes and beneath the street!

Jeff;

Staying Busy Between Code Pushes

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/11/16/staying-busy-between-code-pushes/

Staying Busy Between Code Pushes.

Maintaining a regular cadence of pushing out releases, adding new features, implementing bug fixes and staying on top of support requests is important for any software to thrive; but especially important for open source software due to its rapid pace. It’s easy to lose yourself in code and forget that events are happening all the time – in every corner of the world, where we can learn, share knowledge, and meet like-minded individuals to build better software, together. There are so many amazing events we’d like to participate in, but there simply isn’t enough time (or budget) to fit them all in. Here’s what we’ve been up to recently; between code pushes.

Recent Events

Øredev Conference | Malmö, Sweden: Øredev is one of the biggest developer conferences in Scandinavia, and Grafana Labs jumped at the chance to be a part of it. In early November, Grafana Labs Principal Developer, Carl Bergquist, gave a great talk on “Monitoring for Everyone”, which discussed the concepts of monitoring and why everyone should care, different ways to monitor your systems, extending your monitoring to containers and microservices, and finally what to monitor and alert on. Watch the video of his talk below.

InfluxDays | San Francisco, CA: Dan Cech, our Director of Platform Services, spoke at InfluxDays in San Francisco on Nov 14, and Grafana Labs sponsored the event. InfluxDB is a popular data source for Grafana, so we wanted to connect to the InfluxDB community and show them how to get the most out of their data. Dan discussed building dashboards, choosing the best panels for your data, setting up alerting in Grafana and a few sneak peeks of the upcoming Grafana 5.0. The video of his talk is forthcoming, but Dan has made his presentation available.

PromCon | Munich, Germany: PromCon is the Prometheus-focused event of the year. In August, Carl Bergquist, had the opportunity to speak at PromCon and take a deep dive into Grafana and Prometheus. Many attendees at PromCon were already familiar with Grafana, since it’s the default dashboard tool for Prometheus, but Carl had a trove of tricks and optimizations to share. He also went over some major changes and what we’re currently working on.

CNCF Meetup | New York, NY: Grafana Co-founder and CEO, Raj Dutt, particpated in a panel discussion with the folks of Packet and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. The discussion focused on the success stories, failures, rationales and in-the-trenches challenges when running cloud native in private or non “public cloud” datacenters (bare metal, colocation, private clouds, special hardware or networking setups, compliance and security-focused deployments).

Percona Live | Dublin: Daniel Lee traveled to Dublin, Ireland this fall to present at the database conference Percona Live. There he showed the new native MySQL support, along with a number of upcoming features in Grafana 5.0. His presentation is available to download.

Big Monitoring Meetup | St. Petersburg, Russian Federation: Alexander Zobnin, our developer located in Russia, is the primary maintainer of our popular Zabbix plugin. He attended the Big Monitoring Meetup to discuss monitoring, Grafana dashboards and democratizing metrics.

Why observability matters – now and in the future | Webinar: Our own Carl Bergquist and Neil Gehani, Director of Product at Weaveworks, to discover best practices on how to get started with monitoring both your application and infrastructure. Start capturing metrics that matter, aggregate and visualize them in a useful way that allows for identifying bottlenecks and proactively preventing incidents. View Carl’s presentation.

Upcoming Events

We’re going to maintain this momentum with a number of upcoming events, and hope you can join us.

KubeCon | Austin, TX – Dec. 6-8, 2017: We’re sponsoring KubeCon 2017! This is the must-attend conference for cloud native computing professionals. KubeCon + CloudNativeCon brings together leading contributors in:

  • Cloud native applications and computing
  • Containers
  • Microservices
  • Central orchestration processing
  • And more.

Buy Tickets

How to Use Open Source Projects for Performance Monitoring | Webinar
Nov. 29, 1pm EST:
Check out how you can use popular open source projects, for performance monitoring of your Infrastructure, Application, and Cloud faster, easier, and to scale. In this webinar, Daniel Lee from Grafana Labs, and Chris Churilo from InfluxData, will provide you with step by step instruction from download & configure, to collecting metrics and building dashboards and alerts.

RSVP

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. Carl Bergquist is managing the Cloud and Monitoring Devroom, and the CFP is now open. There is no need to register; all are welcome. If you’re interested in speaking at FOSDEM, submit your talk now!

GrafanaCon EU

Last, but certainly not least, the next GrafanaCon is right around the corner. GrafanaCon EU (to be held in Amsterdam, Netherlands, March 1-2. 2018),is a two-day event with talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding ecosystem. In addition to the latest features and functionality of Grafana, you can expect to see and hear from members of the monitoring community like Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch Kubernetes, and more. Head to grafanacon.org to see the latest speakers confirmed. We have speakers from Automattic, Bloomberg, CERN, Fastly, Tinder and more!

Conclusion

The Grafana Labs team is spread across the globe. Having a “post-geographic” company structure give us the opportunity to take part in events wherever they may be held in the world. As our team continues to grow, we hope to take part in even more events, and hope you can find the time to join us.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 21

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/11/10/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-21/

This week the Stockholm team was in Malmö, Sweden for Øredev – one of the biggest developer conferences in Scandinavia, while the rest of Grafana Labs had to live vicariously through Twitter posts. We also announced a collaboration with Microsoft’s Azure team to create an official Azure data source plugin for Grafana. We’ve also announced the next block of speakers at GrafanaCon. Awesome week!


Photos from Oredev


Latest Release

Grafana 4.6.1 adds some bug fixes:

  • Singlestat: Lost thresholds when using save dashboard as #96816
  • Graph: Fix for series override color picker #97151
  • Go: build using golang 1.9.2 #97134
  • Plugins: Fixed problem with loading plugin js files behind auth proxy #95092
  • Graphite: Annotation tooltip should render empty string when undefined #9707

Download Grafana 4.6.1 Now


From the Blogosphere

Grafana Launches Microsoft Azure Data Source: In this article, Grafana Labs co-founder and CEO Raj, Dutt talks about the new Azure data source for Grafana, the collaboration between teams, and how much he admires Microsoft’s embrace of open source software.

Monitor Azure Services and Applications Using Grafana: Continuing the theme of Microsoft Azure, the Azure team published an article about the collaboration and resulting plugin. Ashwin discusses what prompted the project and shares some links to dive in deeper into how to get up and running.

Monitoring for Everyone: It only took 1 day for the organizers of Oredev Conference to start publishing videos of the talks. Bravo! Carl Bergquist’s talk is a great overview of the whys, what’s, and how’s of monitoring.

Eight years of Go: This article is in honor of Go celebrating 8 years, and discusses the growth and popularity of the language. We are thrilled to be in such good company in the “Go’s impact in open source” section. Congrats, and we wish you many more years of success!

A DIY Dashboard with Grafana: Christoph wanted to experiment with how to feed time series from his own code into a Grafana dashboard. He wrote a proof of concept called grada to connect any Go code to a Grafana dashboard panel.

Visualize Time-Series Data with Open Source Grafana and InfluxDB: Our own Carl Bergquist co-authored an article with Gunnar Aasen from InfluxData on using Grafana with InfluxDB. This is a follow up to a webinar the two participated in earlier in the year.


GrafanaCon EU

Planning for GrafanaCon EU is rolling right along, and we’re excited to announce a new block of speakers! We’ll continue to confirm speakers regularly, so keep an eye on grafanacon.org. Here are the latest additions:

Stig Sorensen
HEAD OF TELEMETRY
BLOOMBERG

Sean Hanson
SOFTWARE DEVELOPER
BLOOMBERG

Utkarsh Bhatnagar
SR. SOFTWARE ENGINEER
TINDER

Borja Garrido
PROJECT ASSOCIATE
CERN

Abhishek Gahlot
SOFTWARE ENGINEER
Automattic

Anna MacLachlan
CONTENT MARKETING MANAGER
Fastly

Gerlando Piro
FRONT END DEVELOPER
Fastly

GrafanaCon Tickets are Available!

Now that you’re getting a glimpse of who will be speaking, lock in your seat for GrafanaCon EU today! Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and more.

Get Your Ticket Now


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We have some awesome talks lined up this November. Hope to see you at one of these events!


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

Pretty awesome to have the co-founder of Kubernetes tweet about Grafana!


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

Well, that wraps up another week! How we’re doing? Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Help us make these weekly roundups better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

Say Hello To Our Newest AWS Community Heroes (Fall 2017 Edition)

Post Syndicated from Sara Rodas original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/say-hello-to-our-newest-aws-community-heroes-fall-2017-edition/

The AWS Community Heroes program helps shine a spotlight on some of the innovative work being done by rockstar AWS developers around the globe. Marrying cloud expertise with a passion for community building and education, these heroes share their time and knowledge across social media and through in-person events. Heroes also actively help drive community-led tracks at conferences. At this year’s re:Invent, many Heroes will be speaking during the Monday Community Day track.

This November, we are thrilled to have four Heroes joining our network of cloud innovators. Without further ado, meet to our newest AWS Community Heroes!

 

Anh Ho Viet

Anh Ho Viet is the founder of AWS Vietnam User Group, Co-founder & CEO of OSAM, an AWS Consulting Partner in Vietnam, an AWS Certified Solutions Architect, and a cloud lover.

At OSAM, Anh and his enthusiastic team have helped many companies, from SMBs to Enterprises, move to the cloud with AWS. They offer a wide range of services, including migration, consultation, architecture, and solution design on AWS. Anh’s vision for OSAM is beyond a cloud service provider; the company will take part in building a complete AWS ecosystem in Vietnam, where other companies are encouraged to become AWS partners through training and collaboration activities.

In 2016, Anh founded the AWS Vietnam User Group as a channel to share knowledge and hands-on experience among cloud practitioners. Since then, the community has reached more than 4,800 members and is still expanding. The group holds monthly meetups, connects many SMEs to AWS experts, and provides real-time, free-of-charge consultancy to startups. In August 2017, Anh joined as lead content creator of a program called “Cloud Computing Lectures for Universities” which includes translating AWS documentation & news into Vietnamese, providing students with fundamental, up-to-date knowledge of AWS cloud computing, and supporting students’ career paths.

 

Thorsten Höger

Thorsten Höger is CEO and Cloud consultant at Taimos, where he is advising customers on how to use AWS. Being a developer, he focuses on improving development processes and automating everything to build efficient deployment pipelines for customers of all sizes.

Before being self-employed, Thorsten worked as a developer and CTO of Germany’s first private bank running on AWS. With his colleagues, he migrated the core banking system to the AWS platform in 2013. Since then he organizes the AWS user group in Stuttgart and is a frequent speaker at Meetups, BarCamps, and other community events.

As a supporter of open source software, Thorsten is maintaining or contributing to several projects on Github, like test frameworks for AWS Lambda, Amazon Alexa, or developer tools for CloudFormation. He is also the maintainer of the Jenkins AWS Pipeline plugin.

In his spare time, he enjoys indoor climbing and cooking.

 

Becky Zhang

Yu Zhang (Becky Zhang) is COO of BootDev, which focuses on Big Data solutions on AWS and high concurrency web architecture. Before she helped run BootDev, she was working at Yubis IT Solutions as an operations manager.

Becky plays a key role in the AWS User Group Shanghai (AWSUGSH), regularly organizing AWS UG events including AWS Tech Meetups and happy hours, gathering AWS talent together to communicate the latest technology and AWS services. As a female in technology industry, Becky is keen on promoting Women in Tech and encourages more woman to get involved in the community.

Becky also connects the China AWS User Group with user groups in other regions, including Korea, Japan, and Thailand. She was invited as a panelist at AWS re:Invent 2016 and spoke at the Seoul AWS Summit this April to introduce AWS User Group Shanghai and communicate with other AWS User Groups around the world.

Besides events, Becky also promotes the Shanghai AWS User Group by posting AWS-related tech articles, event forecasts, and event reports to Weibo, Twitter, Meetup.com, and WeChat (which now has over 2000 official account followers).

 

Nilesh Vaghela

Nilesh Vaghela is the founder of ElectroMech Corporation, an AWS Cloud and open source focused company (the company started as an open source motto). Nilesh has been very active in the Linux community since 1998. He started working with AWS Cloud technologies in 2013 and in 2014 he trained a dedicated cloud team and started full support of AWS cloud services as an AWS Standard Consulting Partner. He always works to establish and encourage cloud and open source communities.

He started the AWS Meetup community in Ahmedabad in 2014 and as of now 12 Meetups have been conducted, focusing on various AWS technologies. The Meetup has quickly grown to include over 2000 members. Nilesh also created a Facebook group for AWS enthusiasts in Ahmedabad, with over 1500 members.

Apart from the AWS Meetup, Nilesh has delivered a number of seminars, workshops, and talks around AWS introduction and awareness, at various organizations, as well as at colleges and universities. He has also been active in working with startups, presenting AWS services overviews and discussing how startups can benefit the most from using AWS services.

Nilesh is Red Hat Linux Technologies and AWS Cloud Technologies trainer as well.

 

To learn more about the AWS Community Heroes Program and how to get involved with your local AWS community, click here.

Gladys Project: a Raspberry Pi home assistant

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/gladys-project-home-assistant/

If, like me, you’re a pretty poor time-keeper with the uncanny ability to never get up when your alarm goes off and yet still somehow make it to work just in time — a little dishevelled, brushing your teeth in the office bathroom — then you too need Gladys.

Raspberry Pi home assistant

Over the last year, we’ve seen off-the-shelf home assistants make their way onto the Raspberry Pi. With the likes of Amazon Alexa, Google Home, and Siri, it’s becoming ever easier to tell the air around you to “Turn off the bathroom light” or “Resume my audiobook”, and it happens without you lifting a finger. It’s quite wonderful. And alongside these big names are several home-brew variants, such as Jarvis and Jasper, which were developed to run on a Pi in order to perform home automation tasks.

So do we need another such service? Sure! And here’s why…

A Romantic Mode with your Home Assistant Gladys !

A simple romantic mode in Gladys ! See https://gladysproject.com for more informations about the project 🙂 Devices used : – A 5$ Xiaomi Switch Button – A Raspberry Pi 3 with Gladys on it – Connected lights ( Works with Philips Hue, Milight lamp, etc..

Gladys Project

According to the Gladys creators’ website, Gladys Project is ‘an open-source program which runs on your Raspberry Pi. It communicates with all your devices and checks your calendar to help you in your everyday life’.

Gladys does the basic day-to-day life maintenance tasks that I need handled in order to exist without my mum there to remind me to wake up in time for work. And, as you can see from the video above, it also plays some mean George Michael.

A screenshot of a mobile phone showing the Gladys app - Gladys Project home assistant

Gladys can help run your day from start to finish, taking into consideration road conditions and travel time to ensure you’re never late, regardless of external influences. It takes you 30 minutes to get ready and another 30 minutes to drive to work for 9.00? OK, but today there’s a queue on the motorway, and now your drive time is looking to be closer to an hour. Thankfully, Gladys has woken you up a half hour earlier, so you’re still on time. Isn’t that nice of her? And while you’re showering and mourning those precious stolen minutes of sleep, she’s opening the blinds and brewing coffee for you. Thanks, mum!

A screenshot of the Gladys hub on the Raspberry Pi - Gladys Project home assistant

Set the parameters of your home(s) using the dedicated hub.

Detecting your return home at the end of the day, Gladys runs your pre-set evening routine. Then, once you place your phone on an NFC tag to indicate bedtime, she turns off the lights and, if your nighttime preferences dictate it, starts the whale music playlist, sending you into a deep, stressless slumber.

A screenshot of Etcher showing the install process of the Gladys image - Gladys Project home assistant

Gladys comes as a pre-built Raspbian image, ready to be cloned to an SD card.

Gladys is free to download from the Gladys Project website and is compatible with smart devices such as Philips Hue lightbulbs, WeMo Insight Switches, and the ever tricky to control without the official app Sonos speakers!

Automate and chill

Which tasks and devices in your home do you control with a home assistant? Do you love sensor-controlled lighting which helps you save on electricity? How about working your way through an audiobook as you do your housework, requesting a pause every time you turn on the vacuum cleaner?

Share your experiences with us in the comments below, and if you’ve built a home assistant for Raspberry Pi, or use an existing setup to run your household, share that too.

And, as ever, if you want to keep up to date with Raspberry Pi projects from across the globe, be sure to follow us on social media, sign up to our weekly newsletter, the Raspberry Pi Weekly, and check out The MagPi, the official magazine of the Raspberry Pi community, available in stores or as a free PDF download.

The post Gladys Project: a Raspberry Pi home assistant appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 20

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/11/03/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-20/

This week, in addition to rolling out a Grafana 4.6.1 release, we’ve been busy prepping for upcoming events. In Europe, we’ll be speaking at and sponsoring the sold-out Øredev Conference in Malmö, Sweden, Nov 7-11, and on the west coast, we’ll be speaking at and sponsoring InfluxDays, Nov 14 in San Francisco, CA. We hope to get a chance to say hi to you at one of these events.

We also closed the CFP window this week for talks at GrafanaCon EU. We received a tremendous number of great submissions, and will spend the next few weeks making our selections. As speakers are confirmed, we’ll add them to the website, so be sure to keep an eye out. We’re thrilled that the community is so excited to share their knowledge of Grafana and open source monitoring.


Latest Release

Grafana 4.6.1 adds some bug fixes:

  • Singlestat: Lost thresholds when using save dashboard as #96816
  • Graph: Fix for series override color picker #97151
  • Go: build using golang 1.9.2 #97134
  • Plugins: Fixed problem with loading plugin js files behind auth proxy #95092
  • Graphite: Annotation tooltip should render empty string when undefined #9707

Download Grafana 4.6.1 Now


From the Blogosphere

FOSDEM 2018 Monitoring & Cloud Devroom CFP: The CFP is now open for the Monitoring & Cloud Devroom at FOSDEM 2018, held in Brussels, Belgium, Feb 3-4, 2018. FOSDEM is the premier open source conference in europe, and covers a broad range of topics. The Monitoring and Cloud devroom was a popular devroom last year, so be sure to submit your talk before the November 26 deadline!

PRTG plus Grafana FTW!: @neuralfraud has written a plugin for PRTG that allows you to view PRTG data directly in Grafana. This article goes over the features of the plugin, beautiful dashboards and visualization options, and how to get started.

Grafana-based GUI for mgstat, a system monitoring tool for InterSystems Caché, Ensemble or HealthShare: This is a continuation of the previous article Making Prometheus Monitoring for InterSystems Caché where we examine how to visualize the results from the mgstat tool. This article is broken down into which stats are collected and how these stats are collected.

Using Grafana & InfluxDB to view XIV Host Performance Metrics: Allan wanted to get an unified view of what his hosts were doing, however, the XIV GUI only allowed 12 hosts to be displayed at a given time– which was extremely limiting. This is the first in a series of articles on how to gather and parse host data and visualize it in Grafana.

Service telemetry with Grafana and InfluxDB – Part I: Introduction: This is the first in a new series of posts which will walk you through the process of building a production-ready solution for monitoring real-time metrics for any application or service, complete with useful and beautiful dashboards.


GrafanaCon General Admission Now Available!

Early bird tickets are no longer available, but you can still lock in your seat for GrafanaCon! Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and more.

Get Your Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

Keeping your Grafana plugins up to date is important. Plugin authors are often adding new features and fixing bugs, which will make your plugin perform better. We’ve made updating easy; for on-prem Grafana, use the Grafana-cli tool, or update with 1 click if you’re using Hosted Grafana.

UPDATED PLUGIN

Piechart Panel – The latest version of the Piechart Panel has the following fixes:

  • Add “No data points” description for pie chart with 0 value
  • Donut now works with transparent panel
  • Can toggle to hide series from piechart
  • On graph legend can show values. Can choose how many decimals
  • Sort pie slices upon sorting of legend entries
  • Fix for color picker for Grafana 4.6

Update


Contribution of the Week:

Each week we highlight some of the important contributions from our amazing open source community. Thank you for helping make Grafana better!

@akshaychhajed
We got an amazing PR this week. Grafana has lots of docker-compose files for internal testing that were created using a very old version of docker-compose. @akshaychhajed sent a PR converting them all to the latest version of docker-compose. Huge thanks from the Grafana team!


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We have some awesome talks lined up this November. Hope to see you at one of these events!


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

Beautiful – I want to build a real-life version of this using a block of wood, some nails and colored string… or maybe have it cross-stitched on a pillow 🙂


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

Well, that wraps up another week! How we’re doing? Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Help us make these weekly roundups better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

The Pirate Bay is Hard to Find on Google in Some Countries

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/pirate-bay-hard-find-google-countries-171027/

Search engine results are something on which any Internet user should be able to rely. After entering a search term, we generally expect the most relevant results to appear at the top, which seems like a fair assumption.

That being said, all searches aren’t equal, even when the same parameters are entered into the same company’s product. Case in point: Google Search and The Pirate Bay.

We’ve known for years that due to entertainment industry pressure, Google has been demoting pirate sites in its search results. That’s perhaps understandable when trying to deter a user from finding specific content via a Google search but should that affect a search about the site itself?

If one types the term The Pirate Bay into Google, there is no reason for the site iin question not to appear at the top of the list. After all, it’s the most informative result for one of the world’s most popular sites. However, tests carried out by TF show that some Google search variants coupled with certain countries’ IP addresses produce dramatically different results.

In all tests we began with an incognito Chrome browser window, to ensure no previous behavior affected our results. We then commenced testing searches for The Pirate Bay, with the UK up first. We know that Google has been under pressure to demote pirate sites in the country, so it wasn’t a surprise to find a relatively poor result.

Using a UK-based IP address to access Google.co.uk, we had to click through to the fifth page of results to find the entry for thepiratebay.org, the site’s main domain.

Google.co.uk, accessed via a UK IP address

However, when we carried out exactly the same test on Google.co.uk but after substituting our UK IP address for one located in the United States, a very different result was achieved. As can be seen in the image below, thepiratebay.org now appears as the very top result, as it should.

Google.co.uk, accessed via a US IP address

Given the above, there’s the suggestion that Google only penalizes users of Google.co.uk searching for The Pirate Bay, if they’re using a UK-based IP address. So we switched things around a little bit to try and find out.

Testing Google.com with a US-based IP address, thepiratebay.org appeared as the top result, as expected. Then, when accessing Google.com with a UK-based IP address, thepiratebay.org was relegated to the sixth page of Google results, which wasn’t a surprise.

Thus far, one could be forgiven for thinking that having a UK-based IP address is the poisoned chalice here. So, with that in mind, we switched over to the Netherlands for some testing there.

Using a Netherlands-based IP address on Google.nl, thepiratebay.org appears as the first result. But, to our surprise, deploying a UK IP address on the same service returns exactly the same position, i.e right at the very top. The same was true for searches carried out on Google.ca (Canada). No matter what IP addresses were used, thepiratebay.org appeared at the top of results.

Of course, The Pirate Bay has been blocked in the UK for some time, so people may have switched away from searching directly for The Pirate Bay towards other proxy services, for example. However, that doesn’t change the indisputable fact that a search for The Pirate Bay should list the site as the first result – because that’s what people are looking for.

But if people think that only UK-based searchers are getting a raw deal, then they should reconsider.

Over in India, using an Indian IP address to access Google.co.in, thepiratebay.org doesn’t appear until page 8. Somewhat unexpectedly, doing a similar search on the same Google variant using a UK IP address actually improved matters, with thepiratebay.org appearing more readily on page 6.

A lowly page 8 for Indian searchers of The Pirate Bay

But in terms of results, there are other countries doing even worse. Tests carried out on Google.fr (France) reveal that thepiratebay.org doesn’t appear until page 12, a result matched identically by Google.ru (Russia), no matter which source IP addresses were used.

To be clear, it’s not like Google doesn’t understand the significance of the site in these low-ranking regions or that searchers aren’t interested. Although it doesn’t place the actual site until a dozen pages down the road, Google is very happy to list dozens of proxies in the first sets of results, including some fake ‘Pirate Bay’ sites that Google itself flags up as unsafe due to malware.

Overall, it’s hard to find much consistency but it’s reasonable to presume that at least to some extent, searches for The Pirate Bay are being manipulated, depending on where you live and which search variant people use. For English speakers, Canada seems a good variant for now. But that could change at any moment.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Twitter makers love Halloween

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/twitter-love-halloween/

Halloween is almost upon us! In honour of one of the maker community’s favourite howlidays, here are some posts from enthusiastic makers on Twitter to get you inspired and prepared for the big event.

Lorraine’s VR Puppet

Lorraine Underwood on Twitter

Using a @Raspberry_Pi with @pimoroni tilt hat to make a cool puppet for #Halloween https://t.co/pOeTFZ0r29

Made with a Pimoroni Pan-Tilt HAT, a Raspberry Pi, and some VR software on her phone, Lorraine Underwood‘s puppet is going to be a rather fitting doorman to interact with this year’s trick-or-treaters. Follow her project’s progress as she posts it on her blog.

Firr’s Monster-Mashing House

Firr on Twitter

Making my house super spooky for Halloween! https://t.co/w553l40BT0

Harnessing the one song guaranteed to earworm its way into my mind this October, Firr has upgraded his house to sing for all those daring enough to approach it this coming All Hallows’ Eve.

Firr used resources from Adafruit, along with three projectors, two Raspberry Pis, and some speakers, to create this semi-interactive display.

While the eyes can move on their own, a joystick can be added for direct control. Firr created a switch that goes between autonomous animation and direct control.

Find out more on the htxt.africa website.

Justin’s Snake Eyes Pumpkin

Justin Smith on Twitter

First #pumpkin of the season for Friday the 13th! @PaintYourDragon’s snake eyes bonnet for the #RaspberryPi to handle the eye animation. https://t.co/TSlUUxYP5Q

The Animated Snake Eyes Bonnet is definitely one of the freakiest products to come from the Adafruit lab, and it’s the perfect upgrade for any carved pumpkin this Halloween. Attach the bonnet to a Raspberry Pi 3, or the smaller Zero or Zero W, and thus add animated eyes to your scary orange masterpiece, as Justin Smith demonstrates in his video. The effect will terrify even the bravest of trick-or-treaters! Just make sure you don’t light a candle in there too…we’re not sure how fire-proof the tech is.

And then there’s this…

EmmArarrghhhhhh on Twitter

Squishy eye keyboard? Anyone? Made with @Raspberry_Pi @pimoroni’s Explorer HAT Pro and a pile of stuff from @Poundland 😂👀‼️ https://t.co/qLfpLLiXqZ

Yeah…the line between frightening and funny is never thinner than on Halloween.

Make and share this Halloween!

For more Halloween project ideas, check out our free resources including Scary ‘Spot the difference’ and the new Pioneers-inspired Pride and Prejudice‘ for zombies.

Halloween Pride and Prejudice Zombies Raspberry Pi

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of the zombie virus must be in want of braaaaaaains.

No matter whether you share your Halloween builds on Twitter, Facebook, G+, Instagram, or YouTube, we want to see them — make sure to tag us in your posts. We also have a comment section below this post, so go ahead and fill it with your ideas, links to completed projects, and general chat about the world of RasBOOrry Pi!

…sorry, that’s a hideous play on words. I apologise.

The post Twitter makers love Halloween appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Getting Ready for AWS re:Invent 2017

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/getting-ready-for-aws-reinvent-2017/

With just 40 days remaining before AWS re:Invent begins, my colleagues and I want to share some tips that will help you to make the most of your time in Las Vegas. As always, our focus is on training and education, mixed in with some after-hours fun and recreation for balance.

Locations, Locations, Locations
The re:Invent Campus will span the length of the Las Vegas strip, with events taking place at the MGM Grand, Aria, Mirage, Venetian, Palazzo, the Sands Expo Hall, the Linq Lot, and the Encore. Each venue will host tracks devoted to specific topics:

MGM Grand – Business Apps, Enterprise, Security, Compliance, Identity, Windows.

Aria – Analytics & Big Data, Alexa, Container, IoT, AI & Machine Learning, and Serverless.

Mirage – Bootcamps, Certifications & Certification Exams.

Venetian / Palazzo / Sands Expo Hall – Architecture, AWS Marketplace & Service Catalog, Compute, Content Delivery, Database, DevOps, Mobile, Networking, and Storage.

Linq Lot – Alexa Hackathons, Gameday, Jam Sessions, re:Play Party, Speaker Meet & Greets.

EncoreBookable meeting space.

If your interests span more than one topic, plan to take advantage of the re:Invent shuttles that will be making the rounds between the venues.

Lots of Content
The re:Invent Session Catalog is now live and you should start to choose the sessions of interest to you now.

With more than 1100 sessions on the agenda, planning is essential! Some of the most popular “deep dive” sessions will be run more than once and others will be streamed to overflow rooms at other venues. We’ve analyzed a lot of data, run some simulations, and are doing our best to provide you with multiple opportunities to build an action-packed schedule.

We’re just about ready to let you reserve seats for your sessions (follow me and/or @awscloud on Twitter for a heads-up). Based on feedback from earlier years, we have fine-tuned our seat reservation model. This year, 75% of the seats for each session will be reserved and the other 25% are for walk-up attendees. We’ll start to admit walk-in attendees 10 minutes before the start of the session.

Las Vegas never sleeps and neither should you! This year we have a host of late-night sessions, workshops, chalk talks, and hands-on labs to keep you busy after dark.

To learn more about our plans for sessions and content, watch the Get Ready for re:Invent 2017 Content Overview video.

Have Fun
After you’ve had enough training and learning for the day, plan to attend the Pub Crawl, the re:Play party, the Tatonka Challenge (two locations this year), our Hands-On LEGO Activities, and the Harley Ride. Stay fit with our 4K Run, Spinning Challenge, Fitness Bootcamps, and Broomball (a longstanding Amazon tradition).

See You in Vegas
As always, I am looking forward to meeting as many AWS users and blog readers as possible. Never hesitate to stop me and to say hello!

Jeff;

 

 

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 17

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/10/13/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-17/

It’s been a busy week here at Grafana Labs. While we’ve been working on GrafanaCon EU preparations here at the NYC office, the Stockholm office has been diligently working to release Grafana 4.6-beta-1. We’re really excited about this latest release and look forward to your feedback on the new features.


Latest Release

Grafana 4.6-beta-1 is now available! Grafana v4.6 brings many enhancements to Annotations, Cloudwatch and Prometheus. It also adds support for Postgres as a metric and table data source!

To see more details on what’s in the newest version, please see the release notes.

Download Grafana 4.6.0-beta-1 Now


From the Blogosphere

Using Kafka and Grafana to Monitor Meteorological Conditions: Oliver was looking for a way to track historical mountain conditions around the UK, but only had available data for the last 24 hours. It seemed like a perfect job for Kafka. This post discusses how to get going with Kafka very easily, store the data in Graphite and visualize the data in Grafana.

Web Interfaces for your Syslog Server – An Overview: System administrators often prefer to use the command line, but complex queries can be completed much faster with logs indexed in a database and a web interface. This article provides a run-down of various GUI-based tools available for your syslog server.

JEE Performance with JMeter, Prometheus and Grafana. Complete Project from Scratch: This comprehensive article walks you through the steps of monitoring JEE application performance from scratch. We start with making implementation decisions, then how to collect data, visualization and dashboarding configuration, and conclude with alerting. Buckle up; it’s a long article, with a ton of information.


Early Bird Tickets Now Available

Early bird tickets are going fast, so take advantage of the discounted price before they’re gone! We will be announcing the first block of speakers in the coming week.

There’s still time to submit a talk. We’ll accept submissions through the end of October. We’re accepting technical and non-technical talks of all sizes. Submit a CFP.

Get Your Early Bird Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

This week we add the Prometheus Alertmanager Data Source to our growing list of plugins, lots of updates to the GLPI Data source, and have a urgent bugfix for the WorldMap Panel. To update plugins from on-prem Grafana, use the Grafana-cli tool, or with 1 click if you are using Hosted Grafana.

NEW PLUGIN

Prometheus Alertmanager Data Source – This new data source lets you show data from the Prometheus Alertmanager in Grafana. The Alertmanager handles alerts sent by client applications such as the Prometheus server. With this data source, you can show data in Table form or as a SingleStat.

Install Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

WorldMap Panel – A new version with an urgent bugfix for Elasticsearch users:

  • A fix for Geohash maps after a breaking change in Grafana 4.5.0.
  • Last Geohash as center for the map – it centers the map on the last geohash position received. Useful for real time tracking (with auto refresh on in Grafana).

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

GLPI App – Lots of fixes in the new version:

  • Compatibility with GLPI 9.2
  • Autofill the Timerange field based on the query
  • When adding new query, add by default a ticket query instead of undefined
  • Correct values in hover tooltip
  • Can have element count by hour of the day with the panel histogram

Update


Contributions of the week:

Each week we highlight some of the important contributions from our amazing open source community. Thank you for helping make Grafana better!


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


New Annotation Function

In addition to being able to add annotations easily in the graph panel, you can also create ranges as shown above. Give 4.6.0-beta-1 a try and give us your feedback.

We Need Your Help!

Do you have a graph that you love because the data is beautiful or because the graph provides interesting information? Please get in touch. Tweet or send us an email with a screenshot, and we’ll tell you about this fun experiment.

Tell Me More


What do you think?

We want to keep these articles interesting and relevant, so please tell us how we’re doing. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Help us make these weekly roundups better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 16

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/10/06/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-16/

Welcome to another issue of TimeShift. In addition to the roundup of articles and plugin updates, we had a big announcement this week – Early Bird tickets to GrafanaCon EU are now available! We’re also accepting CFPs through the end of October, so if you have a topic in mind, don’t wait until the last minute, please send it our way. Speakers who are selected will receive a comped ticket to the conference.


Early Bird Tickets Now Available

We’ve released a limited number of Early Bird tickets before General Admission tickets are available. Take advantage of this discount before they’re sold out!

Get Your Early Bird Ticket Now

Interested in speaking at GrafanaCon? We’re looking for technical and non-tecnical talks of all sizes. Submit a CFP Now.


From the Blogosphere

Get insights into your Azure Cosmos DB: partition heatmaps, OMS, and More: Microsoft recently announced the ability to access a subset of Azure Cosmos DB metrics via Azure Monitor API. Grafana Labs built an Azure Monitor Plugin for Grafana 4.5 to visualize the data.

How to monitor Docker for Mac/Windows: Brian was tired of guessing about the performance of his development machines and test environment. Here, he shows how to monitor Docker with Prometheus to get a better understanding of a dev environment in his quest to monitor all the things.

Prometheus and Grafana to Monitor 10,000 servers: This article covers enokido’s process of choosing a monitoring platform. He identifies three possible solutions, outlines the pros and cons of each, and discusses why he chose Prometheus.

GitLab Monitoring: It’s fascinating to see Grafana dashboards with production data from companies around the world. For instance, we’ve previously highlighted the huge number of dashboards Wikimedia publicly shares. This week, we found that GitLab also has public dashboards to explore.

Monitoring a Docker Swarm Cluster with cAdvisor, InfluxDB and Grafana | The Laboratory: It’s important to know the state of your applications in a scalable environment such as Docker Swarm. This video covers an overview of Docker, VM’s vs. containers, orchestration and how to monitor Docker Swarm.

Introducing Telemetry: Actionable Time Series Data from Counters: Learn how to use counters from mulitple disparate sources, devices, operating systems, and applications to generate actionable time series data.

ofp_sniffer Branch 1.2 (docker/influxdb/grafana) Upcoming Features: This video demo shows off some of the upcoming features for OFP_Sniffer, an OpenFlow sniffer to help network troubleshooting in production networks.


Grafana Plugins

Plugin authors add new features and bugfixes all the time, so it’s important to always keep your plugins up to date. To update plugins from on-prem Grafana, use the Grafana-cli tool, if you are using Hosted Grafana, you can update with 1 click! If you have questions or need help, hit up our community site, where the Grafana team and members of the community are happy to help.

UPDATED PLUGIN

PNP for Nagios Data Source – The latest release for the PNP data source has some fixes and adds a mathematical factor option.

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Google Calendar Data Source – This week, there was a small bug fix for the Google Calendar annotations data source.

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

BT Plugins – Our friends at BT have been busy. All of the BT plugins in our catalog received and update this week. The plugins are the Status Dot Panel, the Peak Report Panel, the Trend Box Panel and the Alarm Box Panel.

Changes include:

  • Custom dashboard links now work in Internet Explorer.
  • The Peak Report panel no longer supports click-to-sort.
  • The Status Dot panel tooltips now look like Grafana tooltips.


This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

Each week we highlight some of the important contributions from our amazing open source community. This week, we’d like to recognize a contributor who did a lot of work to improve Prometheus support.

pdoan017
Thanks to Alin Sinpaleanfor his Prometheus PR – that aligns the step and interval parameters. Alin got a lot of feedback from the Prometheus community and spent a lot of time and energy explaining, debating and iterating before the PR was ready.
Thank you!


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

Wow – Excited to be a part of exploring data to find out how Mexico City is evolving.

We Need Your Help!

Do you have a graph that you love because the data is beautiful or because the graph provides interesting information? Please get in touch. Tweet or send us an email with a screenshot, and we’ll tell you about this fun experiment.

Tell Me More


What do you think?

That’s a wrap! How are we doing? Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Help us make these weekly roundups better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

Football Coach Retweets, Gets Sued for Copyright Infringement

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/football-coach-retweets-gets-sued-for-copyright-infringement-170928/

When copyright infringement lawsuits hit the US courts, there’s often a serious case at hand. Whether that’s the sharing of a leaked movie online or indeed the mass infringement that allegedly took place on Megaupload, there’s usually something quite meaty to discuss.

A lawsuit filed this week in a Pennsylvania federal court certainly provides the later, but without managing to be much more than a fairly trivial matter in the first instance.

The case was filed by sports psychologist and author Dr. Keith Bell. It begins by describing Bell as an “internationally recognized performance consultant” who has worked with 500 teams, including the Olympic and national teams for the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Fiji, and the Cayman Islands.

Bell is further described as a successful speaker, athlete and coach; “A four-time
collegiate All-American swimmer, a holder of numerous world and national masters swim records, and has coached several collegiate, high school, and private swim teams to competitive success.”

At the heart of the lawsuit is a book that Bell published in 1982, entitled Winning Isn’t Normal.

“The book has enjoyed substantial acclaim, distribution and publicity. Dr. Bell is the sole author of this work, and continues to own all rights in the work,” the lawsuit (pdf) reads.

Bell claims that on or about November 6, 2015, King’s College head football coach Jeffery Knarr retweeted a tweet that was initially posted from @NSUBaseball32, a Twitter account operated by Northeastern State University’s RiverHawks baseball team. The retweet, as shown in the lawsuit, can be seen below.

The retweet that sparked the lawsuit

“The post was made without authorization from Dr. Bell and without attribution
to Dr. Bell,” the lawsuit reads.

“Neither Defendant King’s College nor Defendant Jeffery Knarr contacted Dr.
Bell to request permission to use Dr. Bell’s copyrighted work. As of November 14, 2015, the post had received 206 ‘Retweets’ and 189 ‘Likes.’ Due to the globally accessible nature of Twitter, the post was accessible by Internet users across the world.”

Bell says he sent a cease and desist letter to NSU in September 2016 and shortly thereafter NSU removed the post, which removed the retweets. However, this meant that Knarr’s retweet had been online for “at least” 10 months and 21 days.

To put the icing on the cake, Bell also holds the trademark to the phrase “Winning Isn’t Normal”, so he’s suing Knarr and his King’s College employer for trademark infringement too.

“The Defendants included Plaintiff’s trademark twice in the Twitter post. The first instance was as the title of the post, with the mark shown in letters which
were emphasized by being capitalized, bold, and underlined,” the lawsuit notes.

“The second instance was at the end of the post, with the mark shown in letters which were emphasized by being capitalized, bold, underlined, and followed by three
exclamation points.”

Describing what appears to be a casual retweet as “willful, intentional and purposeful” infringement carried out “in disregard of and with indifference to Plaintiff’s rights,” Bell demands damages and attorneys fees from Knarr and his employer.

“As a direct and proximate result of said infringement by Defendants, Plaintiff is
entitled to damages in an amount to be proven at trial,” the lawsuit concludes.

Since the page from the book retweeted by Knarr is a small portion of the overall work, there may be a fair use defense. Nevertheless, defending this kind of suit is never cheap, so it’s probably fair to say there will already be a considerable amount of regret among the defendants at ever having set eyes on Bell’s 35-year-old book.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

All Systems Go! 2017 Schedule Published

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/all-systems-go-2017-schedule-published.html

The All Systems Go! 2017 schedule has been published!

I am happy to announce that we have published the All Systems Go! 2017 schedule!
We are very happy with the large number and the quality of the
submissions we got, and the resulting schedule is exceptionally
strong.

Without further ado:

Here’s the schedule for the first day (Saturday, 21st of October).

And here’s the schedule for the second day (Sunday, 22nd of October).

Here are a couple of keywords from the topics of the talks:
1password, azure, bluetooth, build systems,
casync, cgroups, cilium, cockpit, containers,
ebpf, flatpak, habitat, IoT, kubernetes,
landlock, meson, OCI, rkt, rust, secureboot,
skydive, systemd, testing, tor, varlink,
virtualization, wifi, and more.

Our speakers are from all across the industry: Chef CoreOS, Covalent,
Facebook, Google, Intel, Kinvolk, Microsoft, Mozilla, Pantheon,
Pengutronix, Red Hat, SUSE and more.

For further information about All Systems Go! visit our conference web site.

Make sure to buy your ticket for All Systems Go! 2017 now! A limited
number of tickets are left at this point, so make sure you get yours
before we are all sold out! Find all details here.

See you in Berlin!

Russia’s Largest Torrent Site Celebrates 13 Years Online in a Chinese Restaurant

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/russias-largest-torrent-site-celebrates-13-years-online-in-a-chinese-restaurant-170923/

For most torrent fans around the world, The Pirate Bay is the big symbol of international defiance. Over the years the site has fought, avoided, and snubbed its nose at dozens of battles, yet still remains online today.

But there is another site, located somewhere in the east, that has been online for nearly as long, has millions more registered members, and has proven just as defiant.

RuTracker, for those who haven’t yet found it, is a Russian-focused treasure trove of both local and international content. For many years the site was frequented only by native speakers but with the wonders of tools like Google Translate, anyone can use the site at the flick of the switch. When people are struggling to find content, it’s likely that RuTracker has it.

This position has attracted the negative attention of a wide range of copyright holders and thanks to legislation introduced during 2013, the site is now subject to complete blocking in Russia. In fact, RuTracker has proven so stubborn to copyright holder demands, it is now permanently blocked in the region by all ISPs.

Surprisingly, especially given the enthusiasm for blockades among copyright holders, this doesn’t seem to have dampened demand for the site’s services. According to SimiliarWeb, against all the odds the site is still pulling in around 90 million visitors per month. But the impressive stats don’t stop there.

Impressive stats for a permanently blocked site

This week, RuTracker celebrates its 13th birthday, a relative lifetime for a site that has been front and center of Russia’s most significant copyright battles, trouble which doesn’t look like stopping anytime soon.

Back in 2010, for example, RU-Center, Russia’s largest domain name registrar and web-hosting provider, pulled the plug on the site’s former Torrents.ru domain. The Director of Public Relations at RU-Center said that the domain had been blocked on the orders of the Investigative Division of the regional prosecutor’s office in Moscow. The site never got its domain back but carried on regardless, despite the setbacks.

Back then the site had around 4,000,000 members but now, seven years on, its ranks have swelled to a reported 15,382,907. According to figures published by the site this week, 778,317 of those members signed up this year during a period the site was supposed to be completely inaccessible. Needless to say, its operators remain defiant.

“Today we celebrate the 13th anniversary of our tracker, which is the largest Russian (and not only) -language media library on this planet. A tracker strangely banished in the country where most of its audience is located – in Russia,” a site announcement reads.

“But, despite the prohibitions, with all these legislative obstacles, with all these technical difficulties, we see that our tracker still exists and is successfully developing. And we still believe that the library should be open and free for all, and not be subject to censorship or a victim of legislative and executive power lobbied by the monopolists of the media industry.”

It’s interesting to note the tone of the RuTracker announcement. On any other day it could’ve been written by the crew of The Pirate Bay who, in their prime, loved to stick a finger or two up to the copyright lobby and then rub their noses in it. For the team at RuTracker, that still appears to be one of the main goals.

Like The Pirate Bay but unlike many of the basic torrent indexers that have sprung up in recent years, RuTracker relies on users to upload its content. They certainly haven’t been sitting back. RuTracker reveals that during the past year and despite all the problems, users uploaded a total of 171,819 torrents – on average, 470 torrents per day.

Interestingly, the content most uploaded to the site also points to the growing internationalization of RuTracker. During the past year, the NBA / NCAA section proved most popular, closely followed by non-Russian rock music and NHL games. Non-Russian movies accounted for almost 2,000 fresh torrents in just 12 months.

“It is thanks to you this tracker lives!” the site’s operators informed the users.

“It is thanks to you that it was, is, and, for sure, will continue to offer the most comprehensive, diverse and, most importantly, quality content in the Russian Internet. You stayed with us when the tracker lost its original name: torrents.ru. You stayed with us when access to a new name was blocked in Russia: rutracker.org. You stayed with us when [the site’s trackers] were blocked. We will stay with you as long as you need us!”

So as RuTracker plans for another year online, all that remains is to celebrate its 13th birthday in style. That will be achieved tonight when every adult member of RuTracker is invited to enjoy Chinese meal at the Tian Jin Chinese Restaurant in St. Petersburg.

Turn up early, seating is limited.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

DevOps Cafe Episode 75 – Barbara Bouldin

Post Syndicated from DevOpsCafeAdmin original http://devopscafe.org/show/2017/9/20/devops-cafe-episode-75-barbara-bouldin.html

A lot has changed (but some things haven’t) 

John and Damon chat with Barbara Bouldin about her first-hand view of the good — and the ugly — through the past few decades of the technology industry. From Bell Labs to the breakup of AT&T (“Ma Bell”) to enterprise software to transforming government agencies today, Barbara’s journey has been an interesting ride.

  

Direct download

Follow John Willis on Twitter: @botchagalupe
Follow Damon Edwards on Twitter: @damonedwards 
Follow Barbara Bouldin on Twitter: @bbouldin771

Notes:

 

Please tweet or leave comments or questions below and we’ll read them on the show!

Five Must-Watch Software Engineering Talks

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/five-must-watch-software-engineering-talks/

We’ve all watched dozens of talks online. And we probably don’t remember many of them. But some do stick in our heads and we eventually watch them again (and again) because we know they are good and we want to remember the things that were said there. So I decided to compile a small list of talks that I find very insightful, useful and that have, in a way, shaped my software engineering practice or expanded my understanding of the software world.

1. How To Design A Good API and Why it Matters by Joshua Bloch – this is a must-watch (well, obviously all are). And don’t skip it because “you are not writing APIs” – everyone is writing APIs. Maybe not used by hundreds of other developers, but used by at least several, and that’s a good enough reason. Having watched this talk I ended up buying and reading one of the few software books that I have actually read end-to-end – “Effective Java” (the talk uses Java as an example, but the principles aren’t limited to Java)

2. How to write clean, testable code by Miško Hevery. Maybe there are tons of talks about testing code, maybe Uncle Bob has a more popular one, but I found this one particularly practical and the the point – that writing testable code is a skill, and that testable code is good code. (By the way, the speaker then wrote AngularJS)

3. Back to basics: the mess we’ve made of our fundamental data types by Jon Skeet. The title says it all, and it’s nice to be reminded of how fragile even the basics of programming languages are.

4. The Danger of Software Patents by Richard Stallman. That goes a little bit away from writing software, but puts software in legal context – how do legislation loopholes affect code reuse and business practices related it. It’s a bit long, but I think worth it.

5. Does my ESB look big in this? by Martin Fowler and Jim Webber. It’s about bloated enterprise architecture and how to actually do enterprise architecture without complex and expensive middleware. (Unfortunately it’s not on YouTube, so no embedding).

Although this is not a “ranking”, I’d like to add a few honourable mentions: The famous “WAT” lightning talk, showing some quirks of ruby and javascript, “The future of programming” by Bret Victor, “You suck at Excel” by Joel Spolsky, which isn’t really about creating software, but it’s cool. And a tiny shameless plug with my “Common sense driven development talk”

I hope the compilation is useful and enlightening. Enjoy.

The post Five Must-Watch Software Engineering Talks appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

Michael Reeves and the ridiculous Subscriber Robot

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/michael-reeves-subscriber-robot/

At the beginning of his new build’s video, YouTuber Michael Reeves discusses a revelation he had about why some people don’t subscribe to his channel:

The real reason some people don’t subscribe is that when you hit this button, that’s all, that’s it, it’s done. It’s not special, it’s not enjoyable. So how do we make subscribing a fun, enjoyable process? Well, we do it by slowly chipping away at the content creator’s psyche every time someone subscribes.

His fix? The ‘fun’ interactive Subscriber Robot that is the subject of the video.

Be aware that Michael uses a couple of mild swears in this video, so maybe don’t watch it with a child.

The Subscriber Robot

Just showing that subscriber dedication My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/michaelreeves Personal Site: https://michaelreeves.us/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/michaelreeves08 Song: Summer Salt – Sweet To Me

Who is Michael Reeves?

Software developer and student Michael Reeves started his YouTube account a mere four months ago, with the premiere of his robot that shines lasers into your eyes – now he has 110k+ subscribers. At only 19, Michael co-owns and manages a company together with friends, and is set on his career path in software and computing. So when he is not making videos, he works a nine-to-five job “to pay for college and, y’know, live”.

The Subscriber Robot

Michael shot to YouTube fame with the aforementioned laser robot built around an Arduino. But by now he has also be released videos for a few Raspberry Pi-based contraptions.

Michael Reeves Raspberry Pi Subscriber Robot

Michael, talking us through the details of one of the worst ideas ever made

His Subscriber Robot uses a series of Python scripts running on a Raspberry Pi to check for new subscribers to Michael’s channel via the YouTube API. When it identifies one, the Pi uses a relay to make the ceiling lights in Michael’s office flash ten times a second while ear-splitting noise is emitted by a 102-decibel-rated buzzer. Needless to say, this buzzer is not recommended for home use, work use, or any use whatsoever! Moreover, the Raspberry Pi also connects to a speaker that announces the name of the new subscriber, so Michael knows who to thank.

Michael Reeves Raspberry Pi Subscriber Robot

Subscriber Robot: EEH! EEH! EEH! MoistPretzels has subscribed.
Michael: Thank you, MoistPretzels…

Given that Michael has gained a whopping 30,000 followers in the ten days since the release of this video, it’s fair to assume he is currently curled up in a ball on the office floor, quietly crying to himself.

If you think Michael only makes videos about ridiculous builds, you’re mistaken. He also uses YouTube to provide educational content, because he believes that “it’s super important for people to teach themselves how to program”. For example, he has just released a new C# beginners tutorial, the third in the series.

Support Michael

If you’d like to help Michael in his mission to fill the world with both tutorials and ridiculous robot builds, make sure to subscribe to his channel. You can also follow him on Twitter and support him on Patreon.

You may also want to check out the Useless Duck Company and Simone Giertz if you’re in the mood for more impractical, yet highly amusing, robot builds.

Good luck with your channel, Michael! We are looking forward to, and slightly dreading, more videos from one of our favourite new YouTubers.

The post Michael Reeves and the ridiculous Subscriber Robot appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

OK Google, be aesthetically pleasing

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/aesthetically-pleasing-ok-google/

Maker Andrew Jones took a Raspberry Pi and the Google Assistant SDK and created a gorgeous-looking, and highly functional, alternative to store-bought smart speakers.

Raspberry Pi Google AI Assistant

In this video I get an “Ok Google” voice activated AI assistant running on a raspberry pi. I also hand make a nice wooden box for it to live in.

OK Google, what are you?

Google Assistant is software of the same ilk as Amazon’s Alexa, Apple’s Siri and Microsoft’s Cortana. It’s a virtual assistant that allows you to request information, play audio, and control smart home devices via voice commands.

Infinite Looping Siri, Alexa and Google Home

One can barely see the iPhone’s screen. That’s because I have a privacy protection screen. Sorry, did not check the camera angle. Learn how to create your own loop, why we put Cortana out of the loop, and how to train Siri to an artificial voice: https://www.danrl.com/2016/12/01/looping-ais-siri-alexa-google-home.html

You probably have a digital assistant on your mobile phone, and if you go to the home of someone even mildly tech-savvy, you may see a device awaiting commands via a wake word such the device’s name or, for the Google Assistant, the phrase “OK, Google”.

Homebrew versions

Understanding the maker need to ‘put tech into stuff’ and upgrade everyday objects into everyday objects 2.0, the creators of these virtual assistants have allowed access for developers to run their software on devices such as the Raspberry Pi. This means that your common-or-garden homemade robot can now be controlled via voice, and your shed-built home automation system can have easy-to-use internet connectivity via a reliable, multi-device platform.

Andrew’s Google Assistant build

Andrew gives a peerless explanation of how the Google Assistant works:

There’s Google’s Cloud. You log into Google’s Cloud and you do a bunch of cloud configuration cloud stuff. And then on the Raspberry Pi you install some Python software and you do a bunch of configuration. And then the cloud and the Pi talk the clouds kitten rainbow protocol and then you get a Google AI assistant.

It all makes perfect sense. Though for more extra detail, you could always head directly to Google.

Andrew Jones Raspberry Pi OK Google Assistant

I couldn’t have explained it better myself

Andrew decided to take his Google Assistant-enabled Raspberry Pi and create a new body for it. One that was more aesthetically pleasing than the standard Pi-inna-box. After wiring his build and cannibalising some speakers and a microphone, he created a sleek, wooden body that would sit quite comfortably in any Bang & Olufsen shop window.

Find the entire build tutorial on Instructables.

Make your own

It’s more straightforward than Andrew’s explanation suggests, we promise! And with an array of useful resources online, you should be able to incorporate your choice of virtual assistants into your build.

There’s The Raspberry Pi Guy’s tutorial on setting up Amazon Alexa on the Raspberry Pi. If you’re looking to use Siri on your Pi, YouTube has a plethora of tutorials waiting for you. And lastly, check out Microsoft’s site for using Cortana on the Pi!

If you’re looking for more information on Google Assistant, check out issue 57 of The MagPi Magazine, free to download as a PDF. The print edition of this issue came with a free AIY Projects Voice Kit, and you can sign up for The MagPi newsletter to be the first to know about the kit’s availability for purchase.

The post OK Google, be aesthetically pleasing appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

All Systems Go! 2017 Speakers

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/all-systems-go-2017-speakers.html

The All Systems Go! 2017 Headline Speakers Announced!

Don’t forget to send in your submissions to the All Systems Go! 2017 CfP! Proposals are accepted until September 3rd!

A couple of headline speakers have been announced now:

  • Alban Crequy (Kinvolk)
  • Brian “Redbeard” Harrington (CoreOS)
  • Gianluca Borello (Sysdig)
  • Jon Boulle (NStack/CoreOS)
  • Martin Pitt (Debian)
  • Thomas Graf (covalent.io/Cilium)
  • Vincent Batts (Red Hat/OCI)
  • (and yours truly)

These folks will also review your submissions as part of the papers committee!

All Systems Go! is an Open Source community conference focused on the projects and technologies at the foundation of modern Linux systems — specifically low-level user-space technologies. Its goal is to provide a friendly and collaborative gathering place for individuals and communities working to push these technologies forward.

All Systems Go! 2017 takes place in Berlin, Germany on October 21st+22nd.

To submit your proposal now please visit our CFP submission web site.

For further information about All Systems Go! visit our conference web site.