Tag Archives: stealth

Adding Backdoors at the Chip Level

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/03/adding_backdoor.html

Interesting research into undetectably adding backdoors into computer chips during manufacture: “Stealthy dopant-level hardware Trojans: extended version,” also available here:

Abstract: In recent years, hardware Trojans have drawn the attention of governments and industry as well as the scientific community. One of the main concerns is that integrated circuits, e.g., for military or critical-infrastructure applications, could be maliciously manipulated during the manufacturing process, which often takes place abroad. However, since there have been no reported hardware Trojans in practice yet, little is known about how such a Trojan would look like and how difficult it would be in practice to implement one. In this paper we propose an extremely stealthy approach for implementing hardware Trojans below the gate level, and we evaluate their impact on the security of the target device. Instead of adding additional circuitry to the target design, we insert our hardware Trojans by changing the dopant polarity of existing transistors. Since the modified circuit appears legitimate on all wiring layers (including all metal and polysilicon), our family of Trojans is resistant to most detection techniques, including fine-grain optical inspection and checking against “golden chips”. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by inserting Trojans into two designs — a digital post-processing derived from Intel’s cryptographically secure RNG design used in the Ivy Bridge processors and a side-channel resistant SBox implementation­ — and by exploring their detectability and their effects on security.

The moral is that this kind of technique is very difficult to detect.

AWS PrivateLink Update – VPC Endpoints for Your Own Applications & Services

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-privatelink-update-vpc-endpoints-for-your-own-applications-services/

Earlier this month, my colleague Colm MacCárthaigh told you about AWS PrivateLink and showed you how to use it to access AWS services such as Amazon Kinesis Streams, AWS Service Catalog, EC2 Systems Manager, the EC2 APIs, and the ELB APIs by way of VPC Endpoints. The endpoint (represented by one or more Elastic Network Interfaces or ENIs) resides within your VPC and has IP addresses drawn from the VPC’s subnets, without the need for an Internet or NAT Gateway. This model is clear and easy to understand, not to mention secure and scalable!

Endpoints for Private Connectivity
Today we are building upon the initial launch and extending the PrivateLink model, allowing you to set up and use VPC Endpoints to access your own services and those made available by others. Even before we launched PrivateLink for AWS services, we had a lot of requests for this feature, so I expect it to be pretty popular. For example, one customer told us that they plan to create hundreds of VPCs, each hosting and providing a single microservice (read Microservices on AWS to learn more).

Companies can now create services and offer them for sale to other AWS customers, for access via a private connection. They create a service that accepts TCP traffic, host it behind a Network Load Balancer, and then make the service available, either directly or in AWS Marketplace. They will be notified of new subscription requests and can choose to accept or reject each one. I expect that this feature will be used to create a strong, vibrant ecosystem of service providers in 2018.

The service provider and the service consumer run in separate VPCs and AWS accounts and communicate solely through the endpoint, with all traffic flowing across Amazon’s private network. Service consumers don’t have to worry about overlapping IP addresses, arrange for VPC peering, or use a VPC Gateway. You can also use AWS Direct Connect to connect your existing data center to one of your VPCs in order to allow your cloud-based applications to access services running on-premises, or vice versa.

Providing and Consuming Services
This new feature puts a lot of power at your fingertips. You can set it all up using the VPC APIs, the VPC CLI, or the AWS Management Console. I’ll use the console, and will show you how to provide and then consume a service. I am going to do both within a single AWS account, but that’s just for demo purposes.

Let’s talk about providing a service. It must run behind a Network Load Balancer and must be accessible over TCP. It can be hosted on EC2 instances, ECS containers, or on-premises (configured as an IP target), and should be able to scale in order to meet the expected level of demand. For low latency and fault tolerance, we recommend using an NLB with targets in every AZ of its region. Here’s mine:

I open up the VPC Console and navigate to Endpoint Services, then click on Create Endpoint Service:

I choose my NLB (just one in this case, but I can choose two or more and they will be mapped to consumers on a round-robin basis). By clicking on Acceptance required, I get to control access to my endpoint on a request-by-request basis:

I click on Create service and my service is ready immediately:

If I was going to make this service available in AWS Marketplace, I would go ahead and create a listing now. Since I am going to be the producer and the consumer in this blog post, I’ll skip that step. I will, however, copy the Service name for use in the next step.

I return to the VPC Dashboard and navigate to Endpoints, then click on Create endpoint. Then I select Find service by name, paste the service name, and click on Verify to move ahead. Then I select the desired AZs, and a subnet in each one, pick my security groups, and click on Create endpoint:

Because I checked Acceptance required when I created the endpoint service, the connection is pending acceptance:

Back on the endpoint service side (typically in a separate AWS account), I can see and accept the pending request:

The endpoint becomes available and ready to use within a minute or so. If I was creating a service and selling access on a paid basis, I would accept the request as part of a larger, and perhaps automated, onboarding workflow for a new customer.

On the consumer side, my new endpoint is accessible via DNS name:

Services provided by AWS and services in AWS Marketplace are accessible through split-horizon DNS. Accessing the service through this name will resolve to the “best” endpoint, taking Region and Availability Zone into consideration.

In the Marketplace
As I noted earlier, this new PrivateLink feature creates an opportunity for new and existing sellers in AWS Marketplace. The following SaaS offerings are already available as endpoints and I expect many more to follow (read Sell on AWS Marketplace to get started):

CA TechnologiesCA App Experience Analytics Essentials.

Aqua SecurityAqua Container Image Security Scanner.

DynatraceCloud-Native Monitoring powered by AI.

Cisco StealthwatchPublic Cloud Monitoring – Metered, Public Cloud Monitoring – Contracts.

SigOptML Optimization & Tuning.

Available Today
This new PrivateLink feature is available now and you can start using it today!

Jeff;

 

Vulnerability in Amazon Key

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/11/vulnerability_i.html

Amazon Key is an IoT door lock that can enable one-time access codes for delivery people. To further secure that system, Amazon sells Cloud Cam, a camera that watches the door to ensure that delivery people don’t abuse their one-time access privilege.

Cloud Cam has been hacked:

But now security researchers have demonstrated that with a simple program run from any computer in Wi-Fi range, that camera can be not only disabled but frozen. A viewer watching its live or recorded stream sees only a closed door, even as their actual door is opened and someone slips inside. That attack would potentially enable rogue delivery people to stealthily steal from Amazon customers, or otherwise invade their inner sanctum.

And while the threat of a camera-hacking courier seems an unlikely way for your house to be burgled, the researchers argue it potentially strips away a key safeguard in Amazon’s security system.

Amazon is patching the system.

ShadowBrokers Releases NSA UNITEDRAKE Manual

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/09/shadowbrokers_r.html

The ShadowBrokers released the manual for UNITEDRAKE, a sophisticated NSA Trojan that targets Windows machines:

Able to compromise Windows PCs running on XP, Windows Server 2003 and 2008, Vista, Windows 7 SP 1 and below, as well as Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012, the attack tool acts as a service to capture information.

UNITEDRAKE, described as a “fully extensible remote collection system designed for Windows targets,” also gives operators the opportunity to take complete control of a device.

The malware’s modules — including FOGGYBOTTOM and GROK — can perform tasks including listening in and monitoring communication, capturing keystrokes and both webcam and microphone usage, the impersonation users, stealing diagnostics information and self-destructing once tasks are completed.

More news.

UNITEDRAKE was mentioned in several Snowden documents and also in the TAO catalog of implants.

And Kaspersky Labs has found evidence of these tools in the wild, associated with the Equation Group — generally assumed to be the NSA:

The capabilities of several tools in the catalog identified by the codenames UNITEDRAKE, STRAITBAZZARE, VALIDATOR and SLICKERVICAR appear to match the tools Kaspersky found. These codenames don’t appear in the components from the Equation Group, but Kaspersky did find “UR” in EquationDrug, suggesting a possible connection to UNITEDRAKE (United Rake). Kaspersky also found other codenames in the components that aren’t in the NSA catalog but share the same naming conventions­they include SKYHOOKCHOW, STEALTHFIGHTER, DRINKPARSLEY, STRAITACID, LUTEUSOBSTOS, STRAITSHOOTER, and DESERTWINTER.

ShadowBrokers has only released the UNITEDRAKE manual, not the tool itself. Presumably they’re trying to sell that

CrackMapExec – Active Directory Post-Exploitation Tool

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/r7Om66Zbxck/

CrackMapExec (a.k.a CME) is a post-exploitation tool that helps automate assessing the security of large Active Directory networks. Built with stealth in mind, CME follows the concept of “Living off the Land”: abusing built-in Active Directory features/protocols to achieve its functionality and allowing it to evade most endpoint protection/IDS/IPS…

Read the full post at darknet.org.uk

OpenPuff – Professional Steganography Tool

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/_VMH_YXZiYs/

OpenPuff is a professional steganography tool, with unique features you won’t find among any other free or commercial software. OpenPuff is 100% free and suitable for highly sensitive data covert transmission. The tool contains deniable steganography, carrier chains, unique layers of security and obfuscation, multiple carrier formats, is portable…

Read the full post at darknet.org.uk