Tag Archives: The MagPi

Build a magic mirror in issue 54 of The MagPi

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-a-magic-mirror-in-issue-54-of-the-magpi/

Hey there folks! It’s Rob from The MagPi again. Did you miss me? I missed you.

Anyway, I’m here today to tell you that we’ve finally gone and done it: we’ve got a build-your-own-magic-mirror feature in the magazine. Not only that, it’s our cover feature. This amazing project won the community vote in our top 50 Raspberry Pi projects poll, so we decided to go all out and worked closely with Michael Teeuw (the creator of the winning project) to put together this definitive guide.

magic mirror

The latest issue is packed with excellent content

We also have a follow-up to our beginner’s guide to coding from last issue, as Lucy Hattersley delves deeper into object-oriented programming by using examples in Scratch and Python. And we continue our popular Learn to code with C series from Simon Long, along with our usual selection of finely crafted tutorials, guides, project focus articles, and reviews.

As well as all that, we have a new regular extra for you: starting from this issue, you can grab all the code from the magazine in one handy zip from our website or from our GitHub page for each issue of the mag. We’ve started doing this after a reader request: if you have any ideas that would make The MagPi even better, drop us an email and we’ll see what we can do.

The MagPi 54 is available in stores now from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. Alternatively, you can buy The MagPi online or get it digitally via our app on Android and iOS. There’s even a free PDF of it as well.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and get a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, together with a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 54.

Don’t forget, though, that as with sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy this issue!

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Community Profile: Tim Richardson and Michael Horne

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/community-profile-tim-richardson-michael-horne/

This column is from The MagPi issue 50. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free, or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

Tim Richardson and Michael Horne

Tim and Michael

Category: Makers
Day job: Michael is a web developer, while Tim works as a performance architect.
Website

Michael Horne and Tim Richardson have become regular faces within the Raspberry Pi community, and with good reason. For those local to the Cambridge area, the pair are best known for running the city’s Raspberry Jam – The CamJam – as well as events such as the Birthday Bash and the successful Pi Wars, the next instalment of which is due in April 2017. They’re also responsible for many photos and videos you’ll have seen on our blog over the years.

Mike and Tim at Parliament.

On 8 September, Michael and Tim demonstrated some of their projects and kits at the #10MillionPi House of Commons celebrations

Those further afield may have found themself in possession of a CamJam EduKit from The Pi Hut. Available in several varieties, and accompanied by educational resources on the CamJam website, EduKits provide the components necessary for newcomers to the Raspberry Pi to understand physical computing. From sensors to traffic light LEDs, the affordable kits offer everyone the chance to get to grips with digital making, regardless of their skills or experience.

CamJam

From a small room at the Centre of Mathematical Sciences to multiple rooms and hundreds of attendees, the Cambridge Raspberry Jam continues to grow within the birthplace of the Pi. The EduKit range – providing everyone with the necessary components to learn LED coding, sensors, and more – is available via The Pi Hut.

And if that’s not enough, the online presence of Tim and Michael continues to permeate the social platforms of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. Both are active within the Twittersphere: you’ll no doubt have shared a joke or received advice from either @Geeky_Tim or @recantha. And if you happen to look for information or updates on Raspberry Pi products, projects, or updates, Michael’s website is most likely to be sitting in your browser history.

Michael Horne music box

Michael’s Music Box is his favourite project: it’s a kit that fits neatly into his hand, allowing for the playback and distortion of notes through various button presses and dial twists.

For the pair, the Raspberry Pi was a subject of interest pre-launch, with both ordering one from the start. Tim, the eager tinkerer, began his Pi journey from delivery day, while Michael admits to letting his collect a little dust before finally diving in.

Tim Richardson Weather

Tim is most proud of this Weather Clock, a swish-looking display of numbers and icons that indicate the date and time, along with both current and forecast weather conditions

At first, Michael attended the Milton Keynes Raspberry Jam, learning to solder in order to begin work on a project, the Picorder. Having noticed the Cambridge Raspberry Jam would no longer be running in the home town of the Raspberry Pi, and ensuring he wouldn’t step on a few toes in the process, Michael decided to launch his own Jam at the Centre for Mathematical Sciences. “It was so badly organised that I hadn’t even visited and seen the room beforehand”, he admits. “It was just 30 people at that first one!” This lack of organisational skills would soon be remedied by the introduction of Tim Richardson into the mix. Of future events, Tim notes, “With two of us doing the organisation, we were able to do a lot more. I wanted to get vendors to the event so people could buy stuff for their Pis.” They also put together workshops and, later, presentations. The workshops in turn led to the creation of the CamJam EduKit, a means for workshop attendees to take components home and continue their builds there.

Raspberry Pi Birthday Bash

Cake, project builds, and merriment: the Raspberry Pi Birthday Bash’s continued success draws people from across the globe to join the team in celebrating the
Raspberry Pi, the community, and the future.

The transition of the kits to The Pi Hut took place in July 2014, allowing for greater variety and fewer nights filling bags on the living room floor. More recently, the pair joined the Raspberry Pi team in celebration of the #10MillionPi milestone, bringing their projects to the Houses of Parliament to help introduce more people to the Raspberry Jam scene. And of their continued future within the community? The much-anticipated Pi Wars will be taking place over the first weekend in April 2017, offering all ages and abilities the chance to put their robotic creations to the test against a series of challenges.

Pi Wars

The popular robotics competition allows teams of Raspberry Pi enthusiasts to battle head-to-head in a series of non-destructive challenges. Rolling into its
third year, the next Pi Wars is set to run across the first weekend of April 2017.

 

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So you got a Raspberry Pi for Christmas! Now what?

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/so-you-got-a-raspberry-pi-for-christmas-now-what/

Note: The elves at Pi Towers are all taking next week off to spend some time with their families, and this blog will be quiet for the week. We’ll be back at the start of January. Happy holidays!

Happy 25th of December, everybody!

If you’re one of the many who woke up this morning to find some Raspberry Pi goodies under your tree, congratulations.

Christmas

Now you’ve unpacked the Pi, confirmed it to indeed be roughly the size of a credit card, and confused a less tech-savvy loved one by telling them “This is a computer!”, you may be wondering to do with it next…and that’s where we come in.

The Raspberry Pi can be used to create no end of wonderful things, including robots, musical instruments, virtual pets, stop motion cameras, and much more.

It will also help you to learn programming, allow you to play games, offer the chance to explore space, and automate your home.

Not quite like this…

So many awesome things.

But how do you do any of them!? Well…

1. OS me no questions and I’ll tell you no lies.

Awful pun. I’m sorry.

You’ll need to make sure you have the latest Raspbian operating system (OS) on your Pi. You may have been given an SD with Rasbian pre-installed but if not, head to our downloads page to get it.

2. Start me up

ALL THE POWER!

You’ll need to plug your Pi into a monitor (your TV will do), keyboard and mouse in order to get started. You’ll also need a good-quality power supply providing at least 2A.

We’ve some great instructions within our help pages to get you up and running. And if you’re still stuck, our forum has loads of information and is full of helpful people. Feel free to join and ask a question, and search previous topics for advice.

3. So how do I build a robot then?!

With tinsel and tape and bows and…

Excellent question. But if you’ve never tried to code before, you may want to start with something a little smaller…like Scratch or Sonic Pi, or a physical build such as the Parent Detector or a Burping Jelly Baby.

You may also want to check out some great project books such as Carrie Anne’s Adventures in Raspberry Pi or any of The MagPi Magazine Essentials Guides and Project Books.

You’ll find a lot more suggestions in our Christmas Shopping List.

4. More, more, more!

You’ll find more projects on our resources pages, along with some brilliant inspirational builds on our YouTube channel and blog. Or simply search for Raspberry Pi online. We’ve an amazing community of makers who share their code and builds for all to use, and now you’re one of us…WELCOME!

 

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The MagPi 53 out now! Free Debian + PIXEL DVD

Post Syndicated from Lucy Hattersley original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-53-now-free-debian-pixel-dvd/

The MagPi 53 is out now. This month’s community magazine comes with a free Debian + PIXEL DVD.

With the DVD, you can run the Debian + PIXEL desktop on a PC or Mac.

The MagPi 53 Free DVD

Click here to download The MagPi 53.

The MagPi Translated Edition 2

Launching alongside this month’s The MagPi are more international titles. The second edition of our bite-sized version of The MagPi, translated into four languages, is now available.

The MagPi Translated Edition 2 contains the best projects, reviews, and tutorials from The MagPi. These are translated into Italian, French, Spanish, and Hebrew.

Click here to download The MagPi Translated Edition 2.

Inside The MagPi 53: The best projects and guides

The MagPi 53 Tutorial

Here are some of the incredible projects you will find in this month’s The MagPi:

  • Google DeepDream: how to create surreal works of art with a Raspberry Pi and Google’s AI software
  • Master remote access: use a Raspberry Pi and SSH to connect remotely via the command line
  • Make a GPIO Music Box: Program push buttons to make different sounds
  • Create a horse race game: Get yourselves to the derby with Pi Bakery
  • Use BOINC to donate your Raspberry Pi’s resources to science

Inside The MagPi 53: Debian + PIXEL DVD

The MagPi 53 Beginner's Guide to Coding

There’s a huge amount in this month’s magazine. Here are just some of the features in this issue:

  • Beginner’s guide to programming: learn to code with our complete starter guide
  • Use the Debian + PIXEL DVD: try out our new OS on your computer with your free DVD
  • Create a bootable flash drive that can boot a Mac or PC into the PIXEL desktop

There’s also some amazing news this month: the Raspberry Pi has now sold 11 million units, and Raspberry Pi co-founder Eben Upton has been awarded a CBE! We have exclusive interviews with Eben about his CBE and the launch of Debian + PIXEL.

The MagPI 53 News

The best community projects

We also cover some of the most fantastic community projects ever built:

  • Pegasus and the North American Eagle. Inside the land-speed challenge car, with a Raspberry Pi in the driver’s cockpit
  • QBEE social media dress. This wearable tech posts automatically to social media
  • Self-playing pipe organ. This giant musical instrument is played by the Raspberry Pi
  • Water tank level monitor. This PIoT challenge winning project automates water collection in rural America

The MagPi 53 Project Focus

It’s one of the most feature-packed editions of The MagPi we’ve ever made. Don’t miss out on the free DVD that can bring an old computer back to life as a coding powerhouse. It really is something special.

You can grab The MagPi 53 in stores today: it’s in WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda in the UK, and it will be in Micro Center and selected Barnes & Noble stores when it comes to the US. You can also buy the print edition online from our store, and it’s available digitally on our Android and iOS app.

Get a free Pi Zero

Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and get a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

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PIXEL for PC and Mac

Post Syndicated from Eben Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/pixel-pc-mac/

Our vision in establishing the Raspberry Pi Foundation was that everyone should be able to afford their own programmable general-purpose computer. The intention has always been that the Raspberry Pi should be a full-featured desktop computer at a $35 price point. In support of this, and in parallel with our hardware development efforts, we’ve made substantial investments in our software stack. These culminated in the launch of PIXEL in September 2016.

PIXEL represents our best guess as to what the majority of users are looking for in a desktop environment: a clean, modern user interface; a curated suite of productivity software and programming tools, both free and proprietary; and the Chromium web browser with useful plugins, including Adobe Flash, preinstalled. And all of this is built on top of Debian, providing instant access to thousands of free applications.

Put simply, it’s the GNU/Linux we would want to use.

The PIXEL desktop on Raspberry Pi

Back in the summer, we asked ourselves one simple question: if we like PIXEL so much, why ask people to buy Raspberry Pi hardware in order to run it? There is a massive installed base of PC and Mac hardware out there, which can run x86 Debian just fine. Could we do something for the owners of those machines?

So, after three months of hard work from Simon and Serge, we have a Christmas treat for you: an experimental version of Debian+PIXEL for x86 platforms. Simply download the image, burn it onto a DVD or flash it onto a USB stick, and boot straight into the familiar PIXEL desktop environment on your PC or Mac. Or go out and buy this month’s issue of The MagPi magazine, in stores tomorrow, which has this rather stylish bootable DVD on the cover.

Our first ever covermount

You’ll find all the applications you’re used to, with the exception of Minecraft and Wolfram Mathematica (we don’t have a licence to put those on any machine that’s not a Raspberry Pi). Because we’re using the venerable i386 architecture variant it should run even on vintage machines like my ThinkPad X40, provided they have at least 512MB of RAM.

The finest laptop ever made, made finer

Why do we think this is worth doing? Two reasons:

  • A school can now run PIXEL on its existing installed base of PCs, just as a student can run PIXEL on her Raspberry Pi at home. She can move back and forth between her computing class or after-school club and home, using exactly the same productivity software and programming tools, in exactly the same desktop environment. There is no learning curve, and no need to tweak her schoolwork to run on two subtly different operating systems.
  • And bringing PIXEL to the PC and Mac keeps us honest. We don’t just want to create the best desktop environment for the Raspberry Pi: we want to create the best desktop environment, period. We know we’re not there yet, but by running PIXEL alongside Windows, Mac OS, and the established desktop GNU/Linux distros, we can more easily see where our weak points are, and work to fix them.

Remember that this is a prototype rather then a final release version. Due to the wide variety of PC and Mac hardware out there, there are likely to be minor issues on some hardware configurations. If we decide that this is something we want to commit to in the long run, we will do our best to address these as they come up. You can help us here – please let us know how you get on in the comments below!

Instructions

Download the image, and either burn it to a DVD or write it to a USB stick. For the latter, we recommend Etcher.

Etcher from resin.io

Insert the DVD or USB stick into your PC or Mac, and turn it on. On a PC, you will generally need to enable booting from optical drive or USB stick in the BIOS, and you will have to ensure that the optical drive or USB stick is ahead of all other drives in the boot order. On a Mac, you’ll need to hold down C during boot*.

If you’ve done that correctly, you will be greeted by a boot screen.

Boot screen

Here you can hit escape to access the boot menu, or do nothing to boot through to the desktop.

Spot the difference: the PIXEL desktop on a PC

* We are aware of an issue on some modern Macs (including, annoyingly, mine – but not Liz’s), where the machine fails to identify the image as bootable. We’ll release an updated image once we’ve got to the bottom of the issue.

Persistence

If you are running from DVD, any files you create, or modifications you make to the system, will of course be lost when you power off the machine. If you are running from a USB stick, the system will by default use any spare space on the device to create a persistence partition, which allows files to persist between sessions. The boot menu provides options to run with or without persistence, or to erase any persistence partition that has been created, allowing you to roll back to a clean install at any time.

Boot menu

Disclaimer

One of the great benefits of the Raspberry Pi is that it is a low-consequence environment for messing about: if you trash your SD card you can just flash another one. This is not always true of your PC or Mac. Consider backing up your system before trying this image.

Raspberry Pi can accept no liability for any loss of data or damage to computer systems from using the image.

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Scripto: the distraction-free writing tool

Post Syndicated from Laura Clay original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/scripto-distraction-free-writing-tool/

When I’m not copyediting for the lovely folks at Raspberry Pi and The MagPi, I write fiction, often involving teenagers running away from murderous water-horses. One of the main problems I have is avoiding distractions, like reading Brooding YA Hero‘s adventures on Twitter, the constant nagging thought that the next email will be another rejection, and the copious amounts of Taylor Lautner GIFs on Tumblr.

Taylor Lautner

Sorry, where was I?

Before you know it, it’s 5pm and your word count’s looking grim. Fortunately, Edinburgh’s Craig Lam (@siliconeidolon) has come up with an ingenious solution in the form of the Scripto, a distraction-eliminating writing tool with a Pi Zero at its heart. He explains:

Writing creatively to a deadline is psychologically challenging: any distraction or obstacle can derail the process. Multifunction devices like laptops are rife with distractions; writing longhand is painful; dedicated word processors are out-of-production or severely flawed. These observations inspired a vision for a distraction-free, portable, convenient, and supportive tool for writers.’

Procrastination

The Scripto, devised as part of Craig’s BSc project, takes the familiar form of a laptop, but with a difference: the only connection to the outside world is to cloud backup. No refreshing social media feeds, no ‘I’ll just check my email once more’… just glorious, uninterrupted writing.

Scripto

The Scripto has a Pixel Qi touchscreen readable in sunlight, with a photovoltaic strip to provide extra power on top of the ten hours battery life. No more squinting at a laptop on a summer day. The Pi boots into a fullscreen adapted version of FocusWriter and provides a host of motivational features, like timers for ‘word sprints’ and word count targets.

Scripto UI

What I love about the Scripto is how personal you can make it. Changeable covers are a nice nod to the old Nokia days (one for the 90s kids), and a companion app to track your word count is a great motivator. (Anyone who’s participated in National Novel Writing Month will know about the joys of racing to 50,000 words and watching your daily graph zooming upwards.)

The focus is on ease of use and low cost, just like the Pi Zero that powers it. The case material will be biodegradable – and café-proof, for those of us often writing hunched over a cappuccino and crumbly cake – and the word processor can come preloaded with the Open Dyslexic font, which is another plus. Social sustainability was important when Craig planned the Scripto; he specifically mentions our educational initiatives like Picademy as a factor when choosing a single-board computer to run the device.

Scripto side view

Craig is considering crowdfunding the Scripto, and I’m sure many writers will be queuing up for one of these nifty devices.

While you wait for the Scripto, you could read some brilliant books by Laura Lam, who told me all about her husband’s project. Or you could try short stories by some other Laura, available on Amazon, Smashwords, and in Blackwell’s Edinburgh. Ahem.

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Holidays with Pi

Post Syndicated from Matt Richardson original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/holidays-with-pi/

This column is from The MagPi issue 52. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free, or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

When I was a kid, it felt like it took forever for the holidays to arrive. Now that I’m an adult, the opposite is true: it feels like the holidays come hurtling at us faster and faster every year. As a kid, I was most interested in opening presents and eating all of that amazing holiday food. As an adult, I mostly enjoy the opportunity to pause real life for a few days and spend time with my family – though I do still love eating all that amazing holiday food!

Invariably, the conversations with my extended family turn to Raspberry Pi at some point during the holidays. My relatives may have seen something in the news about it, or perhaps they have a friend who is creating their own retro gaming emulator with it, for example. I sometimes show off the Raspberry Pi projects that I’ve been working on and talk about what the Raspberry Pi Foundation is doing in order to put the power of digital making into the hands of people around the globe.

All over the world there will be a lot of folks, both young and old, who may be receiving Raspberry Pis as gifts during the holidays. For them, hopefully it’s the start of a very rewarding journey making awesome stuff and learning about the power of computers.

The side effect of so many people receiving Raspberry Pis as gifts is that around this time of year we get a lot of people asking, “So I have a Raspberry Pi… now what?” Of course, beyond using it as a typical computer, I encourage anyone with a Raspberry Pi to make something with it. There’s no better way to learn about computing than to create something.

There’s no shortage of project inspiration out there. You’ll find projects that you can make in the current edition of The MagPi, as well as all of the back issues online, which are all available as free PDF files. We share the best projects we’ve seen on our blog, and our Resources section contains fantastic how-to projects.

Be inspired

You can also explore sites such as Hackster.io, Instructables, Hackaday.io, and Makezine.com for tons of ideas for what you can make with your Raspberry Pi. Many projects include full step-by-step guides as well. Whatever you’re interested in, whether it’s music, gaming, electronics, natural sciences, or aviation, there’s sure to be something made with Raspberry Pi that’ll spark your interest.

If you’re looking for something to make to celebrate the holiday season, you’re definitely covered. We’ve seen so many great holiday-related Raspberry Pi projects over the years, such as digital advent calendars, Christmas light displays, tree ornaments, digital menorahs, and new year countdown clocks. And, of course, not only does the current issue of The MagPi contain a few holiday-themed Pi projects, you can even make something festive with the cover and a few LEDs.

There’s a lot of stuff out there to make and I encourage you to work together with your family members on a project, even if it doesn’t seem to be their kind of thing. I think people are often surprised at how easy and fun it can be. And if you do make something together, please share some photos with us!

Whatever you create and whatever holidays you celebrate, all of us at Raspberry Pi send you our very best wishes of the season and we look forward to another year ahead of learning, making, sharing, and having fun with computers.

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Community Profile: Zach Igielman

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/community-profile-zach-igielman/

This column is from The MagPi issue 49. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free, or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

Zachary Igielman

Zach Igielman

Category: Maker
Day job: Student
Website

You may recognise the name Zachary Igielman from issue #38, where he was mentioned during our review of the exciting Pimoroni Piano HAT. The Piano HAT, for those unaware, was inspired by Zach’s own creation, the PiPiano, a successful crowdfunded add-on board that hit 184% of its funding two years ago. Aged 14, Zach had decided to incorporate his passions for making, engineering, and music, building himself a PCB that could use physical keys to control electronic sound files and Sonic Pi code. The PCB, he explains, is a great classroom tool, educating students on the fundamentals of physically building digital tech and soldering, through to understanding sound generation through PWM frequencies.

Zachary Igielman

PiPiano: Zach taught himself how to build a PCB in order to bring the PiPiano to life. Using Indiegogo to fund his project, Zach hit 184% of his target before approaching Pimoroni to hand over the design. And from his homemade PCB, the Piano HAT was born.

Zach began to teach himself to code aged 11, soon discovering the Raspberry Pi and, later, the Cambridge Raspberry Jams. It was through this collective of like-minded individuals that Zach was inspired to broaden his making skills, moving on to create line-following robots that avoided objects by using sensors.

Moving forward, Zach visited the Raspberry Pi offices for work experience, continuing to work on and study robots and robotic guides, working alongside our engineers to build upon his knowledge. It was around this time, in October 2014, that Zach met Frank Thomas-Hockey via Twitter. Frank was looking for help in creating the first London Raspberry Jam and Zach was more than willing to lend a hand. Between them, they 
set up the Covent Garden Jam, welcoming over 100 visitors to their first event. Their most recent Jam – now with the additional help of volunteers Ben, Paul, and Joseph – allowed them to simultaneously run workshops on soldering, Sonic Pi, and Minecraft, while also highlighting maker projects through show-and-tell sessions and talks.

Zachary Igielman Covent Garden Jam

Covent Garden Raspberry Pi Jam: Through Twitter, Zach met Frank in 2014, a like-minded Pi enthusiast looking to start a London-based Raspberry Jam. Between the two of them, they launched the first event at Dragon Hall, continuing the success of the Jam to now include multiple workshops, show-and-tell sessions, and talks.

Finally finished with his GCSE exams and about to begin his sixth-form studies in Maths, Further Maths, Physics, and Computing, Zach now has the time to continue his recent collaboration with friend Jake Blumenow.

Zach met Jake and built a fast friendship online, lovingly referring to him as a fellow “computer geek”. The two have worked on projects together, including several websites, and spent time travelling, bouncing ideas off one another with the aim of creating something important. It’s their most recent venture that’s worthy of recognition.

“At Google Campus, we developed our business model: we believe people of all ages have the right to understand how the technological world around us works, so they can modify and create their own technology.”

Between the two of them, they aim to create complete Raspberry Pi education kits, inviting beginners in making and coding to create functional projects, such as an alarm system, thus cementing the pair’s desire to highlight the day-to-day importance of tech in our lives.

Zachary Igielman Jake Blumenow

Collaboration with Jake Blumenow: Zach and Jake believe everyone has the right to understand how technology builds the world around them. With this in mind, they formed a partnership, working to create Raspberry Pi educational kits, starting with a DIY alarm system.

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The Raspberry Pi Christmas Shopping List 2016

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-raspberry-pi-christmas-shopping-list-2016/

Feeling stuck for what to buy the beloved maker in your life? Maybe your niece wants to get into Minecraft hacking, or your Dad fancies his hand at home automation on a budget?

Maybe you’ve seen Raspberry Pi in the news and figure it would be a fun activity for the family, or you’re stuck for what to buy the Pi pro who’s slowly filling your spare room with wires, servers, and a mysterious, unidentified object that keeps beeping?

Whatever the reason, you’re in the right place. The Raspberry Pi Christmas Shopping List is here to help you out.

For the beginner

Here are some of our favourite bits to get them started.

  • A Raspberry Pi Starter Kit will give your budding maker everything they need to get started. There’s a whole host of options, from our own kit to project-specific collections from our friends at The Pi Hut and Pimoroni in the UK, Adafruit in the USA, Canakit in Canada, and RS Components across the globe.

Marc Scott Beginner's Guide to Coding Book

  • They may already have a screen, keyboard, and mouse, but having a separate display allows them free rein to play to their heart’s content. The pi-top takes the form of a laptop, while the pi-topCEED still requires a mouse and keyboard.

pi-top

CamJam EduKit

For the hobbyist

They’ve been tinkering with LEDs and servo motors for a while. Now it’s time to pull out the big guns.

  • Help to broaden their interest by introducing them to some of the brilliant products over at Bare Conductive. Pair up the Pi Cap with some Electric Paint, and they’ll create an interactive masterpiece by the time the Queen’s Speech is on.

Bare Conductive

  • Add to their maker toolkit with some of the great products in the RasPiO range. The GPIO Zero Ruler will be an instant hit, and a great stocking filler for anyone wanting to do more with the GPIO pins.

GPIO Zero Ruler

Camera Kit Adafruit

For the tech whizz

You don’t understand half the things they talk about at the dinner table, but they seem to be enthusiastic and that’s all that counts.

  • Help them organise their components with a handy Storage Organiser. We swear by them here at Pi Towers.

Storage

Helping Hand

  • And then there’s the PiBorg. Treat them to the superfast DiddyBorg and you’ll be hailed as gift-buyer supreme (sorry if you’ll have to better this next year).

Diddybord

  • And then there’s the Raspberry Pi Zero. Check out availability here and buy them the sought-after $5 beast of an SBC.

For the… I really have no idea what to buy them this year

There’s always one, right?

  • A physical subscription to The MagPi Magazine is sure to go down well. And with the added bonus of a free Raspberry Pi Zero, you’ll win this Christmastime. Well done, you!

MagPi_Logo

 

Stocking fillers for everyone

Regardless of their experience and tech know-how, here are some great stocking fillers that everyone will enjoy.

 

STEM-ish gifts that everyone will love

These books are top of everyone’s lists this year, and for good reason. Why not broaden the interest of the Pi fan in your life with one of these brilliant reads?

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Hour of Code 2016

Post Syndicated from Laura Sach original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hour-of-code-2016/

What could you do in an hour? Perhaps you could watch an episode of a TV show, have a luxurious bath, or even tidy the house a bit! But what if you could spend an hour learning a skill that might influence the future of your career, and perhaps your whole life?

hour-of-code-header

The Hour of Code is a worldwide initiative which aims to get as many people as possible to have a go at programming computers. Our aim is to put digital making into the hands of as many people as possible, so here at Pi Towers we have cooked up some exciting projects for you to try, all of which can be completed in an hour.

Have a go at making a version of a whoopee cushion (a favourite Christmas cracker toy in my house) using physical computing, invent your own lyrics for The Twelve Days of Christmas, or simulate your cat floating in space. Many of the projects don’t even require a Raspberry Pi: you can get started with Scratch just by visiting a website.

Physical computing projects

Physical computing projects
Make a fast-paced reaction game with a Pi and an Explorer HAT

Scratch projects

Ada's Poetry Generator
Program your own animation in Scratch

Astro Pi projects

Sense HAT Random Sparkles
Simulate the effects of weightlessness in space using Scratch

Programming projects

N days of Christmas
Generate cat memes with JavaScript



We are also holding a digital making event at Pi Towers on Wednesday 7 December: if you can travel to Cambridge, then register, join in and achieve your hour of code!

Whether you are a child or an adult, it is never too late to start learning to code. When I was a teacher, I always loved participating in the Hour of Code: the students couldn’t quite believe they were given an hour to do something they would willingly do for fun. What they didn’t know is that the teachers secretly had a lot of fun testing out the projects too, although some of the resulting sounds did cause a few raised eyebrows in the staff room!

Once you’ve started coding, you might not want to stop, so head over to our resources section for more inspirational projects to tackle. Intrepid teachers can download the second issue of the MagPi Educator’s Edition to find out how to take things further in the classroom. The sky’s the limit! Well, actually, if you’re doing one of our Astro Pi projects, space is the limit…

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Christmas Special: The MagPi 52 is out now!

Post Syndicated from Lucy Hattersley original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-christmas-special/

The MagPi Christmas Special is out now.

For the festive season, the official magazine of the Raspberry Pi community is having a maker special. This edition is packed with fun festive projects!

The MagPi issue 52 cover

The MagPi issue 52

Click here to download the MagPi Christmas Special

Here are just some of the fun projects inside this festive issue:

  • Magazine tree: turn the special cover into a Christmas tree, using LED lights to create a shiny, blinky display
  • DIY decorations: bling out your tree with NeoPixels and code
  • Santa tracker: follow Santa Claus around the world with a Raspberry Pi
  • Christmas crackers: the best low-cost presents for makers and hackers
  • Yuletide game: build Sliders, a fab block-sliding game with a festive feel.

Sliders

A Christmas game from the MagPi No.52

Inside the MagPi Christmas special

If you’re a bit Grinchy when it comes to Christmas, there’s plenty of non-festive fun to be found too:

  • Learn to use VNC Viewer
  • Find out how to build a sunrise alarm clock
  • Read our in-depth guide to Amiga emulation
  • Discover the joys of parallel computing

There’s also a huge amount of community news this month. The MagPi has an exclusive feature on Pioneers, our new programme for 12- to 15-year-olds, and news about Astro Pi winning the Arthur Clarke Award.

The Pioneers

The MagPi outlines our new Pioneers programme in detail

After that, we see some of the most stylish projects ever. Inside is the beautiful Sisyphus table; that’s a moving work of art, a facial recognition door lock, and a working loom controlled by a Raspberry Pi.

The MagPi 52 Sisyphus Project Focus

The MagPi interviews the maker of this amazing Sisyphus table

If that wasn’t enough, we also have a big feature on adding sensors to your robots. These can be used to built a battle-bot ready for the upcoming Pi Wars challenge.

The MagPi team wishes you all a merry Christmas! You can grab The MagPi 52 in stores today: it’s in WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda in the UK, and it will be in Micro Center and selected Barnes & Noble stores when it comes to the US. You can also buy the print edition online from our store, and it’s available digitally on our Android and iOS app.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and get a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

If you subscribe to The MagPi before 7 December 2016, you will get a free Pi Zero in time for Christmas.

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The Official Projects Book Volume 2 – out now!

Post Syndicated from Lucy Hattersley original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/official-projects-book-volume-2/

The Official Raspberry Pi Projects Book Volume 2 is on sale now.

The Projects Book is packed with 200 pages of the finest coding and creating tutorials.

It comes from the same team that brings you The MagPi every month, which is the official community magazine, so you can be sure these are the highest-quality tutorials and projects around.

Pick up a copy of The Official Raspberry Pi Projects Book from the following places:

It’s an amazing-looking magazine with a superbly shiny jet-black cover. Embossed on the cover is a metal reflective red and green Raspberry Pi logo. You can’t miss it!

Inside The Official Raspberry Pi Projects Book

“The Raspberry Pi is the best-selling British computer of all time,” says  Managing Editor Russell Barnes. “It’s known the world over for making incredible things, from robots to mirrors and even art. It’s also helping to revolutionise computing.”

You can learn all about the world’s favourite credit card-sized computer in this one book:

  • 200 pages of Raspberry Pi
  • Learn how easy it is to use your Raspberry Pi
  • Find out about amazing community creations
  • Follow expert guides to make your first project
  • Read definitive reviews of add-ons and accessories

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Making life changes

Post Syndicated from Matt Richardson original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/making-life-changes/

This column is from The MagPi issue 51. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free, or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

Making things can change your life. It did for me, and I hear the same from others all the time.

After I graduated from university in 2003, I jumped immediately into the workforce. I landed in New York City’s entertainment industry, which is where I’d dreamed of working since I was young. I was excited to be a staffer on a major television show, where I learned what it takes to produce a weekly drama series. I slowly worked my way up the ladder in the industry over a few years.

There’s a lot to admire about how film and television content is produced. A crew of over one hundred people with creative and technical talents come together to create a piece of entertainment, under the watchful eye of the director. It’s an enormous piece of creative collaboration, but it’s also a business. Everyone does their part to make it happen. It’s incredible to see a show get made.

I had found a niche in the television industry that I did well in, but eventually I hit a rut. I had a small role in a big piece of work. I wanted to be more creative, and to have more autonomy and influence over what I was helping to create. It was at that time that I started closely following what makers were doing.

Feeling inspired by the work of others, I started to make things with microcontrollers and electronics. I’d then share information on how to recreate these projects online. Eventually, I was contributing projects to Make: magazine and I was soon able to make money from making things for companies, writing about how to make, and writing about what others were making. Soon enough, I was in a position to leave the television industry and work as a maker full-time.

That eventually led to my current job, doing outreach for Raspberry Pi in the United States. It’s incredibly gratifying work and despite the long road to get here, I couldn’t be happier with what I’m doing. The spare time I invested in making things as a hobby has paid off greatly in a new career that gives me creative freedom and a much more interesting work day.

Matt meets maker Gerald Burkett at World Maker Faire New York 2016.

Matt meets maker Gerald Burkett at World Maker Faire New York 2016.

Make it happen

I meet people all the time who have stories about how making has had an impact on their lives. At World Maker Faire New York recently, I met student Gerald Burkett, who told me his story of becoming a maker. He said, “I’m doing things I wouldn’t have ever dreamed of just four years ago, and it’s changed my life for the better.” And Gerald is having an impact on others as well. Even though he will be graduating soon, he’s encouraging the school’s administration to foster makers in the student body. He says that they “deserve an inviting environment where creativity is encouraged, and access to tools and supplies they couldn’t otherwise obtain in order to prototype and invent.”

Because of more accessible technology like the Raspberry Pi and freely available online resources, it’s easier than ever to make the things that you want to see in the world. Whether you are a student or you are far down a particular career path, it’s easier than ever to explore making as a passion and, potentially, also a livelihood.

If you’re reading this and you feel like you’re stuck in a rut with your job, I understand that feeling and encourage you to pursue making with vigour. There’s a good chance that what you make can change your life. It worked for me.

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Essential reading: The MagPi’s new coding books are out now

Post Syndicated from Russell Barnes original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/essential-reading-magpis-new-coding-books-now/

We did a bit of a count recently and it turns out that The MagPi magazine has produced more than 3,200 pages of Raspberry Pi-related reading. That’s a lot of quality content (even if I do say so myself).

While we’re rather proud of this achievement, we’re also very aware of the fact that these lovingly crafted collections of words and pictures can very easily get lost in the mists of time (or in the recycling bin).

EssentialsPi

The first four MagPi Essentials books taught us how to use the command line, make games, experiment with the Sense HAT, and even code music with Sonic Pi

So, in 2015, we set out to make sure all the essential reading from the magazine wasn’t consigned to a dusty and dog-eared pile under the coffee table. Enter the MagPi Essentials range! They’re bite-sized books that build on the best articles in the magazine and mould them into a cohesive, easily digested form.

We’ve recently been hard at work putting the finishing touches on the latest batch, and I’m excited to report that the fifth to eighth books are out in hard copy now! We’ll spare you the minute details on each title in the series here, but I’ve hijacked the ‘You might also like’ doohickey on the right so you can read up on each book individually.

new-books_small

Shiny new books! Well, the cover’s actually a matt laminate… Learn to code with Scratch, hack and make with Minecraft, do electronics using GPIO Zero, and program with C in our latest range.

Want them? Point your mouse fingers towards The Pi Hut or Amazon. You can even grab them directly from The MagPi’s own little lemonade stand if you want. Like everything else Raspberry Pi, they’re also super-affordable: £2.99 on our Apple and Android apps, or £3.99 in print. Not sure you can afford them all? You can also download each book as a free PDF too: just click on the appropriate link in our catalogue.

All eight Essentials books, but we're already hard at work on the next ones…

All of these books are available now. Have a read while we crack on with making the next ones…

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Build a remote control robot with The MagPi 51

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-remote-control-robot-magpi-51/

Hi, Rob from The MagPi here! Issue 51 is out and just in case you weren’t sold on it already, here’s a little something to tempt you.

issue51-issue-cover

Brian Corteil, writer of the feature, has christened this robot ‘Tiny’

Over the past few years, Raspberry Pi robotics has really come into its own, taking strides to make building robots just that little bit more fun and accessible. This month in The MagPi, we’ve decided to take all these advances and use them to create an incredible little robot.

We’ll guide you through the process of making your robot while also giving you top advice on other methods for robot construction, in case you feel the spark of inspiration once the build is over. It’s not just robots we’re building this issue though. We have some amazing tutorials on the following:

  • Building an underwater camera
  • Finishing up our RaspCade arcade cabinet build
  • A guide to NOOBS for beginners
  • Using WiFi signals as a people detector

There’s lots more to enjoy, including reviews, columns, and a series of spooky and simple Halloween projects.

You can get hold of the latest issue in stores now from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. Alternatively you can grab an issue online or get it digitally via our app on Android and iOS. There’s even a free PDF of it as well! You’re spoilt for choice…

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and get a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, together with a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 51.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy the issue!

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Fix Dirty COW on the Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/fix-dirty-cow-raspberry-pi/

Hi gang, Rob from The MagPi here. We have a new issue out on Thursday but before that, here comes a PSA.

You may have seen the news recently about a bug in the Linux kernel called Dirty COW – it’s a vulnerability that affects the ‘copy-on-write’ mechanism in Linux, which is also known as COW. This bug can be used to gain full control over a device running a version of Linux, including Android phones, web servers, and even the Raspberry Pi.

We're not sure why a bug got a logo but we're running with it

We’re not sure why a bug got a logo but we’re running with it

You don’t need to worry though, as a patch for Raspbian Jessie to fix Dirty COW has already been released, and you can get it right now. Open up a terminal window and type the following:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install raspberrypi-kernel

Once the install is done, make sure to reboot your Raspberry Pi and you’ll be Dirty COW-free!

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Inspiring educators with a special MagPi!

Post Syndicated from Carrie Anne Philbin original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/inspiring-educators-special-magpi/

If there’s one thing we’re passionate about here at the Raspberry Pi Foundation, it’s sharing our community’s passion for making with technology. Back in January, the Education team exhibited at the Bett Show with a special Educator’s Edition of our fabulous magazine, The MagPi. The goal was to share our projects and programmes with educators who could join our increasing community of digital makers. Like all our publications, a downloadable PDF was made available on our website; this was good thinking, as the magazine proved to be very popular and we ran out of copies soon after the show.

Exhibiting a the Bett Show 2016

Exhibiting at the Bett Show 2016 with the special Educator’s Edition of The MagPi

This year, we’ve been working hard to improve the support we provide to our Raspberry Pi Certified Educators when they take their first steps post-Picademy, and begin to share their new skills with their students or faculty on their own. In the past, we’ve provided printable versions of our resources or handed out copies of The MagPi. Instead of providing these separately, we thought it would be fun to bundle them together for all to access.

Digital making educators getting hands on with their builds at Picademy

Educators getting hands-on with their builds at Picademy

Thanks to the support of our colleagues in the MagPi team, we’ve been able to bring you a new and improved special edition of The MagPi: it’s aimed at educators and is packed full of new content, including tutorials and guides, for use in schools and clubs. You can download a free PDF of the second issue of the special Educator’s Edition right now. If you want a printed copy, then you’ll need to seek us out at events or attend a Picademy in the UK and US whilst we have them in stock!

Warning: contains inspiration!

Warning: contains inspiration!

Contents include:

  • The digital making revolution in education: how the maker movement has been taking the classroom by storm!
  • A case study: creative computing at Eastwood Academy
  • How to start a Code Club in your school
  • Physical computing tutorials with Python and Scratch
  • Teaching computing with Minecraft
  • Blinky lights, cameras, micro:bits, and motor tutorials
  • Sonic Pi live coding
  • What’s next for Astro Pi?
  • News about Raspberry Pi in education

Blinky lights tutorial page from MagPi

Case study page from MagPi about Eastwood Academy

The MagPi Educator’s Edition is freely licensed under Creative Commons (BY-SA-NC 3.0).

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The Impact of Ten Million

Post Syndicated from Matt Richardson original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-impact-of-ten-million/

This column is from The MagPi issue 50. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free, or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

Babbage Bear lies spreadeagled on a heap of Raspberry Pis

Last month, the Raspberry Pi Foundation hit a major milestone by selling its ten millionth computer. Besides taking the opportunity to celebrate – and celebrate we did – it’s also a good time to reflect on the impact that the device has had over the last four and a half years. As you may know already, we don’t just make an ultra-affordable computer. Our mission is to put the power of digital making into the hands of people all over the world; the Raspberry Pi computer helps us do that.

There are many ways in which the Raspberry Pi has a positive impact on the world. It’s used in classrooms, libraries, hackspaces, research laboratories, and within the industrial environment. People of all ages use Raspberry Pi, in these contexts and others, to learn about computing and to create things with computers that we never could have imagined.

But I believe the biggest impact we’ve had was to encourage more people to experiment with computers once again. It used to be that in order to use a computer, you had to have fairly good knowledge of how it worked, and often you needed to know how to program it. Since then, computers have become much more mainstream and consumer-friendly. On the one hand, that change has had an incredible impact on our society, giving more people access to the power of computing and the internet. However, there was a trade-off. In order to make computers easier to use, they also became less ‘tinker-friendly’.

When I was a kid in the 1980s, our family had an old IBM PC in our basement, that was decommissioned from my father’s workplace. On that computer, I learned how to use the DOS prompt to work with files, I created my own menu system out of batch files, and most importantly, I learned my first ever programming language: BASIC.

I feel very lucky that I had access to that computer. That kind of early exposure had such a huge impact on my life. For years I continued to learn programming, both in school and in my own time. Even though I’ve benefited greatly from the mainstream, consumer-friendly technology that has since become available, I still use and build upon the skills that I learned as a kid on that IBM PC. Programming languages and hardware have changed a lot, but the fundamental concepts of computing have remained mostly the same.

The Next Generation

I expect that the Raspberry Pi has a very similar impact on young people today. For them, it fills the void that was left when computers became less like programmable machines and more like consumer products. I suspect that, just like with me, this impact will linger for years to come as these young people grow up and enter a workforce that’s increasingly dependent on their digital skills. And if even just a tiny bit of interest in computing is the spark, then I believe that a tinker-friendly computer like Raspberry Pi is the kindling.

Here’s where that ten million number comes into play. Admittedly, not everyone who is exposed to a Raspberry Pi will be affected by it. But even if you guess conservatively that only a small fraction of all the Raspberry Pis out in the world serve to inspire a young person, it still adds up to an incredible impact on many lives; not just right now, but for many years to come. It’s quite possible that many of tomorrow’s computer scientists and technology specialists are experimenting with a few of the first ten million Raspberry Pis right now.

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Learn C in our brand new MagPi Essentials book!

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/learn-c-in-our-brand-new-magpi-essentials-book/

Rob from The MagPi here again! As I’m sure you’ve noticed, Python is the preferred programming language around these parts. It’s powerful, it’s easy to read, and it’s excellent for teaching coding in general. It isn’t the only language in the world though. We’re happy to reveal that our latest Essentials book will help you learn one of these other languages: C.

4718_essentials-08-code-with-c-cover

Our handy guide to learning C, out now!

If you’ve read the magazine for a while, you’ll have seen pieces on Processing and Node-RED in there. We’ve also been running an ongoing series teaching you C. If getting your learning fix in monthly instalments is too slow for you, though, then Learn to Code with C from the author of that series, Raspberry Pi’s Simon Long, should be just the ticket.

It’s a substantial book, packed with solid, non-gimmicky information. You’ll learn the basics of using C: working with variables, using loops, creating functions and arrays, having user input, controlling your code flow, and much more. You should come away from the book bursting with top-notch knowledge, ready to hack the planet.

Learn to Code with C is available right this instant from our app (which has recently had an overhaul); you can find it on Google Play and the App Store. You can also get the free PDF as usual. I know we’ve been saying that the new range of books will be available in print soon for a while now, but this time we mean really soon. Keep an eye out for future updates.

Any thoughts on the book to close us out, Captain?

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Celebrating our community!

Post Syndicated from Ben Nuttall original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/celebrating-our-community/

Last month, we celebrated the milestone of ten million Raspberry Pi computers sold to date. That’s quite extraordinary, and we’re thrilled to have reached so many people, not just through selling computers, but through our educational programmes and outreach activities. Our successes come in no small part from the support of our wonderful community, and we’d like to take this opportunity to thank you all for the great work that you do to further our mission to put the power of digital making in the hands of people around the world.

Astro Pi winner Hannah Belshaw

Astro Pi winner Hannah Belshaw

One of the things I love most about our community is the mix of people from different backgrounds. When Jams started to appear in mid-2012, all sorts of people came together to learn with Raspberry Pi: hardware hackers, software developers, electronic engineers, teachers, kids, parents, and grandparents.

It’s our great privilege to have the Duke of York as Patron of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and we benefit enormously from his support. On Wednesday evening, he kindly hosted an event at St. James’s Palace to celebrate the Raspberry Pi community. We couldn’t invite everybody we wanted to be there, but we were lucky enough to be able to share the evening with 150 community members.

When we launched the first Raspberry Pi computer four-and-a-half years ago, we had very modest goals. Our founders wanted to inspire more young people to go to university to study computer science. Today, our reach is far greater, and we’re touching the lives of people of all ages in communities around the world.

img_7654
img_7479
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It’s amazing to reflect on how far we’ve come in such a short space of time: not only are we now the best-selling British computer in history, but we’ve made a real impact in education by making programmable computers affordable, training teachers, and providing free learning resources. Tens of thousands of young people have taken part in our educational programmes and competitions. Astro Pi, our very own space mission, has seen young people from the UK design experiments and apps that have run on Raspberry Pi computers on the International Space Station; this marvellous feat will continue with our newly announced European-wide competition.

Maria, Clare and Rik

Maria, Clare and Rik

Everybody in the community contributes in a different way. Whether they help run Raspberry Jams, CoderDojos or Code Clubs, write tutorials and lesson plans, share their projects on GitHub and social media, or create open-source software libraries, it all helps us reach more people. It’s amazing how something an individual can do, no matter how small it seems, can make such a big difference. I followed the Raspberry Pi blog through 2011 and bought a Pi on launch day. If you’d have told me that 5 years later my Python library would be in Eben’s top 5 software projects in The MagPi, I’d never have believed you!

I ran a workshop for Jam organisers last weekend, and at the start of the day I asked everyone why they run their Raspberry Jams. The responses really sum up how amazing our community is:

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Thank you from all of us at the Foundation to everyone participating in activities which help us to extend the opportunity to learn computing and digital making to millions of people around the world. You really are making a big difference, and we’re incredibly grateful to have you all as part of our community.

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