Tag Archives: The MagPi

Making life changes

Post Syndicated from Matt Richardson original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/making-life-changes/

This column is from The MagPi issue 51. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free, or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

Making things can change your life. It did for me, and I hear the same from others all the time.

After I graduated from university in 2003, I jumped immediately into the workforce. I landed in New York City’s entertainment industry, which is where I’d dreamed of working since I was young. I was excited to be a staffer on a major television show, where I learned what it takes to produce a weekly drama series. I slowly worked my way up the ladder in the industry over a few years.

There’s a lot to admire about how film and television content is produced. A crew of over one hundred people with creative and technical talents come together to create a piece of entertainment, under the watchful eye of the director. It’s an enormous piece of creative collaboration, but it’s also a business. Everyone does their part to make it happen. It’s incredible to see a show get made.

I had found a niche in the television industry that I did well in, but eventually I hit a rut. I had a small role in a big piece of work. I wanted to be more creative, and to have more autonomy and influence over what I was helping to create. It was at that time that I started closely following what makers were doing.

Feeling inspired by the work of others, I started to make things with microcontrollers and electronics. I’d then share information on how to recreate these projects online. Eventually, I was contributing projects to Make: magazine and I was soon able to make money from making things for companies, writing about how to make, and writing about what others were making. Soon enough, I was in a position to leave the television industry and work as a maker full-time.

That eventually led to my current job, doing outreach for Raspberry Pi in the United States. It’s incredibly gratifying work and despite the long road to get here, I couldn’t be happier with what I’m doing. The spare time I invested in making things as a hobby has paid off greatly in a new career that gives me creative freedom and a much more interesting work day.

Matt meets maker Gerald Burkett at World Maker Faire New York 2016.

Matt meets maker Gerald Burkett at World Maker Faire New York 2016.

Make it happen

I meet people all the time who have stories about how making has had an impact on their lives. At World Maker Faire New York recently, I met student Gerald Burkett, who told me his story of becoming a maker. He said, “I’m doing things I wouldn’t have ever dreamed of just four years ago, and it’s changed my life for the better.” And Gerald is having an impact on others as well. Even though he will be graduating soon, he’s encouraging the school’s administration to foster makers in the student body. He says that they “deserve an inviting environment where creativity is encouraged, and access to tools and supplies they couldn’t otherwise obtain in order to prototype and invent.”

Because of more accessible technology like the Raspberry Pi and freely available online resources, it’s easier than ever to make the things that you want to see in the world. Whether you are a student or you are far down a particular career path, it’s easier than ever to explore making as a passion and, potentially, also a livelihood.

If you’re reading this and you feel like you’re stuck in a rut with your job, I understand that feeling and encourage you to pursue making with vigour. There’s a good chance that what you make can change your life. It worked for me.

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Essential reading: The MagPi’s new coding books are out now

Post Syndicated from Russell Barnes original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/essential-reading-magpis-new-coding-books-now/

We did a bit of a count recently and it turns out that The MagPi magazine has produced more than 3,200 pages of Raspberry Pi-related reading. That’s a lot of quality content (even if I do say so myself).

While we’re rather proud of this achievement, we’re also very aware of the fact that these lovingly crafted collections of words and pictures can very easily get lost in the mists of time (or in the recycling bin).

EssentialsPi

The first four MagPi Essentials books taught us how to use the command line, make games, experiment with the Sense HAT, and even code music with Sonic Pi

So, in 2015, we set out to make sure all the essential reading from the magazine wasn’t consigned to a dusty and dog-eared pile under the coffee table. Enter the MagPi Essentials range! They’re bite-sized books that build on the best articles in the magazine and mould them into a cohesive, easily digested form.

We’ve recently been hard at work putting the finishing touches on the latest batch, and I’m excited to report that the fifth to eighth books are out in hard copy now! We’ll spare you the minute details on each title in the series here, but I’ve hijacked the ‘You might also like’ doohickey on the right so you can read up on each book individually.

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Shiny new books! Well, the cover’s actually a matt laminate… Learn to code with Scratch, hack and make with Minecraft, do electronics using GPIO Zero, and program with C in our latest range.

Want them? Point your mouse fingers towards The Pi Hut or Amazon. You can even grab them directly from The MagPi’s own little lemonade stand if you want. Like everything else Raspberry Pi, they’re also super-affordable: £2.99 on our Apple and Android apps, or £3.99 in print. Not sure you can afford them all? You can also download each book as a free PDF too: just click on the appropriate link in our catalogue.

All eight Essentials books, but we're already hard at work on the next ones…

All of these books are available now. Have a read while we crack on with making the next ones…

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Build a remote control robot with The MagPi 51

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-remote-control-robot-magpi-51/

Hi, Rob from The MagPi here! Issue 51 is out and just in case you weren’t sold on it already, here’s a little something to tempt you.

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Brian Corteil, writer of the feature, has christened this robot ‘Tiny’

Over the past few years, Raspberry Pi robotics has really come into its own, taking strides to make building robots just that little bit more fun and accessible. This month in The MagPi, we’ve decided to take all these advances and use them to create an incredible little robot.

We’ll guide you through the process of making your robot while also giving you top advice on other methods for robot construction, in case you feel the spark of inspiration once the build is over. It’s not just robots we’re building this issue though. We have some amazing tutorials on the following:

  • Building an underwater camera
  • Finishing up our RaspCade arcade cabinet build
  • A guide to NOOBS for beginners
  • Using WiFi signals as a people detector

There’s lots more to enjoy, including reviews, columns, and a series of spooky and simple Halloween projects.

You can get hold of the latest issue in stores now from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. Alternatively you can grab an issue online or get it digitally via our app on Android and iOS. There’s even a free PDF of it as well! You’re spoilt for choice…

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and get a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, together with a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 51.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy the issue!

The post Build a remote control robot with The MagPi 51 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Fix Dirty COW on the Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/fix-dirty-cow-raspberry-pi/

Hi gang, Rob from The MagPi here. We have a new issue out on Thursday but before that, here comes a PSA.

You may have seen the news recently about a bug in the Linux kernel called Dirty COW – it’s a vulnerability that affects the ‘copy-on-write’ mechanism in Linux, which is also known as COW. This bug can be used to gain full control over a device running a version of Linux, including Android phones, web servers, and even the Raspberry Pi.

We're not sure why a bug got a logo but we're running with it

We’re not sure why a bug got a logo but we’re running with it

You don’t need to worry though, as a patch for Raspbian Jessie to fix Dirty COW has already been released, and you can get it right now. Open up a terminal window and type the following:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install raspberrypi-kernel

Once the install is done, make sure to reboot your Raspberry Pi and you’ll be Dirty COW-free!

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Inspiring educators with a special MagPi!

Post Syndicated from Carrie Anne Philbin original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/inspiring-educators-special-magpi/

If there’s one thing we’re passionate about here at the Raspberry Pi Foundation, it’s sharing our community’s passion for making with technology. Back in January, the Education team exhibited at the Bett Show with a special Educator’s Edition of our fabulous magazine, The MagPi. The goal was to share our projects and programmes with educators who could join our increasing community of digital makers. Like all our publications, a downloadable PDF was made available on our website; this was good thinking, as the magazine proved to be very popular and we ran out of copies soon after the show.

Exhibiting a the Bett Show 2016

Exhibiting at the Bett Show 2016 with the special Educator’s Edition of The MagPi

This year, we’ve been working hard to improve the support we provide to our Raspberry Pi Certified Educators when they take their first steps post-Picademy, and begin to share their new skills with their students or faculty on their own. In the past, we’ve provided printable versions of our resources or handed out copies of The MagPi. Instead of providing these separately, we thought it would be fun to bundle them together for all to access.

Digital making educators getting hands on with their builds at Picademy

Educators getting hands-on with their builds at Picademy

Thanks to the support of our colleagues in the MagPi team, we’ve been able to bring you a new and improved special edition of The MagPi: it’s aimed at educators and is packed full of new content, including tutorials and guides, for use in schools and clubs. You can download a free PDF of the second issue of the special Educator’s Edition right now. If you want a printed copy, then you’ll need to seek us out at events or attend a Picademy in the UK and US whilst we have them in stock!

Warning: contains inspiration!

Warning: contains inspiration!

Contents include:

  • The digital making revolution in education: how the maker movement has been taking the classroom by storm!
  • A case study: creative computing at Eastwood Academy
  • How to start a Code Club in your school
  • Physical computing tutorials with Python and Scratch
  • Teaching computing with Minecraft
  • Blinky lights, cameras, micro:bits, and motor tutorials
  • Sonic Pi live coding
  • What’s next for Astro Pi?
  • News about Raspberry Pi in education

Blinky lights tutorial page from MagPi

Case study page from MagPi about Eastwood Academy

The MagPi Educator’s Edition is freely licensed under Creative Commons (BY-SA-NC 3.0).

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The Impact of Ten Million

Post Syndicated from Matt Richardson original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-impact-of-ten-million/

This column is from The MagPi issue 50. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free, or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

Babbage Bear lies spreadeagled on a heap of Raspberry Pis

Last month, the Raspberry Pi Foundation hit a major milestone by selling its ten millionth computer. Besides taking the opportunity to celebrate – and celebrate we did – it’s also a good time to reflect on the impact that the device has had over the last four and a half years. As you may know already, we don’t just make an ultra-affordable computer. Our mission is to put the power of digital making into the hands of people all over the world; the Raspberry Pi computer helps us do that.

There are many ways in which the Raspberry Pi has a positive impact on the world. It’s used in classrooms, libraries, hackspaces, research laboratories, and within the industrial environment. People of all ages use Raspberry Pi, in these contexts and others, to learn about computing and to create things with computers that we never could have imagined.

But I believe the biggest impact we’ve had was to encourage more people to experiment with computers once again. It used to be that in order to use a computer, you had to have fairly good knowledge of how it worked, and often you needed to know how to program it. Since then, computers have become much more mainstream and consumer-friendly. On the one hand, that change has had an incredible impact on our society, giving more people access to the power of computing and the internet. However, there was a trade-off. In order to make computers easier to use, they also became less ‘tinker-friendly’.

When I was a kid in the 1980s, our family had an old IBM PC in our basement, that was decommissioned from my father’s workplace. On that computer, I learned how to use the DOS prompt to work with files, I created my own menu system out of batch files, and most importantly, I learned my first ever programming language: BASIC.

I feel very lucky that I had access to that computer. That kind of early exposure had such a huge impact on my life. For years I continued to learn programming, both in school and in my own time. Even though I’ve benefited greatly from the mainstream, consumer-friendly technology that has since become available, I still use and build upon the skills that I learned as a kid on that IBM PC. Programming languages and hardware have changed a lot, but the fundamental concepts of computing have remained mostly the same.

The Next Generation

I expect that the Raspberry Pi has a very similar impact on young people today. For them, it fills the void that was left when computers became less like programmable machines and more like consumer products. I suspect that, just like with me, this impact will linger for years to come as these young people grow up and enter a workforce that’s increasingly dependent on their digital skills. And if even just a tiny bit of interest in computing is the spark, then I believe that a tinker-friendly computer like Raspberry Pi is the kindling.

Here’s where that ten million number comes into play. Admittedly, not everyone who is exposed to a Raspberry Pi will be affected by it. But even if you guess conservatively that only a small fraction of all the Raspberry Pis out in the world serve to inspire a young person, it still adds up to an incredible impact on many lives; not just right now, but for many years to come. It’s quite possible that many of tomorrow’s computer scientists and technology specialists are experimenting with a few of the first ten million Raspberry Pis right now.

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Learn C in our brand new MagPi Essentials book!

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/learn-c-in-our-brand-new-magpi-essentials-book/

Rob from The MagPi here again! As I’m sure you’ve noticed, Python is the preferred programming language around these parts. It’s powerful, it’s easy to read, and it’s excellent for teaching coding in general. It isn’t the only language in the world though. We’re happy to reveal that our latest Essentials book will help you learn one of these other languages: C.

4718_essentials-08-code-with-c-cover

Our handy guide to learning C, out now!

If you’ve read the magazine for a while, you’ll have seen pieces on Processing and Node-RED in there. We’ve also been running an ongoing series teaching you C. If getting your learning fix in monthly instalments is too slow for you, though, then Learn to Code with C from the author of that series, Raspberry Pi’s Simon Long, should be just the ticket.

It’s a substantial book, packed with solid, non-gimmicky information. You’ll learn the basics of using C: working with variables, using loops, creating functions and arrays, having user input, controlling your code flow, and much more. You should come away from the book bursting with top-notch knowledge, ready to hack the planet.

Learn to Code with C is available right this instant from our app (which has recently had an overhaul); you can find it on Google Play and the App Store. You can also get the free PDF as usual. I know we’ve been saying that the new range of books will be available in print soon for a while now, but this time we mean really soon. Keep an eye out for future updates.

Any thoughts on the book to close us out, Captain?

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Celebrating our community!

Post Syndicated from Ben Nuttall original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/celebrating-our-community/

Last month, we celebrated the milestone of ten million Raspberry Pi computers sold to date. That’s quite extraordinary, and we’re thrilled to have reached so many people, not just through selling computers, but through our educational programmes and outreach activities. Our successes come in no small part from the support of our wonderful community, and we’d like to take this opportunity to thank you all for the great work that you do to further our mission to put the power of digital making in the hands of people around the world.

Astro Pi winner Hannah Belshaw

Astro Pi winner Hannah Belshaw

One of the things I love most about our community is the mix of people from different backgrounds. When Jams started to appear in mid-2012, all sorts of people came together to learn with Raspberry Pi: hardware hackers, software developers, electronic engineers, teachers, kids, parents, and grandparents.

It’s our great privilege to have the Duke of York as Patron of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and we benefit enormously from his support. On Wednesday evening, he kindly hosted an event at St. James’s Palace to celebrate the Raspberry Pi community. We couldn’t invite everybody we wanted to be there, but we were lucky enough to be able to share the evening with 150 community members.

When we launched the first Raspberry Pi computer four-and-a-half years ago, we had very modest goals. Our founders wanted to inspire more young people to go to university to study computer science. Today, our reach is far greater, and we’re touching the lives of people of all ages in communities around the world.

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It’s amazing to reflect on how far we’ve come in such a short space of time: not only are we now the best-selling British computer in history, but we’ve made a real impact in education by making programmable computers affordable, training teachers, and providing free learning resources. Tens of thousands of young people have taken part in our educational programmes and competitions. Astro Pi, our very own space mission, has seen young people from the UK design experiments and apps that have run on Raspberry Pi computers on the International Space Station; this marvellous feat will continue with our newly announced European-wide competition.

Maria, Clare and Rik

Maria, Clare and Rik

Everybody in the community contributes in a different way. Whether they help run Raspberry Jams, CoderDojos or Code Clubs, write tutorials and lesson plans, share their projects on GitHub and social media, or create open-source software libraries, it all helps us reach more people. It’s amazing how something an individual can do, no matter how small it seems, can make such a big difference. I followed the Raspberry Pi blog through 2011 and bought a Pi on launch day. If you’d have told me that 5 years later my Python library would be in Eben’s top 5 software projects in The MagPi, I’d never have believed you!

I ran a workshop for Jam organisers last weekend, and at the start of the day I asked everyone why they run their Raspberry Jams. The responses really sum up how amazing our community is:

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Thank you from all of us at the Foundation to everyone participating in activities which help us to extend the opportunity to learn computing and digital making to millions of people around the world. You really are making a big difference, and we’re incredibly grateful to have you all as part of our community.

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The 50 greatest Pi projects ever in The MagPi 50

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/50-greatest-pi-projects-ever-magpi-50/

Rob from The MagPi here! We’re absolutely thrilled finally to be able to share with you The MagPi 50, our landmark issue with a super special feature on the 50 greatest Raspberry Pi projects of all time, the top 20 of which were voted on by you, the Raspberry Pi community.

The MagPi magazine issue 50: silver text on the cover reads "50 greatest Raspberry Pi projects"

The MagPi 50, out right this instant

As well as the thousands who voted, we had a panel of judges choosing the best projects in a few special categories. Eben Upton, the man behind Raspberry Pi, gave us his picks of software projects. Philip Colligan, CEO of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, carefully selected some incredible humanitarian projects. Liz Upton, Director of Communications/my boss, made some tough decisions in the young makers category. Finally, Michael Horne and Tim Richardson of CamJam and Pi Wars fame presided over the Pi robots.

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Hopefully your favourite project made its way into the top 50! It was a hard task whittling it down to this number, and to be perfectly honest we could probably feature another 50 projects next month that are equally good. The Raspberry Pi community has done some incredible things over the last four years and change, and I’m immensely proud that we can share some of the outstanding work you folk have done in this issue.

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But wait, there’s more! As well as our big community celebration, we also have our usual selection of excellent tutorials, news, and reviews. If the reveal of USB and Ethernet booting on Pi 3 piqued your interest a few weeks ago, we have a full eight-page guide on how you can do that yourself. We cover the #10MillionPi event at the Houses of Parliament in the news, along with some wonderful Raspberry Pi-powered tech that’s being used in the health industry.

Also, here’s Mike’s dancing skeleton from the Pi Bakery, in plenty of time for you to get your own spooky version ready for Halloween. We love it.

Danse Macabre

Danse Macabre or Skeleton Dance is a project in the MagPi Magazine No.50 October 2016. It uses the spectrum board from The MagPi No. 46 June 2016 ( https://vimeo.com/167914646 ) , to make one to three skeletons dance to music.

You can grab The MagPi 50 in stores today: it’s in WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda in the UK, and it will be in Micro Center and selected Barnes & Noble stores when it comes to America. You can also buy the print edition online from our store, and it’s available digitally on our Android and iOS app.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and get a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 50.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy this issue. We’re off for a cup of tea. See you soon!

The post The 50 greatest Pi projects ever in The MagPi 50 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Beyond the bookcase

Post Syndicated from Matt Richardson original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/beyond-the-bookcase/

This column is from The MagPi issue 49. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

Seattle Central Library (photo by Bobak Ha'Eri)

Seattle Central Library (photo by Bobak Ha’Eri)

Before I became a part of the maker movement, my impression of a library was mostly formed by my childhood experiences there. Both my school and local public library were places for books, magazines, newspapers, and research. In short, it was a place for quiet reading. Libraries today look and sound a lot different than I remember. Many now include makerspaces, tools for connected learning, and spaces for community gathering.

But if you take a closer look at what these institutions set out to accomplish in the first place, then the reason they’ve transformed becomes clear. Take, for instance, the mission of the Seattle Public Library, which is to “[bring] people, information, and ideas together to enrich lives and build community.” The mission of the library isn’t directly related to reading, even though reading can be a big part of achieving that mission.

A few years ago, I had the opportunity to visit the central branch of the Seattle Public Library. The fifth floor is called ‘The Mixing Chamber’ and is a designated location where people, information, and ideas can come together. Of course, there’s plenty of material to read at the main branch of the Seattle Public Library, but this building in particular makes it very clear that they’re about more than just reading.

As another indication of this, we see a lot of interest in Raspberry Pi from librarians. A group of us recently visited the annual conference of the American Library Association in Orlando, and the reaction to our presence there was incredibly positive. Not only have many librarians heard of Raspberry Pi, but they also use it in so many ways.

Of course, library makerspaces use Raspberry Pi just like any other makerspace would: as a platform for DIY projects. There are even many libraries that create Raspberry Pi checkout kits so that their patrons can experiment with Raspberry Pi in their own time, either in the library or at home.

And just as Raspberry Pi is used in the classroom to learn about computing, it’s also being used in the library for the very same reason. We’ve had many librarians come to our Picademy educator professional development programme to learn about teaching people with digital making and computing. These librarians have gone on to share their knowledge and our learning resources with their patrons. Librarians especially love that our content, including The MagPi, is available online entirely for free, and is Creative Commons licensed.

Multitasking

What I particularly like about the librarians I’ve encountered is that they don’t just put Raspberry Pi in the hands of their patrons, but they use our computers as a tool for their own work. For instance, I recently met Richard Loomis from the Somerset County Library System in New Jersey. He uses Raspberry Pis for networked digital signage across a few different branches. And John Jakobsen from the Palos Verdes Library District recently shared how he set up Raspberry Pis as terminals for their public access catalogue, replacing old and expensive computers. So librarians don’t just talk the talk: they also walk the walk.

I’m optimistic that libraries will continue to thrive as technology changes. At the Raspberry Pi Foundation, we’re delighted to see that libraries all over the world use our computers for digital making, education, and utility. Our organisation’s connection with libraries will always be rich and meaningful, not only because of the way they use Raspberry Pi, but because we have something critical in common with them: we deeply value accessibility and community.

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Hallo Deutschland! The MagPi magazine has arrived in Germany

Post Syndicated from Russell Barnes original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hallo-deutschland-magpi-magazine-arrived-germany/

It gives me great pleasure to announce that The MagPi, the official Raspberry Pi magazine, is now available – fully translated and localised – in Germany, thanks to a collaboration with our friends at CHIP.

The cover of the first issue of the German version of the MagPi magazine, "das offizielle Raspberry Pi Magazin"

Germany was one of the first places outside the UK to take an interest in Raspberry Pi, so it’s quite fitting that it’s our first license. Eben Upton tells us more:

Germany is our third largest market so it seems natural that, after only 18 months, Germany should be the first country to get a localised version of The MagPi.

On a personal note, it’s particularly satisfying for me to see the MagPi launch in Germany, because as a child I used to import German Commodore Amiga magazines, which had so much more technical detail than their UK equivalents. The style of the MagPi is very reminiscent of these magazines: I hope that we’re in some sense “returning the favour,” and that German children of all ages (from 8-80) will be inspired to create exciting projects with Raspberry Pi and share them with the world.

The first issue is out right now everywhere you’d expect a cutting-edge technology magazine to be, not to mention available direct from CHIP’s online store.

Like the UK magazine, das offizielle Raspberry Pi Magazin features 100 pages of glossy Raspberry Pi goodness, but unlike its UK language counterpart it’s currently scheduled to run bi-monthly, so the next issue will be arriving on 2 November.

The magazine is available now for €9.95 in print or €6.50 on digital devices, and you can pick up a subscription for €54.80. Subscribers will also receive the same amazing free gift – a Raspberry Pi Zero and full cable bundle (including the camera ribbon cable). The free PDF edition will follow in 90 days.

A two-page spread from the magazine featuring photographs and text: "LEBENDIGE LEGOSTADT"

A two-page spread from the magazine, featuring text and code snippets: "PROGRAMMIEREN IN C: ERSTE SCHRITTE"

A two-page spread from the magazine, featuring photos and text: "WILDLIFE-KAMERA"

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Begin your journey with Raspberry Pi in The MagPi 49

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/begin-your-journey-with-raspberry-pi-in-the-magpi-49/

We’ve all seen the numbers. The Raspberry Pi is selling faster and faster every year, which means there are new people getting Raspberry Pis every day. With this in mind, we decided to make a brand new beginner’s guide in issue 49 of The MagPi, out now.

Get started with Raspberry Pi with The MagPi 49!

Get started with Raspberry Pi with The MagPi 49!

The Raspberry Pi beginner’s guide takes you from selecting your Raspberry Pi all the way through setting it up and getting to know the Raspbian OS that powers it. We’re also using it to jump-start a beginner’s tutorial that will be a monthly feature in The MagPi from now on.

#49 Apollo Pi

Set your Pi up so it can take you to the moon! (Moon rocket not included)

As well as the cover feature, we also have a feature on the recently released Apollo 11 source code and how you can emulate a virtual Apollo computer on your Raspberry Pi, along with some historical factoids about making and programming a computer to take people to the moon. There’s also our usual range of amazing tutorials, projects, and product reviews for you to read about as well, including Mike Cook’s rhythmic gymnastics project in the Pi Bakery.

Rhythmic Gymnastics Ribbons

Inspired by the Rio Olympics Gymnastic display of ribbon twirling. In the MagPi 49 – September 2016, https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/ twirl your own virtual ribbons.

You can grab the latest issue of The MagPi in stores today from WH Smith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda in the UK, and it will be in Micro Center and selected Barnes & Noble stores when it comes to America. It’s also available in print online from our store, and digitally on our Android and iOS app.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and start with issue 47 to get not only the Astro Pi poster and mission patch, but also a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 49.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

I also want to remind you that we’re running a poll to find out what you, the community, think are the top 20 Raspberry Pi projects to be included in our 50th issue spectacular. Get voting!

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The post Begin your journey with Raspberry Pi in The MagPi 49 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Vote for the top 20 Raspberry Pi projects in The MagPi!

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/vote-top-20-raspberry-pi-projects-magpi/

Although this Thursday will see the release of issue 49 of The MagPi, we’re already hard at work putting together our 50th issue spectacular. As part of this issue we’re going to be covering 50 of the best Raspberry Pi projects ever and we want you, the community, to vote for the top 20.

Below we have listed the 30 projects that we think represent the best of the best. All we ask is that you vote for your favourite. We will have a few special categories with some other amazing projects in the final article, but if you think we’ve missed out something truly excellent, let us know in the comments. Here’s the list so you can remind yourselves of the projects, with the poll posted at the bottom.

From paper boats to hybrid sports cars

From paper boats to hybrid sports cars

  1. SeeMore – a huge sculpture of 256 Raspberry Pis connected as a cluster
  2. BeetBox – beets (vegetable) you can use to play sick beats (music)
  3. Voyage – 300 paper boats (actually polypropylene) span a river, and you control how they light up
  4. Aquarium – a huge aquarium with Pi-powered weather control simulating the environment of the Cayman Islands
  5. ramanPi – a Raman spectrometer used to identify different types of molecules
  6. Joytone – an electronic musical instrument operated by 72 back-lit joysticks
  7. Internet of LEGO – a city of LEGO, connected to and controlled by the internet
  8. McMaster Formula Hybrid – a Raspberry Pi provides telemetry on this hybrid racing car
  9. PiGRRL – Adafruit show us how to make an upgraded, 3D-printed Game Boy
  10. Magic Mirror – check out how you look while getting some at-a-glance info about your day
Dinosaurs, space, and modern art

Dinosaurs, space, and modern art

  1. 4bot – play a game of Connect 4 with a Raspberry Pi robot
  2. Blackgang Chine dinosaurs – these theme park attractions use the diminutive Pi to make them larger than life
  3. Sound Fighter – challenge your friend to the ultimate Street Fight, controlled by pianos
  4. Astro Pi – Raspberry Pis go to space with code written by school kids
  5. Pi in the Sky – Raspberry Pis go to near space and send back live images
  6. BrewPi – a microbrewery controlled by a micro-computer
  7. LED Mirror – a sci-fi effect comes to life as you’re represented on a wall of lights
  8. Raspberry Pi VCR – a retro VCR-player is turned into a pink media playing machine
  9. #OZWall – Contemporary art in the form of many TVs from throughout the ages
  10. #HiutMusic – you choose the music for a Welsh denim factory through Twitter
Robots and arcade machines make the cut

Robots and arcade machines make the cut

  1. CandyPi – control a jelly bean dispenser from your browser without the need to twist the dial
  2. Digital Zoetrope – still images rotated to create animation, updated for the 21st century
  3. LifeBox – create virtual life inside this box and watch it adapt and survive
  4. Coffee Table Pi – classy coffee table by name, arcade cabinet by nature. Tea and Pac-Man, anyone?
  5. Raspberry Pi Notebook – this handheld Raspberry Pi is many people’s dream machine
  6. Pip-Boy 3000A – turn life into a Bethesda RPG with this custom Pip-Boy
  7. Mason Jar Preserve – Mason jars are used to preserve things, so this one is a beautiful backup server to preserve your data
  8. Pi glass – Google Glass may be gone but you can still make your own amazing Raspberry Pi facsimile
  9. DoodleBorg – a powerful PiBorg robot that can tow a caravan
  10. BigHak – a Big Trak that is truly big: it’s large enough for you to ride in

Now you’ve refreshed your memory of all these amazing projects, it’s time to vote for the one you think is best!

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

The vote is running over the next two weeks, and the results will be in The MagPi 50. We’ll see you again on Thursday for the release of the excellent MagPi 49: don’t miss it!

The post Vote for the top 20 Raspberry Pi projects in The MagPi! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Software, the unsung hero

Post Syndicated from Matt Richardson original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/software-the-unsung-hero/

This column is from The MagPi issue 48. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.The MagPi 48

As Raspberry Pi enthusiasts, we tend to focus a lot on hardware. When a new or updated board is released, it garners a lot of attention and excitement. On one hand, that’s sensible because Raspberry Pi is a leader in pushing the boundaries of affordable hardware. On the other hand, it tends to overshadow the fact that strong software support makes an enormous contribution to Raspberry Pi’s success in education, hobby, and industrial markets.

Because of that, I want to take the opportunity this month to highlight how important software is for Raspberry Pi. Whether you’re using our computer as a desktop replacement, a project platform, or a learning tool, you depend on an enormous amount of software built on top of the hardware. From the foundation of the Linux kernel, all the way up to the graphical user interface of the application you’re using, you rely on the work of many people who have spent countless hours designing, developing, and testing software.

clean_desktop

The look and feel of the desktop environment in Raspbian serves as a good signal of the progress being made to the software made specifically for Raspberry Pi. I encourage you to compare the early versions of Raspbian’s desktop environment to what you get when you download Raspbian today. Many little tweaks are made with each release, and they’ve really built up to make a huge difference in the user experience.

Skin deep

And keep in mind that’s only considering the desktop interface of Raspbian. The improvements to the operating system under the hood go well beyond what you might notice on screen. For Raspberry Pi, there’s been updates for firmware, more functionality, and improved hardware drivers. All of this is in addition to the ongoing improvements to the Linux kernel for all supported platforms.

For those of us who are hobbyists, we have access to so many code libraries contributed by developers, so that we can create things easily with Raspberry Pi in a ton of different programming languages. As you probably know, the power of Raspberry Pi lies in its GPIO pins which make it perfect for physical computing projects, much like the ones you find in the pages of The MagPi. New Python libraries like GPIO Zero make it even easier than ever to explore physical computing. What used to take four lines of code is boiled down to just LED.blink(), for example.

etcher-500pxwide

Not all software that helps us was made to run on Raspberry Pi directly. Take, for instance, Etcher, a wonderful program from the team at Resin.io. Etcher is the easiest SD card flasher I have ever used, and takes a lot of guesswork out of flashing SD cards with Raspbian or any other operating system. Those of us who write tutorials are especially happy about this; since Etcher is cross-platform, you don’t need to have a separate set of instructions for people running Windows, Mac, and Linux. In addition, its well-designed graphical interface is a sight for sore eyes, especially for those of us who have been using command line tools for SD card flashing.

The list of amazing software that supports Raspberry Pi could go on for pages, but I only have limited space here. So I’ll leave you with my favourite point about Raspberry Pi’s strong software support. When you get a Raspberry Pi today and download Raspbian, you can rest assured that, because of the rapidly improving software support, it will only get better with age. You certainly can’t say that about everything you buy.

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Astro Pi: Mission Update 9 – Science Results

Post Syndicated from David Honess original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/astro-pi-mission-update-9-science-results/

Liz: Before we get down to business, we’ve a notice to share. Laura Clay, who is behind the scenes editing this blog, The MagPi and much more, is also a fiction writer; and she’s been chosen as one of 17 Emerging Writers by the Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature Trust. Each writer will be reading a short story at the Edinburgh International Book Festival, and it’s a great way to discover writers living and working in the city at the start of their careers. Laura will be reading her story Loch na Bèiste on Friday 26 August at 3pm in the Spiegeltent, and entry is free, so why not come along and support her? Warning: story may contain murderous kelpies.

Now that British ESA Astronaut Tim Peake is back on the ground it’s time for the final Astro Pi mission update: the summary of the experiment results from the International Space Station (ISS). We’ve been holding this back to give the winners some time to publish the results of their experiments themselves.

Back in 2015 we ran a competition where students could design and program computer science experiments, to be run by Tim Peake on specially cased Raspberry Pis called Astro Pis. Here’s the original competition video, voiced by Tim himself:

Astro Pi

This is “Astro Pi” by raspberrypi on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

The competition ran from January to July 2015 and produced seven winning experiments, which were launched into space a few days before Tim started his mission. Between February and April 2016, these experiments were run on board the ISS under Tim Peake’s supervision. They’re mostly based around the sensors found on the Sense HAT, but a few also employ the Raspberry Pi Camera Module. Head over to the Astro Pi website now to check out the results, released today!

You might also know that we ran an extension to this competition involving a couple of music-based challenges. These challenges have no scientific output to discuss, because they were part of a crew care package for Tim’s enjoyment, but you can get your hands on the winning code to turn the Astro Pis into MP3 players and Sonic Pi tunes.

One of the main things we’ve learnt from running Astro Pi is that the biggest motivational factor for young people is the very tangible goal of having their code run in space. This eclipses any physical prize we could offer. Many people see space as quite distant and abstract, but with Astro Pi you can actually get your hands on space-qualified hardware, create something that would work up in space, and become an active participant in the European space programme.

Many of the Astro Pi winners now express an interest in studying aerospace and computer science. They’ve gained exposure to the real-life process of scientific endeavour, and faced industrial software development challenges along the way. We hope that everyone who participated in Astro Pi has been positively influenced by the programme. The results also demonstrate that the payload works reliably in space. This has been noticed by ESA, who are now planning to use it during upcoming missions. It’s really important for us that the payload continues to be used to run your code in space, so we’re working hard with ESA to make sure that we can do Astro Pi all over again.

This project has been a huge collaborative effort from the start and the Raspberry Pi Foundation would like to thank everyone who has participated in the competitions, and the following companies who have contributed staff time, facilities, and funding to make it all happen: UK Space Agency, European Space Agency, BIOTESC, TLOGOS, Surrey Satellite Technology, Airbus Defence and Space, CGI Group, QinetiQ Space, UK Space Trade Association, ESERO UK, KTN Space, and Nesta. Of course, Tim Peake himself has been hugely supportive and enthusiastic about the project from the start.

British ESA Astronaut Tim Peake with the prototype Astro Pi

British ESA Astronaut Tim Peake with the prototype Astro Pi. Image credit ESA.

We would also like to thank Libby Jackson, who is the Astronaut Flight Education Programme Manager at the UK Space Agency and a former flight director at ESA. She oversees all of the Principia educational activities, including Astro Pi.

libby-jackson-uksa

Libby Jackson, UK Space Agency. Image credit Imperial College London.

During the interview for her job at the UK Space Agency a few years ago, she pitched an idea for running a project on the ISS involving Raspberry Pi computers. Instead of launching traditional physical equipment, the experiments would be in the form of computer software, meaning that many more experiments could be accommodated. That kernel of an idea is what eventually became Astro Pi.

iss046e042740

Izzy deployed on the Nadir Hatch window of Node 2. Image credit ESA.

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Learn how to make with Windows 10 IoT Core in The MagPi 48

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/learn-make-windows-10-iot-core-magpi-48/

Rob here from The MagPi. It’s the last Thursday of the month, which can only mean one thing: a new issue is out!

Windows 10 is better than ever on Raspberry Pi

Windows 10 is better than ever on Raspberry Pi

Whenever a new piece of hardware comes out, there are always people trying to port or emulate different operating systems onto them. The Raspberry Pi was no different, with several attempts at porting differing operating systems when it was first launched. For over a year now though, Microsoft has officially supported Windows on the Raspberry Pi through Windows 10 IoT Core.

In The MagPi 48 we cover the latest developments in Windows 10 IoT Core that have come about since the Raspberry Pi 3 was launched, and how to make use of them in your own projects. We’ve also got exclusive news on an upcoming kit specifically for the Raspberry Pi 3 that lets you create amazing projects right out of the box.

Compete in the Scratch Olympics. You don't even have to leave your house

Compete in the Scratch Olympics. You don’t even have to leave your house.

As well as all the Windows talk, we invite you to take part in the Scratch Olympics, continue building the arcade machine of your dreams, learn about Twitch-controlled robots, and read a review of the long-awaited NatureBytes wildlife camera.

You can also learn how to make this swimming game from the legendary Mike Cook, which involves paddling your arms wildly in the air in the general direction of a home-built sensor board to control your character.

Raspberry Pi Olympic swimming

From the The MagPi 48 – August 2016 – an Olympic swimming simulator for the Raspberry Pi.

The MagPi 48 is out today in WH Smith, Tesco, Sainsburys, and Asda in the UK and will be in Micro Center and selected Barnes & Noble when it comes to America. You can also buy a copy online from our store, or get it digitally on our app that’s available for iOS and Android.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and start with issue 47 to not only get the poster and mission patch, but also a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 48.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy the issue! We’re off for a haircut.

The post Learn how to make with Windows 10 IoT Core in The MagPi 48 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Blast off with The MagPi 47 Astro Pi special!

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/blast-off-magpi-47-astro-pi-special/

Get your free poster and mission patch exclusively in the print edition of The MagPi 47!

Get your free poster and mission patch exclusively in the print edition of The MagPi 47!

We’ve been avidly following Tim Peake’s adventures in space in The MagPi for the last six months, especially all the excellent work he’s been doing with the Astro Pis running code from school students across the UK. Tim returned to Earth a couple of weeks ago, so we thought we’d celebrate in The MagPi 47 with a massive feature about his time in space, along with the results of the Astro Pi experiments and the project’s future…

The space celebration doesn’t stop there: print copies of The MagPi 47 come with an exclusive Astro Pi mission patch and a Tim Peake Astro Pi poster!

The results of what Tim, Ed, and Izzy have been up to for the past six months

The results of what Tim, Ed, and Izzy have been up to for the past six months

The issue also has our usual range of excellent tutorials, from programming dinosaurs to creating motion sensor games and optical illusions. We also have the hottest news on high-altitude balloons and how you can get involved in sending a Pi to the edge of space, as well as the details on the next Pi Wars Pi-powered robot competition.

You can get your latest spaceworthy issue in-store from WH Smith, Tesco, Sainsburys, and Asda. Our American cousins will be able to buy issues from Barnes & Noble and Micro Center when the issue makes its way over there. It’s also available right now in print on our online store, which delivers internationally. If you prefer digital, it’s ready to download on the Android and iOS apps.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and start with issue 47 to not only get the poster and mission patch, but also a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 47.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

This is not the end of Astro Pi. It’s only the beginning.

The post Blast off with The MagPi 47 Astro Pi special! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Learn to code with Scratch with The MagPi’s latest e-book

Post Syndicated from Russell Barnes original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/learn-code-scratch-magpis-latest-essentials-e-book/

Scratch is the world-leading visual programming language, created by the boffins at MIT. It’s designed to help kids of all ages learn about computer science within minutes. We think it’s rather cool, and it’s been a core part of Raspberry Pi’s software offering since day one for very obvious reasons.

We’ve been working for a while now to dedicate a new Essentials book to it, and we’re ultra-chuffed to let you know that it’s out now!

Scratch-Cover

Click the cover to download it today!

The book, which you can download as a free PDF, includes chapters built from some of the excellent articles we’ve featured in the magazine, the amazing learning resources from Raspberry Pi, and even the outstanding material created by our chums at Code Club.

It features 13 jam-packed chapters that help you:

  • Master the different block types
  • Create animations and add interactive elements
  • Build your first games and applications
  • Make and control electronic circuits
  • Understand every block
  • and much, much more!

With our help, we think you’ll find that Scratch isn’t just a great way to learn to program, but lots of fun too!

You can buy Learn to Code with Scratch as an in-app purchase on our free Android and iOS app, as well as the usual PDF download.

Excuse us – we’re off to celebrate!

Learn to Code with Scratch is freely licensed under Creative Commons (BY-SA-NC 3.0). You can download the PDF free now and forever, but buying digitally supports the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s charitable mission to democratise computing and educate kids all over the world.

The post Learn to code with Scratch with The MagPi’s latest e-book appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Astro Pi: Goodnight, Mr Tim

Post Syndicated from Helen Lynn original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/astro-pi-goodnight-mr-tim/

On Saturday, British ESA astronaut Tim Peake returned to Earth after six months on the International Space Station. During his time in orbit, he did a huge amount of work to share the excitement of his trip with young people and support education across the curriculum: as part of this, he used our two Astro Pi computers, Izzy and Ed, to run UK school students’ code and play their music in space. But what lies ahead for the pair now Tim’s mission, Principia, is complete?

Watch Part 4 of the Story of Astro Pi!

The Story of Astro Pi – Part 4: Goodnight, Mr Tim

As British ESA astronaut Tim Peake’s mission comes to an end, what will become of Ed and Izzy, our courageous Astro Pis? Find out more at astro-pi.org/about/mission/ Narration by Fran Scott: franscott.co.uk

Ed and Izzy will remain on the International Space Station until 2022, and they have exciting work ahead of them. Keep an eye on this blog and on our official magazine, The MagPi, for news!

The post Astro Pi: Goodnight, Mr Tim appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

The MagPi magazine #46 is out now!

Post Syndicated from Russell Barnes original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-magazine-46-now/

The June 2016 edition of The MagPi magazine is on sale today with another 100 pages of projects, ideas, and inspiration for hackers and makers of all ages and abilities.

#46 mockup

Click the pic to download the latest issue free!

buy_print_smallIf you or someone you know has never quite got to grips with using the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO pins then #46 has some excellent advice and starter projects, including Rob’s rather splendid selfie stick:

Raspberry Pi on Twitter

A sneak peek at some @TheMagP1 content from this Thursday’s edition. @RobThez has made a selfie fish slice stick.pic.twitter.com/TZLiAnkU7D

Elsewhere this issue we’re hacking RC controllers with Pi Zero, building IoT weight scales, knocking together night-vision cameras and coding an Asteroids clone (and that’s just for starters). As always, we’ve got a plethora of amazing projects from the community, including this charming coffee roaster:

The MagPi wouldn't be possible without copious amounts of lovely, lovely coffee…

The MagPi wouldn’t be possible without copious amounts of lovely, lovely coffee…

Grab your free Pi Zero!

The other big story from this issue is that we’ve got a brand-spanking new print subscription offer. Subscribe today and you’ll get a brand new Pi Zero 1.3, HDMI and USB adaptors, and a camera ribbon cable with your first issue.

Free gifts don’t come much better than this. Back of the net!

The post The MagPi magazine #46 is out now! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.