Tag Archives: Transportation/Sensors

Choosing an Optical Measurement Sensor for Non-contact Displacement, Dimension and Thickness Measurement

Post Syndicated from IEEE Spectrum Recent Content full text original https://spectrum.ieee.org/webinar/choosing_an_optical_measurement_sensor_for_non-contact_displacement_dimension_and_thickness_measurement

Learn the operating principles of optical measuring sensors for displacement, position, thickness, gap, profile and 2D/3D dimension with just one sensor

A Radar to Watch You in Your Car

Post Syndicated from Philip E. Ross original https://spectrum.ieee.org/cars-that-think/transportation/sensors/vayyar-promises-a-radar-for-inside-the-car-as-well-as-outside-it

Vayyar says there are at least four good reasons to monitor passengers with radar instead of cameras

Used to be, when we said the walls had ears, it meant there were microphones hidden in them. Now, when we say the walls have eyes, will it mean they have radar?

Maybe so, at least in your car. Vayyar Imaging, a firm based in Tel Aviv, says it has a radar chip that can form a three-dimensional view of what’s going on inside a car as well as outside of it. Right now, though, it’s concentrating on the inside, because there’s a regulatory push to having in-cabin observation in place in the early 2020s, and Vayyar thinks it has a head start.

Everyone else seems to be banking on cameras, including infrared cameras, to do this job. You can buy such a system right now: the Cadillac CT6 Super Cruise. That car can drive itself for extended periods, but it uses a camera to scrutinize the driver for signs of distraction or fatigue to make sure that, if a problem comes up that the system can’t solve, it can safely hand control back to the human.

3 Types of 3D Sensing for Smartphones and Self-Driving Cars

Post Syndicated from IEEE Spectrum Staff original https://spectrum.ieee.org/transportation/sensors/3-types-of-3d-sensing-for-smartphones-and-selfdriving-cars

3D cameras already help us make 3D emoji/animoji. Now, ams wants to use 3D sensing to help smartphones capture more accurate colors

MWC report logo, link to report landing page

Cameras that scan and render objects in 3D are now a standard feature in many smartphones, drones, robots, and automobiles. Paired with the right software, these cameras are making it possible to sense light levels, movements, and textures in more places, and at a lower cost, than was previously possible.

ams (located on the former grounds of an Austrian castle) produces the tiny lasers and low-power light sensors that many of these camera systems rely on to identify hand gestures or track eye movements in an instant. The company’s technology must produce accurate results for a wide variety of consumer and industrial devices that operate in very different environments.

ams has a team of 1,200 engineers, and as demand has grown, ams has focused its R&D resources and budget on designing components for three types of 3D sensing: structured light, time-of-flight, and active stereo vision.

Bosch to Sell Low-Cost Sensors for Flying Cars

Post Syndicated from Philip E. Ross original https://spectrum.ieee.org/cars-that-think/transportation/sensors/bosch-adapts-automotive-sensors-for-use-air-taxis

Bosch expects the first flying taxi service to take off in a major city by 2023

Bosch today said it plans to sell a universal control unit for flying cars that combines dozens of sensors that have been proven in cars on the ground. 

“The first flying taxis are set to take off in major cities starting in 2023, at the latest,” Harald Kröger, president of the Bosch Automotive Electronics division, said in a statement. “Bosch plans to play a leading role in shaping this future market.” 

Among the many sensors in the universal, plug-and-play unit are MEMS-based acceleration sensors. These include yaw-rate sensors to measure the angle of attack—that is, the plane’s angle with respect to the oncoming air. This was the quality that was mismeasured by the sensors and misinterpreted by the control unit of the Boeing 737 Max, contributing to the two crashes of that airliner.