Tag Archives: trend micro

Fake News As A Service (FNaaS?) – $400k To Rig An Election

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/UqEqmi9y3oY/

This is pretty interesting, the prices for Fake News as a Service have come out after some research by Trend Micro, imagine that you can create a fake celebrity with 300,000 followers for only $2,600. Now we all know this Fake News thing has been going on for a while, and of course, if it’s […]

The post Fake News As A Service (FNaaS?)…

Read the full post at darknet.org.uk

Some notes on #MacronLeak

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2017/05/some-notes-on-macronleak.html

Tonight (Friday May 5 2017) hackers dumped emails (and docs) related to French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron. He’s the anti-Putin candidate running against the pro-Putin Marin Le Pen. I thought I’d write up some notes.

Are they Macron’s emails?

No. They are e-mails from members of his staff/supporters, namely Alain Tourret, Pierre Person, Cedric O??, Anne-Christine Lang, and Quentin Lafay.
There are some documents labeled “Macron” which may have been taken from his computer, cloud drive — his own, or an assistant.

Who done it?
Obviously, everyone assumes that Russian hackers did it, but there’s nothing (so far) that points to anybody in particular.
It appears to be the most basic of phishing attacks, which means anyone could’ve done it, including your neighbor’s pimply faced teenager.

Update: Several people [*] have pointed out Trend Micro reporting that Russian/APT28 hackers were targeting Macron back on April 24. Coincidentally, this is also the latest that emails appear in the dump.

What’s the hacker’s evil plan?
Everyone is proposing theories about the hacker’s plan, but the most likely answer is they don’t have one. Hacking is opportunistic. They likely targeted everyone in the campaign, and these were the only victims they could hack. It’s probably not the outcome they were hoping for.
But since they’ve gone through all the work, it’d be a shame to waste it. Thus, they are likely releasing the dump not because they believe it will do any good, but because it’ll do them no harm. It’s a shame to waste all the work they put into it.
If there’s any plan, it’s probably a long range one, serving notice that any political candidate that goes against Putin will have to deal with Russian hackers dumping email.
Why now? Why not leak bits over time like with Clinton?

France has a campaign blackout starting tonight at midnight until the election on Sunday. Thus, it’s the perfect time to leak the files. Anything salacious, or even rumors of something bad, will spread viraly through Facebook and Twitter, without the candidate or the media having a good chance to rebut the allegations.
The last emails in the logs appear to be from April 24, the day after the first round vote (Sunday’s vote is the second, runoff, round). Thus, the hackers could’ve leaked this dump any time in the last couple weeks. They chose now to do it.
Are the emails verified?
Yes and no.
Yes, we have DKIM signatures between people’s accounts, so we know for certain that hackers successfully breached these accounts. DKIM is an anti-spam method that cryptographically signs emails by the sending domain (e.g. @gmail.com), and thus, can also verify the email hasn’t been altered or forged.
But no, when a salacious email or document is found in the dump, it’ll likely not have such a signature (most emails don’t), and thus, we probably won’t be able to verify the scandal. In other words, the hackers could have altered or forged something that becomes newsworthy.
What are the most salacious emails/files?

I don’t know. Before this dump, hackers on 4chan were already making allegations that Macron had secret offshore accounts (debunked). Presumably we need to log in to 4chan tomorrow for them to point out salacious emails/files from this dump.

Another email going around seems to indicate that Alain Tourret, a member of the French legislature, had his assistant @FrancoisMachado buy drugs online with Bitcoin and had them sent to his office in the legislature building. The drugs in question, 3-MMC, is a variant of meth that might be legal in France. The emails point to a tracking number which looks legitimate, at least, that a package was indeed shipped to that area of Paris. There is a bitcoin transaction that matches the address, time, and amount specified in the emails. Some claim these drug emails are fake, but so far, I haven’t seen any emails explaining why they should be fake. On the other hand, there’s nothing proving they are true (no DKIM sig), either.

Some salacious emails might be obvious, but some may take people with more expertise to find. For example, one email is a receipt from Uber (with proper DKIM validation) that shows the route that “Quenten” took on the night of the first round election. Somebody clued into the French political scene might be able to figure out he’s visiting his mistress, or something. (This is hypothetical — in reality, he’s probably going from one campaign rally to the next).

What’s the Macron camp’s response?

They have just the sort of response you’d expect.
They claim some of the documents/email are fake, without getting into specifics. They claim that information is needed to be understand in context. They claim that this was a “massive coordinated attack”, even though it’s something that any pimply faced teenager can do. They claim it’s an attempt to destabilize democracy. They call upon journalists to be “responsible”.

Welcome to the Newest AWS Community Heroes (Spring 2017)

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/welcome-to-the-newest-aws-community-heroes-spring-2017/

We would like to extend a very warm welcome to the newest AWS Community Heroes:

AWS Community Heroes share their knowledge and demonstrate their enthusiasm for AWS in a plethora of ways. They go above and beyond to share AWS insights via social media, blog posts, open source projects, and through in-person events, user groups, and workshops.


Mark Nunnikhoven
Mark Nunnikhoven explores the impact of technology on individuals, organizations, and communities through the lens of privacy and security. Asking the question, “How can we better protect our information?” Mark studies the world of cybercrime to better understand the risks and threats to our digital world.

As the Vice President of Cloud Research at Trend Micro, a long time Amazon Web Services Advanced Technology Partner and provider of security tools for the AWS Cloud, Mark uses that knowledge to help organizations around the world modernize their security practices by taking advantage of the power of the AWS Cloud.

With a strong focus on automation, he helps bridge the gap between DevOps and traditional security through his writing, speaking, teaching, and by engaging with the AWS community.

 

SangUk Park
SangUk Park is a Chief Solutions Architect at Megazone, which became Korea’s first AWS Partner in 2012 and is the only AWS Premier Consulting Partner to provide AWS support in Korean.

He served as a System Architect for KT’s public cloud and VDI design, and led the system operation of YDOnline and Nexon Japan, one of the leading online gaming companies. Certified both as an AWS Solutions Architect – Professional and AWS DevOps Engineer – Professional, SangUk has authored AWS books, including DevOps and AWS Cloud Design Patterns, and translated four books related to the AWS Cloud.

He’s been making efforts to revitalize the local AWS Korea User Group community as co-leader by presenting at AWS Korea User Group meetings and AWS Summits, and helping to establish small group gatherings such as the AWSKRUG System Engineers in Gangnam. Also, he has done many hands-on labs and has been running a booth as a leader of the user groups at AWS events to cultivate developers and system engineers.

SangUk maintains a close relationship with the Japanese AWS User Group (JAWS UG), using his excellent Japanese communication skills and experiences in Japan. He makes every effort to participate in events held between Japanese and Korean user groups as a facilitator and translator, and will promote cross-regional communications beyond APAC going forward.

 

James Hall
James Hall has been working in the digital sector for over a decade. He is the author of the popular jsPDF library, and is a founder/Director of Parallax, a digital agency in the UK. He’s worked as a software developer on a wide variety of projects, from LED Billboards, car unlocking apps, to large web applications and tools.

Parallax built an online recording studio for David Guetta and UEFA using Serverless technology shortly after API Gateway was released. Since then they have consulted on various serverless projects and technologies. They run the AWS Meetup in Leeds, and help companies around the world build their businesses online. James has contributed to and promotes the Serverless Framework which allows you to elegantly build web applications on top of Lambda and related services.

 

Drew Firment
Drew Firment works with business leaders and technology teams from organizations that seek to accelerate cloud adoption. He has over twenty years of experience leading large-scale technology programs, enterprise platforms, and cultural transformations in a fast-paced agile environment.

After migrating Capital One’s early adopters of AWS into production, his focus shifted toward accelerating a scaleable and sustainable transition to cloud computing. Drew pioneered the intersection of strategy, governance, engineering, agile, and education to drive an enterprise-wide talent transformation. He founded Capital One’s cloud engineering college, and implemented an innovative outcome-based curriculum oriented towards learning communities. Several thousand employees have enrolled in his cloud-fluency program, enabling well over 1,000 AWS certifications since its inception.

Drew has earned all three of the AWS associate-level certifications, enjoys developing custom Amazon Alexa skills using AWS Lambda, and believes serverless is the future of cloud computing. He also serves as an advisory partner to A Cloud Guru and is editor-in-chief of the their community-sourced publication.

Welcome
Please join me in welcoming to our newest AWS Community Heroes!

-Ana

Introducing Allgress Regulatory Product Mapping

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/introducing-allgress-regulatory-product-mapping/

This guest post is brought to you by Andrew Benjamin and Tim Sandage.

-Ana


It’s increasingly difficult for organizations within regulated industries (such as government, financial, and healthcare) to demonstrate compliance with security requirements. The burden to comply is compounded by the use of legacy security frameworks and a lack of understanding of which services enable appropriate threat mitigations. It is further complicated by security responsibilities in relation to cloud computing, Internet of Things (IoT), and mobile applications.

Allgress helps minimize this burden by helping enterprise security and risk professionals assess, understand, and manage corporate risk. Allgress and AWS are working to offer a way to establish clear mappings from AWS services and 3rd party software solutions in AWS Marketplace to common security frameworks. The result for regulated customers within the AWS Cloud will be minimized business impact, increased security effectiveness, and reduced risk.

The name of this new solution is Allgress Marketplace Regulatory Product Mapping Tool (RPM) Allgress designed this tool specifically for customers deployed within AWS who want to reduce the complexity, increase the speed, and shorten the time frame of achieving compliance, including compliance with legislation such as Sarbanes Oxley, HIPAA, and FISMA. Allgress RPM is designed to achieve these results by letting customers quickly map their regulatory security frameworks (such as ISO, NIST, and PCI-DSS controls) to AWS services, solutions in AWS Markeplace, and APN technology partner solutions. The tool even guides customers through the compliance process, providing focused content every step of the way.

Here are the four simple steps to get a regulatory assessment:

  1. If you’re a new user, you can Login as a guest into the tool. Registration is not required. If you’re an existing user, you can log in using your Username and Password to return to a saved assessment:

01[1]

  1. Once you’ve logged in, you can select your Regulatory Security Framework (e.g. FedRAMP or PCI). After you’ve selected your framework, you have two explorer options: Coverage Overview and Product Explorer (explained in detail below).02[1]

The Coverage Overview includes three use cases: AWS customer controls review, regulatory requirement mapping, and gap-assessment planning. The Product Explorer tool provides detailed control coverage for the AWS services selected and/or all available AWS Marketplace vendor solutions.

  1. You can select Coverage Overview to review AWS Inherited, Shared, Operation, and AWS Marketplace Control mappings.03[1]

Coverage overview – This view breaks down security frameworks into four categories:

  1. AWS Inherited Controls — Controls that you fully inherit from AWS.
  2. AWS Shared Controls — AWS provides the control implementation for the infrastructure, and you provide your own control implementation within its use of AWS services. (e.g. Fault Tolerance)
  3. Operational Controls – These are procedural controls that AWS or an AWS consulting partner can help you implement within your AWS environment.
  4. AWS Marketplace Controls — These are technical controls that can be implemented (partially or fully) with an AWS technology partner and vendors from AWS Marketplace.

Note: Features in this tool include the ability to zoom into the controls using your mouse. With point-and-click ease, you can zoom in at the domain (Control Family) level, or into individual controls:

04[1]05[1]

  1. The additional capabilities within RPM is Product Explorer, which Identifies solutions in AWS Marketplace that can partially or fully implement the requirements of a security control. The screen below illustrates the 327 control for FedRAMP moderate — as well as several solutions available from software vendors on AWS Marketplace that can help remediate the control requirements.

06[1]

The Product Explorer page has several capabilities to highlight both service and control association:

  1. At the top of the page you can remove controls that do not currently have associated mapping.
  2. You can also zoom into Domains, Sub-domains, and Controls.
  3. You can select single products or multiple products with quick view options.
  4. You can select single or multiple products, and then select Product Cart to review detailed control implementations.

07_CORRECT[1]

Product Explorer Note: Non-associated controls have been removed in order to clearly see potential product mappings.

08[1]

Product Explorer — Zoom function for a specific control (e.g. AU-11) identifies all potential AWS services and associated products which can be leveraged for control implementation.

 09[1]

Product Explorer – Single product control coverage view. For a detail view you can Click on the Product Cart and view detailed implementation notes.

10[1]

Product Explorer – You can also add multiple services and solutions into a product cart and then connect to Marketplace for each software vendor solution available through our public managed software catalog.

11[1]

More about Allgres RPM
The AWS Services, Consulting, and Technology vendors that Allgress RPM is designed to map, have all demonstrated technical proficiency as a security solution, and can treat security controls across multiple regulated industries. At launch, RPM includes 10 vendors who all have deep experience working with regulated customers to deliver mission-critical workloads and applications on AWS. You can reach Allgress here.

View more Security solutions in AWS Marketplace. Please note that many of the products available in AWS Marketplace offer free trials. You can request free credits here: AWS Marketplace – Get Infrastructure Credits.

We wish to thank our launch partners, who worked with AWS and the Allgress team to map their products and services: Allgress, Alert Logic, Barracuda, Trend Micro, Splunk, Palo Alto Networks, OKTA, CloudCheckr, Evident.io and CIS (Center for Internet Security).

We wish to thank our launch partners, who worked with AWS and the Allgress team to map their products and services: Allgress, Alert Logic, Barracuda, Trend Micro, Splunk, Palo Alto Networks, OKTA, CloudCheckr, Evident.io and CIS (Center for Internet Security).

-Andrew Benjamin and Tim Sandage.

Now Open – AWS London Region

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-open-aws-london-region/

Last week we launched our 15th AWS Region and today we are launching our 16th. We have expanded the AWS footprint into the United Kingdom with a new Region in London, our third in Europe. AWS customers can use the new London Region to better serve end-users in the United Kingdom and can also use it to store data in the UK.

The Details
The new London Region provides a broad suite of AWS services including Amazon CloudWatch, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon ECS, Amazon ElastiCache, Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), EC2 Container Registry, Amazon EMR, Amazon Glacier, Amazon Kinesis Streams, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF), Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Auto Scaling, AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), AWS CloudFormation, AWS CloudTrail, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS Config, AWS Database Migration Service, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, AWS Snowball, AWS Snowmobile, AWS Key Management Service (KMS), AWS Marketplace, AWS OpsWorks, AWS Personal Health Dashboard, AWS Shield Standard, AWS Storage Gateway, AWS Support API, Elastic Load Balancing, VM Import/Export, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon Route 53, AWS WAF, AWS Trusted Advisor, and AWS Direct Connect (follow the links for pricing and other information).

The London Region supports all sizes of C4, D2, M4, T2, and X1 instances.

Check out the AWS Global Infrastructure page to learn more about current and future AWS Regions.

From Our Customers
Many AWS customers are getting ready to use this new Region. Here’s a very small sample:

Trainline is Europe’s number one independent rail ticket retailer. Every day more than 100,000 people travel using tickets bought from Trainline. Here’s what Mark Holt (CTO of Trainline) shared with us:

We recently completed the migration of 100 percent of our eCommerce infrastructure to AWS and have seen awesome results: improved security, 60 percent less downtime, significant cost savings and incredible improvements in agility. From extensive testing, we know that 0.3s of latency is worth more than 8 million pounds and so, while AWS connectivity is already blazingly fast, we expect that serving our UK customers from UK datacenters should lead to significant top-line benefits.

Kainos Evolve Electronic Medical Records (EMR) automates the creation, capture and handling of medical case notes and operational documents and records, allowing healthcare providers to deliver better patient safety and quality of care for several leading NHS Foundation Trusts and market leading healthcare technology companies.

Travis Perkins, the largest supplier of building materials in the UK, is implementing the biggest systems and business change in its history including the migration of its datacenters to AWS.

Just Eat is the world’s leading marketplace for online food delivery. Using AWS, JustEat has been able to experiment faster and reduce the time to roll out new feature updates.

OakNorth, a new bank focused on lending between £1m-£20m to entrepreneurs and growth businesses, became the UK’s first cloud-based bank in May after several months of working with AWS to drive the development forward with the regulator.

Partners
I’m happy to report that we are already working with a wide variety of consulting, technology, managed service, and Direct Connect partners in the United Kingdom. Here’s a partial list:

  • AWS Premier Consulting Partners – Accenture, Claranet, Cloudreach, CSC, Datapipe, KCOM, Rackspace, and Slalom.
  • AWS Consulting Partners – Attenda, Contino, Deloitte, KPMG, LayerV, Lemongrass, Perfect Image, and Version 1.
  • AWS Technology Partners – Splunk, Sage, Sophos, Trend Micro, and Zerolight.
  • AWS Managed Service Partners – Claranet, Cloudreach, KCOM, and Rackspace.
  • AWS Direct Connect Partners – AT&T, BT, Hutchison Global Communications, Level 3, Redcentric, and Vodafone.

Here are a few examples of what our partners are working on:

KCOM is a professional services provider offering consultancy, architecture, project delivery and managed service capabilities to large UK-based enterprise businesses. The scalability and flexibility of AWS gives them a significant competitive advantage with their enterprise and public sector customers. The new Region will allow KCOM to build innovative solutions for their public sector clients while meeting local regulatory requirements.

Splunk is a member of the AWS Partner Network and a market leader in analyzing machine data to deliver operational intelligence for security, IT, and the business. They use cloud computing and big data analytics to help their customers to embrace digital transformation and continuous innovation. The new Region will provide even more companies with real-time visibility into the operation of their systems and infrastructure.

Redcentric is a NHS Digital-approved N3 Commercial Aggregator. Their work allows health and care providers such as NHS acute, emergency and mental trusts, clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), and the ISV community to connect securely to AWS. The London Region will allow health and care providers to deliver new digital services and to improve outcomes for citizens and patients.

Visit the AWS Partner Network page to read some case studies and to learn how to join.

Compliance & Connectivity
Every AWS Region is designed and built to meet rigorous compliance standards including ISO 27001, ISO 9001, ISO 27017, ISO 27018, SOC 1, SOC 2, SOC3, PCI DSS Level 1, and many more. Our Cloud Compliance page includes information about these standards, along with those that are specific to the UK, including Cyber Essentials Plus.

The UK Government recognizes that local datacenters from hyper scale public cloud providers can deliver secure solutions for OFFICIAL workloads. In order to meet the special security needs of public sector organizations in the UK with respect to OFFICIAL workloads, we have worked with our Direct Connect Partners to make sure that obligations for connectivity to the Public Services Network (PSN) and N3 can be met.

Use it Today
The London Region is open for business now and you can start using it today! If you need additional information about this Region, please feel free to contact our UK team at [email protected].

Jeff;

AWS Managed Services – Infrastructure Operations Management for the Enterprise

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-managed-services-infrastructure-operations-management-for-the-enterprise/

Large-scale, enterprise data centers are generally run “by the book.” Policies, best practices, and operational procedures are developed, refined, captured, and codified, as part of responsible IT management, often with an eye toward the ITIL model. Ideally, all infrastructure improvements, configuration changes, and provisioning requests are handled in a process-oriented fashion that serves to impose some discipline on the operation of the data center without becoming overly complex or bureaucratic. With IT staff responsible for provisioning hardware, installing software, applying patches, monitoring operations, taking and restoring backups, and dealing with unpredictable operational and security incidents, there’s plenty of work to go around.

These organizations have been looking at the AWS Cloud and want to take advantage of the scale and innovation that it offers, while also looking to become more agile and to save money in the process. As they plan their migration to the cloud, they want to build on their existing systems and practices, while also getting all of the benefits that the cloud has to offer. They want to add additional automation, make use of standard components that can be used more than once, and to relieve their staff of as many routine operational duties as possible.

Introducing AWS Managed Services
Today we are launching AWS Managed Services. Designed for the Fortune 1000 and the Global 2000, this service is designed to accelerate cloud adoption. It simplifies deployment,  migration, and management using automation and machine learning, backed up by a dedicated team of Amazon employees. AWS MS builds on AWS and provides a set of integration points (APIs and a set of CLI tools) for connection to your existing service management system. We’ve been working with a representative set of AWS enterprise customers and partners for the last couple of years in order to make sure that this service meets a very wide range of enterprise requirements.

AWS MS is built around the concept of a Virtual Data Center that is linked to one or more AWS accounts. The VDC consists of a Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) which contains multiple Deployment Groups which consist of Multi-AZ subnets for a DMZ, shared services, and for customer applications. Each application or application component is packaged up into a Managed Stack.

Here’s a brief overview of the feature set:

Incident Monitoring & ResolutionAWS MS manages incidents that are detected by our monitoring systems or reported by our customers. It correlates multiple Amazon CloudWatch alarms and looks for failed updates and security events that could impact the health of running applications. Incidents are created within AWS MS for investigation and are then resolved either automatically or manually by AWS engineers. False positives are used to improve our systems and processes, allowing AWS MS to improve over time by drawing on data collected at scale.

Change ControlAWS MS coordinates all actions on resources. Changes must originate with a change request (an RFC, or Request for Change), and can be manual or scripted. AWS MS makes sure that changes are applied to individual stacks on an orderly, non-overlapping basis. It also holds all incoming manual requests until they have been approved.

ProvisioningAWS MS includes a set of predefined stacks (application templates), each built to conform to long-established AWS best practices. The stacks contain sensible defaults, any of which can be overridden when the stack is provisioned.

Patch ManagementAWS MS takes care of the above-the-hypervisor patching. This includes operating system (Linux and Windows) and infrastructure application (SSH, RDP, ISS, Apache, and so forth) security updates and patches. AWS MS employs multiple strategies, patching and building new AMIs for cloud-aware applications that can be easily restarted, and resorting to in-place patches for the rest.

Security & Access ManagementAWS MS uses third-party applications from AWS Marketplace, starting with Trend Micro Deep Security to look for viruses and malware and to detect intrusions on managed instances. It makes extensive use of EC2 Security Groups and manages controlled, time-limited access to production systems.

Backup & Restore – Each stack is backed up at a specified frequency. A percentage of the backup snapshots are tested for integrity and a run book is used to bring failed infrastructure back to life.

ReportingAWS MS provides a set of financial and capacity management reports, delivered by a dedicated Cloud Service Advisor using AWS Trusted Advisor and other tools. The underlying AWS CloudTrail and Amazon CloudWatch logs are also accessible.

Accessing AWS Managed Services
You can connect AWS Managed Services to your existing service management tools using the AWS MS API and command-line tools. You can also access it through the AWS Management Console, but we expect API and CLI usage to be far more popular. However you choose to access AWS MS, the basic objects and operations are the same. You can create, view, approve, and manage RFCs, service requests, and incident reports. Here’s what this looks like from the Console:

Here’s how a Request for Change (RFC) is created:

And here’s how technical users can customize the RFC:

After a change request has been entered, approved, and scheduled, AWS MS supervises the actual change. Automated changes take place with no further human interaction. Manual changes are performed within a scheduled change window using temporary credentials specific to the change. AWS engineers use the same mechanisms and follow the same discipline. Either way, the entire process is tracked and logged.

Partners & Customers
AWS Managed Services was designed with partners in mind. We have set up a pair of new training programs (AWS MS Business Essentials and AWS MS Technical Essentials) that will provide partners with the background information needed to start building a practice around AWS MS. I expect partners to help their customers connect their existing IT Service Management (ITSM) systems, processes, and tools to AWS MS, assist with the on-boarding process, and manage the migration of applications. There are also opportunities for partners to use AWS MS to provide even better levels of support and service to customers.

As I mentioned earlier, we’ve been working with enterprise customers and partners to make sure that AWS MS meets their needs. Here are a few observations that they shared with us.

Tom Ray of Cloudreach (“Intelligent Cloud Adoption”), an AWS Premier Partner:

We see AWS Managed Services as a key solution in the AWS portfolio, designed to meet the need for a cost effective, highly controlled AWS environment, where the heavy lifting of management and control can be outsourced to AWS. This will extend our relationship even further, as Cloudreach will help customers design, migrate to AWS Managed Services, plus provide application level support alongside AWS.

Paul Hannan of SGN (a regulated oil & gas utility):

SGN’s migration to cloud is based upon improving the security and durability of its IT, while becoming more responsive to its business and customer service needs – all at a lower cost. We decided the best way for us to manage the migration into AWS, at the lowest risk to ourselves, was to partner with AWS. Its managed service team has the expertise to optimise the AWS platform, allowing us to accelerate our understanding of how to best manage the infrastructure within AWS. It’s been a real benefit working with a partner which recognises our desire to always put our customer first and which will pull out all the stops to achieve what’s needed.

Available Now
AWS Managed Services is available today. It is able to manage AWS resources in the US East (Northern Virginia), US West (Oregon), EU (Ireland), and Asia Pacific (Sydney) Regions, with others coming online as soon as possible.

Pricing is based on your AWS usage. To learn more about AWS MS or to initiate the on-boarding process, contact your AWS sales representative.

Jeff;

New – SaaS Subscriptions on AWS Marketplace

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-saas-subscriptions-on-aws-marketplace/

You can now find, buy, and use a nice variety of SaaS (Software as a Service) solutions from AWS Marketplace Vendors.

The new SaaS solutions run on AWS infrastructure and you will pay only for the service that you consume, with no monthly fees or subscription costs. For example, you can buy security services on a per-host basis, log processing on a per-GB-ingested basis, geocoding on a per-request basis, or caching on a per-GB-cached basis. Usage charge for the services that you consume will appear on your AWS bill.

The list of vendors and products is growing every day; here’s what we have lined up so far:

Application Development and Monitoring
  • Cloudyn
  • Cloudinary
  • Datapath.io
  • New Relic Infrastructure (Pro & Essential)
  • Ruxit Dynatrace Cloud-Native Monitoring
  • Solano Labs CI
  • Solodev Enterprise Cloud
Security and Log Management
  • Alert Logic Cloud Insight
  • Bitium Identity and Access Management for AWS
  • Datadog Apps Monitoring
  • Dome9 Serenity for AWS Enterprise Edition
  • Sumo Logic Log Analytics
  • Trend Micro Deep Security
Databases, BI, and Big Data
  • HERE Forward Geocoder Global Service
  • Pitney Bowes GeoCode API
  • Qubole Data Service
Media
  • Aspera Transfer Service
  • NetApp DataSync
  • Signiant Flight
Storage
  • Druva Phoenix (Enterprise & Business)
Other Business Applications and Services
  • Avalara AvaTax

The AWS Marketplace page for each of these offerings includes the relevant per-unit pricing information. Here are a couple of examples:

 You can locate these applications by selecting
SaaS as your delivery method when you search
Marketplace:

To learn more, visit the AWS Marketplace SaaS page.

Attention ISVs
If you are an ISV and would like to offer a new SaaS solution or modify an existing offering to become a SaaS solution, visit the Sell in AWS Marketplace page.

Jeff

32 Security and Compliance Sessions Now Live in the re:Invent 2016 Session Catalog

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/32-security-and-compliance-sessions-now-live-in-the-reinvent-2016-session-catalog/

re:Invent 2016 logo

AWS re:Invent 2016 begins November 28, and now, the live session catalog includes 32 security and compliance sessions. 19 of these sessions are in the Security & Compliance track and 13 are in the re:Source Mini Con for Security Services. All 32se titles and abstracts are included below.

Security & Compliance Track sessions

As in past years, the sessions in the Security & Compliance track will take place in The Venetian | Palazzo in Las Vegas. Here’s what you have to look forward to!

SAC201 – Lessons from a Chief Security Officer: Achieving Continuous Compliance in Elastic Environments

Does meeting stringent compliance requirements keep you up at night? Do you worry about having the right audit trails in place as proof?
Cengage Learning’s Chief Security Officer, Robert Hotaling, shares his organization’s journey to AWS, and how they enabled continuous compliance for their dynamic environment with automation. When Cengage shifted from publishing to digital education and online learning, they needed a secure elastic infrastructure for their data intensive and cyclical business, and workload layer security tools that would help them meet compliance requirements (e.g., PCI).
In this session, you will learn why building security in from the beginning saves you time (and painful retrofits) later, how to gather and retain audit evidence for instances that are only up for minutes or hours, and how Cengage used Trend Micro Deep Security to meet many compliance requirements and ensured instances were instantly protected as they came online in a hybrid cloud architecture. Session sponsored by Trend Micro, Inc.

 

SAC302 – Automating Security Event Response, from Idea to Code to Execution

With security-relevant services such as AWS Config, VPC Flow Logs, Amazon CloudWatch Events, and AWS Lambda, you now have the ability to programmatically wrangle security events that may occur within your AWS environment, including prevention, detection, response, and remediation. This session covers the process of automating security event response with various AWS building blocks, taking several ideas from drawing board to code, and gaining confidence in your coverage by proactively testing security monitoring and response effectiveness before anyone else does.

 

SAC303 – Become an AWS IAM Policy Ninja in 60 Minutes or Less

Are you interested in learning how to control access to your AWS resources? Have you ever wondered how to best scope down permissions to achieve least privilege permissions access control? If your answer to these questions is “yes,” this session is for you. We take an in-depth look at the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policy language. We start with the basics of the policy language and how to create and attach policies to IAM users, groups, and roles. As we dive deeper, we explore policy variables, conditions, and other tools to help you author least privilege policies. Throughout the session, we cover some common use cases, such as granting a user secure access to an Amazon S3 bucket or to launch an Amazon EC2 instance of a specific type.

 

SAC304 – Predictive Security: Using Big Data to Fortify Your Defenses

In a rapidly changing IT environment, detecting and responding to new threats is more important than ever. This session shows you how to build a predictive analytics stack on AWS, which harnesses the power of Amazon Machine Learning in conjunction with Amazon Elasticsearch Service, AWS CloudTrail, and VPC Flow Logs to perform tasks such as anomaly detection and log analysis. We also demonstrate how you can use AWS Lambda to act on this information in an automated fashion, such as performing updates to AWS WAF and security groups, leading to an improved security posture and alleviating operational burden on your security teams.

 

SAC305 – Auditing a Cloud Environment in 2016: What Tools Can Internal and External Auditors Leverage to Maintain Compliance?

With the rapid increase of complexity in managing security for distributed IT and cloud computing, security and compliance managers can innovate to ensure a high level of security when managing AWS resources. In this session, Chad Woolf, director of compliance for AWS, discusses which AWS service features to leverage to achieve a high level of security assurance over AWS resources, giving you more control of the security of your data and preparing you for a wide range of audits. You can now implement point-in-time audits and continuous monitoring in system architecture. Internal and external auditors can learn about emerging tools for monitoring environments in real time. Follow use case examples and demonstrations of services like Amazon Inspector, Amazon CloudWatch Logs, AWS CloudTrail, and AWS Config. Learn firsthand what some AWS customers have accomplished by leveraging AWS features to meet specific industry compliance requirements.

 

SAC306 – Encryption: It Was the Best of Controls, It Was the Worst of Controls

Encryption is a favorite of security and compliance professionals everywhere. Many compliance frameworks actually mandate encryption. Though encryption is important, it is also treacherous. Cryptographic protocols are subtle, and researchers are constantly finding new and creative flaws in them. Using encryption correctly, especially over time, also is expensive because you have to stay up to date.
AWS wants to encrypt data. And our customers, including Amazon, want to encrypt data. In this talk, we look at some of the challenges with using encryption, how AWS thinks internally about encryption, and how that thinking has informed the services we have built, the features we have vended, and our own usage of AWS.

 

SAC307 – The Psychology of Security Automation

Historically, relationships between developers and security teams have been challenging. Security teams sometimes see developers as careless and ignorant of risk, while developers might see security teams as dogmatic barriers to productivity. Can technologies and approaches such as the cloud, APIs, and automation lead to happier developers and more secure systems? Netflix has had success pursuing this approach, by leaning into the fundamental cloud concept of self-service, the Netflix cultural value of transparency in decision making, and the engineering efficiency principle of facilitating a “paved road.” This session explores how security teams can use thoughtful tools and automation to improve relationships with development teams while creating a more secure and manageable environment. Topics include Netflix’s approach to IAM entity management, Elastic Load Balancing and certificate management, and general security configuration monitoring.

 

SAC308 – Hackproof Your Cloud: Responding to 2016 Threats

In this session, CloudCheckr CTO Aaron Newman highlights effective strategies and tools that AWS users can employ to improve their security posture. Specific emphasis is placed upon leveraging native AWS services. He covers how to include concrete steps that users can begin employing immediately.  Session sponsored by CloudCheckr.

 

SAC309 – You Can’t Protect What You Can’t See: AWS Security Monitoring & Compliance Validation from Adobe

Ensuring security and compliance across a globally distributed, large-scale AWS deployment requires a scalable process and a comprehensive set of technologies. In this session, Adobe will deep-dive into the AWS native monitoring and security services and some Splunk technologies leveraged globally to perform security monitoring across a large number of AWS accounts. You will learn about Adobe’s collection plumbing including components of S3, Kinesis, CloudWatch, SNS, Dynamo DB and Lambda, as well as the tooling and processes used at Adobe to deliver scalable monitoring without managing an unwieldy number of API keys and input stanzas.  Session sponsored by Splunk.

 

SAC310 – Securing Serverless Architectures, and API Filtering at Layer 7

AWS serverless architecture components such as Amazon S3, Amazon SQS, Amazon SNS, CloudWatch Logs, DynamoDB, Amazon Kinesis, and Lambda can be tightly constrained in their operation. However, it may still be possible to use some of them to propagate payloads that could be used to exploit vulnerabilities in some consuming endpoints or user-generated code. This session explores techniques for enhancing the security of these services, from assessing and tightening permissions in IAM to integrating tools and mechanisms for inline and out-of-band payload analysis that are more typically applied to traditional server-based architectures.

 

SAC311 – Evolving an Enterprise-level Compliance Framework with Amazon CloudWatch Events and AWS Lambda

Johnson & Johnson is in the process of doing a proof of concept to rewrite the compliance framework that they presented at re:Invent 2014. This framework leverages the newest AWS services and abandons the need for continual describes and master rules servers. Instead, Johnson & Johnson plans to use a distributed, event-based architecture that not only reduces costs but also assigns costs to the appropriate projects rather than central IT.

 

SAC312 – Architecting for End-to-End Security in the Enterprise

This session tells how our most mature, security-minded Fortune 500 customers adopt AWS while improving end-to-end protection of their sensitive data. Learn about the enterprise security architecture decisions made during actual sensitive workload deployments as told by the AWS professional services and the solution architecture team members who lived them. In this very prescriptive, technical walkthrough, we share lessons learned from the development of enterprise security strategy, security use-case development, security configuration decisions, and the creation of AWS security operations playbooks to support customer architectures.

 

SAC313 – Enterprise Patterns for Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS)

Professional services has completed five deep PCI engagements with enterprise customers over the last year. Common patterns were identified and codified in various artifacts. This session introduces the patterns that help customers address PCI requirements in a standard manner that also meets AWS best practices. Hear customers speak about their side of the journey and the solutions that they used to deploy a PCI compliance workload.

 

SAC314 – GxP Compliance in the Cloud

GxP is an acronym that refers to the regulations and guidelines applicable to life sciences organizations that make food and medical products such as drugs, medical devices, and medical software applications. The overall intent of GxP requirements is to ensure that food and medical products are safe for consumers and to ensure the integrity of data used to make product-related safety decisions.

 

The term GxP encompasses a broad range of compliance-related activities such as Good Laboratory Practices (GLP), Good Clinical Practices (GCP), Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), and others, each of which has product-specific requirements that life sciences organizations must implement based on the 1) type of products they make and 2) country in which their products are sold. When life sciences organizations use computerized systems to perform certain GxP activities, they must ensure that the computerized GxP system is developed, validated, and operated appropriately for the intended use of the system.

 

For this session, co-presented with Merck, services such as Amazon EC2, Amazon CloudWatch Logs, AWS CloudTrail, AWS CodeCommit, Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), and AWS CodePipeline will be discussed with an emphasis on implementing GxP-compliant systems in the AWS Cloud.

 

SAC315 – Scaling Security Operations: Using AWS Services to Automate Governance of Security Controls and Remediate Violations

This session enables security operators to use data provided by AWS services such as AWS CloudTrail, AWS Config, Amazon CloudWatch Events, and VPC Flow Fogs to reduce vulnerabilities, and when required, execute timely security actions that fix the violation or gather more information about the vulnerability and attacker. We look at security practices for compliance with PCI, CIS Security Controls,and HIPAA. We dive deep into an example from an AWS customer, Siemens AG, which has automated governance and implemented automated remediation using CloudTrail, AWS Config Rules, and AWS Lambda. A prerequisite for this session is knowledge of software development with Java, Python, or Node.

 

SAC316 – Security Automation: Spend Less Time Securing Your Applications

As attackers become more sophisticated, web application developers need to constantly update their security configurations. Static firewall rules are no longer good enough. Developers need a way to deploy automated security that can learn from the application behavior and identify bad traffic patterns to detect bad bots or bad actors on the Internet. This session showcases some of the real-world customer use cases that use machine learning and AWS WAF (a web application firewall) to automatically identify bad actors affecting multiplayer gaming applications. We also present tutorials and code samples that show how customers can analyze traffic patterns and deploy new AWS WAF rules on the fly.

 

SAC317 – IAM Best Practices to Live By

This session covers AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) best practices that can help improve your security posture. We cover how to manage users and their security credentials. We also explain why you should delete your root access keys—or at the very least, rotate them regularly. Using common use cases, we demonstrate when to choose between using IAM users and IAM roles. Finally, we explore how to set permissions to grant least privilege access control in one or more of your AWS accounts.

 

SAC318 – Life Without SSH: Immutable Infrastructure in Production

This session covers what a real-world production deployment of a fully automated deployment pipeline looks like with instances that are deployed without SSH keys. By leveraging AWS CodeDeploy and Docker, we will show how we achieved semi-immutable and fully immutable infrastructures, and what the challenges and remediations were.

 

SAC401 – 5 Security Automation Improvements You Can Make by Using Amazon CloudWatch Events and AWS Config Rules

This session demonstrates 5 different security and compliance validation actions that you can perform using Amazon CloudWatch Events and AWS Config rules. This session focuses on the actual code for the various controls, actions, and remediation features, and how to use various AWS services and features to build them. The demos in this session include CIS Amazon Web Services Foundations validation; host-based AWS Config rules validation using AWS Lambda, SSH, and VPC-E; automatic creation and assigning of MFA tokens when new users are created; and automatic instance isolation based on SSH logons or VPC Flow Logs deny logs. This session focuses on code and live demos.

 

re:Source Mini Con for Security Services sessions

The re:Source Mini Con for Security Services offers you an opportunity to dive even deeper into security and compliance topics. Think of it as a one-day, fully immersive mini-conference. The Mini Con will take place in The Mirage in Las Vegas.

SEC301 – Audit Your AWS Account Against Industry Best Practices: The CIS AWS Benchmarks

Audit teams can consistently evaluate the security of an AWS account. Best practices greatly reduce complexity when managing risk and auditing the use of AWS for critical, audited, and regulated systems. You can integrate these security checks into your security and audit ecosystem. Center for Internet Security (CIS) benchmarks are incorporated into products developed by 20 security vendors, are referenced by PCI 3.1 and FedRAMP, and are included in the National Vulnerability Database (NVD) National Checklist Program (NCP). This session shows you how to implement foundational security measures in your AWS account. The prescribed best practices help make implementation of core AWS security measures more straightforward for security teams and AWS account owners.

 

SEC302 – WORKSHOP: Working with AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) Policies and Configuring Network Security Using VPCs and Security Groups

In this 2.5-hour workshop, we will show you how to manage permissions by drafting AWS IAM policies that adhere to the principle of least privilege–granting the least permissions required to achieve a task. You will learn all the ins and outs of drafting and applying IAM policies appropriately to help secure your AWS resources. In addition, we will show you how to configure network security using VPCs and security groups.

 

SEC303 – Get the Most from AWS KMS: Architecting Applications for High Security

AWS Key Management Service provides an easy and cost-effective way to secure your data in AWS. In this session, you learn about leveraging the latest features of the service to minimize risk for your data. We also review the recently released Import Key feature that gives you more control over the encryption process by letting you bring your own keys to AWS.

 

SEC304 – Reduce Your Blast Radius by Using Multiple AWS Accounts Per Region and Service

This session shows you how to reduce your blast radius by using multiple AWS accounts per region and service, which helps limit the impact of a critical event such as a security breach. Using multiple accounts helps you define boundaries and provides blast-radius isolation.

 

SEC305 – Scaling Security Resources for Your First 10 Million Customers

Cloud computing offers many advantages, such as the ability to scale your web applications or website on demand. But how do you scale your security and compliance infrastructure along with the business? Join this session to understand best practices for scaling your security resources as you grow from zero to millions of users. Specifically, you learn the following:
  • How to scale your security and compliance infrastructure to keep up with a rapidly expanding threat base.
  • The security implications of scaling for numbers of users and numbers of applications, and how to satisfy both needs.
  • How agile development with integrated security testing and validation leads to a secure environment.
  • Best practices and design patterns of a continuous delivery pipeline and the appropriate security-focused testing for each.
  • The necessity of treating your security as code, just as you would do with infrastructure.
The services covered in this session include AWS IAM, Auto Scaling, Amazon Inspector, AWS WAF, and Amazon Cognito.

 

SEC306 – WORKSHOP: How to Implement a General Solution for Federated API/CLI Access Using SAML 2.0

AWS supports identity federation using SAML (Security Assertion Markup Language) 2.0. Using SAML, you can configure your AWS accounts to integrate with your identity provider (IdP). Once configured, your federated users are authenticated and authorized by your organization’s IdP, and then can use single sign-on (SSO) to sign in to the AWS Management Console. This not only obviates the need for your users to remember yet another user name and password, but it also streamlines identity management for your administrators. This is great if your federated users want to access the AWS Management Console, but what if they want to use the AWS CLI or programmatically call AWS APIs?
In this 2.5-hour workshop, we will show you how you can implement federated API and CLI access for your users. The examples provided use the AWS Python SDK and some additional client-side integration code. If you have federated users that require this type of access, implementing this solution should earn you more than one high five on your next trip to the water cooler.

 

SEC307 – Microservices, Macro Security Needs: How Nike Uses a Multi-Layer, End-to-End Security Approach to Protect Microservice-Based Solutions at Scale

Microservice architectures provide numerous benefits but also have significant security challenges. This session presents how Nike uses layers of security to protect consumers and business. We show how network topology, network security primitives, identity and access management, traffic routing, secure network traffic, secrets management, and host-level security (antivirus, intrusion prevention system, intrusion detection system, file integrity monitoring) all combine to create a multilayer, end-to-end security solution for our microservice-based premium consumer experiences. Technologies to be covered include Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, access control lists, security groups, IAM roles and profiles, AWS KMS, NAT gateways, ELB load balancers, and Cerberus (our cloud-native secrets management solution).

 

SEC308 – Securing Enterprise Big Data Workloads on AWS

Security of big data workloads in a hybrid IT environment often comes as an afterthought. This session discusses how enterprises can architect securing big data workloads on AWS. We cover the application of authentication, authorization, encryption, and additional security principles and mechanisms to workloads leveraging Amazon Elastic MapReduce and Amazon Redshift.

 

SEC309 – Proactive Security Testing in AWS: From Early Implementation to Deployment Security Testing

Attend this session to learn about security testing your applications in AWS. Effective security testing is challenging, but multiple features and services within AWS make security testing easier. This session covers common approaches to testing, including how we think about testing within AWS, how to apply AWS services to your test setup, remediating findings, and automation.

 

SEC310 – Mitigating DDoS Attacks on AWS: Five Vectors and Four Use Cases

Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack mitigation has traditionally been a challenge for those hosting on fixed infrastructure. In the cloud, users can build applications on elastic infrastructure that is capable of mitigating and absorbing DDoS attacks. What once required overprovisioning, additional infrastructure, or third-party services is now an inherent capability of many cloud-based applications. This session explains common DDoS attack vectors and how AWS customers with different use cases are addressing these challenges. As part of the session, we show you how to build applications that are resilient to DDoS and demonstrate how they work in practice.

 

SEC311 – How to Automate Policy Validation

Managing permissions across a growing number of identities and resources can be time consuming and complex. Testing, validating, and understanding permissions before and after policy changes are deployed is critical to ensuring that your users and systems have the appropriate level of access. This session walks through the tools that are available to test, validate, and understand the permissions in your account. We demonstrate how to use these tools and how to automate them to continually validate the permissions in your accounts. The tools demonstrated in this session help you answer common questions such as:
  • How does a policy change affect the overall permissions for a user, group, or role?
  • Who has access to perform powerful actions?
  • Which services can this role access?
  • Can a user access a specific Amazon S3 bucket?

 

SEC312 – State of the Union for re:Source Mini Con for Security Services

AWS CISO Steve Schmidt presents the state of the union for re:Source Mini Con for Security Services. He addresses the state of the security and compliance ecosystem; large enterprise customer additions in key industries; the vertical view: maturing spaces for AWS security assurance (GxP, IoT, CIS foundations); and the international view: data privacy protections and data sovereignty. The state of the union also addresses a number of new identity, directory, and access services, and closes by looking at what’s on the horizon.

 

SEC401 – Automated Formal Reasoning About AWS Systems

Automatic and semiautomatic mechanical theorem provers are now being used within AWS to find proofs in mathematical logic that establish desired properties of key AWS components. In this session, we outline these efforts and discuss how mechanical theorem provers are used to replay found proofs of desired properties when software artifacts or networks are modified, thus helping provide security throughout the lifetime of the AWS system. We consider these use cases:
  • Using constraint solving to show that VPCs have desired safety properties, and maintaining this continuously at each change to the VPC.
  • Using automatic mechanical theorem provers to prove that s2n’s HMAC is correct and maintaining this continuously at each change to the s2n source code.
  • Using semiautomatic mechanical theorem provers to prove desired safety properties of Sassy protocol.

– Craig

32 Security and Compliance Sessions Now Live in the re:Invent 2016 Session Catalog

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://blogs.aws.amazon.com/security/post/Tx3UX2WK7G84E5J/32-Security-and-Compliance-Sessions-Now-Live-in-the-re-Invent-2016-Session-Catal

AWS re:Invent 2016 begins November 28, and now, the live session catalog includes 32 security and compliance sessions. 19 of these sessions are in the Security & Compliance track and 13 are in the re:Source Mini Con for Security Services. All 32 titles and abstracts are included below.

Security & Compliance Track sessions

As in past years, the sessions in the Security & Compliance track will take place in The Venetian | Palazzo in Las Vegas. Here’s what you have to look forward to!

SAC201 – Lessons from a Chief Security Officer: Achieving Continuous Compliance in Elastic Environments

Does meeting stringent compliance requirements keep you up at night? Do you worry about having the right audit trails in place as proof? 
 
Cengage Learning’s Chief Security Officer, Robert Hotaling, shares his organization’s journey to AWS, and how they enabled continuous compliance for their dynamic environment with automation. When Cengage shifted from publishing to digital education and online learning, they needed a secure elastic infrastructure for their data intensive and cyclical business, and workload layer security tools that would help them meet compliance requirements (e.g., PCI).
 
In this session, you will learn why building security in from the beginning saves you time (and painful retrofits) later, how to gather and retain audit evidence for instances that are only up for minutes or hours, and how Cengage used Trend Micro Deep Security to meet many compliance requirements and ensured instances were instantly protected as they came online in a hybrid cloud architecture. Session sponsored by Trend Micro, Inc.
  

SAC302 – Automating Security Event Response, from Idea to Code to Execution

With security-relevant services such as AWS Config, VPC Flow Logs, Amazon CloudWatch Events, and AWS Lambda, you now have the ability to programmatically wrangle security events that may occur within your AWS environment, including prevention, detection, response, and remediation. This session covers the process of automating security event response with various AWS building blocks, taking several ideas from drawing board to code, and gaining confidence in your coverage by proactively testing security monitoring and response effectiveness before anyone else does.
 
 

SAC303 – Become an AWS IAM Policy Ninja in 60 Minutes or Less

Are you interested in learning how to control access to your AWS resources? Have you ever wondered how to best scope down permissions to achieve least privilege permissions access control? If your answer to these questions is "yes," this session is for you. We take an in-depth look at the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policy language. We start with the basics of the policy language and how to create and attach policies to IAM users, groups, and roles. As we dive deeper, we explore policy variables, conditions, and other tools to help you author least privilege policies. Throughout the session, we cover some common use cases, such as granting a user secure access to an Amazon S3 bucket or to launch an Amazon EC2 instance of a specific type. 
 

SAC304 – Predictive Security: Using Big Data to Fortify Your Defenses

In a rapidly changing IT environment, detecting and responding to new threats is more important than ever. This session shows you how to build a predictive analytics stack on AWS, which harnesses the power of Amazon Machine Learning in conjunction with Amazon Elasticsearch Service, AWS CloudTrail, and VPC Flow Logs to perform tasks such as anomaly detection and log analysis. We also demonstrate how you can use AWS Lambda to act on this information in an automated fashion, such as performing updates to AWS WAF and security groups, leading to an improved security posture and alleviating operational burden on your security teams.
 

SAC305 – Auditing a Cloud Environment in 2016: What Tools Can Internal and External Auditors Leverage to Maintain Compliance?

With the rapid increase of complexity in managing security for distributed IT and cloud computing, security and compliance managers can innovate to ensure a high level of security when managing AWS resources. In this session, Chad Woolf, director of compliance for AWS, discusses which AWS service features to leverage to achieve a high level of security assurance over AWS resources, giving you more control of the security of your data and preparing you for a wide range of audits. You can now implement point-in-time audits and continuous monitoring in system architecture. Internal and external auditors can learn about emerging tools for monitoring environments in real time. Follow use case examples and demonstrations of services like Amazon Inspector, Amazon CloudWatch Logs, AWS CloudTrail, and AWS Config. Learn firsthand what some AWS customers have accomplished by leveraging AWS features to meet specific industry compliance requirements.
 

SAC306 – Encryption: It Was the Best of Controls, It Was the Worst of Controls

Encryption is a favorite of security and compliance professionals everywhere. Many compliance frameworks actually mandate encryption. Though encryption is important, it is also treacherous. Cryptographic protocols are subtle, and researchers are constantly finding new and creative flaws in them. Using encryption correctly, especially over time, also is expensive because you have to stay up to date.
 
AWS wants to encrypt data. And our customers, including Amazon, want to encrypt data. In this talk, we look at some of the challenges with using encryption, how AWS thinks internally about encryption, and how that thinking has informed the services we have built, the features we have vended, and our own usage of AWS.
 

SAC307 – The Psychology of Security Automation

Historically, relationships between developers and security teams have been challenging. Security teams sometimes see developers as careless and ignorant of risk, while developers might see security teams as dogmatic barriers to productivity. Can technologies and approaches such as the cloud, APIs, and automation lead to happier developers and more secure systems? Netflix has had success pursuing this approach, by leaning into the fundamental cloud concept of self-service, the Netflix cultural value of transparency in decision making, and the engineering efficiency principle of facilitating a “paved road.”
 
This session explores how security teams can use thoughtful tools and automation to improve relationships with development teams while creating a more secure and manageable environment. Topics include Netflix’s approach to IAM entity management, Elastic Load Balancing and certificate management, and general security configuration monitoring.
 

SAC308 – Hackproof Your Cloud: Responding to 2016 Threats

In this session, CloudCheckr CTO Aaron Newman highlights effective strategies and tools that AWS users can employ to improve their security posture. Specific emphasis is placed upon leveraging native AWS services. He covers how to include concrete steps that users can begin employing immediately.  Session sponsored by CloudCheckr.
 

SAC309 – You Can’t Protect What You Can’t See: AWS Security Monitoring & Compliance Validation from Adobe

Ensuring security and compliance across a globally distributed, large-scale AWS deployment requires a scalable process and a comprehensive set of technologies. In this session, Adobe will deep-dive into the AWS native monitoring and security services and some Splunk technologies leveraged globally to perform security monitoring across a large number of AWS accounts. You will learn about Adobe’s collection plumbing including components of S3, Kinesis, CloudWatch, SNS, Dynamo DB and Lambda, as well as the tooling and processes used at Adobe to deliver scalable monitoring without managing an unwieldy number of API keys and input stanzas.  Session sponsored by Splunk.
 

SAC310 – Securing Serverless Architectures, and API Filtering at Layer 7

AWS serverless architecture components such as Amazon S3, Amazon SQS, Amazon SNS, CloudWatch Logs, DynamoDB, Amazon Kinesis, and Lambda can be tightly constrained in their operation. However, it may still be possible to use some of them to propagate payloads that could be used to exploit vulnerabilities in some consuming endpoints or user-generated code. This session explores techniques for enhancing the security of these services, from assessing and tightening permissions in IAM to integrating tools and mechanisms for inline and out-of-band payload analysis that are more typically applied to traditional server-based architectures.
 

SAC311 – Evolving an Enterprise-level Compliance Framework with Amazon CloudWatch Events and AWS Lambda

Johnson & Johnson is in the process of doing a proof of concept to rewrite the compliance framework that they presented at re:Invent 2014. This framework leverages the newest AWS services and abandons the need for continual describes and master rules servers. Instead, Johnson & Johnson plans to use a distributed, event-based architecture that not only reduces costs but also assigns costs to the appropriate projects rather than central IT.
 

SAC312 – Architecting for End-to-End Security in the Enterprise

This session tells how our most mature, security-minded Fortune 500 customers adopt AWS while improving end-to-end protection of their sensitive data. Learn about the enterprise security architecture decisions made during actual sensitive workload deployments as told by the AWS professional services and the solution architecture team members who lived them. In this very prescriptive, technical walkthrough, we share lessons learned from the development of enterprise security strategy, security use-case development, security configuration decisions, and the creation of AWS security operations playbooks to support customer architectures.
 

SAC313 – Enterprise Patterns for Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS)

Professional services has completed five deep PCI engagements with enterprise customers over the last year. Common patterns were identified and codified in various artifacts. This session introduces the patterns that help customers address PCI requirements in a standard manner that also meets AWS best practices. Hear customers speak about their side of the journey and the solutions that they used to deploy a PCI compliance workload.
 

SAC314 – GxP Compliance in the Cloud

GxP is an acronym that refers to the regulations and guidelines applicable to life sciences organizations that make food and medical products such as drugs, medical devices, and medical software applications. The overall intent of GxP requirements is to ensure that food and medical products are safe for consumers and to ensure the integrity of data used to make product-related safety decisions.
 
The term GxP encompasses a broad range of compliance-related activities such as Good Laboratory Practices (GLP), Good Clinical Practices (GCP), Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), and others, each of which has product-specific requirements that life sciences organizations must implement based on the 1) type of products they make and 2) country in which their products are sold. When life sciences organizations use computerized systems to perform certain GxP activities, they must ensure that the computerized GxP system is developed, validated, and operated appropriately for the intended use of the system.
 
For this session, co-presented with Merck, services such as Amazon EC2, Amazon CloudWatch Logs, AWS CloudTrail, AWS CodeCommit, Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), and AWS CodePipeline will be discussed with an emphasis on implementing GxP-compliant systems in the AWS Cloud.
 

SAC315 – Scaling Security Operations: Using AWS Services to Automate Governance of Security Controls and Remediate Violations

This session enables security operators to use data provided by AWS services such as AWS CloudTrail, AWS Config, Amazon CloudWatch Events, and VPC Flow Fogs to reduce vulnerabilities, and when required, execute timely security actions that fix the violation or gather more information about the vulnerability and attacker. We look at security practices for compliance with PCI, CIS Security Controls,and HIPAA. We dive deep into an example from an AWS customer, Siemens AG, which has automated governance and implemented automated remediation using CloudTrail, AWS Config Rules, and AWS Lambda. A prerequisite for this session is knowledge of software development with Java, Python, or Node.
 

SAC316 – Security Automation: Spend Less Time Securing Your Applications

As attackers become more sophisticated, web application developers need to constantly update their security configurations. Static firewall rules are no longer good enough. Developers need a way to deploy automated security that can learn from the application behavior and identify bad traffic patterns to detect bad bots or bad actors on the Internet. This session showcases some of the real-world customer use cases that use machine learning and AWS WAF (a web application firewall) to automatically identify bad actors affecting multiplayer gaming applications. We also present tutorials and code samples that show how customers can analyze traffic patterns and deploy new AWS WAF rules on the fly.
 

SAC317 – IAM Best Practices to Live By

This session covers AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) best practices that can help improve your security posture. We cover how to manage users and their security credentials. We also explain why you should delete your root access keys—or at the very least, rotate them regularly. Using common use cases, we demonstrate when to choose between using IAM users and IAM roles. Finally, we explore how to set permissions to grant least privilege access control in one or more of your AWS accounts.
 

SAC318 – Life Without SSH: Immutable Infrastructure in Production

This session covers what a real-world production deployment of a fully automated deployment pipeline looks like with instances that are deployed without SSH keys. By leveraging AWS CodeDeploy and Docker, we will show how we achieved semi-immutable and fully immutable infrastructures, and what the challenges and remediations were.
 

SAC401 – 5 Security Automation Improvements You Can Make by Using Amazon CloudWatch Events and AWS Config Rules

This session demonstrates 5 different security and compliance validation actions that you can perform using Amazon CloudWatch Events and AWS Config rules. This session focuses on the actual code for the various controls, actions, and remediation features, and how to use various AWS services and features to build them. The demos in this session include CIS Amazon Web Services Foundations validation; host-based AWS Config rules validation using AWS Lambda, SSH, and VPC-E; automatic creation and assigning of MFA tokens when new users are created; and automatic instance isolation based on SSH logons or VPC Flow Logs deny logs. This session focuses on code and live demos.
 
 
 

re:Source Mini Con for Security Services sessions

The re:Source Mini Con for Security Services offers you an opportunity to dive even deeper into security and compliance topics. Think of it as a one-day, fully immersive mini-conference. The Mini Con will take place in The Mirage in Las Vegas.

SEC301 – Audit Your AWS Account Against Industry Best Practices: The CIS AWS Benchmarks

Audit teams can consistently evaluate the security of an AWS account. Best practices greatly reduce complexity when managing risk and auditing the use of AWS for critical, audited, and regulated systems. You can integrate these security checks into your security and audit ecosystem. Center for Internet Security (CIS) benchmarks are incorporated into products developed by 20 security vendors, are referenced by PCI 3.1 and FedRAMP, and are included in the National Vulnerability Database (NVD) National Checklist Program (NCP). This session shows you how to implement foundational security measures in your AWS account. The prescribed best practices help make implementation of core AWS security measures more straightforward for security teams and AWS account owners.
 

SEC302 – WORKSHOP: Working with AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) Policies and Configuring Network Security Using VPCs and Security Groups

In this 2.5-hour workshop, we will show you how to manage permissions by drafting AWS IAM policies that adhere to the principle of least privilege–granting the least permissions required to achieve a task. You will learn all the ins and outs of drafting and applying IAM policies appropriately to help secure your AWS resources.
 
In addition, we will show you how to configure network security using VPCs and security groups. 
 

SEC303 – Get the Most from AWS KMS: Architecting Applications for High Security

AWS Key Management Service provides an easy and cost-effective way to secure your data in AWS. In this session, you learn about leveraging the latest features of the service to minimize risk for your data. We also review the recently released Import Key feature that gives you more control over the encryption process by letting you bring your own keys to AWS.
 

SEC304 – Reduce Your Blast Radius by Using Multiple AWS Accounts Per Region and Service

This session shows you how to reduce your blast radius by using multiple AWS accounts per region and service, which helps limit the impact of a critical event such as a security breach. Using multiple accounts helps you define boundaries and provides blast-radius isolation.
 

SEC305 – Scaling Security Resources for Your First 10 Million Customers

Cloud computing offers many advantages, such as the ability to scale your web applications or website on demand. But how do you scale your security and compliance infrastructure along with the business? Join this session to understand best practices for scaling your security resources as you grow from zero to millions of users. Specifically, you learn the following:
  • How to scale your security and compliance infrastructure to keep up with a rapidly expanding threat base.
  • The security implications of scaling for numbers of users and numbers of applications, and how to satisfy both needs.
  • How agile development with integrated security testing and validation leads to a secure environment.
  • Best practices and design patterns of a continuous delivery pipeline and the appropriate security-focused testing for each.
  • The necessity of treating your security as code, just as you would do with infrastructure.
The services covered in this session include AWS IAM, Auto Scaling, Amazon Inspector, AWS WAF, and Amazon Cognito.
 

SEC306 – WORKSHOP: How to Implement a General Solution for Federated API/CLI Access Using SAML 2.0

AWS supports identity federation using SAML (Security Assertion Markup Language) 2.0. Using SAML, you can configure your AWS accounts to integrate with your identity provider (IdP). Once configured, your federated users are authenticated and authorized by your organization’s IdP, and then can use single sign-on (SSO) to sign in to the AWS Management Console. This not only obviates the need for your users to remember yet another user name and password, but it also streamlines identity management for your administrators. This is great if your federated users want to access the AWS Management Console, but what if they want to use the AWS CLI or programmatically call AWS APIs?
 
In this 2.5-hour workshop, we will show you how you can implement federated API and CLI access for your users. The examples provided use the AWS Python SDK and some additional client-side integration code. If you have federated users that require this type of access, implementing this solution should earn you more than one high five on your next trip to the water cooler. 
 

SEC307 – Microservices, Macro Security Needs: How Nike Uses a Multi-Layer, End-to-End Security Approach to Protect Microservice-Based Solutions at Scale

Microservice architectures provide numerous benefits but also have significant security challenges. This session presents how Nike uses layers of security to protect consumers and business. We show how network topology, network security primitives, identity and access management, traffic routing, secure network traffic, secrets management, and host-level security (antivirus, intrusion prevention system, intrusion detection system, file integrity monitoring) all combine to create a multilayer, end-to-end security solution for our microservice-based premium consumer experiences. Technologies to be covered include Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, access control lists, security groups, IAM roles and profiles, AWS KMS, NAT gateways, ELB load balancers, and Cerberus (our cloud-native secrets management solution).
 

SEC308 – Securing Enterprise Big Data Workloads on AWS

Security of big data workloads in a hybrid IT environment often comes as an afterthought. This session discusses how enterprises can architect securing big data workloads on AWS. We cover the application of authentication, authorization, encryption, and additional security principles and mechanisms to workloads leveraging Amazon Elastic MapReduce and Amazon Redshift.
 

SEC309 – Proactive Security Testing in AWS: From Early Implementation to Deployment Security Testing

Attend this session to learn about security testing your applications in AWS. Effective security testing is challenging, but multiple features and services within AWS make security testing easier. This session covers common approaches to testing, including how we think about testing within AWS, how to apply AWS services to your test setup, remediating findings, and automation.
 

SEC310 – Mitigating DDoS Attacks on AWS: Five Vectors and Four Use Cases

Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack mitigation has traditionally been a challenge for those hosting on fixed infrastructure. In the cloud, users can build applications on elastic infrastructure that is capable of mitigating and absorbing DDoS attacks. What once required overprovisioning, additional infrastructure, or third-party services is now an inherent capability of many cloud-based applications. This session explains common DDoS attack vectors and how AWS customers with different use cases are addressing these challenges. As part of the session, we show you how to build applications that are resilient to DDoS and demonstrate how they work in practice.
 

SEC311 – How to Automate Policy Validation

Managing permissions across a growing number of identities and resources can be time consuming and complex. Testing, validating, and understanding permissions before and after policy changes are deployed is critical to ensuring that your users and systems have the appropriate level of access. This session walks through the tools that are available to test, validate, and understand the permissions in your account. We demonstrate how to use these tools and how to automate them to continually validate the permissions in your accounts. The tools demonstrated in this session help you answer common questions such as:
  • How does a policy change affect the overall permissions for a user, group, or role?
  • Who has access to perform powerful actions?
  • Which services can this role access?
  • Can a user access a specific Amazon S3 bucket?

SEC312 – State of the Union for re:Source Mini Con for Security Services

AWS CISO Steve Schmidt presents the state of the union for re:Source Mini Con for Security Services. He addresses the state of the security and compliance ecosystem; large enterprise customer additions in key industries; the vertical view: maturing spaces for AWS security assurance (GxP, IoT, CIS foundations); and the international view: data privacy protections and data sovereignty. The state of the union also addresses a number of new identity, directory, and access services, and closes by looking at what’s on the horizon.
 

SEC401 – Automated Formal Reasoning About AWS Systems

Automatic and semiautomatic mechanical theorem provers are now being used within AWS to find proofs in mathematical logic that establish desired properties of key AWS components. In this session, we outline these efforts and discuss how mechanical theorem provers are used to replay found proofs of desired properties when software artifacts or networks are modified, thus helping provide security throughout the lifetime of the AWS system. We consider these use cases:
  • Using constraint solving to show that VPCs have desired safety properties, and maintaining this continuously at each change to the VPC.
  • Using automatic mechanical theorem provers to prove that s2n’s HMAC is correct and maintaining this continuously at each change to the s2n source code.
  • Using semiautomatic mechanical theorem provers to prove desired safety properties of Sassy protocol.
 
– Craig

In Case You Missed These: AWS Security Blog Posts from June, July, and August

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://blogs.aws.amazon.com/security/post/Tx3KVD6T490MM47/In-Case-You-Missed-These-AWS-Security-Blog-Posts-from-June-July-and-August

In case you missed any AWS Security Blog posts from June, July, and August, they are summarized and linked to below. The posts are shown in reverse chronological order (most recent first), and the subject matter ranges from a tagging limit increase to recording SSH sessions established through a bastion host.

August

August 16: Updated Whitepaper Available: AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency
We recently released the 2016 version of the AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency Whitepaper, which can be helpful if you have public-facing endpoints that might attract unwanted distributed denial of service (DDoS) activity.

August 15: Now Organize Your AWS Resources by Using up to 50 Tags per Resource
Tagging AWS resources simplifies the way you organize and discover resources, allocate costs, and control resource access across services. Many of you have told us that as the number of applications, teams, and projects running on AWS increases, you need more than 10 tags per resource. Based on this feedback, we now support up to 50 tags per resource. You do not need to take additional action—you can begin applying as many as 50 tags per resource today.

August 11: New! Import Your Own Keys into AWS Key Management Service
Today, we are happy to announce the launch of the new import key feature that enables you to import keys from your own key management infrastructure (KMI) into AWS Key Management Service (KMS). After you have exported keys from your existing systems and imported them into KMS, you can use them in all KMS-integrated AWS services and custom applications.

August 2: Customer Update: Amazon Web Services and the EU-US Privacy Shield
Recently, the European Commission and the US Government agreed on a new framework called the EU-US Privacy Shield, and on July 12, the European Commission formally adopted it. AWS welcomes this new framework for transatlantic data flow. As the EU-US Privacy Shield replaces Safe Harbor, we understand many of our customers have questions about what this means for them. The security of our customers’ data is our number one priority, so I wanted to take a few moments to explain what this all means.

August 2: How to Remove Single Points of Failure by Using a High-Availability Partition Group in Your AWS CloudHSM Environment
In this post, I will walk you through steps to remove single points of failure in your AWS CloudHSM environment by setting up a high-availability (HA) partition group. Single points of failure occur when a single CloudHSM device fails in a non-HA configuration, which can result in the permanent loss of keys and data. The HA partition group, however, allows for one or more CloudHSM devices to fail, while still keeping your environment operational.

July

July 28: Enable Your Federated Users to Work in the AWS Management Console for up to 12 Hours
AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) supports identity federation, which enables external identities, such as users in your corporate directory, to sign in to the AWS Management Console via single sign-on (SSO). Now with a small configuration change, your AWS administrators can allow your federated users to work in the AWS Management Console for up to 12 hours, instead of having to reauthenticate every 60 minutes. In addition, administrators can now revoke active federated user sessions. In this blog post, I will show how to configure the console session duration for two common federation use cases: using Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) 2.0 and using a custom federation broker that leverages the sts:AssumeRole* APIs (see this downloadable sample of a federation proxy). I will wrap up this post with a walkthrough of the new session revocation process.

July 28: Amazon Cognito Your User Pools is Now Generally Available
Amazon Cognito makes it easy for developers to add sign-up, sign-in, and enhanced security functionality to mobile and web apps. With Amazon Cognito Your User Pools, you get a simple, fully managed service for creating and maintaining your own user directory that can scale to hundreds of millions of users.

July 27: How to Audit Cross-Account Roles Using AWS CloudTrail and Amazon CloudWatch Events
In this blog post, I will walk through the process of auditing access across AWS accounts by a cross-account role. This process links API calls that assume a role in one account to resource-related API calls in a different account. To develop this process, I will use AWS CloudTrail, Amazon CloudWatch Events, and AWS Lambda functions. When complete, the process will provide a full audit chain from end user to resource access across separate AWS accounts.

July 25: AWS Becomes First Cloud Service Provider to Adopt New PCI DSS 3.2
We are happy to announce the availability of the Amazon Web Services PCI DSS 3.2 Compliance Package for the 2016/2017 cycle. AWS is the first cloud service provider (CSP) to successfully complete the assessment against the newly released PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) version 3.2, 18 months in advance of the mandatory February 1, 2018, deadline. The AWS Attestation of Compliance (AOC), available upon request, now features 26 PCI DSS certified services, including the latest additions of Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS), AWS Config, and AWS WAF (a web application firewall). We at AWS are committed to this international information security and compliance program, and adopting the new standard as early as possible once again demonstrates our commitment to information security as our highest priority. Our customers (and customers of our customers) can operate confidently as they store and process credit card information (and any other sensitive data) in the cloud knowing that AWS products and services are tested against the latest and most mature set of PCI compliance requirements.

July 20: New AWS Compute Blog Post: Help Secure Container-Enabled Applications with IAM Roles for ECS Tasks
Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) now allows you to specify an IAM role that can be used by the containers in an ECS task, as a new AWS Compute Blog post explains. 

July 14: New Whitepaper Now Available: The Security Perspective of the AWS Cloud Adoption Framework
Today, AWS released the Security Perspective of the AWS Cloud Adoption Framework (AWS CAF). The AWS CAF provides a framework to help you structure and plan your cloud adoption journey, and build a comprehensive approach to cloud computing throughout the IT lifecycle. The framework provides seven specific areas of focus or Perspectives: business, platform, maturity, people, process, operations, and security.

July 14: New Amazon Inspector Blog Post on the AWS Blog
On the AWS Blog yesterday, Jeff Barr published a new security-related blog post written by AWS Principal Security Engineer Eric Fitzgerald. Here’s the beginning of the post, which is entitled, Scale Your Security Vulnerability Testing with Amazon Inspector:

July 12: How to Use AWS CloudFormation to Automate Your AWS WAF Configuration with Example Rules and Match Conditions
We recently announced AWS CloudFormation support for all current features of AWS WAF. This enables you to leverage CloudFormation templates to configure, customize, and test AWS WAF settings across all your web applications. Using CloudFormation templates can help you reduce the time required to configure AWS WAF. In this blog post, I will show you how to use CloudFormation to automate your AWS WAF configuration with example rules and match conditions.

July 11: How to Restrict Amazon S3 Bucket Access to a Specific IAM Role
In this blog post, I show how you can restrict S3 bucket access to a specific IAM role or user within an account using Conditions instead of with the NotPrincipal element. Even if another user in the same account has an Admin policy or a policy with s3:*, they will be denied if they are not explicitly listed. You can use this approach, for example, to configure a bucket for access by instances within an Auto Scaling group. You can also use this approach to limit access to a bucket with a high-level security need.

July 7: How to Use SAML to Automatically Direct Federated Users to a Specific AWS Management Console Page
In this blog post, I will show you how to create a deep link for federated users via the SAML 2.0 RelayState parameter in Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS). By using a deep link, your users will go directly to the specified console page without additional navigation.

July 6: How to Prevent Uploads of Unencrypted Objects to Amazon S3
In this blog post, I will show you how to create an S3 bucket policy that prevents users from uploading unencrypted objects, unless they are using server-side encryption with S3–managed encryption keys (SSE-S3) or server-side encryption with AWS KMS–managed keys (SSE-KMS).

June

June 30: The Top 20 AWS IAM Documentation Pages so Far This Year
The following 20 pages have been the most viewed AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) documentation pages so far this year. I have included a brief description with each link to give you a clearer idea of what each page covers. Use this list to see what other people have been viewing and perhaps to pique your own interest about a topic you’ve been meaning to research. 

June 29: The Most Viewed AWS Security Blog Posts so Far in 2016
The following 10 posts are the most viewed AWS Security Blog posts that we published during the first six months of this year. You can use this list as a guide to catch up on your blog reading or even read a post again that you found particularly useful.

June 25: AWS Earns Department of Defense Impact Level 4 Provisional Authorization
I am pleased to share that, for our AWS GovCloud (US) Region, AWS has received a Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) Provisional Authorization (PA) at Impact Level 4 (IL4). This will allow Department of Defense (DoD) agencies to use the AWS Cloud for production workloads with export-controlled data, privacy information, and protected health information as well as other controlled unclassified information. This new authorization continues to demonstrate our advanced work in the public sector space; you might recall AWS was the first cloud service provider to obtain an Impact Level 4 PA in August 2014, paving the way for DoD pilot workloads and applications in the cloud. Additionally, we recently achieved a FedRAMP High provisional Authorization to Operate (P-ATO) from the Joint Authorization Board (JAB), also for AWS GovCloud (US), and today’s announcement allows DoD mission owners to continue to leverage AWS for critical production applications.

June 23: AWS re:Invent 2016 Registration Is Now Open
Register now for the fifth annual AWS re:Invent, the largest gathering of the global cloud computing community. Join us in Las Vegas for opportunities to connect, collaborate, and learn about AWS solutions. This year we are offering all-new technical deep-dives on topics such as security, IoT, serverless computing, and containers. We are also delivering more than 400 sessions, more hands-on labs, bootcamps, and opportunities for one-on-one engagements with AWS experts.

June 23: AWS Achieves FedRAMP High JAB Provisional Authorization
We are pleased to announce that AWS has received a FedRAMP High JAB Provisional Authorization to Operate (P-ATO) from the Joint Authorization Board (JAB) for the AWS GovCloud (US) Region. The new Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) High JAB Provisional Authorization is mapped to more than 400 National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) security controls. This P-ATO recognizes AWS GovCloud (US) as a secure environment on which to run highly sensitive government workloads, including Personally Identifiable Information (PII), sensitive patient records, financial data, law enforcement data, and other Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI).

June 22: AWS IAM Service Last Accessed Data Now Available for South America (Sao Paulo) and Asia Pacific (Seoul) Regions
In December, AWS IAM released service last accessed data, which helps you identify overly permissive policies attached to an IAM entity (a user, group, or role). Today, we have extended service last accessed data to support two additional regions: South America (Sao Paulo) and Asia Pacific (Seoul). With this release, you can now view the date when an IAM entity last accessed an AWS service in these two regions. You can use this information to identify unnecessary permissions and update policies to remove access to unused services.

June 20: New Twitter Handle Now Live: @AWSSecurityInfo
Today, we launched a new Twitter handle: @AWSSecurityInfo. The purpose of this new handle is to share security bulletins, security whitepapers, compliance news and information, and other AWS security-related and compliance-related information. The scope of this handle is broader than that of @AWSIdentity, which focuses primarily on Security Blog posts. However, feel free to follow both handles!

June 15: Announcing Two New AWS Quick Start Reference Deployments for Compliance
As part of the Professional Services Enterprise Accelerator – Compliance program, AWS has published two new Quick Start reference deployments to assist federal government customers and others who need to meet National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) SP 800-53 (Revision 4) security control requirements, including those at the high-impact level. The new Quick Starts are AWS Enterprise Accelerator – Compliance: NIST-based Assurance Frameworks and AWS Enterprise Accelerator – Compliance: Standardized Architecture for NIST High-Impact Controls Featuring Trend Micro Deep Security. These Quick Starts address many of the NIST controls at the infrastructure layer. Furthermore, for systems categorized as high impact, AWS has worked with Trend Micro to incorporate its Deep Security product into a Quick Start deployment in order to address many additional high-impact controls at the workload layer (app, data, and operating system). In addition, we have worked with Telos Corporation to populate security control implementation details for each of these Quick Starts into the Xacta product suite for customers who rely upon that suite for governance, risk, and compliance workflows.

June 14: Now Available: Get Even More Details from Service Last Accessed Data
In December, AWS IAM released service last accessed data, which shows the time when an IAM entity (a user, group, or role) last accessed an AWS service. This provided a powerful tool to help you grant least privilege permissions. Starting today, it’s easier to identify where you can reduce permissions based on additional service last accessed data.

June 14: How to Record SSH Sessions Established Through a Bastion Host
A bastion host is a server whose purpose is to provide access to a private network from an external network, such as the Internet. Because of its exposure to potential attack, a bastion host must minimize the chances of penetration. For example, you can use a bastion host to mitigate the risk of allowing SSH connections from an external network to the Linux instances launched in a private subnet of your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC). In this blog post, I will show you how to leverage a bastion host to record all SSH sessions established with Linux instances. Recording SSH sessions enables auditing and can help in your efforts to comply with regulatory requirements.

June 14: AWS Granted Authority to Operate for Department of Commerce and NOAA
AWS already has a number of federal agencies onboarded to the cloud, including the Department of Energy, The Department of the Interior, and NASA. Today we are pleased to announce the addition of two more ATOs (authority to operate) for the Department of Commerce (DOC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Specifically, the DOC will be utilizing AWS for their Commerce Data Service, and NOAA will be leveraging the cloud for their “Big Data Project." According to NOAA, the goal of the Big Data Project is to “create a sustainable, market-driven ecosystem that lowers the cost barrier to data publication. This project will create a new economic space for growth and job creation while providing the public far greater access to the data created with its tax dollars.”

June 2: How to Set Up DNS Resolution Between On-Premises Networks and AWS by Using Unbound
In previous AWS Security Blog posts, Drew Dennis covered two options for establishing DNS connectivity between your on-premises networks and your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) environments. His first post explained how to use Simple AD to forward DNS requests originating from on-premises networks to an Amazon Route 53 private hosted zone. His second post showed how you can use Microsoft Active Directory (also provisioned with AWS Directory Service) to provide the same DNS resolution with some additional forwarding capabilities. In this post, I will explain how you can set up DNS resolution between your on-premises DNS with Amazon VPC by using Unbound, an open-source, recursive DNS resolver. This solution is not a managed solution like Microsoft AD and Simple AD, but it does provide the ability to route DNS requests between on-premises environments and an Amazon VPC–provided DNS.

June 1: How to Manage Secrets for Amazon EC2 Container Service–Based Applications by Using Amazon S3 and Docker
In this blog post, I will show you how to store secrets on Amazon S3, and use AWS IAM roles to grant access to those stored secrets using an example WordPress application deployed as a Docker image using ECS. Using IAM roles means that developers and operations staff do not have the credentials to access secrets. Only the application and staff who are responsible for managing the secrets can access them. The deployment model for ECS ensures that tasks are run on dedicated EC2 instances for the same AWS account and are not shared between customers, which gives sufficient isolation between different container environments.

If you have comments  about any of these posts, please add your comments in the "Comments" section of the appropriate post. If you have questions about or issues implementing the solutions in any of these posts, please start a new thread on the AWS IAM forum.

– Craig

In Case You Missed These: AWS Security Blog Posts from June, July, and August

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/in-case-you-missed-these-aws-security-blog-posts-from-june-july-and-august/

In case you missed any AWS Security Blog posts from June, July, and August, they are summarized and linked to below. The posts are shown in reverse chronological order (most recent first), and the subject matter ranges from a tagging limit increase to recording SSH sessions established through a bastion host.

August

August 16: Updated Whitepaper Available: AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency
We recently released the 2016 version of the AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency Whitepaper, which can be helpful if you have public-facing endpoints that might attract unwanted distributed denial of service (DDoS) activity.

August 15: Now Organize Your AWS Resources by Using up to 50 Tags per Resource
Tagging AWS resources simplifies the way you organize and discover resources, allocate costs, and control resource access across services. Many of you have told us that as the number of applications, teams, and projects running on AWS increases, you need more than 10 tags per resource. Based on this feedback, we now support up to 50 tags per resource. You do not need to take additional action—you can begin applying as many as 50 tags per resource today.

August 11: New! Import Your Own Keys into AWS Key Management Service
Today, we are happy to announce the launch of the new import key feature that enables you to import keys from your own key management infrastructure (KMI) into AWS Key Management Service (KMS). After you have exported keys from your existing systems and imported them into KMS, you can use them in all KMS-integrated AWS services and custom applications.

August 2: Customer Update: Amazon Web Services and the EU-US Privacy Shield
Recently, the European Commission and the US Government agreed on a new framework called the EU-US Privacy Shield, and on July 12, the European Commission formally adopted it. AWS welcomes this new framework for transatlantic data flow. As the EU-US Privacy Shield replaces Safe Harbor, we understand many of our customers have questions about what this means for them. The security of our customers’ data is our number one priority, so I wanted to take a few moments to explain what this all means.

August 2: How to Remove Single Points of Failure by Using a High-Availability Partition Group in Your AWS CloudHSM Environment
In this post, I will walk you through steps to remove single points of failure in your AWS CloudHSM environment by setting up a high-availability (HA) partition group. Single points of failure occur when a single CloudHSM device fails in a non-HA configuration, which can result in the permanent loss of keys and data. The HA partition group, however, allows for one or more CloudHSM devices to fail, while still keeping your environment operational.

July

July 28: Enable Your Federated Users to Work in the AWS Management Console for up to 12 Hours
AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) supports identity federation, which enables external identities, such as users in your corporate directory, to sign in to the AWS Management Console via single sign-on (SSO). Now with a small configuration change, your AWS administrators can allow your federated users to work in the AWS Management Console for up to 12 hours, instead of having to reauthenticate every 60 minutes. In addition, administrators can now revoke active federated user sessions. In this blog post, I will show how to configure the console session duration for two common federation use cases: using Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) 2.0 and using a custom federation broker that leverages the sts:AssumeRole* APIs (see this downloadable sample of a federation proxy). I will wrap up this post with a walkthrough of the new session revocation process.

July 28: Amazon Cognito Your User Pools is Now Generally Available
Amazon Cognito makes it easy for developers to add sign-up, sign-in, and enhanced security functionality to mobile and web apps. With Amazon Cognito Your User Pools, you get a simple, fully managed service for creating and maintaining your own user directory that can scale to hundreds of millions of users.

July 27: How to Audit Cross-Account Roles Using AWS CloudTrail and Amazon CloudWatch Events
In this blog post, I will walk through the process of auditing access across AWS accounts by a cross-account role. This process links API calls that assume a role in one account to resource-related API calls in a different account. To develop this process, I will use AWS CloudTrail, Amazon CloudWatch Events, and AWS Lambda functions. When complete, the process will provide a full audit chain from end user to resource access across separate AWS accounts.

July 25: AWS Becomes First Cloud Service Provider to Adopt New PCI DSS 3.2
We are happy to announce the availability of the Amazon Web Services PCI DSS 3.2 Compliance Package for the 2016/2017 cycle. AWS is the first cloud service provider (CSP) to successfully complete the assessment against the newly released PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) version 3.2, 18 months in advance of the mandatory February 1, 2018, deadline. The AWS Attestation of Compliance (AOC), available upon request, now features 26 PCI DSS certified services, including the latest additions of Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS), AWS Config, and AWS WAF (a web application firewall). We at AWS are committed to this international information security and compliance program, and adopting the new standard as early as possible once again demonstrates our commitment to information security as our highest priority. Our customers (and customers of our customers) can operate confidently as they store and process credit card information (and any other sensitive data) in the cloud knowing that AWS products and services are tested against the latest and most mature set of PCI compliance requirements.

July 20: New AWS Compute Blog Post: Help Secure Container-Enabled Applications with IAM Roles for ECS Tasks
Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) now allows you to specify an IAM role that can be used by the containers in an ECS task, as a new AWS Compute Blog post explains.

July 14: New Whitepaper Now Available: The Security Perspective of the AWS Cloud Adoption Framework
Today, AWS released the Security Perspective of the AWS Cloud Adoption Framework (AWS CAF). The AWS CAF provides a framework to help you structure and plan your cloud adoption journey, and build a comprehensive approach to cloud computing throughout the IT lifecycle. The framework provides seven specific areas of focus or Perspectives: business, platform, maturity, people, process, operations, and security.

July 14: New Amazon Inspector Blog Post on the AWS Blog
On the AWS Blog yesterday, Jeff Barr published a new security-related blog post written by AWS Principal Security Engineer Eric Fitzgerald. Here’s the beginning of the post, which is entitled, Scale Your Security Vulnerability Testing with Amazon Inspector:

July 12: How to Use AWS CloudFormation to Automate Your AWS WAF Configuration with Example Rules and Match Conditions
We recently announced AWS CloudFormation support for all current features of AWS WAF. This enables you to leverage CloudFormation templates to configure, customize, and test AWS WAF settings across all your web applications. Using CloudFormation templates can help you reduce the time required to configure AWS WAF. In this blog post, I will show you how to use CloudFormation to automate your AWS WAF configuration with example rules and match conditions.

July 11: How to Restrict Amazon S3 Bucket Access to a Specific IAM Role
In this blog post, I show how you can restrict S3 bucket access to a specific IAM role or user within an account using Conditions instead of with the NotPrincipal element. Even if another user in the same account has an Admin policy or a policy with s3:*, they will be denied if they are not explicitly listed. You can use this approach, for example, to configure a bucket for access by instances within an Auto Scaling group. You can also use this approach to limit access to a bucket with a high-level security need.

July 7: How to Use SAML to Automatically Direct Federated Users to a Specific AWS Management Console Page
In this blog post, I will show you how to create a deep link for federated users via the SAML 2.0 RelayState parameter in Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS). By using a deep link, your users will go directly to the specified console page without additional navigation.

July 6: How to Prevent Uploads of Unencrypted Objects to Amazon S3
In this blog post, I will show you how to create an S3 bucket policy that prevents users from uploading unencrypted objects, unless they are using server-side encryption with S3–managed encryption keys (SSE-S3) or server-side encryption with AWS KMS–managed keys (SSE-KMS).

June

June 30: The Top 20 AWS IAM Documentation Pages so Far This Year
The following 20 pages have been the most viewed AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) documentation pages so far this year. I have included a brief description with each link to give you a clearer idea of what each page covers. Use this list to see what other people have been viewing and perhaps to pique your own interest about a topic you’ve been meaning to research.

June 29: The Most Viewed AWS Security Blog Posts so Far in 2016
The following 10 posts are the most viewed AWS Security Blog posts that we published during the first six months of this year. You can use this list as a guide to catch up on your blog reading or even read a post again that you found particularly useful.

June 25: AWS Earns Department of Defense Impact Level 4 Provisional Authorization
I am pleased to share that, for our AWS GovCloud (US) Region, AWS has received a Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) Provisional Authorization (PA) at Impact Level 4 (IL4). This will allow Department of Defense (DoD) agencies to use the AWS Cloud for production workloads with export-controlled data, privacy information, and protected health information as well as other controlled unclassified information. This new authorization continues to demonstrate our advanced work in the public sector space; you might recall AWS was the first cloud service provider to obtain an Impact Level 4 PA in August 2014, paving the way for DoD pilot workloads and applications in the cloud. Additionally, we recently achieved a FedRAMP High provisional Authorization to Operate (P-ATO) from the Joint Authorization Board (JAB), also for AWS GovCloud (US), and today’s announcement allows DoD mission owners to continue to leverage AWS for critical production applications.

June 23: AWS re:Invent 2016 Registration Is Now Open
Register now for the fifth annual AWS re:Invent, the largest gathering of the global cloud computing community. Join us in Las Vegas for opportunities to connect, collaborate, and learn about AWS solutions. This year we are offering all-new technical deep-dives on topics such as security, IoT, serverless computing, and containers. We are also delivering more than 400 sessions, more hands-on labs, bootcamps, and opportunities for one-on-one engagements with AWS experts.

June 23: AWS Achieves FedRAMP High JAB Provisional Authorization
We are pleased to announce that AWS has received a FedRAMP High JAB Provisional Authorization to Operate (P-ATO) from the Joint Authorization Board (JAB) for the AWS GovCloud (US) Region. The new Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) High JAB Provisional Authorization is mapped to more than 400 National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) security controls. This P-ATO recognizes AWS GovCloud (US) as a secure environment on which to run highly sensitive government workloads, including Personally Identifiable Information (PII), sensitive patient records, financial data, law enforcement data, and other Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI).

June 22: AWS IAM Service Last Accessed Data Now Available for South America (Sao Paulo) and Asia Pacific (Seoul) Regions
In December, AWS IAM released service last accessed data, which helps you identify overly permissive policies attached to an IAM entity (a user, group, or role). Today, we have extended service last accessed data to support two additional regions: South America (Sao Paulo) and Asia Pacific (Seoul). With this release, you can now view the date when an IAM entity last accessed an AWS service in these two regions. You can use this information to identify unnecessary permissions and update policies to remove access to unused services.

June 20: New Twitter Handle Now Live: @AWSSecurityInfo
Today, we launched a new Twitter handle: @AWSSecurityInfo. The purpose of this new handle is to share security bulletins, security whitepapers, compliance news and information, and other AWS security-related and compliance-related information. The scope of this handle is broader than that of @AWSIdentity, which focuses primarily on Security Blog posts. However, feel free to follow both handles!

June 15: Announcing Two New AWS Quick Start Reference Deployments for Compliance
As part of the Professional Services Enterprise Accelerator – Compliance program, AWS has published two new Quick Start reference deployments to assist federal government customers and others who need to meet National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) SP 800-53 (Revision 4) security control requirements, including those at the high-impact level. The new Quick Starts are AWS Enterprise Accelerator – Compliance: NIST-based Assurance Frameworks and AWS Enterprise Accelerator – Compliance: Standardized Architecture for NIST High-Impact Controls Featuring Trend Micro Deep Security. These Quick Starts address many of the NIST controls at the infrastructure layer. Furthermore, for systems categorized as high impact, AWS has worked with Trend Micro to incorporate its Deep Security product into a Quick Start deployment in order to address many additional high-impact controls at the workload layer (app, data, and operating system). In addition, we have worked with Telos Corporation to populate security control implementation details for each of these Quick Starts into the Xacta product suite for customers who rely upon that suite for governance, risk, and compliance workflows.

June 14: Now Available: Get Even More Details from Service Last Accessed Data
In December, AWS IAM released service last accessed data, which shows the time when an IAM entity (a user, group, or role) last accessed an AWS service. This provided a powerful tool to help you grant least privilege permissions. Starting today, it’s easier to identify where you can reduce permissions based on additional service last accessed data.

June 14: How to Record SSH Sessions Established Through a Bastion Host
A bastion host is a server whose purpose is to provide access to a private network from an external network, such as the Internet. Because of its exposure to potential attack, a bastion host must minimize the chances of penetration. For example, you can use a bastion host to mitigate the risk of allowing SSH connections from an external network to the Linux instances launched in a private subnet of your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC). In this blog post, I will show you how to leverage a bastion host to record all SSH sessions established with Linux instances. Recording SSH sessions enables auditing and can help in your efforts to comply with regulatory requirements.

June 14: AWS Granted Authority to Operate for Department of Commerce and NOAA
AWS already has a number of federal agencies onboarded to the cloud, including the Department of Energy, The Department of the Interior, and NASA. Today we are pleased to announce the addition of two more ATOs (authority to operate) for the Department of Commerce (DOC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Specifically, the DOC will be utilizing AWS for their Commerce Data Service, and NOAA will be leveraging the cloud for their “Big Data Project.” According to NOAA, the goal of the Big Data Project is to “create a sustainable, market-driven ecosystem that lowers the cost barrier to data publication. This project will create a new economic space for growth and job creation while providing the public far greater access to the data created with its tax dollars.”

June 2: How to Set Up DNS Resolution Between On-Premises Networks and AWS by Using Unbound
In previous AWS Security Blog posts, Drew Dennis covered two options for establishing DNS connectivity between your on-premises networks and your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) environments. His first post explained how to use Simple AD to forward DNS requests originating from on-premises networks to an Amazon Route 53 private hosted zone. His second post showed how you can use Microsoft Active Directory (also provisioned with AWS Directory Service) to provide the same DNS resolution with some additional forwarding capabilities. In this post, I will explain how you can set up DNS resolution between your on-premises DNS with Amazon VPC by using Unbound, an open-source, recursive DNS resolver. This solution is not a managed solution like Microsoft AD and Simple AD, but it does provide the ability to route DNS requests between on-premises environments and an Amazon VPC–provided DNS.

June 1: How to Manage Secrets for Amazon EC2 Container Service–Based Applications by Using Amazon S3 and Docker
In this blog post, I will show you how to store secrets on Amazon S3, and use AWS IAM roles to grant access to those stored secrets using an example WordPress application deployed as a Docker image using ECS. Using IAM roles means that developers and operations staff do not have the credentials to access secrets. Only the application and staff who are responsible for managing the secrets can access them. The deployment model for ECS ensures that tasks are run on dedicated EC2 instances for the same AWS account and are not shared between customers, which gives sufficient isolation between different container environments.

If you have comments  about any of these posts, please add your comments in the “Comments” section of the appropriate post. If you have questions about or issues implementing the solutions in any of these posts, please start a new thread on the AWS IAM forum.

– Craig