Tag Archives: updated

Fix Your Crawler

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/fix-your-crawler/

Every now and then I open the admin panel of my blog hosting and ban a few IPs (after I’ve tried messaging their abuse email, if I find one). It is always IPs that are generating tons of requests (and traffic) – most likely running some home-made crawler. In some cases the IPs belong to an actual service that captures and provides content, in other cases it’s just a scraper for unknown reasons.

I don’t want to ban IPs, especially because that same IP may be reassigned to a legitimate user (or network) in the future. But they are increasing my hosting usage, which in turn leads to the hosting provider suggesting an upgrade in the plan. And this is not about me, I’m just an example – tons of requests to millions of sites are … useless.

My advice (and plea) is this – please fix your crawlers. Or scrapers. Or whatever you prefer to call that thing that programmatically goes on websites and gets their content.

How? First, reuse an existing crawler. No need to make something new (unless there’s a very specific use-case). A good intro and comparison can be seen here.

Second, make your crawler “polite” (the “politeness” property in the article above). Here’s a good overview on how to be polite, including respect for robots.txt. Existing implementations most likely have politeness options, but you may have to configure them.

Here I’d suggest another option – set a dynamic crawl rate per website that depends on how often the content is updated. My blog updates 3 times a month – no need to crawl it more than once or twice a day. TechCrunch updates many times a day; it’s probably a good idea to crawl it way more often. I don’t have a formula, but you can come up with one that ends up crawling different sites with periods between 2 minutes and 1 day.

Third, don’t “scrape” the content if a better protocol is supported. Many content websites have RSS – use that instead of the HTML of the page. If not, make use of sitemaps. If the WebSub protocol gains traction, you can avoid the crawling/scraping entirely and get notified on new content.

Finally, make sure your crawler/scraper is identifiable by the UserAgent. You can supply your service name or web address in it to make it easier for website owners to find you and complain in case you’ve misconfigured something.

I guess it makes sense to see if using a service like import.io, ScrapingHub, WrapAPI or GetData makes sense for your usecase, instead of reinventing the wheel.

No matter what your use case or approach is, please make sure you don’t put unnecessary pressure on others’ websites.

The post Fix Your Crawler appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 29

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2018/01/12/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-29/

Welcome to TimeShift

intro paragraph


Latest Stable Release

Grafana 4.6.3 is now available. Latest bugfixes include:

  • Gzip: Fixes bug Gravatar images when gzip was enabled #5952
  • Alert list: Now shows alert state changes even after adding manual annotations on dashboard #99513
  • Alerting: Fixes bug where rules evaluated as firing when all conditions was false and using OR operator. #93183
  • Cloudwatch: CloudWatch no longer display metrics’ default alias #101514, thx @mtanda

Download Grafana 4.6.3 Now


From the Blogosphere

Graphite 1.1: Teaching an Old Dog New Tricks: Grafana Labs’ own Dan Cech is a contributor to the Graphite project, and has been instrumental in the addition of some of the newest features. This article discusses five of the biggest additions, how they work, and what you can expect for the future of the project.

Instrument an Application Using Prometheus and Grafana: Chris walks us through how easy it is to get useful metrics from an application to understand bottlenecks and performace. In this article, he shares an application he built that indexes your Gmail account into Elasticsearch, and sends the metrics to Prometheus. Then, he shows you how to set up Grafana to get meaningful graphs and dashboards.

Visualising Serverless Metrics With Grafana Dashboards: Part 3 in this series of blog posts on “Monitoring Serverless Applications Metrics” starts with an overview of Grafana and the UI, covers queries and templating, then dives into creating some great looking dashboards. The series plans to conclude with a post about setting up alerting.

Huawei FAT WLAN Access Points in Grafana: Huawei’s FAT firmware for their WLAN Access points lacks central management overview. To get a sense of the performance of your AP’s, why not quickly create a templated dashboard in Grafana? This article quickly steps your through the process, and includes a sample dashboard.


Grafana Plugins

Lots of updated plugins this week. Plugin authors add new features and fix bugs often, to make your plugin perform better – so it’s important to keep your plugins up to date. We’ve made updating easy; for on-prem Grafana, use the Grafana-cli tool, or update with 1 click if you’re using Hosted Grafana.

UPDATED PLUGIN

Clickhouse Data Source – The Clickhouse Data Source plugin has been updated a few times with small fixes during the last few weeks.

  • Fix for quantile functions
  • Allow rounding with round option for both time filters: $from and $to

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Zabbix App – The Zabbix App had a release with a redesign of the Triggers panel as well as support for Multiple data sources for the triggers panel

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

OpenHistorian Data Source – this data source plugin received some new query builder screens and improved documentation.

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

BT Status Dot Panel – This panel received a small bug fix.

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Carpet Plot Panel – A recent update for this panel fixes a D3 import bug.

Update


Upcoming Events

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We also like to make sure we mention other Grafana-related events happening all over the world. If you’re putting on just such an event, let us know and we’ll list it here.

Women Who Go Berlin: Go Workshop – Monitoring and Troubleshooting using Prometheus and Grafana | Berlin, Germany – Jan 31, 2018: In this workshop we will learn about one of the most important topics in making apps production ready: Monitoring. We will learn how to use tools you’ve probably heard a lot about – Prometheus and Grafana, and using what we learn we will troubleshoot a particularly buggy Go app.

Register Now

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. There is no need to register; all are welcome.

Jfokus | Stockholm, Sweden – Feb 5-7, 2018:
Carl Bergquist – Quickie: Monitoring? Not OPS Problem

Why should we monitor our system? Why can’t we just rely on the operations team anymore? They use to be able to do that. What’s currently changing? Presentation content: – Why do we monitor our system – How did it use to work? – Whats changing – Why do we need to shift focus – Everyone should be on call. – Resilience is the goal (Best way of having someone care about quality is to make them responsible).

Register Now

Jfokus | Stockholm, Sweden – Feb 5-7, 2018:
Leonard Gram – Presentation: DevOps Deconstructed

What’s a Site Reliability Engineer and how’s that role different from the DevOps engineer my boss wants to hire? I really don’t want to be on call, should I? Is Docker the right place for my code or am I better of just going straight to Serverless? And why should I care about any of it? I’ll try to answer some of these questions while looking at what DevOps really is about and how commodisation of servers through “the cloud” ties into it all. This session will be an opinionated piece from a developer who’s been on-call for the past 6 years and would like to convince you to do the same, at least once.

Register Now

Stockholm Metrics and Monitoring | Stockholm, Sweden – Feb 7, 2018:
Observability 3 ways – Logging, Metrics and Distributed Tracing

Let’s talk about often confused telemetry tools: Logging, Metrics and Distributed Tracing. We’ll show how you capture latency using each of the tools and how they work differently. Through examples and discussion, we’ll note edge cases where certain tools have advantages over others. By the end of this talk, we’ll better understand how each of Logging, Metrics and Distributed Tracing aids us in different ways to understand our applications.

Register Now

OpenNMS – Introduction to “Grafana” | Webinar – Feb 21, 2018:
IT monitoring helps detect emerging hardware damage and performance bottlenecks in the enterprise network before any consequential damage or disruption to business processes occurs. The powerful open-source OpenNMS software monitors a network, including all connected devices, and provides logging of a variety of data that can be used for analysis and planning purposes. In our next OpenNMS webinar on February 21, 2018, we introduce “Grafana” – a web-based tool for creating and displaying dashboards from various data sources, which can be perfectly combined with OpenNMS.

Register Now

GrafanaCon EU | Amsterdam, Netherlands – March 1-2, 2018:
Lock in your seat for GrafanaCon EU while there are still tickets avaialable! Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and more.

We have some exciting talks lined up from Google, CERN, Bloomberg, eBay, Red Hat, Tinder, Automattic, Prometheus, InfluxData, Percona and more! Be sure to get your ticket before they’re sold out.

Learn More


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

Nice hack! I know I like to keep one eye on server requests when I’m dropping beats. 😉


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

Thanks for reading another issue of timeShift. Let us know what you think! Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum.

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

Torrent Links Disappear From Torrentz2

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/torrent-links-disappear-from-torrentz2-171223/

Last year, Torrentz.eu decided to close its doors. Without prior warning, all torrent listings were removed from the meta-search engine.

As is often the case with torrent sites, this gap was quickly filled. Just several hours after Torrentz has thrown the proverbial towel, several ‘copies’ popped up, eager to take its place.

The most successful alternative, in terms of traffic, is the elegantly named Torrentz2.eu. Unlike many others, Torrentz2 has always been upfront with its users and never claimed to be an official resurrection.

They just wanted to do what Torrentz did, or even better. This worked, as millions of users were drawn to the site. However, since a few days Torrentz2 is no longer listing any torrent links.

People can still search for files, but the site only lists file details and no links to third-party sites where these can be downloaded.

No links?

The problems first started earlier this week and have been persistent since at least Thursday.

To the broader public it’s unclear what’s causing the issue. It could very well be a technical problem that can be addressed easily, or perhaps something more severe.

Interestingly, new torrent data is still being added to the site. The links to other torrent sites are missing, however, which makes it pretty much unusable.

TorrentFreak reached out to the operator to find out more but we haven’t heard back yet. If we received a response the article will be updated accordingly.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN discounts, offers and coupons

HiveMQ 3.3.2 released

Post Syndicated from The HiveMQ Team original https://www.hivemq.com/blog/hivemq-3-3-2-released/

The HiveMQ team is pleased to announce the availability of HiveMQ 3.3.2. This is a maintenance release for the 3.3 series and brings the following improvements:

  • Improved unsubscribe performance
  • Webinterface now shows a warning if different HiveMQ versions are in a cluster
  • At Startup HiveMQ shows the enabled cipher suites and protocols for TLS listeners in the log
  • The Web UI Dashboard now shows MQTT Publishes instead of all MQTT messages in the graphs
  • Updated integrated native SSL/TLS library to latest version
  • Improved message ordering while the cluster topology changes
  • Fixed a cosmetic NullPointerException with background cleanup jobs
  • Fixed an issue where Web UI Popups could not be closed on IE/Edge and Safari
  • Fixed an issue which could lead to an IllegalArgumentException with a QoS 0 message in a rare edge-case
  • Improved persistence migrations for updating single HiveMQ deployments
  • Fixed a reference counting issue
  • Fixed an issue with rolling upgrades if the AsyncMetricService is used while the update is in progress

You can download the new HiveMQ version here.

We recommend to upgrade if you are an HiveMQ 3.3.x user.

Have a great day,
The HiveMQ Team

AWS Updated Its ISO Certifications and Now Has 67 Services Under ISO Compliance

Post Syndicated from Chad Woolf original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-updated-its-iso-certifications-and-now-has-67-services-under-iso-compliance/

ISO logo

AWS has updated its certifications against ISO 9001, ISO 27001, ISO 27017, and ISO 27018 standards, bringing the total to 67 services now under ISO compliance. We added the following 29 services this cycle:

Amazon Aurora Amazon S3 Transfer Acceleration AWS [email protected]
Amazon Cloud Directory Amazon SageMaker AWS Managed Services
Amazon CloudWatch Logs Amazon Simple Notification Service AWS OpsWorks Stacks
Amazon Cognito Auto Scaling AWS Shield
Amazon Connect AWS Batch AWS Snowball Edge
Amazon Elastic Container Registry AWS CodeBuild AWS Snowmobile
Amazon Inspector AWS CodeCommit AWS Step Functions
Amazon Kinesis Data Streams AWS CodeDeploy AWS Systems Manager (formerly Amazon EC2 Systems Manager)
Amazon Macie AWS CodePipeline AWS X-Ray
Amazon QuickSight AWS IoT Core

For the complete list of services under ISO compliance, see AWS Services in Scope by Compliance Program.

AWS maintains certifications through extensive audits of its controls to ensure that information security risks that affect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of company and customer information are appropriately managed.

You can download copies of the AWS ISO certificates that contain AWS’s in-scope services and Regions, and use these certificates to jump-start your own certification efforts:

AWS does not increase service costs in any AWS Region as a result of updating its certifications.

To learn more about compliance in the AWS Cloud, see AWS Cloud Compliance.

– Chad

US Government Teaches Anti-Piracy Skills Around The Globe

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/us-government-teaches-anti-piracy-skills-around-the-globe-171217/

Online piracy is a global issue. Pirate sites and services tend to operate in multiple jurisdictions and are purposefully set up to evade law enforcement.

This makes it hard for police from one country to effectively crack down on a site in another. International cooperation is often required, and the US Government is one of the leaders on this front.

The US Department of Justice (DoJ) has quite a bit of experience in tracking down pirates and they are actively sharing this knowledge with countries that can use some help. This goes far beyond the occasional seminar.

A diplomatic cable obtained through a Freedom of Information request provides a relatively recent example of these efforts. The document gives an overview of anti-piracy training, provided and funded by the US Government, during the fall of 2015.

“On November 24 and 25, prosecutors and investigators from Romania, Moldova, Bulgaria, and Turkey participated in a two-day, US. Department of Justice (USDOJ)-sponsored training program on combatting online piracy.

“The program updated participants on legal issues, including data retention legislation, surrounding the investigation and prosecution of online piracy,” the cable adds.

According to the cable, piracy has become a very significant problem in Eastern Europe, costing rightsholders and governments millions of dollars in revenues. After the training, local law enforcement officers in these countries should be better equipped to deal with the problem.

Pirates Beware

The event was put together with help from various embassies and among the presenters were law enforcement professionals from around the world.

The Director of the DoJ’s CCIPS Cybercrime Laboratory was among the speakers. He gave training on computer forensics and participants were provided with various tools to put this to use.

“Participants were given copies of forensic tools at the conclusion of the program so that they could put to use some of what they saw demonstrated during the training,” the cable reads.

While catching pirates can be quite hard already, getting them convicted is a challenge as well. Increasingly we’ve seen criminal complaints using non-copyright claims to have site owners prosecuted.

By using money laundering and tax offenses, pirates can receive tougher penalties. This was one of the talking points during the training as well.

“Participants were encouraged to consider the use of statutes such as money laundering and tax evasion, in addition to those protecting copyrights and trademarks, since these offenses are often punished more severely than standalone intellectual property crimes.”

The cable, written by the US Embassy in Bucharest, provides a lot of detail about the two-day training session. It’s also clear on the overall objective. The US wants to increase the likelihood that pirate sites are brought to justice. Not only in the homeland, but around the globe.

“By focusing approximately forty investigators and prosecutors from four countries on how they can more effectively attack rogue sites, and by connecting rights holders and their investigators with law enforcement, the chances of pirates being caught and held accountable have increased.”

While it’s hard to link the training to any concrete successes, Romanian law enforcement did shut down the country’s leading pirate site a few months later. As with a previous case in Romania, which involved the FBI, money laundering and tax evasion allegations were expected.

While it’s not out of the ordinary for international law enforcers to work together, it’s notable how coordinated the US efforts are. Earlier this week we wrote about the US pressure on Sweden to raid The Pirate Bay. And these are not isolated incidents.

While the US Department of Justice doesn’t reveal all details of its operations, it is very open about its global efforts to protect Intellectual Property.

Around the world..

The DoJ’s Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section (CCIPS) has relationships with law enforcement worldwide and regularly provides training to foreign officers.

A crucial part of the Department’s international enforcement activities is the Intellectual Property Law Enforcement Coordinator (IPLEC) program, which started in 2006.

Through IPLECs, the department now has Attorneys stationed in Thailand, Hong Kong, Romania, Brazil, and Nigeria. These Attorneys keep an eye on local law enforcement and provide assistance and training, to protect US copyright holders.

“Our strategically placed coordinators draw upon their subject matter expertise to help ensure that property holders’ rights are enforced across the globe, and that the American people are protected from harmful products entering the marketplace,” Attorney General John Cronan of the Criminal Division said just last Friday.

Or to end with the title of the Romanian cable: ‘Pirates beware!’

The cable cited here was made available in response to a Freedom of Information request, which was submitted by Rachael Tackett and shared with TorrentFreak. It starts at page 47 of document 2.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN discounts, offers and coupons

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 26

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/12/15/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-26/

Welcome to TimeShift

Big news this week: Grafana v5.0 has been merged into master and is available in the nightly builds! We are really excited to share this with the community, and look forward to receiving community feedback (good or bad) on the new features and enhancements. As you see in the video below, there are some big changes that aim to improve workflow, team organization, permissions, and overall user experience. Check out the video below to see it in action, and give it a spin yourself.

  • New Grid Layout Engine: Make it easier to build dashboards and enable more complex layouts
  • Dashboard Folders & Permissions
  • User Teams
  • Improved Dashboard Settings UX
  • Improved Page Design and Navigation

NOTE: That’s actually Torkel Odegaard, creator of Grafana shredding on the soundtrack!


Latest Stable Release

Grafana 4.6.3 is available and includes some bug fixes:

  • Gzip: Fixes bug Gravatar images when gzip was enabled #5952
  • Alert list: Now shows alert state changes even after adding manual annotations on dashboard #99513
  • Alerting: Fixes bug where rules evaluated as firing when all conditions was false and using OR operator. #93183
  • Cloudwatch: CloudWatch no longer display metrics’ default alias #101514, thx @mtanda

Download Grafana 4.6.3 Now


From the Blogosphere

Monitoring MySQL with Prometheus and Grafana: Julien Pivotto (who will be speaking at GrafanaCon EU), gave a great presentation last month on Monitoring MySQL with Prometheus and Grafana. You can also check out his slides.

Monitor your Docker Containers: docker stats doesn’t often give you the level of insight you need to effectively manage your containers. This article discuses how to use cAdvisor, Prometheus and Grafana to get a handle on your Docker performance.

Magento Performance Monitoring with Grafana Dashboards and Alerts: This Christmas-themed post walks you through how to monitor the performance of Magento, start building dashboards, and setup Slack alerts, all while sitting in your rocking chair, sipping eggnog.

Icinga Web2 and Grafana Working Together: This is a follow-up post about displaying service performance data from Icinga2 in Grafana. Now that we know how to list the services on a dashboard, it would be helpful to filter this list so that specific teams can know the status of services they specifically manage.

Setup of sitespeed in AWS with Peter Hedenskog: In this video, Peter Hedenskop from Wikimedia and Stefan Judis set up a video call to go over setting up sitespeed in AWS. They create a fully functional Grafana dashboard, including web performance metrics from Stefan’s personal website running in the cloud.

Deploying Grafana to Access Zabbix in Alibaba Cloud ECS: This article walks you through how to deploy Grafana on Alibaba Cloud ECS to access Zabbix to visualize performance data for your website or application.

Let’s Summarize the Test Results with Grafana Annotations + Prometheus: The engineers of NTT Communications Corporation have created something of an Advent Calendar, with new posts each day. December 14th’s post focused on Grafana’s new annotation functionality via the UI and the API.


New Speakers Added!

We have added new speakers, and talk titles to the lineup at grafanacon.org. Only a few left to include, which should be added in the next few days.

Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and many other topics.

This year we have speakers from Bloomberg, CERN, Tinder, Red Hat, Prometheus, InfluxData, Fastly, Automattic, Percona, and more!

Get Your Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

This week we have a new plugin for the popular IoT platform DeviceHive, and an update to our own Kubernetes App. To install or update any plugin in an on-prem Grafana instance, use the Grafana-cli tool, or install and update with 1 click on Hosted Grafana.

NEW PLUGIN

DeviceHive is an IOT Platform and now has a data source plugin, which means you can visualize the live commands and notifications from a device.


Install Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

Kubernetes App – The Grafana Kubernetes App allows you to monitor your Kubernetes cluster’s performance. It includes 4 dashboards, Cluster, Node, Pod/Container and Deployment, and also comes with Intel Snap collectors that are deployed to your cluster to collect health metrics.


Update


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We also like to make sure we mention other Grafana-related events happening all over the world. If you’re putting on just such an event, let us know and we’ll list it here.

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. Carl Bergquist is managing the Cloud and Monitoring Devroom, and we’ve heard there were some great talks submitted. There is no need to register; all are welcome.


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove


Ok, ok – This tweet isn’t showing a off a dashboard, but we can’t help but be thrilled when someone post about our poster series. We’ll be working on the fourth poster to be unveiled at GrafanaCon EU!


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

Let us know what you think about timeShift. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Find an article I haven’t included? Send it my way. Help us make timeShift better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

How to Enhance the Security of Sensitive Customer Data by Using Amazon CloudFront Field-Level Encryption

Post Syndicated from Alex Tomic original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-enhance-the-security-of-sensitive-customer-data-by-using-amazon-cloudfront-field-level-encryption/

Amazon CloudFront is a web service that speeds up distribution of your static and dynamic web content to end users through a worldwide network of edge locations. CloudFront provides a number of benefits and capabilities that can help you secure your applications and content while meeting compliance requirements. For example, you can configure CloudFront to help enforce secure, end-to-end connections using HTTPS SSL/TLS encryption. You also can take advantage of CloudFront integration with AWS Shield for DDoS protection and with AWS WAF (a web application firewall) for protection against application-layer attacks, such as SQL injection and cross-site scripting.

Now, CloudFront field-level encryption helps secure sensitive data such as a customer phone numbers by adding another security layer to CloudFront HTTPS. Using this functionality, you can help ensure that sensitive information in a POST request is encrypted at CloudFront edge locations. This information remains encrypted as it flows to and beyond your origin servers that terminate HTTPS connections with CloudFront and throughout the application environment. In this blog post, we demonstrate how you can enhance the security of sensitive data by using CloudFront field-level encryption.

Note: This post assumes that you understand concepts and services such as content delivery networks, HTTP forms, public-key cryptography, CloudFrontAWS Lambda, and the AWS CLI. If necessary, you should familiarize yourself with these concepts and review the solution overview in the next section before proceeding with the deployment of this post’s solution.

How field-level encryption works

Many web applications collect and store data from users as those users interact with the applications. For example, a travel-booking website may ask for your passport number and less sensitive data such as your food preferences. This data is transmitted to web servers and also might travel among a number of services to perform tasks. However, this also means that your sensitive information may need to be accessed by only a small subset of these services (most other services do not need to access your data).

User data is often stored in a database for retrieval at a later time. One approach to protecting stored sensitive data is to configure and code each service to protect that sensitive data. For example, you can develop safeguards in logging functionality to ensure sensitive data is masked or removed. However, this can add complexity to your code base and limit performance.

Field-level encryption addresses this problem by ensuring sensitive data is encrypted at CloudFront edge locations. Sensitive data fields in HTTPS form POSTs are automatically encrypted with a user-provided public RSA key. After the data is encrypted, other systems in your architecture see only ciphertext. If this ciphertext unintentionally becomes externally available, the data is cryptographically protected and only designated systems with access to the private RSA key can decrypt the sensitive data.

It is critical to secure private RSA key material to prevent unauthorized access to the protected data. Management of cryptographic key material is a larger topic that is out of scope for this blog post, but should be carefully considered when implementing encryption in your applications. For example, in this blog post we store private key material as a secure string in the Amazon EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store. The Parameter Store provides a centralized location for managing your configuration data such as plaintext data (such as database strings) or secrets (such as passwords) that are encrypted using AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS). You may have an existing key management system in place that you can use, or you can use AWS CloudHSM. CloudHSM is a cloud-based hardware security module (HSM) that enables you to easily generate and use your own encryption keys in the AWS Cloud.

To illustrate field-level encryption, let’s look at a simple form submission where Name and Phone values are sent to a web server using an HTTP POST. A typical form POST would contain data such as the following.

POST / HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
Content-Length:60

Name=Jane+Doe&Phone=404-555-0150

Instead of taking this typical approach, field-level encryption converts this data similar to the following.

POST / HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
Content-Length: 1713

Name=Jane+Doe&Phone=AYABeHxZ0ZqWyysqxrB5pEBSYw4AAA...

To further demonstrate field-level encryption in action, this blog post includes a sample serverless application that you can deploy by using a CloudFormation template, which creates an application environment using CloudFront, Amazon API Gateway, and Lambda. The sample application is only intended to demonstrate field-level encryption functionality and is not intended for production use. The following diagram depicts the architecture and data flow of this sample application.

Sample application architecture and data flow

Diagram of the solution's architecture and data flow

Here is how the sample solution works:

  1. An application user submits an HTML form page with sensitive data, generating an HTTPS POST to CloudFront.
  2. Field-level encryption intercepts the form POST and encrypts sensitive data with the public RSA key and replaces fields in the form post with encrypted ciphertext. The form POST ciphertext is then sent to origin servers.
  3. The serverless application accepts the form post data containing ciphertext where sensitive data would normally be. If a malicious user were able to compromise your application and gain access to your data, such as the contents of a form, that user would see encrypted data.
  4. Lambda stores data in a DynamoDB table, leaving sensitive data to remain safely encrypted at rest.
  5. An administrator uses the AWS Management Console and a Lambda function to view the sensitive data.
  6. During the session, the administrator retrieves ciphertext from the DynamoDB table.
  7. The administrator decrypts sensitive data by using private key material stored in the EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store.
  8. Decrypted sensitive data is transmitted over SSL/TLS via the AWS Management Console to the administrator for review.

Deployment walkthrough

The high-level steps to deploy this solution are as follows:

  1. Stage the required artifacts
    When deployment packages are used with Lambda, the zipped artifacts have to be placed in an S3 bucket in the target AWS Region for deployment. This step is not required if you are deploying in the US East (N. Virginia) Region because the package has already been staged there.
  2. Generate an RSA key pair
    Create a public/private key pair that will be used to perform the encrypt/decrypt functionality.
  3. Upload the public key to CloudFront and associate it with the field-level encryption configuration
    After you create the key pair, the public key is uploaded to CloudFront so that it can be used by field-level encryption.
  4. Launch the CloudFormation stack
    Deploy the sample application for demonstrating field-level encryption by using AWS CloudFormation.
  5. Add the field-level encryption configuration to the CloudFront distribution
    After you have provisioned the application, this step associates the field-level encryption configuration with the CloudFront distribution.
  6. Store the RSA private key in the Parameter Store
    Store the private key in the Parameter Store as a SecureString data type, which uses AWS KMS to encrypt the parameter value.

Deploy the solution

1. Stage the required artifacts

(If you are deploying in the US East [N. Virginia] Region, skip to Step 2, “Generate an RSA key pair.”)

Stage the Lambda function deployment package in an Amazon S3 bucket located in the AWS Region you are using for this solution. To do this, download the zipped deployment package and upload it to your in-region bucket. For additional information about uploading objects to S3, see Uploading Object into Amazon S3.

2. Generate an RSA key pair

In this section, you will generate an RSA key pair by using OpenSSL:

  1. Confirm access to OpenSSL.
    $ openssl version

    You should see version information similar to the following.

    OpenSSL <version> <date>

  1. Create a private key using the following command.
    $ openssl genrsa -out private_key.pem 2048

    The command results should look similar to the following.

    Generating RSA private key, 2048 bit long modulus
    ................................................................................+++
    ..........................+++
    e is 65537 (0x10001)
  1. Extract the public key from the private key by running the following command.
    $ openssl rsa -pubout -in private_key.pem -out public_key.pem

    You should see output similar to the following.

    writing RSA key
  1. Restrict access to the private key.$ chmod 600 private_key.pem Note: You will use the public and private key material in Steps 3 and 6 to configure the sample application.

3. Upload the public key to CloudFront and associate it with the field-level encryption configuration

Now that you have created the RSA key pair, you will use the AWS Management Console to upload the public key to CloudFront for use by field-level encryption. Complete the following steps to upload and configure the public key.

Note: Do not include spaces or special characters when providing the configuration values in this section.

  1. From the AWS Management Console, choose Services > CloudFront.
  2. In the navigation pane, choose Public Key and choose Add Public Key.
    Screenshot of adding a public key

Complete the Add Public Key configuration boxes:

  • Key Name: Type a name such as DemoPublicKey.
  • Encoded Key: Paste the contents of the public_key.pem file you created in Step 2c. Copy and paste the encoded key value for your public key, including the -----BEGIN PUBLIC KEY----- and -----END PUBLIC KEY----- lines.
  • Comment: Optionally add a comment.
  1. Choose Create.
  2. After adding at least one public key to CloudFront, the next step is to create a profile to tell CloudFront which fields of input you want to be encrypted. While still on the CloudFront console, choose Field-level encryption in the navigation pane.
  3. Under Profiles, choose Create profile.
    Screenshot of creating a profile

Complete the Create profile configuration boxes:

  • Name: Type a name such as FLEDemo.
  • Comment: Optionally add a comment.
  • Public key: Select the public key you configured in Step 4.b.
  • Provider name: Type a provider name such as FLEDemo.
    This information will be used when the form data is encrypted, and must be provided to applications that need to decrypt the data, along with the appropriate private key.
  • Pattern to match: Type phone. This configures field-level encryption to match based on the phone.
  1. Choose Save profile.
  2. Configurations include options for whether to block or forward a query to your origin in scenarios where CloudFront can’t encrypt the data. Under Encryption Configurations, choose Create configuration.
    Screenshot of creating a configuration

Complete the Create configuration boxes:

  • Comment: Optionally add a comment.
  • Content type: Enter application/x-www-form-urlencoded. This is a common media type for encoding form data.
  • Default profile ID: Select the profile you added in Step 3e.
  1. Choose Save configuration

4. Launch the CloudFormation stack

Launch the sample application by using a CloudFormation template that automates the provisioning process.

Input parameter Input parameter description
ProviderID Enter the Provider name you assigned in Step 3e. The ProviderID is used in field-level encryption configuration in CloudFront (letters and numbers only, no special characters)
PublicKeyName Enter the Key Name you assigned in Step 3b. This name is assigned to the public key in field-level encryption configuration in CloudFront (letters and numbers only, no special characters).
PrivateKeySSMPath Leave as the default: /cloudfront/field-encryption-sample/private-key
ArtifactsBucket The S3 bucket with artifact files (staged zip file with app code). Leave as default if deploying in us-east-1.
ArtifactsPrefix The path in the S3 bucket containing artifact files. Leave as default if deploying in us-east-1.

To finish creating the CloudFormation stack:

  1. Choose Next on the Select Template page, enter the input parameters and choose Next.
    Note: The Artifacts configuration needs to be updated only if you are deploying outside of us-east-1 (US East [N. Virginia]). See Step 1 for artifact staging instructions.
  2. On the Options page, accept the defaults and choose Next.
  3. On the Review page, confirm the details, choose the I acknowledge that AWS CloudFormation might create IAM resources check box, and then choose Create. (The stack will be created in approximately 15 minutes.)

5. Add the field-level encryption configuration to the CloudFront distribution

While still on the CloudFront console, choose Distributions in the navigation pane, and then:

    1. In the Outputs section of the FLE-Sample-App stack, look for CloudFrontDistribution and click the URL to open the CloudFront console.
    2. Choose Behaviors, choose the Default (*) behavior, and then choose Edit.
    3. For Field-level Encryption Config, choose the configuration you created in Step 3g.
      Screenshot of editing the default cache behavior
    4. Choose Yes, Edit.
    5. While still in the CloudFront distribution configuration, choose the General Choose Edit, scroll down to Distribution State, and change it to Enabled.
    6. Choose Yes, Edit.

6. Store the RSA private key in the Parameter Store

In this step, you store the private key in the EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store as a SecureString data type, which uses AWS KMS to encrypt the parameter value. For more information about AWS KMS, see the AWS Key Management Service Developer Guide. You will need a working installation of the AWS CLI to complete this step.

  1. Store the private key in the Parameter Store with the AWS CLI by running the following command. You will find the <KMSKeyID> in the KMSKeyID in the CloudFormation stack Outputs. Substitute it for the placeholder in the following command.
    $ aws ssm put-parameter --type "SecureString" --name /cloudfront/field-encryption-sample/private-key --value file://private_key.pem --key-id "<KMSKeyID>"
    
    ------------------
    |  PutParameter  |
    +----------+-----+
    |  Version |  1  |
    +----------+-----+

  1. Verify the parameter. Your private key material should be accessible through the ssm get-parameter in the following command in the Value The key material has been truncated in the following output.
    $ aws ssm get-parameter --name /cloudfront/field-encryption-sample/private-key --with-decryption
    
    -----…
    
    ||  Value  |  -----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
    MIIEowIBAAKCAQEAwGRBGuhacmw+C73kM6Z…….

    Notice we use the —with decryption argument in this command. This returns the private key as cleartext.

    This completes the sample application deployment. Next, we show you how to see field-level encryption in action.

  1. Delete the private key from local storage. On Linux for example, using the shred command, securely delete the private key material from your workstation as shown below. You may also wish to store the private key material within an AWS CloudHSM or other protected location suitable for your security requirements. For production implementations, you also should implement key rotation policies.
    $ shred -zvu -n  100 private*.pem
    
    shred: private_encrypted_key.pem: pass 1/101 (random)...
    shred: private_encrypted_key.pem: pass 2/101 (dddddd)...
    shred: private_encrypted_key.pem: pass 3/101 (555555)...
    ….

Test the sample application

Use the following steps to test the sample application with field-level encryption:

  1. Open sample application in your web browser by clicking the ApplicationURL link in the CloudFormation stack Outputs. (for example, https:d199xe5izz82ea.cloudfront.net/prod/). Note that it may take several minutes for the CloudFront distribution to reach the Deployed Status from the previous step, during which time you may not be able to access the sample application.
  2. Fill out and submit the HTML form on the page:
    1. Complete the three form fields: Full Name, Email Address, and Phone Number.
    2. Choose Submit.
      Screenshot of completing the sample application form
      Notice that the application response includes the form values. The phone number returns the following ciphertext encryption using your public key. This ciphertext has been stored in DynamoDB.
      Screenshot of the phone number as ciphertext
  3. Execute the Lambda decryption function to download ciphertext from DynamoDB and decrypt the phone number using the private key:
    1. In the CloudFormation stack Outputs, locate DecryptFunction and click the URL to open the Lambda console.
    2. Configure a test event using the “Hello World” template.
    3. Choose the Test button.
  4. View the encrypted and decrypted phone number data.
    Screenshot of the encrypted and decrypted phone number data

Summary

In this blog post, we showed you how to use CloudFront field-level encryption to encrypt sensitive data at edge locations and help prevent access from unauthorized systems. The source code for this solution is available on GitHub. For additional information about field-level encryption, see the documentation.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing this solution, please start a new thread on the CloudFront forum.

– Alex and Cameron

Amazon EC2 Price Reduction in the Asia Pacific (Mumbai) Region

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-ec2-price-reduction-in-the-asia-pacific-mumbai-region/

Whew – I am just getting back in to blogging after a quick recovery from AWS re:Invent!

I’m happy to start things off with yet another AWS price reduction, this one for four instance families in the Asia Pacific (Mumbai) Region. Effective December 1, 2017 we are reducing prices for On-Demand and Reserved Instances as follows:

  • M4 – Up to 15%.
  • T2 – Up to 15%.
  • R4 – Up to 15%.
  • C4 – Up to 10%.

The pricing pages have been updated. Enjoy!

Jeff;

 

Introducing the New GDPR Center and “Navigating GDPR Compliance on AWS” Whitepaper

Post Syndicated from Chad Woolf original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/introducing-the-new-gdpr-center-and-navigating-gdpr-compliance-on-aws-whitepaper/

European Union flag

At AWS re:Invent 2017, the AWS Compliance team participated in excellent engagements with AWS customers about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), including discussions that generated helpful input. Today, I am announcing resulting enhancements to our recently launched GDPR Center and the release of a new whitepaper, Navigating GDPR Compliance on AWS. The resources available on the GDPR Center are designed to give you GDPR basics, and provide some ideas as you work out the details of the regulation and find a path to compliance.

In this post, I focus on two of these new GDPR requirements in terms of articles in the GDPR, and explain some of the AWS services and other resources that can help you meet these requirements.

Background about the GDPR

The GDPR is a European privacy law that will become enforceable on May 25, 2018, and is intended to harmonize data protection laws throughout the European Union (EU) by applying a single data protection law that is binding throughout each EU member state. The GDPR not only applies to organizations located within the EU, but also to organizations located outside the EU if they offer goods or services to, or monitor the behavior of, EU data subjects. All AWS services will comply with the GDPR in advance of the May 25, 2018, enforcement date.

We are already seeing customers move personal data to AWS to help solve challenges in complying with the EU’s GDPR because of AWS’s advanced toolset for identifying, securing, and managing all types of data, including personal data. Steve Schmidt, the AWS CISO, has already written about the internal and external work we have been undertaking to help you use AWS services to meet your own GDPR compliance goals.

Article 25 – Data Protection by Design and by Default (Privacy by Design)

Privacy by Design is the integration of data privacy and compliance into the systems development process, enabling applications, systems, and accounts, among other things, to be secure by default. To secure your AWS account, we offer a script to evaluate your AWS account against the full Center for Internet Security (CIS) Amazon Web Services Foundations Benchmark 1.1. You can access this public benchmark on GitHub. Additionally, AWS Trusted Advisor is an online resource to help you improve security by optimizing your AWS environment. Among other things, Trusted Advisor lists a number of security-related controls you should be monitoring. AWS also offers AWS CloudTrail, a logging tool to track usage and API activity. Another example of tooling that enables data protection is Amazon Inspector, which includes a knowledge base of hundreds of rules (regularly updated by AWS security researchers) mapped to common security best practices and vulnerability definitions. Examples of built-in rules include checking for remote root login being enabled or vulnerable software versions installed. These and other tools enable you to design an environment that protects customer data by design.

An accurate inventory of all the GDPR-impacting data is important but sometimes difficult to assess. AWS has some advanced tooling, such as Amazon Macie, to help you determine where customer data is present in your AWS resources. Macie uses advanced machine learning to automatically discover and classify data so that you can protect data, per Article 25.

Article 32 – Security of Processing

You can use many AWS services and features to secure the processing of data regulated by the GDPR. Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) lets you provision a logically isolated section of the AWS Cloud where you can launch resources in a virtual network that you define. You have complete control over your virtual networking environment, including the selection of your own IP address range, creation of subnets, and configuration of route tables and network gateways. With Amazon VPC, you can make the Amazon Cloud a seamless extension of your existing on-premises resources.

AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) is a managed service that makes it easy for you to create and control the encryption keys used to encrypt your data, and uses hardware security modules (HSMs) to help protect your keys. Managing keys with AWS KMS allows you to choose to encrypt data either on the server side or the client side. AWS KMS is integrated with several other AWS services to help you protect the data you store with these services. AWS KMS is also integrated with CloudTrail to provide you with logs of all key usage to help meet your regulatory and compliance needs. You can also use the AWS Encryption SDK to correctly generate and use encryption keys, as well as protect keys after they have been used.

We also recently announced new encryption and security features for Amazon S3, including default encryption and a detailed inventory report. Services of this type as well as additional GDPR enablers will be published regularly on our GDPR Center.

Other resources

As you prepare for GDPR, you may want to visit our AWS Customer Compliance Center or Tools for Amazon Web Services to learn about options for building anything from small scripts that delete data to a full orchestration framework that uses AWS Code services.

-Chad

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 25

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/12/08/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-25/

Welcome to TimeShift

This week, a few of us from Grafana Labs, along with 4,000 of our closest friends, headed down to chilly Austin, TX for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2017. We got to see a number of great talks and were thrilled to see Grafana make appearances in some of the presentations. We were also a sponsor of the conference and handed out a ton of swag (we overnighted some of our custom Grafana scarves, which came in handy for Thursday’s snow).

We also announced Grafana Labs has joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation as a Silver member! We’re excited to share our expertise in time series data visualization and open source software with the CNCF community.


Latest Release

Grafana 4.6.2 is available and includes some bug fixes:

  • Prometheus: Fixes bug with new Prometheus alerts in Grafana. Make sure to download this version if you’re using Prometheus for alerting. More details in the issue. #9777
  • Color picker: Bug after using textbox input field to change/paste color string #9769
  • Cloudwatch: build using golang 1.9.2 #9667, thanks @mtanda
  • Heatmap: Fixed tooltip for “time series buckets” mode #9332
  • InfluxDB: Fixed query editor issue when using > or < operators in WHERE clause #9871

Download Grafana 4.6.2 Now


From the Blogosphere

Grafana Labs Joins the CNCF: Grafana Labs has officially joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). We look forward to working with the CNCF community to democratize metrics and help unify traditionally disparate information.

Automating Web Performance Regression Alerts: Peter and his team needed a faster and easier way to find web performance regressions at the Wikimedia Foundation. Grafana 4’s alerting features were exactly what they needed. This post covers their journey on setting up alerts for both RUM and synthetic testing and shares the alerts they’ve set up on their dashboards.

How To Install Grafana on Ubuntu 17.10: As you probably guessed from the title, this article walks you through installing and configuring Grafana in the latest version of Ubuntu (or earlier releases). It also covers installing plugins using the Grafana CLI tool.

Prometheus: Starting the Server with Alertmanager, cAdvisor and Grafana: Learn how to monitor Docker from scratch using cAdvisor, Prometheus and Grafana in this detailed, step-by-step walkthrough.

Monitoring Java EE Servers with Prometheus and Payara: In this screencast, Adam uses firehose; a Java EE 7+ metrics gateway for Prometheus, to convert the JSON output into Prometheus statistics and visualizes the data in Grafana.

Monitoring Spark Streaming with InfluxDB and Grafana: This article focuses on how to monitor Apache Spark Streaming applications with InfluxDB and Grafana at scale.


GrafanaCon EU, March 1-2, 2018

We are currently reaching out to everyone who submitted a talk to GrafanaCon and will soon publish the final schedule at grafanacon.org.

Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and more.

Get Your Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

Lots of plugin updates and a new OpenNMS Helm App plugin to announce! To install or update any plugin in an on-prem Grafana instance, use the Grafana-cli tool, or install and update with 1 click on Hosted Grafana.

NEW PLUGIN

OpenNMS Helm App – The new OpenNMS Helm App plugin replaces the old OpenNMS data source. Helm allows users to create flexible dashboards using both fault management (FM) and performance management (PM) data from OpenNMS® Horizon™ and/or OpenNMS® Meridian™. The old data source is now deprecated.


Install Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

PNP Data Source – This data source plugin (that uses PNP4Nagios to access RRD files) received a small, but important update that fixes template query parsing.


Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Vonage Status Panel – The latest version of the Status Panel comes with a number of small fixes and changes. Below are a few of the enhancements:

  • Threshold settings – removed Show Always option, and replaced it with 2 options:
    • Display Alias – Select when to show the metric alias.
    • Display Value – Select when to show the metric value.
  • Text format configuration (bold / italic) for warning / critical / disabled states.
  • Option to change the corner radius of the panel. Now you can change the panel’s shape to have rounded corners.

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Google Calendar Plugin – This plugin received a small update, so be sure to install version 1.0.4.


Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Carpet Plot Panel – The Carpet Plot Panel received a fix for IE 11, and also added the ability to choose custom colors.


Update


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We also like to make sure we mention other Grafana-related events happening all over the world. If you’re putting on just such an event, let us know and we’ll list it here.

Docker Meetup @ Tuenti | Madrid, Spain – Dec 12, 2017: Javier Provecho: Intro to Metrics with Swarm, Prometheus and Grafana

Learn how to gain visibility in real time for your micro services. We’ll cover how to deploy a Prometheus server with persistence and Grafana, how to enable metrics endpoints for various service types (docker daemon, traefik proxy and postgres) and how to scrape, visualize and set up alarms based on those metrics.

RSVP

Grafana Lyon Meetup n ° 2 | Lyon, France – Dec 14, 2017: This meetup will cover some of the latest innovations in Grafana and discussion about automation. Also, free beer and chips, so – of course you’re going!

RSVP

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. Carl Bergquist is managing the Cloud and Monitoring Devroom, and we’ve heard there were some great talks submitted. There is no need to register; all are welcome.


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

We were thrilled to see our dashboards bigger than life at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon this week. Thanks for snapping a photo and sharing!


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

Hard to believe this is the 25th issue of Timeshift! I have a blast writing these roundups, but Let me know what you think. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Find an article I haven’t included? Send it my way. Help us make timeShift better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

How to Easily Apply Amazon Cloud Directory Schema Changes with In-Place Schema Upgrades

Post Syndicated from Mahendra Chheda original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-easily-apply-amazon-cloud-directory-schema-changes-with-in-place-schema-upgrades/

Now, Amazon Cloud Directory makes it easier for you to apply schema changes across your directories with in-place schema upgrades. Your directory now remains available while Cloud Directory applies backward-compatible schema changes such as the addition of new fields. Without migrating data between directories or applying code changes to your applications, you can upgrade your schemas. You also can view the history of your schema changes in Cloud Directory by using version identifiers, which help you track and audit schema versions across directories. If you have multiple instances of a directory with the same schema, you can view the version history of schema changes to manage your directory fleet and ensure that all directories are running with the same schema version.

In this blog post, I demonstrate how to perform an in-place schema upgrade and use schema versions in Cloud Directory. I add additional attributes to an existing facet and add a new facet to a schema. I then publish the new schema and apply it to running directories, upgrading the schema in place. I also show how to view the version history of a directory schema, which helps me to ensure my directory fleet is running the same version of the schema and has the correct history of schema changes applied to it.

Note: I share Java code examples in this post. I assume that you are familiar with the AWS SDK and can use Java-based code to build a Cloud Directory code example. You can apply the concepts I cover in this post to other programming languages such as Python and Ruby.

Cloud Directory fundamentals

I will start by covering a few Cloud Directory fundamentals. If you are already familiar with the concepts behind Cloud Directory facets, schemas, and schema lifecycles, you can skip to the next section.

Facets: Groups of attributes. You use facets to define object types. For example, you can define a device schema by adding facets such as computers, phones, and tablets. A computer facet can track attributes such as serial number, make, and model. You can then use the facets to create computer objects, phone objects, and tablet objects in the directory to which the schema applies.

Schemas: Collections of facets. Schemas define which types of objects can be created in a directory (such as users, devices, and organizations) and enforce validation of data for each object class. All data within a directory must conform to the applied schema. As a result, the schema definition is essentially a blueprint to construct a directory with an applied schema.

Schema lifecycle: The four distinct states of a schema: Development, Published, Applied, and Deleted. Schemas in the Published and Applied states have version identifiers and cannot be changed. Schemas in the Applied state are used by directories for validation as applications insert or update data. You can change schemas in the Development state as many times as you need them to. In-place schema upgrades allow you to apply schema changes to an existing Applied schema in a production directory without the need to export and import the data populated in the directory.

How to add attributes to a computer inventory application schema and perform an in-place schema upgrade

To demonstrate how to set up schema versioning and perform an in-place schema upgrade, I will use an example of a computer inventory application that uses Cloud Directory to store relationship data. Let’s say that at my company, AnyCompany, we use this computer inventory application to track all computers we give to our employees for work use. I previously created a ComputerSchema and assigned its version identifier as 1. This schema contains one facet called ComputerInfo that includes attributes for SerialNumber, Make, and Model, as shown in the following schema details.

Schema: ComputerSchema
Version: 1

Facet: ComputerInfo
Attribute: SerialNumber, type: Integer
Attribute: Make, type: String
Attribute: Model, type: String

AnyCompany has offices in Seattle, Portland, and San Francisco. I have deployed the computer inventory application for each of these three locations. As shown in the lower left part of the following diagram, ComputerSchema is in the Published state with a version of 1. The Published schema is applied to SeattleDirectory, PortlandDirectory, and SanFranciscoDirectory for AnyCompany’s three locations. Implementing separate directories for different geographic locations when you don’t have any queries that cross location boundaries is a good data partitioning strategy and gives your application better response times with lower latency.

Diagram of ComputerSchema in Published state and applied to three directories

Legend for the diagrams in this post

The following code example creates the schema in the Development state by using a JSON file, publishes the schema, and then creates directories for the Seattle, Portland, and San Francisco locations. For this example, I assume the schema has been defined in the JSON file. The createSchema API creates a schema Amazon Resource Name (ARN) with the name defined in the variable, SCHEMA_NAME. I can use the putSchemaFromJson API to add specific schema definitions from the JSON file.

// The utility method to get valid Cloud Directory schema JSON
String validJson = getJsonFile("ComputerSchema_version_1.json")

String SCHEMA_NAME = "ComputerSchema";

String developmentSchemaArn = client.createSchema(new CreateSchemaRequest()
        .withName(SCHEMA_NAME))
        .getSchemaArn();

// Put the schema document in the Development schema
PutSchemaFromJsonResult result = client.putSchemaFromJson(new PutSchemaFromJsonRequest()
        .withSchemaArn(developmentSchemaArn)
        .withDocument(validJson));

The following code example takes the schema that is currently in the Development state and publishes the schema, changing its state to Published.

String SCHEMA_VERSION = "1";
String publishedSchemaArn = client.publishSchema(
        new PublishSchemaRequest()
        .withDevelopmentSchemaArn(developmentSchemaArn)
        .withVersion(SCHEMA_VERSION))
        .getPublishedSchemaArn();

// Our Published schema ARN is as follows
// arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:schema/published/ComputerSchema/1

The following code example creates a directory named SeattleDirectory and applies the published schema. The createDirectory API call creates a directory by using the published schema provided in the API parameters. Note that Cloud Directory stores a version of the schema in the directory in the Applied state. I will use similar code to create directories for PortlandDirectory and SanFranciscoDirectory.

String DIRECTORY_NAME = "SeattleDirectory"; 

CreateDirectoryResult directory = client.createDirectory(
        new CreateDirectoryRequest()
        .withName(DIRECTORY_NAME)
        .withSchemaArn(publishedSchemaArn));

String directoryArn = directory.getDirectoryArn();
String appliedSchemaArn = directory.getAppliedSchemaArn();

// This code section can be reused to create directories for Portland and San Francisco locations with the appropriate directory names

// Our directory ARN is as follows 
// arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:directory/XX_DIRECTORY_GUID_XX

// Our applied schema ARN is as follows 
// arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:directory/XX_DIRECTORY_GUID_XX/schema/ComputerSchema/1

Revising a schema

Now let’s say my company, AnyCompany, wants to add more information for computers and to track which employees have been assigned a computer for work use. I modify the schema to add two attributes to the ComputerInfo facet: Description and OSVersion (operating system version). I make Description optional because it is not important for me to track this attribute for the computer objects I create. I make OSVersion mandatory because it is critical for me to track it for all computer objects so that I can make changes such as applying security patches or making upgrades. Because I make OSVersion mandatory, I must provide a default value that Cloud Directory will apply to objects that were created before the schema revision, in order to handle backward compatibility. Note that you can replace the value in any object with a different value.

I also add a new facet to track computer assignment information, shown in the following updated schema as the ComputerAssignment facet. This facet tracks these additional attributes: Name (the name of the person to whom the computer is assigned), EMail (the email address of the assignee), Department, and department CostCenter. Note that Cloud Directory refers to the previously available version identifier as the Major Version. Because I can now add a minor version to a schema, I also denote the changed schema as Minor Version A.

Schema: ComputerSchema
Major Version: 1
Minor Version: A 

Facet: ComputerInfo
Attribute: SerialNumber, type: Integer 
Attribute: Make, type: String
Attribute: Model, type: Integer
Attribute: Description, type: String, required: NOT_REQUIRED
Attribute: OSVersion, type: String, required: REQUIRED_ALWAYS, default: "Windows 7"

Facet: ComputerAssignment
Attribute: Name, type: String
Attribute: EMail, type: String
Attribute: Department, type: String
Attribute: CostCenter, type: Integer

The following diagram shows the changes that were made when I added another facet to the schema and attributes to the existing facet. The highlighted area of the diagram (bottom left) shows that the schema changes were published.

Diagram showing that schema changes were published

The following code example revises the existing Development schema by adding the new attributes to the ComputerInfo facet and by adding the ComputerAssignment facet. I use a new JSON file for the schema revision, and for the purposes of this example, I am assuming the JSON file has the full schema including planned revisions.

// The utility method to get a valid CloudDirectory schema JSON
String schemaJson = getJsonFile("ComputerSchema_version_1_A.json")

// Put the schema document in the Development schema
PutSchemaFromJsonResult result = client.putSchemaFromJson(
        new PutSchemaFromJsonRequest()
        .withSchemaArn(developmentSchemaArn)
        .withDocument(schemaJson));

Upgrading the Published schema

The following code example performs an in-place schema upgrade of the Published schema with schema revisions (it adds new attributes to the existing facet and another facet to the schema). The upgradePublishedSchema API upgrades the Published schema with backward-compatible changes from the Development schema.

// From an earlier code example, I know the publishedSchemaArn has this value: "arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:schema/published/ComputerSchema/1"

// Upgrade publishedSchemaArn to minorVersion A. The Development schema must be backward compatible with 
// the existing publishedSchemaArn. 

String minorVersion = "A"

UpgradePublishedSchemaResult upgradePublishedSchemaResult = client.upgradePublishedSchema(new UpgradePublishedSchemaRequest()
        .withDevelopmentSchemaArn(developmentSchemaArn)
        .withPublishedSchemaArn(publishedSchemaArn)
        .withMinorVersion(minorVersion));

String upgradedPublishedSchemaArn = upgradePublishedSchemaResult.getUpgradedSchemaArn();

// The Published schema ARN after the upgrade shows a minor version as follows 
// arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:schema/published/ComputerSchema/1/A

Upgrading the Applied schema

The following diagram shows the in-place schema upgrade for the SeattleDirectory directory. I am performing the schema upgrade so that I can reflect the new schemas in all three directories. As a reminder, I added new attributes to the ComputerInfo facet and also added the ComputerAssignment facet. After the schema and directory upgrade, I can create objects for the ComputerInfo and ComputerAssignment facets in the SeattleDirectory. Any objects that were created with the old facet definition for ComputerInfo will now use the default values for any additional attributes defined in the new schema.

Diagram of the in-place schema upgrade for the SeattleDirectory directory

I use the following code example to perform an in-place upgrade of the SeattleDirectory to a Major Version of 1 and a Minor Version of A. Note that you should change a Major Version identifier in a schema to make backward-incompatible changes such as changing the data type of an existing attribute or dropping a mandatory attribute from your schema. Backward-incompatible changes require directory data migration from a previous version to the new version. You should change a Minor Version identifier in a schema to make backward-compatible upgrades such as adding additional attributes or adding facets, which in turn may contain one or more attributes. The upgradeAppliedSchema API lets me upgrade an existing directory with a different version of a schema.

// This upgrades ComputerSchema version 1 of the Applied schema in SeattleDirectory to Major Version 1 and Minor Version A
// The schema must be backward compatible or the API will fail with IncompatibleSchemaException

UpgradeAppliedSchemaResult upgradeAppliedSchemaResult = client.upgradeAppliedSchema(new UpgradeAppliedSchemaRequest()
        .withDirectoryArn(directoryArn)
        .withPublishedSchemaArn(upgradedPublishedSchemaArn));

String upgradedAppliedSchemaArn = upgradeAppliedSchemaResult.getUpgradedSchemaArn();

// The Applied schema ARN after the in-place schema upgrade will appear as follows
// arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:directory/XX_DIRECTORY_GUID_XX/schema/ComputerSchema/1

// This code section can be reused to upgrade directories for the Portland and San Francisco locations with the appropriate directory ARN

Note: Cloud Directory has excluded returning the Minor Version identifier in the Applied schema ARN for backward compatibility and to enable the application to work across older and newer versions of the directory.

The following diagram shows the changes that are made when I perform an in-place schema upgrade in the two remaining directories, PortlandDirectory and SanFranciscoDirectory. I make these calls sequentially, upgrading PortlandDirectory first and then upgrading SanFranciscoDirectory. I use the same code example that I used earlier to upgrade SeattleDirectory. Now, all my directories are running the most current version of the schema. Also, I made these schema changes without having to migrate data and while maintaining my application’s high availability.

Diagram showing the changes that are made with an in-place schema upgrade in the two remaining directories

Schema revision history

I can now view the schema revision history for any of AnyCompany’s directories by using the listAppliedSchemaArns API. Cloud Directory maintains the five most recent versions of applied schema changes. Similarly, to inspect the current Minor Version that was applied to my schema, I use the getAppliedSchemaVersion API. The listAppliedSchemaArns API returns the schema ARNs based on my schema filter as defined in withSchemaArn.

I use the following code example to query an Applied schema for its version history.

// This returns the five most recent Minor Versions associated with a Major Version
ListAppliedSchemaArnsResult listAppliedSchemaArnsResult = client.listAppliedSchemaArns(new ListAppliedSchemaArnsRequest()
        .withDirectoryArn(directoryArn)
        .withSchemaArn(upgradedAppliedSchemaArn));

// Note: The listAppliedSchemaArns API without the SchemaArn filter returns all the Major Versions in a directory

The listAppliedSchemaArns API returns the two ARNs as shown in the following output.

arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:directory/XX_DIRECTORY_GUID_XX/schema/ComputerSchema/1
arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:directory/XX_DIRECTORY_GUID_XX/schema/ComputerSchema/1/A

The following code example queries an Applied schema for current Minor Version by using the getAppliedSchemaVersion API.

// This returns the current Applied schema's Minor Version ARN 

GetAppliedSchemaVersion getAppliedSchemaVersionResult = client.getAppliedSchemaVersion(new GetAppliedSchemaVersionRequest()
	.withSchemaArn(upgradedAppliedSchemaArn));

The getAppliedSchemaVersion API returns the current Applied schema ARN with a Minor Version, as shown in the following output.

arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:directory/XX_DIRECTORY_GUID_XX/schema/ComputerSchema/1/A

If you have a lot of directories, schema revision API calls can help you audit your directory fleet and ensure that all directories are running the same version of a schema. Such auditing can help you ensure high integrity of directories across your fleet.

Summary

You can use in-place schema upgrades to make changes to your directory schema as you evolve your data set to match the needs of your application. An in-place schema upgrade allows you to maintain high availability for your directory and applications while the upgrade takes place. For more information about in-place schema upgrades, see the in-place schema upgrade documentation.

If you have comments about this blog post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about implementing the solution in this post, start a new thread in the Directory Service forum or contact AWS Support.

– Mahendra

 

Newly Updated Whitepaper: FERPA Compliance on AWS

Post Syndicated from Chris Gile original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/newly-updated-whitepaper-ferpa-compliance-on-aws/

One of the main tenets of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is the protection of student education records, including personally identifiable information (PII) and directory information. We recently updated our FERPA Compliance on AWS whitepaper to include AWS service-specific guidance for 24 AWS services. The whitepaper describes how these services can be used to help secure protected data. In conjunction with more detailed service-specific documentation, this updated information helps make it easier for you to plan, deploy, and operate secure environments to meet your compliance requirements in the AWS Cloud.

The updated whitepaper is especially useful for educational institutions and their vendors who need to understand:

  • AWS’s Shared Responsibility Model.
  • How AWS services can be used to help deploy educational and PII workloads securely in the AWS Cloud.
  • Key security disciplines in a security program to help you run a FERPA-compliant program (such as auditing, data destruction, and backup and disaster recovery).

In a related effort to help you secure PII, we also added to the whitepaper a mapping of NIST SP 800-122, which provides guidance for protecting PII, as well as a link to our NIST SP 800-53 Quick Start, a CloudFormation template that automatically configures AWS resources and deploys a multi-tier, Linux-based web application. To learn how this Quick Start works, see the Automate NIST Compliance in AWS GovCloud (US) with AWS Quick Start Tools video. The template helps you streamline and automate secure baselines in AWS—from initial design to operational security readiness—by incorporating the expertise of AWS security and compliance subject matter experts.

For more information about AWS Compliance and FERPA or to request support for your organization, contact your AWS account manager.

– Chris Gile, Senior Manager, AWS Security Assurance

Implementing Dynamic ETL Pipelines Using AWS Step Functions

Post Syndicated from Tara Van Unen original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/implementing-dynamic-etl-pipelines-using-aws-step-functions/

This post contributed by:
Wangechi Dole, AWS Solutions Architect
Milan Krasnansky, ING, Digital Solutions Developer, SGK
Rian Mookencherry, Director – Product Innovation, SGK

Data processing and transformation is a common use case you see in our customer case studies and success stories. Often, customers deal with complex data from a variety of sources that needs to be transformed and customized through a series of steps to make it useful to different systems and stakeholders. This can be difficult due to the ever-increasing volume, velocity, and variety of data. Today, data management challenges cannot be solved with traditional databases.

Workflow automation helps you build solutions that are repeatable, scalable, and reliable. You can use AWS Step Functions for this. A great example is how SGK used Step Functions to automate the ETL processes for their client. With Step Functions, SGK has been able to automate changes within the data management system, substantially reducing the time required for data processing.

In this post, SGK shares the details of how they used Step Functions to build a robust data processing system based on highly configurable business transformation rules for ETL processes.

SGK: Building dynamic ETL pipelines

SGK is a subsidiary of Matthews International Corporation, a diversified organization focusing on brand solutions and industrial technologies. SGK’s Global Content Creation Studio network creates compelling content and solutions that connect brands and products to consumers through multiple assets including photography, video, and copywriting.

We were recently contracted to build a sophisticated and scalable data management system for one of our clients. We chose to build the solution on AWS to leverage advanced, managed services that help to improve the speed and agility of development.

The data management system served two main functions:

  1. Ingesting a large amount of complex data to facilitate both reporting and product funding decisions for the client’s global marketing and supply chain organizations.
  2. Processing the data through normalization and applying complex algorithms and data transformations. The system goal was to provide information in the relevant context—such as strategic marketing, supply chain, product planning, etc. —to the end consumer through automated data feeds or updates to existing ETL systems.

We were faced with several challenges:

  • Output data that needed to be refreshed at least twice a day to provide fresh datasets to both local and global markets. That constant data refresh posed several challenges, especially around data management and replication across multiple databases.
  • The complexity of reporting business rules that needed to be updated on a constant basis.
  • Data that could not be processed as contiguous blocks of typical time-series data. The measurement of the data was done across seasons (that is, combination of dates), which often resulted with up to three overlapping seasons at any given time.
  • Input data that came from 10+ different data sources. Each data source ranged from 1–20K rows with as many as 85 columns per input source.

These challenges meant that our small Dev team heavily invested time in frequent configuration changes to the system and data integrity verification to make sure that everything was operating properly. Maintaining this system proved to be a daunting task and that’s when we turned to Step Functions—along with other AWS services—to automate our ETL processes.

Solution overview

Our solution included the following AWS services:

  • AWS Step Functions: Before Step Functions was available, we were using multiple Lambda functions for this use case and running into memory limit issues. With Step Functions, we can execute steps in parallel simultaneously, in a cost-efficient manner, without running into memory limitations.
  • AWS Lambda: The Step Functions state machine uses Lambda functions to implement the Task states. Our Lambda functions are implemented in Java 8.
  • Amazon DynamoDB provides us with an easy and flexible way to manage business rules. We specify our rules as Keys. These are key-value pairs stored in a DynamoDB table.
  • Amazon RDS: Our ETL pipelines consume source data from our RDS MySQL database.
  • Amazon Redshift: We use Amazon Redshift for reporting purposes because it integrates with our BI tools. Currently we are using Tableau for reporting which integrates well with Amazon Redshift.
  • Amazon S3: We store our raw input files and intermediate results in S3 buckets.
  • Amazon CloudWatch Events: Our users expect results at a specific time. We use CloudWatch Events to trigger Step Functions on an automated schedule.

Solution architecture

This solution uses a declarative approach to defining business transformation rules that are applied by the underlying Step Functions state machine as data moves from RDS to Amazon Redshift. An S3 bucket is used to store intermediate results. A CloudWatch Event rule triggers the Step Functions state machine on a schedule. The following diagram illustrates our architecture:

Here are more details for the above diagram:

  1. A rule in CloudWatch Events triggers the state machine execution on an automated schedule.
  2. The state machine invokes the first Lambda function.
  3. The Lambda function deletes all existing records in Amazon Redshift. Depending on the dataset, the Lambda function can create a new table in Amazon Redshift to hold the data.
  4. The same Lambda function then retrieves Keys from a DynamoDB table. Keys represent specific marketing campaigns or seasons and map to specific records in RDS.
  5. The state machine executes the second Lambda function using the Keys from DynamoDB.
  6. The second Lambda function retrieves the referenced dataset from RDS. The records retrieved represent the entire dataset needed for a specific marketing campaign.
  7. The second Lambda function executes in parallel for each Key retrieved from DynamoDB and stores the output in CSV format temporarily in S3.
  8. Finally, the Lambda function uploads the data into Amazon Redshift.

To understand the above data processing workflow, take a closer look at the Step Functions state machine for this example.

We walk you through the state machine in more detail in the following sections.

Walkthrough

To get started, you need to:

  • Create a schedule in CloudWatch Events
  • Specify conditions for RDS data extracts
  • Create Amazon Redshift input files
  • Load data into Amazon Redshift

Step 1: Create a schedule in CloudWatch Events
Create rules in CloudWatch Events to trigger the Step Functions state machine on an automated schedule. The following is an example cron expression to automate your schedule:

In this example, the cron expression invokes the Step Functions state machine at 3:00am and 2:00pm (UTC) every day.

Step 2: Specify conditions for RDS data extracts
We use DynamoDB to store Keys that determine which rows of data to extract from our RDS MySQL database. An example Key is MCS2017, which stands for, Marketing Campaign Spring 2017. Each campaign has a specific start and end date and the corresponding dataset is stored in RDS MySQL. A record in RDS contains about 600 columns, and each Key can represent up to 20K records.

A given day can have multiple campaigns with different start and end dates running simultaneously. In the following example DynamoDB item, three campaigns are specified for the given date.

The state machine example shown above uses Keys 31, 32, and 33 in the first ChoiceState and Keys 21 and 22 in the second ChoiceState. These keys represent marketing campaigns for a given day. For example, on Monday, there are only two campaigns requested. The ChoiceState with Keys 21 and 22 is executed. If three campaigns are requested on Tuesday, for example, then ChoiceState with Keys 31, 32, and 33 is executed. MCS2017 can be represented by Key 21 and Key 33 on Monday and Tuesday, respectively. This approach gives us the flexibility to add or remove campaigns dynamically.

Step 3: Create Amazon Redshift input files
When the state machine begins execution, the first Lambda function is invoked as the resource for FirstState, represented in the Step Functions state machine as follows:

"Comment": ” AWS Amazon States Language.", 
  "StartAt": "FirstState",
 
"States": { 
  "FirstState": {
   
"Type": "Task",
   
"Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:xx-xxxx-x:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:Start",
    "Next": "ChoiceState" 
  } 

As described in the solution architecture, the purpose of this Lambda function is to delete existing data in Amazon Redshift and retrieve keys from DynamoDB. In our use case, we found that deleting existing records was more efficient and less time-consuming than finding the delta and updating existing records. On average, an Amazon Redshift table can contain about 36 million cells, which translates to roughly 65K records. The following is the code snippet for the first Lambda function in Java 8:

public class LambdaFunctionHandler implements RequestHandler<Map<String,Object>,Map<String,String>> {
    Map<String,String> keys= new HashMap<>();
    public Map<String, String> handleRequest(Map<String, Object> input, Context context){
       Properties config = getConfig(); 
       // 1. Cleaning Redshift Database
       new RedshiftDataService(config).cleaningTable(); 
       // 2. Reading data from Dynamodb
       List<String> keyList = new DynamoDBDataService(config).getCurrentKeys();
       for(int i = 0; i < keyList.size(); i++) {
           keys.put(”key" + (i+1), keyList.get(i)); 
       }
       keys.put(”key" + T,String.valueOf(keyList.size()));
       // 3. Returning the key values and the key count from the “for” loop
       return (keys);
}

The following JSON represents ChoiceState.

"ChoiceState": {
   "Type" : "Choice",
   "Choices": [ 
   {

      "Variable": "$.keyT",
     "StringEquals": "3",
     "Next": "CurrentThreeKeys" 
   }, 
   {

     "Variable": "$.keyT",
    "StringEquals": "2",
    "Next": "CurrentTwooKeys" 
   } 
 ], 
 "Default": "DefaultState"
}

The variable $.keyT represents the number of keys retrieved from DynamoDB. This variable determines which of the parallel branches should be executed. At the time of publication, Step Functions does not support dynamic parallel state. Therefore, choices under ChoiceState are manually created and assigned hardcoded StringEquals values. These values represent the number of parallel executions for the second Lambda function.

For example, if $.keyT equals 3, the second Lambda function is executed three times in parallel with keys, $key1, $key2 and $key3 retrieved from DynamoDB. Similarly, if $.keyT equals two, the second Lambda function is executed twice in parallel.  The following JSON represents this parallel execution:

"CurrentThreeKeys": { 
  "Type": "Parallel",
  "Next": "NextState",
  "Branches": [ 
  {

     "StartAt": “key31",
    "States": { 
       “key31": {

          "Type": "Task",
        "InputPath": "$.key1",
        "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:xx-xxxx-x:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:Execution",
        "End": true 
       } 
    } 
  }, 
  {

     "StartAt": “key32",
    "States": { 
     “key32": {

        "Type": "Task",
       "InputPath": "$.key2",
         "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:xx-xxxx-x:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:Execution",
       "End": true 
      } 
     } 
   }, 
   {

      "StartAt": “key33",
       "States": { 
          “key33": {

                "Type": "Task",
             "InputPath": "$.key3",
             "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:xx-xxxx-x:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:Execution",
           "End": true 
       } 
     } 
    } 
  ] 
} 

Step 4: Load data into Amazon Redshift
The second Lambda function in the state machine extracts records from RDS associated with keys retrieved for DynamoDB. It processes the data then loads into an Amazon Redshift table. The following is code snippet for the second Lambda function in Java 8.

public class LambdaFunctionHandler implements RequestHandler<String, String> {
 public static String key = null;

public String handleRequest(String input, Context context) { 
   key=input; 
   //1. Getting basic configurations for the next classes + s3 client Properties
   config = getConfig();

   AmazonS3 s3 = AmazonS3ClientBuilder.defaultClient(); 
   // 2. Export query results from RDS into S3 bucket 
   new RdsDataService(config).exportDataToS3(s3,key); 
   // 3. Import query results from S3 bucket into Redshift 
    new RedshiftDataService(config).importDataFromS3(s3,key); 
   System.out.println(input); 
   return "SUCCESS"; 
 } 
}

After the data is loaded into Amazon Redshift, end users can visualize it using their preferred business intelligence tools.

Lessons learned

  • At the time of publication, the 1.5–GB memory hard limit for Lambda functions was inadequate for processing our complex workload. Step Functions gave us the flexibility to chunk our large datasets and process them in parallel, saving on costs and time.
  • In our previous implementation, we assigned each key a dedicated Lambda function along with CloudWatch rules for schedule automation. This approach proved to be inefficient and quickly became an operational burden. Previously, we processed each key sequentially, with each key adding about five minutes to the overall processing time. For example, processing three keys meant that the total processing time was three times longer. With Step Functions, the entire state machine executes in about five minutes.
  • Using DynamoDB with Step Functions gave us the flexibility to manage keys efficiently. In our previous implementations, keys were hardcoded in Lambda functions, which became difficult to manage due to frequent updates. DynamoDB is a great way to store dynamic data that changes frequently, and it works perfectly with our serverless architectures.

Conclusion

With Step Functions, we were able to fully automate the frequent configuration updates to our dataset resulting in significant cost savings, reduced risk to data errors due to system downtime, and more time for us to focus on new product development rather than support related issues. We hope that you have found the information useful and that it can serve as a jump-start to building your own ETL processes on AWS with managed AWS services.

For more information about how Step Functions makes it easy to coordinate the components of distributed applications and microservices in any workflow, see the use case examples and then build your first state machine in under five minutes in the Step Functions console.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

Stretch for PCs and Macs, and a Raspbian update

Post Syndicated from Simon Long original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/stretch-pcs-macs-raspbian-update/

Today, we are launching the first Debian Stretch release of the Raspberry Pi Desktop for PCs and Macs, and we’re also releasing the latest version of Raspbian Stretch for your Pi.

Raspberry Pi Desktop Stretch splash screen

For PCs and Macs

When we released our custom desktop environment on Debian for PCs and Macs last year, we were slightly taken aback by how popular it turned out to be. We really only created it as a result of one of those “Wouldn’t it be cool if…” conversations we sometimes have in the office, so we were delighted by the Pi community’s reaction.

Seeing how keen people were on the x86 version, we decided that we were going to try to keep releasing it alongside Raspbian, with the ultimate aim being to make simultaneous releases of both. This proved to be tricky, particularly with the move from the Jessie version of Debian to the Stretch version this year. However, we have now finished the job of porting all the custom code in Raspbian Stretch to Debian, and so the first Debian Stretch release of the Raspberry Pi Desktop for your PC or Mac is available from today.

The new Stretch releases

As with the Jessie release, you can either run this as a live image from a DVD, USB stick, or SD card or install it as the native operating system on the hard drive of an old laptop or desktop computer. Please note that installing this software will erase anything else on the hard drive — do not install this over a machine running Windows or macOS that you still need to use for its original purpose! It is, however, safe to boot a live image on such a machine, since your hard drive will not be touched by this.

We’re also pleased to announce that we are releasing the latest version of Raspbian Stretch for your Pi today. The Pi and PC versions are largely identical: as before, there are a few applications (such as Mathematica) which are exclusive to the Pi, but the user interface, desktop, and most applications will be exactly the same.

For Raspbian, this new release is mostly bug fixes and tweaks over the previous Stretch release, but there are one or two changes you might notice.

File manager

The file manager included as part of the LXDE desktop (on which our desktop is based) is a program called PCManFM, and it’s very feature-rich; there’s not much you can’t do in it. However, having used it for a few years, we felt that it was perhaps more complex than it needed to be — the sheer number of menu options and choices made some common operations more awkward than they needed to be. So to try to make file management easier, we have implemented a cut-down mode for the file manager.

Raspberry Pi Desktop Stretch - file manager

Most of the changes are to do with the menus. We’ve removed a lot of options that most people are unlikely to change, and moved some other options into the Preferences screen rather than the menus. The two most common settings people tend to change — how icons are displayed and sorted — are now options on the toolbar and in a top-level menu rather than hidden away in submenus.

The sidebar now only shows a single hierarchical view of the file system, and we’ve tidied the toolbar and updated the icons to make them match our house style. We’ve removed the option for a tabbed interface, and we’ve stomped a few bugs as well.

One final change was to make it possible to rename a file just by clicking on its icon to highlight it, and then clicking on its name. This is the way renaming works on both Windows and macOS, and it’s always seemed slightly awkward that Unix desktop environments tend not to support it.

As with most of the other changes we’ve made to the desktop over the last few years, the intention is to make it simpler to use, and to ease the transition from non-Unix environments. But if you really don’t like what we’ve done and long for the old file manager, just untick the box for Display simplified user interface and menus in the Layout page of Preferences, and everything will be back the way it was!

Raspberry Pi Desktop Stretch - preferences GUI

Battery indicator for laptops

One important feature missing from the previous release was an indication of the amount of battery life. Eben runs our desktop on his Mac, and he was becoming slightly irritated by having to keep rebooting into macOS just to check whether his battery was about to die — so fixing this was a priority!

We’ve added a battery status icon to the taskbar; this shows current percentage charge, along with whether the battery is charging, discharging, or connected to the mains. When you hover over the icon with the mouse pointer, a tooltip with more details appears, including the time remaining if the battery can provide this information.

Raspberry Pi Desktop Stretch - battery indicator

While this battery monitor is mainly intended for the PC version, it also supports the first-generation pi-top — to see it, you’ll only need to make sure that I2C is enabled in Configuration. A future release will support the new second-generation pi-top.

New PC applications

We have included a couple of new applications in the PC version. One is called PiServer — this allows you to set up an operating system, such as Raspbian, on the PC which can then be shared by a number of Pi clients networked to it. It is intended to make it easy for classrooms to have multiple Pis all running exactly the same software, and for the teacher to have control over how the software is installed and used. PiServer is quite a clever piece of software, and it’ll be covered in more detail in another blog post in December.

We’ve also added an application which allows you to easily use the GPIO pins of a Pi Zero connected via USB to a PC in applications using Scratch or Python. This makes it possible to run the same physical computing projects on the PC as you do on a Pi! Again, we’ll tell you more in a separate blog post this month.

Both of these applications are included as standard on the PC image, but not on the Raspbian image. You can run them on a Pi if you want — both can be installed from apt.

How to get the new versions

New images for both Raspbian and Debian versions are available from the Downloads page.

It is possible to update existing installations of both Raspbian and Debian versions. For Raspbian, this is easy: just open a terminal window and enter

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

Updating Raspbian on your Raspberry Pi

How to update to the latest version of Raspbian on your Raspberry Pi. Download Raspbian here: More information on the latest version of Raspbian: Buy a Raspberry Pi:

It is slightly more complex for the PC version, as the previous release was based around Debian Jessie. You will need to edit the files /etc/apt/sources.list and /etc/apt/sources.list.d/raspi.list, using sudo to do so. In both files, change every occurrence of the word “jessie” to “stretch”. When that’s done, do the following:

sudo apt-get update 
sudo dpkg --force-depends -r libwebkitgtk-3.0-common
sudo apt-get -f install
sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
sudo apt-get install python3-thonny
sudo apt-get install sonic-pi=2.10.0~repack-rpt1+2
sudo apt-get install piserver
sudo apt-get install usbbootgui

At several points during the upgrade process, you will be asked if you want to keep the current version of a configuration file or to install the package maintainer’s version. In every case, keep the existing version, which is the default option. The update may take an hour or so, depending on your network connection.

As with all software updates, there is the possibility that something may go wrong during the process, which could lead to your operating system becoming corrupted. Therefore, we always recommend making a backup first.

Enjoy the new versions, and do let us know any feedback you have in the comments or on the forums!

The post Stretch for PCs and Macs, and a Raspbian update appeared first on Raspberry Pi.