Tag Archives: web applications

Protecting your API using Amazon API Gateway and AWS WAF — Part I

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/protecting-your-api-using-amazon-api-gateway-and-aws-waf-part-i/

This post courtesy of Thiago Morais, AWS Solutions Architect

When you build web applications or expose any data externally, you probably look for a platform where you can build highly scalable, secure, and robust REST APIs. As APIs are publicly exposed, there are a number of best practices for providing a secure mechanism to consumers using your API.

Amazon API Gateway handles all the tasks involved in accepting and processing up to hundreds of thousands of concurrent API calls, including traffic management, authorization and access control, monitoring, and API version management.

In this post, I show you how to take advantage of the regional API endpoint feature in API Gateway, so that you can create your own Amazon CloudFront distribution and secure your API using AWS WAF.

AWS WAF is a web application firewall that helps protect your web applications from common web exploits that could affect application availability, compromise security, or consume excessive resources.

As you make your APIs publicly available, you are exposed to attackers trying to exploit your services in several ways. The AWS security team published a whitepaper solution using AWS WAF, How to Mitigate OWASP’s Top 10 Web Application Vulnerabilities.

Regional API endpoints

Edge-optimized APIs are endpoints that are accessed through a CloudFront distribution created and managed by API Gateway. Before the launch of regional API endpoints, this was the default option when creating APIs using API Gateway. It primarily helped to reduce latency for API consumers that were located in different geographical locations than your API.

When API requests predominantly originate from an Amazon EC2 instance or other services within the same AWS Region as the API is deployed, a regional API endpoint typically lowers the latency of connections. It is recommended for such scenarios.

For better control around caching strategies, customers can use their own CloudFront distribution for regional APIs. They also have the ability to use AWS WAF protection, as I describe in this post.

Edge-optimized API endpoint

The following diagram is an illustrated example of the edge-optimized API endpoint where your API clients access your API through a CloudFront distribution created and managed by API Gateway.

Regional API endpoint

For the regional API endpoint, your customers access your API from the same Region in which your REST API is deployed. This helps you to reduce request latency and particularly allows you to add your own content delivery network, as needed.

Walkthrough

In this section, you implement the following steps:

  • Create a regional API using the PetStore sample API.
  • Create a CloudFront distribution for the API.
  • Test the CloudFront distribution.
  • Set up AWS WAF and create a web ACL.
  • Attach the web ACL to the CloudFront distribution.
  • Test AWS WAF protection.

Create the regional API

For this walkthrough, use an existing PetStore API. All new APIs launch by default as the regional endpoint type. To change the endpoint type for your existing API, choose the cog icon on the top right corner:

After you have created the PetStore API on your account, deploy a stage called “prod” for the PetStore API.

On the API Gateway console, select the PetStore API and choose Actions, Deploy API.

For Stage name, type prod and add a stage description.

Choose Deploy and the new API stage is created.

Use the following AWS CLI command to update your API from edge-optimized to regional:

aws apigateway update-rest-api \
--rest-api-id {rest-api-id} \
--patch-operations op=replace,path=/endpointConfiguration/types/EDGE,value=REGIONAL

A successful response looks like the following:

{
    "description": "Your first API with Amazon API Gateway. This is a sample API that integrates via HTTP with your demo Pet Store endpoints", 
    "createdDate": 1511525626, 
    "endpointConfiguration": {
        "types": [
            "REGIONAL"
        ]
    }, 
    "id": "{api-id}", 
    "name": "PetStore"
}

After you change your API endpoint to regional, you can now assign your own CloudFront distribution to this API.

Create a CloudFront distribution

To make things easier, I have provided an AWS CloudFormation template to deploy a CloudFront distribution pointing to the API that you just created. Click the button to deploy the template in the us-east-1 Region.

For Stack name, enter RegionalAPI. For APIGWEndpoint, enter your API FQDN in the following format:

{api-id}.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com

After you fill out the parameters, choose Next to continue the stack deployment. It takes a couple of minutes to finish the deployment. After it finishes, the Output tab lists the following items:

  • A CloudFront domain URL
  • An S3 bucket for CloudFront access logs
Output from CloudFormation

Output from CloudFormation

Test the CloudFront distribution

To see if the CloudFront distribution was configured correctly, use a web browser and enter the URL from your distribution, with the following parameters:

https://{your-distribution-url}.cloudfront.net/{api-stage}/pets

You should get the following output:

[
  {
    "id": 1,
    "type": "dog",
    "price": 249.99
  },
  {
    "id": 2,
    "type": "cat",
    "price": 124.99
  },
  {
    "id": 3,
    "type": "fish",
    "price": 0.99
  }
]

Set up AWS WAF and create a web ACL

With the new CloudFront distribution in place, you can now start setting up AWS WAF to protect your API.

For this demo, you deploy the AWS WAF Security Automations solution, which provides fine-grained control over the requests attempting to access your API.

For more information about deployment, see Automated Deployment. If you prefer, you can launch the solution directly into your account using the following button.

For CloudFront Access Log Bucket Name, add the name of the bucket created during the deployment of the CloudFormation stack for your CloudFront distribution.

The solution allows you to adjust thresholds and also choose which automations to enable to protect your API. After you finish configuring these settings, choose Next.

To start the deployment process in your account, follow the creation wizard and choose Create. It takes a few minutes do finish the deployment. You can follow the creation process through the CloudFormation console.

After the deployment finishes, you can see the new web ACL deployed on the AWS WAF console, AWSWAFSecurityAutomations.

Attach the AWS WAF web ACL to the CloudFront distribution

With the solution deployed, you can now attach the AWS WAF web ACL to the CloudFront distribution that you created earlier.

To assign the newly created AWS WAF web ACL, go back to your CloudFront distribution. After you open your distribution for editing, choose General, Edit.

Select the new AWS WAF web ACL that you created earlier, AWSWAFSecurityAutomations.

Save the changes to your CloudFront distribution and wait for the deployment to finish.

Test AWS WAF protection

To validate the AWS WAF Web ACL setup, use Artillery to load test your API and see AWS WAF in action.

To install Artillery on your machine, run the following command:

$ npm install -g artillery

After the installation completes, you can check if Artillery installed successfully by running the following command:

$ artillery -V
$ 1.6.0-12

As the time of publication, Artillery is on version 1.6.0-12.

One of the WAF web ACL rules that you have set up is a rate-based rule. By default, it is set up to block any requesters that exceed 2000 requests under 5 minutes. Try this out.

First, use cURL to query your distribution and see the API output:

$ curl -s https://{distribution-name}.cloudfront.net/prod/pets
[
  {
    "id": 1,
    "type": "dog",
    "price": 249.99
  },
  {
    "id": 2,
    "type": "cat",
    "price": 124.99
  },
  {
    "id": 3,
    "type": "fish",
    "price": 0.99
  }
]

Based on the test above, the result looks good. But what if you max out the 2000 requests in under 5 minutes?

Run the following Artillery command:

artillery quick -n 2000 --count 10  https://{distribution-name}.cloudfront.net/prod/pets

What you are doing is firing 2000 requests to your API from 10 concurrent users. For brevity, I am not posting the Artillery output here.

After Artillery finishes its execution, try to run the cURL request again and see what happens:

 

$ curl -s https://{distribution-name}.cloudfront.net/prod/pets

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<HTML><HEAD><META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<TITLE>ERROR: The request could not be satisfied</TITLE>
</HEAD><BODY>
<H1>ERROR</H1>
<H2>The request could not be satisfied.</H2>
<HR noshade size="1px">
Request blocked.
<BR clear="all">
<HR noshade size="1px">
<PRE>
Generated by cloudfront (CloudFront)
Request ID: [removed]
</PRE>
<ADDRESS>
</ADDRESS>
</BODY></HTML>

As you can see from the output above, the request was blocked by AWS WAF. Your IP address is removed from the blocked list after it falls below the request limit rate.

Conclusion

In this first part, you saw how to use the new API Gateway regional API endpoint together with Amazon CloudFront and AWS WAF to secure your API from a series of attacks.

In the second part, I will demonstrate some other techniques to protect your API using API keys and Amazon CloudFront custom headers.

Acunetix v12 – More Comprehensive More Accurate & 2x Faster

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2018/05/acunetix-v12-more-comprehensive-more-accurate-2x-faster/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

Acunetix v12 – More Comprehensive More Accurate & 2x Faster

Acunetix, the pioneer in automated web application security software, has announced the release of Acunetix v12. This new version provides support for JavaScript ES7 to better analyse sites which rely heavily on JavaScript such as SPAs. This coupled with a new AcuSensor for Java web applications, sets Acunetix ahead of the curve in its ability to comprehensively and accurately scan all types of websites.

With v12 also comes a brand new scanning engine, re-engineered and re-written from the ground up, making Acunetix the fastest scanning engine in the industry.

Read the rest of Acunetix v12 – More Comprehensive More Accurate & 2x Faster now! Only available at Darknet.

User Authentication Best Practices Checklist

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/user-authentication-best-practices-checklist/

User authentication is the functionality that every web application shared. We should have perfected that a long time ago, having implemented it so many times. And yet there are so many mistakes made all the time.

Part of the reason for that is that the list of things that can go wrong is long. You can store passwords incorrectly, you can have a vulnerably password reset functionality, you can expose your session to a CSRF attack, your session can be hijacked, etc. So I’ll try to compile a list of best practices regarding user authentication. OWASP top 10 is always something you should read, every year. But that might not be enough.

So, let’s start. I’ll try to be concise, but I’ll include as much of the related pitfalls as I can cover – e.g. what could go wrong with the user session after they login:

  • Store passwords with bcrypt/scrypt/PBKDF2. No MD5 or SHA, as they are not good for password storing. Long salt (per user) is mandatory (the aforementioned algorithms have it built in). If you don’t and someone gets hold of your database, they’ll be able to extract the passwords of all your users. And then try these passwords on other websites.
  • Use HTTPS. Period. (Otherwise user credentials can leak through unprotected networks). Force HTTPS if user opens a plain-text version.
  • Mark cookies as secure. Makes cookie theft harder.
  • Use CSRF protection (e.g. CSRF one-time tokens that are verified with each request). Frameworks have such functionality built-in.
  • Disallow framing (X-Frame-Options: DENY). Otherwise your website may be included in another website in a hidden iframe and “abused” through javascript.
  • Have a same-origin policy
  • Logout – let your users logout by deleting all cookies and invalidating the session. This makes usage of shared computers safer (yes, users should ideally use private browsing sessions, but not all of them are that savvy)
  • Session expiry – don’t have forever-lasting sessions. If the user closes your website, their session should expire after a while. “A while” may still be a big number depending on the service provided. For ajax-heavy website you can have regular ajax-polling that keeps the session alive while the page stays open.
  • Remember me – implementing “remember me” (on this machine) functionality is actually hard due to the risks of a stolen persistent cookie. Spring-security uses this approach, which I think should be followed if you wish to implement more persistent logins.
  • Forgotten password flow – the forgotten password flow should rely on sending a one-time (or expiring) link to the user and asking for a new password when it’s opened. 0Auth explain it in this post and Postmark gives some best pracitces. How the link is formed is a separate discussion and there are several approaches. Store a password-reset token in the user profile table and then send it as parameter in the link. Or do not store anything in the database, but send a few params: userId:expiresTimestamp:hmac(userId+expiresTimestamp). That way you have expiring links (rather than one-time links). The HMAC relies on a secret key, so the links can’t be spoofed. It seems there’s no consensus, as the OWASP guide has a bit different approach
  • One-time login links – this is an option used by Slack, which sends one-time login links instead of asking users for passwords. It relies on the fact that your email is well guarded and you have access to it all the time. If your service is not accessed to often, you can have that approach instead of (rather than in addition to) passwords.
  • Limit login attempts – brute-force through a web UI should not be possible; therefore you should block login attempts if they become too many. One approach is to just block them based on IP. The other one is to block them based on account attempted. (Spring example here). Which one is better – I don’t know. Both can actually be combined. Instead of fully blocking the attempts, you may add a captcha after, say, the 5th attempt. But don’t add the captcha for the first attempt – it is bad user experience.
  • Don’t leak information through error messages – you shouldn’t allow attackers to figure out if an email is registered or not. If an email is not found, upon login report just “Incorrect credentials”. On passwords reset, it may be something like “If your email is registered, you should have received a password reset email”. This is often at odds with usability – people don’t often remember the email they used to register, and the ability to check a number of them before getting in might be important. So this rule is not absolute, though it’s desirable, especially for more critical systems.
  • Make sure you use JWT only if it’s really necessary and be careful of the pitfalls.
  • Consider using a 3rd party authentication – OpenID Connect, OAuth by Google/Facebook/Twitter (but be careful with OAuth flaws as well). There’s an associated risk with relying on a 3rd party identity provider, and you still have to manage cookies, logout, etc., but some of the authentication aspects are simplified.
  • For high-risk or sensitive applications use 2-factor authentication. There’s a caveat with Google Authenticator though – if you lose your phone, you lose your accounts (unless there’s a manual process to restore it). That’s why Authy seems like a good solution for storing 2FA keys.

I’m sure I’m missing something. And you see it’s complicated. Sadly we’re still at the point where the most common functionality – authenticating users – is so tricky and cumbersome, that you almost always get at least some of it wrong.

The post User Authentication Best Practices Checklist appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

The Top 10 Most Downloaded AWS Security and Compliance Documents in 2017

Post Syndicated from Sara Duffer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/the-top-10-most-downloaded-aws-security-and-compliance-documents-in-2017/

AWS download logo

The following list includes the ten most downloaded AWS security and compliance documents in 2017. Using this list, you can learn about what other AWS customers found most interesting about security and compliance last year.

  1. AWS Security Best Practices – This guide is intended for customers who are designing the security infrastructure and configuration for applications running on AWS. The guide provides security best practices that will help you define your Information Security Management System (ISMS) and build a set of security policies and processes for your organization so that you can protect your data and assets in the AWS Cloud.
  2. AWS: Overview of Security Processes – This whitepaper describes the physical and operational security processes for the AWS managed network and infrastructure, and helps answer questions such as, “How does AWS help me protect my data?”
  3. Architecting for HIPAA Security and Compliance on AWS – This whitepaper describes how to leverage AWS to develop applications that meet HIPAA and HITECH compliance requirements.
  4. Service Organization Controls (SOC) 3 Report – This publicly available report describes internal AWS security controls, availability, processing integrity, confidentiality, and privacy.
  5. Introduction to AWS Security –This document provides an introduction to AWS’s approach to security, including the controls in the AWS environment, and some of the products and features that AWS makes available to customers to meet your security objectives.
  6. AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency – This whitepaper covers techniques to mitigate distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks.
  7. AWS: Risk and Compliance – This whitepaper provides information to help customers integrate AWS into their existing control framework, including a basic approach for evaluating AWS controls and a description of AWS certifications, programs, reports, and third-party attestations.
  8. Use AWS WAF to Mitigate OWASP’s Top 10 Web Application Vulnerabilities – AWS WAF is a web application firewall that helps you protect your websites and web applications against various attack vectors at the HTTP protocol level. This whitepaper outlines how you can use AWS WAF to mitigate the application vulnerabilities that are defined in the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) Top 10 list of most common categories of application security flaws.
  9. Introduction to Auditing the Use of AWS – This whitepaper provides information, tools, and approaches for auditors to use when auditing the security of the AWS managed network and infrastructure.
  10. AWS Security and Compliance: Quick Reference Guide – By using AWS, you inherit the many security controls that we operate, thus reducing the number of security controls that you need to maintain. Your own compliance and certification programs are strengthened while at the same time lowering your cost to maintain and run your specific security assurance requirements. Learn more in this quick reference guide.

– Sara

Instrumenting Web Apps Using AWS X-Ray

Post Syndicated from Bharath Kumar original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/instrumenting-web-apps-using-aws-x-ray/

This post was written by James Bowman, Software Development Engineer, AWS X-Ray

AWS X-Ray helps developers analyze and debug distributed applications and underlying services in production. You can identify and analyze root-causes of performance issues and errors, understand customer impact, and extract statistical aggregations (such as histograms) for optimization.

In this blog post, I will provide a step-by-step walkthrough for enabling X-Ray tracing in the Go programming language. You can use these steps to add X-Ray tracing to any distributed application.

Revel: A web framework for the Go language

This section will assist you with designing a guestbook application. Skip to “Instrumenting with AWS X-Ray” section below if you already have a Go language application.

Revel is a web framework for the Go language. It facilitates the rapid development of web applications by providing a predefined framework for controllers, views, routes, filters, and more.

To get started with Revel, run revel new github.com/jamesdbowman/guestbook. A project base is then copied to $GOPATH/src/github.com/jamesdbowman/guestbook.

$ tree -L 2
.
├── README.md
├── app
│ ├── controllers
│ ├── init.go
│ ├── routes
│ ├── tmp
│ └── views
├── conf
│ ├── app.conf
│ └── routes
├── messages
│ └── sample.en
├── public
│ ├── css
│ ├── fonts
│ ├── img
│ └── js
└── tests
└── apptest.go

Writing a guestbook application

A basic guestbook application can consist of just two routes: one to sign the guestbook and another to list all entries.
Let’s set up these routes by adding a Book controller, which can be routed to by modifying ./conf/routes.

./app/controllers/book.go:
package controllers

import (
    "math/rand"
    "time"

    "github.com/aws/aws-sdk-go/aws"
    "github.com/aws/aws-sdk-go/aws/endpoints"
    "github.com/aws/aws-sdk-go/aws/session"
    "github.com/aws/aws-sdk-go/service/dynamodb"
    "github.com/aws/aws-sdk-go/service/dynamodb/dynamodbattribute"
    "github.com/revel/revel"
)

const TABLE_NAME = "guestbook"
const SUCCESS = "Success.\n"
const DAY = 86400

var letters = []rune("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ")

func init() {
    rand.Seed(time.Now().UnixNano())
}

// randString returns a random string of len n, used for DynamoDB Hash key.
func randString(n int) string {
    b := make([]rune, n)
    for i := range b {
        b[i] = letters[rand.Intn(len(letters))]
    }
    return string(b)
}

// Book controls interactions with the guestbook.
type Book struct {
    *revel.Controller
    ddbClient *dynamodb.DynamoDB
}

// Signature represents a user's signature.
type Signature struct {
    Message string
    Epoch   int64
    ID      string
}

// ddb returns the controller's DynamoDB client, instatiating a new client if necessary.
func (c Book) ddb() *dynamodb.DynamoDB {
    if c.ddbClient == nil {
        sess := session.Must(session.NewSession(&aws.Config{
            Region: aws.String(endpoints.UsWest2RegionID),
        }))
        c.ddbClient = dynamodb.New(sess)
    }
    return c.ddbClient
}

// Sign allows users to sign the book.
// The message is to be passed as application/json typed content, listed under the "message" top level key.
func (c Book) Sign() revel.Result {
    var s Signature

    err := c.Params.BindJSON(&s)
    if err != nil {
        return c.RenderError(err)
    }
    now := time.Now()
    s.Epoch = now.Unix()
    s.ID = randString(20)

    item, err := dynamodbattribute.MarshalMap(s)
    if err != nil {
        return c.RenderError(err)
    }

    putItemInput := &dynamodb.PutItemInput{
        TableName: aws.String(TABLE_NAME),
        Item:      item,
    }
    _, err = c.ddb().PutItem(putItemInput)
    if err != nil {
        return c.RenderError(err)
    }

    return c.RenderText(SUCCESS)
}

// List allows users to list all signatures in the book.
func (c Book) List() revel.Result {
    scanInput := &dynamodb.ScanInput{
        TableName: aws.String(TABLE_NAME),
        Limit:     aws.Int64(100),
    }
    res, err := c.ddb().Scan(scanInput)
    if err != nil {
        return c.RenderError(err)
    }

    messages := make([]string, 0)
    for _, v := range res.Items {
        messages = append(messages, *(v["Message"].S))
    }
    return c.RenderJSON(messages)
}

./conf/routes:
POST /sign Book.Sign
GET /list Book.List

Creating the resources and testing

For the purposes of this blog post, the application will be run and tested locally. We will store and retrieve messages from an Amazon DynamoDB table. Use the following AWS CLI command to create the guestbook table:

aws dynamodb create-table --region us-west-2 --table-name "guestbook" --attribute-definitions AttributeName=ID,AttributeType=S AttributeName=Epoch,AttributeType=N --key-schema AttributeName=ID,KeyType=HASH AttributeName=Epoch,KeyType=RANGE --provisioned-throughput ReadCapacityUnits=5,WriteCapacityUnits=5

Now, let’s test our sign and list routes. If everything is working correctly, the following result appears:

$ curl -d '{"message":"Hello from cURL!"}' -H "Content-Type: application/json" http://localhost:9000/book/sign
Success.
$ curl http://localhost:9000/book/list
[
  "Hello from cURL!"
]%

Integrating with AWS X-Ray

Download and run the AWS X-Ray daemon

The AWS SDKs emit trace segments over UDP on port 2000. (This port can be configured.) In order for the trace segments to make it to the X-Ray service, the daemon must listen on this port and batch the segments in calls to the PutTraceSegments API.
For information about downloading and running the X-Ray daemon, see the AWS X-Ray Developer Guide.

Installing the AWS X-Ray SDK for Go

To download the SDK from GitHub, run go get -u github.com/aws/aws-xray-sdk-go/... The SDK will appear in the $GOPATH.

Enabling the incoming request filter

The first step to instrumenting an application with AWS X-Ray is to enable the generation of trace segments on incoming requests. The SDK conveniently provides an implementation of http.Handler which does exactly that. To ensure incoming web requests travel through this handler, we can modify app/init.go, adding a custom function to be run on application start.

import (
    "github.com/aws/aws-xray-sdk-go/xray"
    "github.com/revel/revel"
)

...

func init() {
  ...
    revel.OnAppStart(installXRayHandler)
}

func installXRayHandler() {
    revel.Server.Handler = xray.Handler(xray.NewFixedSegmentNamer("GuestbookApp"), revel.Server.Handler)
}

The application will now emit a segment for each incoming web request. The service graph appears:

You can customize the name of the segment to make it more descriptive by providing an alternate implementation of SegmentNamer to xray.Handler. For example, you can use xray.NewDynamicSegmentNamer(fallback, pattern) in place of the fixed namer. This namer will use the host name from the incoming web request (if it matches pattern) as the segment name. This is often useful when you are trying to separate different instances of the same application.

In addition, HTTP-centric information such as method and URL is collected in the segment’s http subsection:

"http": {
    "request": {
        "url": "/book/list",
        "method": "GET",
        "user_agent": "curl/7.54.0",
        "client_ip": "::1"
    },
    "response": {
        "status": 200
    }
},

Instrumenting outbound calls

To provide detailed performance metrics for distributed applications, the AWS X-Ray SDK needs to measure the time it takes to make outbound requests. Trace context is passed to downstream services using the X-Amzn-Trace-Id header. To draw a detailed and accurate representation of a distributed application, outbound call instrumentation is required.

AWS SDK calls

The AWS X-Ray SDK for Go provides a one-line AWS client wrapper that enables the collection of detailed per-call metrics for any AWS client. We can modify the DynamoDB client instantiation to include this line:

// ddb returns the controller's DynamoDB client, instatiating a new client if necessary.
func (c Book) ddb() *dynamodb.DynamoDB {
    if c.ddbClient == nil {
        sess := session.Must(session.NewSession(&aws.Config{
            Region: aws.String(endpoints.UsWest2RegionID),
        }))
        c.ddbClient = dynamodb.New(sess)
        xray.AWS(c.ddbClient.Client) // add subsegment-generating X-Ray handlers to this client
    }
    return c.ddbClient
}

We also need to ensure that the segment generated by our xray.Handler is passed to these AWS calls so that the X-Ray SDK knows to which segment these generated subsegments belong. In Go, the context.Context object is passed throughout the call path to achieve this goal. (In most other languages, some variant of ThreadLocal is used.) AWS clients provide a *WithContext method variant for each AWS operation, which we need to switch to:

_, err = c.ddb().PutItemWithContext(c.Request.Context(), putItemInput)
    res, err := c.ddb().ScanWithContext(c.Request.Context(), scanInput)

We now see much more detail in the Timeline view of the trace for the sign and list operations:

We can use this detail to help diagnose throttling on our DynamoDB table. In the following screenshot, the purple in the DynamoDB service graph node indicates that our table is underprovisioned. The red in the GuestbookApp node indicates that the application is throwing faults due to this throttling.

HTTP calls

Although the guestbook application does not make any non-AWS outbound HTTP calls in its current state, there is a similar one-liner to wrap HTTP clients that make outbound requests. xray.Client(c *http.Client) wraps an existing http.Client (or nil if you want to use a default HTTP client). For example:

resp, err := ctxhttp.Get(ctx, xray.Client(nil), "https://aws.amazon.com/")

Instrumenting local operations

X-Ray can also assist in measuring the performance of local compute operations. To see this in action, let’s create a custom subsegment inside the randString method:


// randString returns a random string of len n, used for DynamoDB Hash key.
func randString(ctx context.Context, n int) string {
    xray.Capture(ctx, "randString", func(innerCtx context.Context) {
        b := make([]rune, n)
        for i := range b {
            b[i] = letters[rand.Intn(len(letters))]
        }
        s := string(b)
    })
    return s
}

// we'll also need to change the callsite

s.ID = randString(c.Request.Context(), 20)

Summary

By now, you are an expert on how to instrument X-Ray for your Go applications. Instrumenting X-Ray with your applications is an easy way to analyze and debug performance issues and understand customer impact. Please feel free to give any feedback or comments below.

For more information about advanced configuration of the AWS X-Ray SDK for Go, see the AWS X-Ray SDK for Go in the AWS X-Ray Developer Guide and the aws/aws-xray-sdk-go GitHub repository.

For more information about some of the advanced X-Ray features such as histograms, annotations, and filter expressions, see the Analyzing Performance for Amazon Rekognition Apps Written on AWS Lambda Using AWS X-Ray blog post.

Using Amazon CloudWatch and Amazon SNS to Notify when AWS X-Ray Detects Elevated Levels of Latency, Errors, and Faults in Your Application

Post Syndicated from Bharath Kumar original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/using-amazon-cloudwatch-and-amazon-sns-to-notify-when-aws-x-ray-detects-elevated-levels-of-latency-errors-and-faults-in-your-application/

AWS X-Ray helps developers analyze and debug production applications built using microservices or serverless architectures and quantify customer impact. With X-Ray, you can understand how your application and its underlying services are performing and identify and troubleshoot the root cause of performance issues and errors. You can use these insights to identify issues and opportunities for optimization.

In this blog post, I will show you how you can use Amazon CloudWatch and Amazon SNS to get notified when X-Ray detects high latency, errors, and faults in your application. Specifically, I will show you how to use this sample app to get notified through an email or SMS message when your end users observe high latencies or server-side errors when they use your application. You can customize the alarms and events by updating the sample app code.

Sample App Overview

The sample app uses the X-Ray GetServiceGraph API to get the following information:

  • Aggregated response time.
  • Requests that failed with 4xx status code (errors).
  • 429 status code (throttle).
  • 5xx status code (faults).
Sample app architecture

Overview of sample app architecture

Getting started

The sample app uses AWS CloudFormation to deploy the required resources.
To install the sample app:

  1. Run git clone to get the sample app.
  2. Update the JSON file in the Setup folder with threshold limits and notification details.
  3. Run the install.py script to install the sample app.

For more information about the installation steps, see the readme file on GitHub.

You can update the app configuration to include your phone number or email to get notified when your application in X-Ray breaches the latency, error, and fault limits you set in the configuration. If you prefer to not provide your phone number and email, then you can use the CloudWatch alarm deployed by the sample app to monitor your application in X-Ray.

The sample app deploys resources with the sample app namespace you provided during setup. This enables you to have multiple sample apps in the same region.

CloudWatch rules

The sample app uses two CloudWatch rules:

  1. SCHEDULEDLAMBDAFOR-sample_app_name to trigger at regular intervals the AWS Lambda function that queries the GetServiceGraph API.
  2. XRAYALERTSFOR-sample_app_name to look for published CloudWatch events that match the pattern defined in this rule.
CloudWatch Rules for sample app

CloudWatch rules created for the sample app

CloudWatch alarms

If you did not provide your phone number or email in the JSON file, the sample app uses a CloudWatch alarm named XRayCloudWatchAlarm-sample_app_name in combination with the CloudWatch event that you can use for monitoring.

CloudWatch Alarm for sample app

CloudWatch alarm created for the sample app

Amazon SNS messages

The sample app creates two SNS topics:

  • sample_app_name-cloudwatcheventsnstopic to send out an SMS message when the CloudWatch event matches a pattern published from the Lambda function.
  • sample_app_name-cloudwatchalarmsnstopic to send out an email message when the CloudWatch alarm goes into an ALARM state.
Amazon SNS for sample app

Amazon SNS created for the sample app

Getting notifications

The CloudWatch event looks for the following matching pattern:

{
  "detail-type": [
    "XCW Notification for Alerts"
  ],
  "source": [
    "<sample_app_name>-xcw.alerts"
  ]
}

The event then invokes an SNS topic that sends out an SMS message.

SMS in sample app

SMS that is sent when CloudWatch Event invokes Amazon SNS topic

The CloudWatch alarm looks for the TriggeredRules metric that is published whenever the CloudWatch event matches the event pattern. It goes into the ALARM state whenever TriggeredRules > 0 for the specified evaluation period and invokes an SNS topic that sends an email message.

Email sent in sample app

Email that is sent when CloudWatch Alarm goes to ALARM state

Stopping notifications

If you provided your phone number or email address, but would like to stop getting notified, change the SUBSCRIBE_TO_EMAIL_SMS environment variable in the Lambda function to No. Then, go to the Amazon SNS console and delete the subscriptions. You can still monitor your application for elevated levels of latency, errors, and faults by using the CloudWatch console.

Lambda environment variable in sample app

Change environment variable in Lambda

 

Delete subscription in SNS for sample app

Delete subscriptions to stop getting notified

Uninstalling the sample app

To uninstall the sample app, run the uninstall.py script in the Setup folder.

Extending the sample app

The sample app notifes you when when X-Ray detects high latency, errors, and faults in your application. You can extend it to provide more value for your use cases (for example, to perform an action on a resource when the state of a CloudWatch alarm changes).

To summarize, after this set up you will be able to get notified through Amazon SNS when X-Ray detects high latency, errors and faults in your application.

I hope you found this information about setting up alarms and alerts for your application in AWS X-Ray helpful. Feel free to leave questions or other feedback in the comments. Feel free to learn more about AWS X-Ray, Amazon SNS and Amazon CloudWatch

About the Author

Bharath Kumar is a Sr.Product Manager with AWS X-Ray. He has developed and launched mobile games, web applications on microservices and serverless architecture.

How to Enhance the Security of Sensitive Customer Data by Using Amazon CloudFront Field-Level Encryption

Post Syndicated from Alex Tomic original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-enhance-the-security-of-sensitive-customer-data-by-using-amazon-cloudfront-field-level-encryption/

Amazon CloudFront is a web service that speeds up distribution of your static and dynamic web content to end users through a worldwide network of edge locations. CloudFront provides a number of benefits and capabilities that can help you secure your applications and content while meeting compliance requirements. For example, you can configure CloudFront to help enforce secure, end-to-end connections using HTTPS SSL/TLS encryption. You also can take advantage of CloudFront integration with AWS Shield for DDoS protection and with AWS WAF (a web application firewall) for protection against application-layer attacks, such as SQL injection and cross-site scripting.

Now, CloudFront field-level encryption helps secure sensitive data such as a customer phone numbers by adding another security layer to CloudFront HTTPS. Using this functionality, you can help ensure that sensitive information in a POST request is encrypted at CloudFront edge locations. This information remains encrypted as it flows to and beyond your origin servers that terminate HTTPS connections with CloudFront and throughout the application environment. In this blog post, we demonstrate how you can enhance the security of sensitive data by using CloudFront field-level encryption.

Note: This post assumes that you understand concepts and services such as content delivery networks, HTTP forms, public-key cryptography, CloudFrontAWS Lambda, and the AWS CLI. If necessary, you should familiarize yourself with these concepts and review the solution overview in the next section before proceeding with the deployment of this post’s solution.

How field-level encryption works

Many web applications collect and store data from users as those users interact with the applications. For example, a travel-booking website may ask for your passport number and less sensitive data such as your food preferences. This data is transmitted to web servers and also might travel among a number of services to perform tasks. However, this also means that your sensitive information may need to be accessed by only a small subset of these services (most other services do not need to access your data).

User data is often stored in a database for retrieval at a later time. One approach to protecting stored sensitive data is to configure and code each service to protect that sensitive data. For example, you can develop safeguards in logging functionality to ensure sensitive data is masked or removed. However, this can add complexity to your code base and limit performance.

Field-level encryption addresses this problem by ensuring sensitive data is encrypted at CloudFront edge locations. Sensitive data fields in HTTPS form POSTs are automatically encrypted with a user-provided public RSA key. After the data is encrypted, other systems in your architecture see only ciphertext. If this ciphertext unintentionally becomes externally available, the data is cryptographically protected and only designated systems with access to the private RSA key can decrypt the sensitive data.

It is critical to secure private RSA key material to prevent unauthorized access to the protected data. Management of cryptographic key material is a larger topic that is out of scope for this blog post, but should be carefully considered when implementing encryption in your applications. For example, in this blog post we store private key material as a secure string in the Amazon EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store. The Parameter Store provides a centralized location for managing your configuration data such as plaintext data (such as database strings) or secrets (such as passwords) that are encrypted using AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS). You may have an existing key management system in place that you can use, or you can use AWS CloudHSM. CloudHSM is a cloud-based hardware security module (HSM) that enables you to easily generate and use your own encryption keys in the AWS Cloud.

To illustrate field-level encryption, let’s look at a simple form submission where Name and Phone values are sent to a web server using an HTTP POST. A typical form POST would contain data such as the following.

POST / HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
Content-Length:60

Name=Jane+Doe&Phone=404-555-0150

Instead of taking this typical approach, field-level encryption converts this data similar to the following.

POST / HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
Content-Length: 1713

Name=Jane+Doe&Phone=AYABeHxZ0ZqWyysqxrB5pEBSYw4AAA...

To further demonstrate field-level encryption in action, this blog post includes a sample serverless application that you can deploy by using a CloudFormation template, which creates an application environment using CloudFront, Amazon API Gateway, and Lambda. The sample application is only intended to demonstrate field-level encryption functionality and is not intended for production use. The following diagram depicts the architecture and data flow of this sample application.

Sample application architecture and data flow

Diagram of the solution's architecture and data flow

Here is how the sample solution works:

  1. An application user submits an HTML form page with sensitive data, generating an HTTPS POST to CloudFront.
  2. Field-level encryption intercepts the form POST and encrypts sensitive data with the public RSA key and replaces fields in the form post with encrypted ciphertext. The form POST ciphertext is then sent to origin servers.
  3. The serverless application accepts the form post data containing ciphertext where sensitive data would normally be. If a malicious user were able to compromise your application and gain access to your data, such as the contents of a form, that user would see encrypted data.
  4. Lambda stores data in a DynamoDB table, leaving sensitive data to remain safely encrypted at rest.
  5. An administrator uses the AWS Management Console and a Lambda function to view the sensitive data.
  6. During the session, the administrator retrieves ciphertext from the DynamoDB table.
  7. The administrator decrypts sensitive data by using private key material stored in the EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store.
  8. Decrypted sensitive data is transmitted over SSL/TLS via the AWS Management Console to the administrator for review.

Deployment walkthrough

The high-level steps to deploy this solution are as follows:

  1. Stage the required artifacts
    When deployment packages are used with Lambda, the zipped artifacts have to be placed in an S3 bucket in the target AWS Region for deployment. This step is not required if you are deploying in the US East (N. Virginia) Region because the package has already been staged there.
  2. Generate an RSA key pair
    Create a public/private key pair that will be used to perform the encrypt/decrypt functionality.
  3. Upload the public key to CloudFront and associate it with the field-level encryption configuration
    After you create the key pair, the public key is uploaded to CloudFront so that it can be used by field-level encryption.
  4. Launch the CloudFormation stack
    Deploy the sample application for demonstrating field-level encryption by using AWS CloudFormation.
  5. Add the field-level encryption configuration to the CloudFront distribution
    After you have provisioned the application, this step associates the field-level encryption configuration with the CloudFront distribution.
  6. Store the RSA private key in the Parameter Store
    Store the private key in the Parameter Store as a SecureString data type, which uses AWS KMS to encrypt the parameter value.

Deploy the solution

1. Stage the required artifacts

(If you are deploying in the US East [N. Virginia] Region, skip to Step 2, “Generate an RSA key pair.”)

Stage the Lambda function deployment package in an Amazon S3 bucket located in the AWS Region you are using for this solution. To do this, download the zipped deployment package and upload it to your in-region bucket. For additional information about uploading objects to S3, see Uploading Object into Amazon S3.

2. Generate an RSA key pair

In this section, you will generate an RSA key pair by using OpenSSL:

  1. Confirm access to OpenSSL.
    $ openssl version

    You should see version information similar to the following.

    OpenSSL <version> <date>

  1. Create a private key using the following command.
    $ openssl genrsa -out private_key.pem 2048

    The command results should look similar to the following.

    Generating RSA private key, 2048 bit long modulus
    ................................................................................+++
    ..........................+++
    e is 65537 (0x10001)
  1. Extract the public key from the private key by running the following command.
    $ openssl rsa -pubout -in private_key.pem -out public_key.pem

    You should see output similar to the following.

    writing RSA key
  1. Restrict access to the private key.$ chmod 600 private_key.pem Note: You will use the public and private key material in Steps 3 and 6 to configure the sample application.

3. Upload the public key to CloudFront and associate it with the field-level encryption configuration

Now that you have created the RSA key pair, you will use the AWS Management Console to upload the public key to CloudFront for use by field-level encryption. Complete the following steps to upload and configure the public key.

Note: Do not include spaces or special characters when providing the configuration values in this section.

  1. From the AWS Management Console, choose Services > CloudFront.
  2. In the navigation pane, choose Public Key and choose Add Public Key.
    Screenshot of adding a public key

Complete the Add Public Key configuration boxes:

  • Key Name: Type a name such as DemoPublicKey.
  • Encoded Key: Paste the contents of the public_key.pem file you created in Step 2c. Copy and paste the encoded key value for your public key, including the -----BEGIN PUBLIC KEY----- and -----END PUBLIC KEY----- lines.
  • Comment: Optionally add a comment.
  1. Choose Create.
  2. After adding at least one public key to CloudFront, the next step is to create a profile to tell CloudFront which fields of input you want to be encrypted. While still on the CloudFront console, choose Field-level encryption in the navigation pane.
  3. Under Profiles, choose Create profile.
    Screenshot of creating a profile

Complete the Create profile configuration boxes:

  • Name: Type a name such as FLEDemo.
  • Comment: Optionally add a comment.
  • Public key: Select the public key you configured in Step 4.b.
  • Provider name: Type a provider name such as FLEDemo.
    This information will be used when the form data is encrypted, and must be provided to applications that need to decrypt the data, along with the appropriate private key.
  • Pattern to match: Type phone. This configures field-level encryption to match based on the phone.
  1. Choose Save profile.
  2. Configurations include options for whether to block or forward a query to your origin in scenarios where CloudFront can’t encrypt the data. Under Encryption Configurations, choose Create configuration.
    Screenshot of creating a configuration

Complete the Create configuration boxes:

  • Comment: Optionally add a comment.
  • Content type: Enter application/x-www-form-urlencoded. This is a common media type for encoding form data.
  • Default profile ID: Select the profile you added in Step 3e.
  1. Choose Save configuration

4. Launch the CloudFormation stack

Launch the sample application by using a CloudFormation template that automates the provisioning process.

Input parameterInput parameter description
ProviderIDEnter the Provider name you assigned in Step 3e. The ProviderID is used in field-level encryption configuration in CloudFront (letters and numbers only, no special characters)
PublicKeyNameEnter the Key Name you assigned in Step 3b. This name is assigned to the public key in field-level encryption configuration in CloudFront (letters and numbers only, no special characters).
PrivateKeySSMPathLeave as the default: /cloudfront/field-encryption-sample/private-key
ArtifactsBucketThe S3 bucket with artifact files (staged zip file with app code). Leave as default if deploying in us-east-1.
ArtifactsPrefixThe path in the S3 bucket containing artifact files. Leave as default if deploying in us-east-1.

To finish creating the CloudFormation stack:

  1. Choose Next on the Select Template page, enter the input parameters and choose Next.
    Note: The Artifacts configuration needs to be updated only if you are deploying outside of us-east-1 (US East [N. Virginia]). See Step 1 for artifact staging instructions.
  2. On the Options page, accept the defaults and choose Next.
  3. On the Review page, confirm the details, choose the I acknowledge that AWS CloudFormation might create IAM resources check box, and then choose Create. (The stack will be created in approximately 15 minutes.)

5. Add the field-level encryption configuration to the CloudFront distribution

While still on the CloudFront console, choose Distributions in the navigation pane, and then:

    1. In the Outputs section of the FLE-Sample-App stack, look for CloudFrontDistribution and click the URL to open the CloudFront console.
    2. Choose Behaviors, choose the Default (*) behavior, and then choose Edit.
    3. For Field-level Encryption Config, choose the configuration you created in Step 3g.
      Screenshot of editing the default cache behavior
    4. Choose Yes, Edit.
    5. While still in the CloudFront distribution configuration, choose the General Choose Edit, scroll down to Distribution State, and change it to Enabled.
    6. Choose Yes, Edit.

6. Store the RSA private key in the Parameter Store

In this step, you store the private key in the EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store as a SecureString data type, which uses AWS KMS to encrypt the parameter value. For more information about AWS KMS, see the AWS Key Management Service Developer Guide. You will need a working installation of the AWS CLI to complete this step.

  1. Store the private key in the Parameter Store with the AWS CLI by running the following command. You will find the <KMSKeyID> in the KMSKeyID in the CloudFormation stack Outputs. Substitute it for the placeholder in the following command.
    $ aws ssm put-parameter --type "SecureString" --name /cloudfront/field-encryption-sample/private-key --value file://private_key.pem --key-id "<KMSKeyID>"
    
    ------------------
    |  PutParameter  |
    +----------+-----+
    |  Version |  1  |
    +----------+-----+

  1. Verify the parameter. Your private key material should be accessible through the ssm get-parameter in the following command in the Value The key material has been truncated in the following output.
    $ aws ssm get-parameter --name /cloudfront/field-encryption-sample/private-key --with-decryption
    
    -----…
    
    ||  Value  |  -----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
    MIIEowIBAAKCAQEAwGRBGuhacmw+C73kM6Z…….

    Notice we use the —with decryption argument in this command. This returns the private key as cleartext.

    This completes the sample application deployment. Next, we show you how to see field-level encryption in action.

  1. Delete the private key from local storage. On Linux for example, using the shred command, securely delete the private key material from your workstation as shown below. You may also wish to store the private key material within an AWS CloudHSM or other protected location suitable for your security requirements. For production implementations, you also should implement key rotation policies.
    $ shred -zvu -n  100 private*.pem
    
    shred: private_encrypted_key.pem: pass 1/101 (random)...
    shred: private_encrypted_key.pem: pass 2/101 (dddddd)...
    shred: private_encrypted_key.pem: pass 3/101 (555555)...
    ….

Test the sample application

Use the following steps to test the sample application with field-level encryption:

  1. Open sample application in your web browser by clicking the ApplicationURL link in the CloudFormation stack Outputs. (for example, https:d199xe5izz82ea.cloudfront.net/prod/). Note that it may take several minutes for the CloudFront distribution to reach the Deployed Status from the previous step, during which time you may not be able to access the sample application.
  2. Fill out and submit the HTML form on the page:
    1. Complete the three form fields: Full Name, Email Address, and Phone Number.
    2. Choose Submit.
      Screenshot of completing the sample application form
      Notice that the application response includes the form values. The phone number returns the following ciphertext encryption using your public key. This ciphertext has been stored in DynamoDB.
      Screenshot of the phone number as ciphertext
  3. Execute the Lambda decryption function to download ciphertext from DynamoDB and decrypt the phone number using the private key:
    1. In the CloudFormation stack Outputs, locate DecryptFunction and click the URL to open the Lambda console.
    2. Configure a test event using the “Hello World” template.
    3. Choose the Test button.
  4. View the encrypted and decrypted phone number data.
    Screenshot of the encrypted and decrypted phone number data

Summary

In this blog post, we showed you how to use CloudFront field-level encryption to encrypt sensitive data at edge locations and help prevent access from unauthorized systems. The source code for this solution is available on GitHub. For additional information about field-level encryption, see the documentation.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing this solution, please start a new thread on the CloudFront forum.

– Alex and Cameron

Attend This Free December 13 Tech Talk: “Cloud-Native DDoS Mitigation with AWS Shield”

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/register-for-and-attend-this-december-14-aws-shield-tech-talk-cloud-native-ddos-mitigation/

AWS Online Tech Talks banner

As part of the AWS Online Tech Talks series, AWS will present Cloud-Native DDoS Mitigation with AWS Shield on Wednesday, December 13. This tech talk will start at 9:00 A.M. Pacific Time and end at 9:40 A.M. Pacific Time.

Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) mitigation can help you maintain application availability, but traditional solutions are hard to scale and require expensive hardware. AWS Shield is a managed DDoS protection service that helps you safeguard web applications running in the AWS Cloud. In this tech talk, you will learn simple techniques for using AWS Shield to help you build scalable DDoS defenses into your applications without investing in costly infrastructure. You also will learn how AWS Shield helps you monitor your applications to detect DDoS attempts and how to respond to in-progress events.

This tech talk is free. Register today.

– Craig

Event-Driven Computing with Amazon SNS and AWS Compute, Storage, Database, and Networking Services

Post Syndicated from Christie Gifrin original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/event-driven-computing-with-amazon-sns-compute-storage-database-and-networking-services/

Contributed by Otavio Ferreira, Manager, Software Development, AWS Messaging

Like other developers around the world, you may be tackling increasingly complex business problems. A key success factor, in that case, is the ability to break down a large project scope into smaller, more manageable components. A service-oriented architecture guides you toward designing systems as a collection of loosely coupled, independently scaled, and highly reusable services. Microservices take this even further. To improve performance and scalability, they promote fine-grained interfaces and lightweight protocols.

However, the communication among isolated microservices can be challenging. Services are often deployed onto independent servers and don’t share any compute or storage resources. Also, you should avoid hard dependencies among microservices, to preserve maintainability and reusability.

If you apply the pub/sub design pattern, you can effortlessly decouple and independently scale out your microservices and serverless architectures. A pub/sub messaging service, such as Amazon SNS, promotes event-driven computing that statically decouples event publishers from subscribers, while dynamically allowing for the exchange of messages between them. An event-driven architecture also introduces the responsiveness needed to deal with complex problems, which are often unpredictable and asynchronous.

What is event-driven computing?

Given the context of microservices, event-driven computing is a model in which subscriber services automatically perform work in response to events triggered by publisher services. This paradigm can be applied to automate workflows while decoupling the services that collectively and independently work to fulfil these workflows. Amazon SNS is an event-driven computing hub, in the AWS Cloud, that has native integration with several AWS publisher and subscriber services.

Which AWS services publish events to SNS natively?

Several AWS services have been integrated as SNS publishers and, therefore, can natively trigger event-driven computing for a variety of use cases. In this post, I specifically cover AWS compute, storage, database, and networking services, as depicted below.

Compute services

  • Auto Scaling: Helps you ensure that you have the correct number of Amazon EC2 instances available to handle the load for your application. You can configure Auto Scaling lifecycle hooks to trigger events, as Auto Scaling resizes your EC2 cluster.As an example, you may want to warm up the local cache store on newly launched EC2 instances, and also download log files from other EC2 instances that are about to be terminated. To make this happen, set an SNS topic as your Auto Scaling group’s notification target, then subscribe two Lambda functions to this SNS topic. The first function is responsible for handling scale-out events (to warm up cache upon provisioning), whereas the second is in charge of handling scale-in events (to download logs upon termination).

  • AWS Elastic Beanstalk: An easy-to-use service for deploying and scaling web applications and web services developed in a number of programming languages. You can configure event notifications for your Elastic Beanstalk environment so that notable events can be automatically published to an SNS topic, then pushed to topic subscribers.As an example, you may use this event-driven architecture to coordinate your continuous integration pipeline (such as Jenkins CI). That way, whenever an environment is created, Elastic Beanstalk publishes this event to an SNS topic, which triggers a subscribing Lambda function, which then kicks off a CI job against your newly created Elastic Beanstalk environment.

  • Elastic Load Balancing: Automatically distributes incoming application traffic across Amazon EC2 instances, containers, or other resources identified by IP addresses.You can configure CloudWatch alarms on Elastic Load Balancing metrics, to automate the handling of events derived from Classic Load Balancers. As an example, you may leverage this event-driven design to automate latency profiling in an Amazon ECS cluster behind a Classic Load Balancer. In this example, whenever your ECS cluster breaches your load balancer latency threshold, an event is posted by CloudWatch to an SNS topic, which then triggers a subscribing Lambda function. This function runs a task on your ECS cluster to trigger a latency profiling tool, hosted on the cluster itself. This can enhance your latency troubleshooting exercise by making it timely.

Storage services

  • Amazon S3: Object storage built to store and retrieve any amount of data.You can enable S3 event notifications, and automatically get them posted to SNS topics, to automate a variety of workflows. For instance, imagine that you have an S3 bucket to store incoming resumes from candidates, and a fleet of EC2 instances to encode these resumes from their original format (such as Word or text) into a portable format (such as PDF).In this example, whenever new files are uploaded to your input bucket, S3 publishes these events to an SNS topic, which in turn pushes these messages into subscribing SQS queues. Then, encoding workers running on EC2 instances poll these messages from the SQS queues; retrieve the original files from the input S3 bucket; encode them into PDF; and finally store them in an output S3 bucket.

  • Amazon EFS: Provides simple and scalable file storage, for use with Amazon EC2 instances, in the AWS Cloud.You can configure CloudWatch alarms on EFS metrics, to automate the management of your EFS systems. For example, consider a highly parallelized genomics analysis application that runs against an EFS system. By default, this file system is instantiated on the “General Purpose” performance mode. Although this performance mode allows for lower latency, it might eventually impose a scaling bottleneck. Therefore, you may leverage an event-driven design to handle it automatically.Basically, as soon as the EFS metric “Percent I/O Limit” breaches 95%, CloudWatch could post this event to an SNS topic, which in turn would push this message into a subscribing Lambda function. This function automatically creates a new file system, this time on the “Max I/O” performance mode, then switches the genomics analysis application to this new file system. As a result, your application starts experiencing higher I/O throughput rates.

  • Amazon Glacier: A secure, durable, and low-cost cloud storage service for data archiving and long-term backup.You can set a notification configuration on an Amazon Glacier vault so that when a job completes, a message is published to an SNS topic. Retrieving an archive from Amazon Glacier is a two-step asynchronous operation, in which you first initiate a job, and then download the output after the job completes. Therefore, SNS helps you eliminate polling your Amazon Glacier vault to check whether your job has been completed, or not. As usual, you may subscribe SQS queues, Lambda functions, and HTTP endpoints to your SNS topic, to be notified when your Amazon Glacier job is done.

  • AWS Snowball: A petabyte-scale data transport solution that uses secure appliances to transfer large amounts of data.You can leverage Snowball notifications to automate workflows related to importing data into and exporting data from AWS. More specifically, whenever your Snowball job status changes, Snowball can publish this event to an SNS topic, which in turn can broadcast the event to all its subscribers.As an example, imagine a Geographic Information System (GIS) that distributes high-resolution satellite images to users via Web browser. In this example, the GIS vendor could capture up to 80 TB of satellite images; create a Snowball job to import these files from an on-premises system to an S3 bucket; and provide an SNS topic ARN to be notified upon job status changes in Snowball. After Snowball changes the job status from “Importing” to “Completed”, Snowball publishes this event to the specified SNS topic, which delivers this message to a subscribing Lambda function, which finally creates a CloudFront web distribution for the target S3 bucket, to serve the images to end users.

Database services

  • Amazon RDS: Makes it easy to set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud.RDS leverages SNS to broadcast notifications when RDS events occur. As usual, these notifications can be delivered via any protocol supported by SNS, including SQS queues, Lambda functions, and HTTP endpoints.As an example, imagine that you own a social network website that has experienced organic growth, and needs to scale its compute and database resources on demand. In this case, you could provide an SNS topic to listen to RDS DB instance events. When the “Low Storage” event is published to the topic, SNS pushes this event to a subscribing Lambda function, which in turn leverages the RDS API to increase the storage capacity allocated to your DB instance. The provisioning itself takes place within the specified DB maintenance window.

  • Amazon ElastiCache: A web service that makes it easy to deploy, operate, and scale an in-memory data store or cache in the cloud.ElastiCache can publish messages using Amazon SNS when significant events happen on your cache cluster. This feature can be used to refresh the list of servers on client machines connected to individual cache node endpoints of a cache cluster. For instance, an ecommerce website fetches product details from a cache cluster, with the goal of offloading a relational database and speeding up page load times. Ideally, you want to make sure that each web server always has an updated list of cache servers to which to connect.To automate this node discovery process, you can get your ElastiCache cluster to publish events to an SNS topic. Thus, when ElastiCache event “AddCacheNodeComplete” is published, your topic then pushes this event to all subscribing HTTP endpoints that serve your ecommerce website, so that these HTTP servers can update their list of cache nodes.

  • Amazon Redshift: A fully managed data warehouse that makes it simple to analyze data using standard SQL and BI (Business Intelligence) tools.Amazon Redshift uses SNS to broadcast relevant events so that data warehouse workflows can be automated. As an example, imagine a news website that sends clickstream data to a Kinesis Firehose stream, which then loads the data into Amazon Redshift, so that popular news and reading preferences might be surfaced on a BI tool. At some point though, this Amazon Redshift cluster might need to be resized, and the cluster enters a ready-only mode. Hence, this Amazon Redshift event is published to an SNS topic, which delivers this event to a subscribing Lambda function, which finally deletes the corresponding Kinesis Firehose delivery stream, so that clickstream data uploads can be put on hold.At a later point, after Amazon Redshift publishes the event that the maintenance window has been closed, SNS notifies a subscribing Lambda function accordingly, so that this function can re-create the Kinesis Firehose delivery stream, and resume clickstream data uploads to Amazon Redshift.

  • AWS DMS: Helps you migrate databases to AWS quickly and securely. The source database remains fully operational during the migration, minimizing downtime to applications that rely on the database.DMS also uses SNS to provide notifications when DMS events occur, which can automate database migration workflows. As an example, you might create data replication tasks to migrate an on-premises MS SQL database, composed of multiple tables, to MySQL. Thus, if replication tasks fail due to incompatible data encoding in the source tables, these events can be published to an SNS topic, which can push these messages into a subscribing SQS queue. Then, encoders running on EC2 can poll these messages from the SQS queue, encode the source tables into a compatible character set, and restart the corresponding replication tasks in DMS. This is an event-driven approach to a self-healing database migration process.

Networking services

  • Amazon Route 53: A highly available and scalable cloud-based DNS (Domain Name System). Route 53 health checks monitor the health and performance of your web applications, web servers, and other resources.You can set CloudWatch alarms and get automated Amazon SNS notifications when the status of your Route 53 health check changes. As an example, imagine an online payment gateway that reports the health of its platform to merchants worldwide, via a status page. This page is hosted on EC2 and fetches platform health data from DynamoDB. In this case, you could configure a CloudWatch alarm for your Route 53 health check, so that when the alarm threshold is breached, and the payment gateway is no longer considered healthy, then CloudWatch publishes this event to an SNS topic, which pushes this message to a subscribing Lambda function, which finally updates the DynamoDB table that populates the status page. This event-driven approach avoids any kind of manual update to the status page visited by merchants.

  • AWS Direct Connect (AWS DX): Makes it easy to establish a dedicated network connection from your premises to AWS, which can reduce your network costs, increase bandwidth throughput, and provide a more consistent network experience than Internet-based connections.You can monitor physical DX connections using CloudWatch alarms, and send SNS messages when alarms change their status. As an example, when a DX connection state shifts to 0 (zero), indicating that the connection is down, this event can be published to an SNS topic, which can fan out this message to impacted servers through HTTP endpoints, so that they might reroute their traffic through a different connection instead. This is an event-driven approach to connectivity resilience.

More event-driven computing on AWS

In addition to SNS, event-driven computing is also addressed by Amazon CloudWatch Events, which delivers a near real-time stream of system events that describe changes in AWS resources. With CloudWatch Events, you can route each event type to one or more targets, including:

Many AWS services publish events to CloudWatch. As an example, you can get CloudWatch Events to capture events on your ETL (Extract, Transform, Load) jobs running on AWS Glue and push failed ones to an SQS queue, so that you can retry them later.

Conclusion

Amazon SNS is a pub/sub messaging service that can be used as an event-driven computing hub to AWS customers worldwide. By capturing events natively triggered by AWS services, such as EC2, S3 and RDS, you can automate and optimize all kinds of workflows, namely scaling, testing, encoding, profiling, broadcasting, discovery, failover, and much more. Business use cases presented in this post ranged from recruiting websites, to scientific research, geographic systems, social networks, retail websites, and news portals.

Start now by visiting Amazon SNS in the AWS Management Console, or by trying the AWS 10-Minute Tutorial, Send Fan-out Event Notifications with Amazon SNS and Amazon SQS.

 

Enabling Two-Factor Authentication For Your Web Application

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/enabling-two-factor-authentication-web-application/

It’s almost always a good idea to support two-factor authentication (2FA), especially for back-office systems. 2FA comes in many different forms, some of which include SMS, TOTP, or even hardware tokens.

Enabling them requires a similar flow:

  • The user goes to their profile page (skip this if you want to force 2fa upon registration)
  • Clicks “Enable two-factor authentication”
  • Enters some data to enable the particular 2FA method (phone number, TOTP verification code, etc.)
  • Next time they login, in addition to the username and password, the login form requests the 2nd factor (verification code) and sends that along with the credentials

I will focus on Google Authenticator, which uses a TOTP (Time-based one-time password) for generating a sequence of verification codes. The ideas is that the server and the client application share a secret key. Based on that key and on the current time, both come up with the same code. Of course, clocks are not perfectly synced, so there’s a window of a few codes that the server accepts as valid.

How to implement that with Java (on the server)? Using the GoogleAuth library. The flow is as follows:

  • The user goes to their profile page
  • Clicks “Enable two-factor authentication”
  • The server generates a secret key, stores it as part of the user profile and returns a URL to a QR code
  • The user scans the QR code with their Google Authenticator app thus creating a new profile in the app
  • The user enters the verification code shown the app in a field that has appeared together with the QR code and clicks “confirm”
  • The server marks the 2FA as enabled in the user profile
  • If the user doesn’t scan the code or doesn’t verify the process, the user profile will contain just a orphaned secret key, but won’t be marked as enabled
  • There should be an option to later disable the 2FA from their user profile page

The most important bit from theoretical point of view here is the sharing of the secret key. The crypto is symmetric, so both sides (the authenticator app and the server) have the same key. It is shared via a QR code that the user scans. If an attacker has control on the user’s machine at that point, the secret can be leaked and thus the 2FA – abused by the attacker as well. But that’s not in the threat model – in other words, if the attacker has access to the user’s machine, the damage is already done anyway.

Upon login, the flow is as follows:

  • The user enters username and password and clicks “Login”
  • Using an AJAX request the page asks the server whether this email has 2FA enabled
  • If 2FA is not enabled, just submit the username & password form
  • If 2FA is enabled, the login form is not submitted, but instead an additional field is shown to let the user input the verification code from the authenticator app
  • After the user enters the code and presses login, the form can be submitted. Either using the same login button, or a new “verify” button, or the verification input + button could be an entirely new screen (hiding the username/password inputs).
  • The server then checks again if the user has 2FA enabled and if yes, verifies the verification code. If it matches, login is successful. If not, login fails and the user is allowed to reenter the credentials and the verification code. Note here that you can have different responses depending on whether username/password are wrong or in case the code is wrong. You can also attempt to login prior to even showing the verification code input. That way is arguably better, because that way you don’t reveal to a potential attacker that the user uses 2FA.

While I’m speaking of username and password, that can apply to any other authentication method. After you get a success confirmation from an OAuth / OpenID Connect / SAML provider, or after you can a token from SecureLogin, you can request the second factor (code).

In code, the above processes look as follows (using Spring MVC; I’ve merged the controller and service layer for brevity. You can replace the @AuthenticatedPrincipal bit with your way of supplying the currently logged in user details to the controllers). Assuming the methods are in controller mapped to “/user/”:

@RequestMapping(value = "/init2fa", method = RequestMethod.POST)
@ResponseBody
public String initTwoFactorAuth(@AuthenticationPrincipal LoginAuthenticationToken token) {
    User user = getLoggedInUser(token);
    GoogleAuthenticatorKey googleAuthenticatorKey = googleAuthenticator.createCredentials();
    user.setTwoFactorAuthKey(googleAuthenticatorKey.getKey());
    dao.update(user);
    return GoogleAuthenticatorQRGenerator.getOtpAuthURL(GOOGLE_AUTH_ISSUER, email, googleAuthenticatorKey);
}

@RequestMapping(value = "/confirm2fa", method = RequestMethod.POST)
@ResponseBody
public boolean confirmTwoFactorAuth(@AuthenticationPrincipal LoginAuthenticationToken token, @RequestParam("code") int code) {
    User user = getLoggedInUser(token);
    boolean result = googleAuthenticator.authorize(user.getTwoFactorAuthKey(), code);
    user.setTwoFactorAuthEnabled(result);
    dao.update(user);
    return result;
}

@RequestMapping(value = "/disable2fa", method = RequestMethod.GET)
@ResponseBody
public void disableTwoFactorAuth(@AuthenticationPrincipal LoginAuthenticationToken token) {
    User user = getLoggedInUser(token);
    user.setTwoFactorAuthKey(null);
    user.setTwoFactorAuthEnabled(false);
    dao.update(user);
}

@RequestMapping(value = "/requires2fa", method = RequestMethod.POST)
@ResponseBody
public boolean login(@RequestParam("email") String email) {
    // TODO consider verifying the password here in order not to reveal that a given user uses 2FA
    return userService.getUserDetailsByEmail(email).isTwoFactorAuthEnabled();
}

On the client side it’s simple AJAX requests to the above methods (sidenote: I kind of feel the term AJAX is no longer trendy, but I don’t know how to call them. Async? Background? Javascript?).

$("#two-fa-init").click(function() {
    $.post("/user/init2fa", function(qrImage) {
	$("#two-fa-verification").show();
	$("#two-fa-qr").prepend($('<img>',{id:'qr',src:qrImage}));
	$("#two-fa-init").hide();
    });
});

$("#two-fa-confirm").click(function() {
    var verificationCode = $("#verificationCode").val().replace(/ /g,'')
    $.post("/user/confirm2fa?code=" + verificationCode, function() {
       $("#two-fa-verification").hide();
       $("#two-fa-qr").hide();
       $.notify("Successfully enabled two-factor authentication", "success");
       $("#two-fa-message").html("Successfully enabled");
    });
});

$("#two-fa-disable").click(function() {
    $.post("/user/disable2fa", function(qrImage) {
       window.location.reload();
    });
});

The login form code depends very much on the existing login form you are using, but the point is to call the /requires2fa with the email (and password) to check if 2FA is enabled and then show a verification code input.

Overall, the implementation if two-factor authentication is simple and I’d recommend it for most systems, where security is more important than simplicity of the user experience.

The post Enabling Two-Factor Authentication For Your Web Application appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

AWS Developer Tools Expands Integration to Include GitHub

Post Syndicated from Balaji Iyer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/aws-developer-tools-expands-integration-to-include-github/

AWS Developer Tools is a set of services that include AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeBuild, and AWS CodeDeploy. Together, these services help you securely store and maintain version control of your application’s source code and automatically build, test, and deploy your application to AWS or your on-premises environment. These services are designed to enable developers and IT professionals to rapidly and safely deliver software.

As part of our continued commitment to extend the AWS Developer Tools ecosystem to third-party tools and services, we’re pleased to announce AWS CodeStar and AWS CodeBuild now integrate with GitHub. This will make it easier for GitHub users to set up a continuous integration and continuous delivery toolchain as part of their release process using AWS Developer Tools.

In this post, I will walk through the following:

Prerequisites:

You’ll need an AWS account, a GitHub account, an Amazon EC2 key pair, and administrator-level permissions for AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS CodeStar, AWS CodeBuild, AWS CodePipeline, Amazon EC2, Amazon S3.

 

Integrating GitHub with AWS CodeStar

AWS CodeStar enables you to quickly develop, build, and deploy applications on AWS. Its unified user interface helps you easily manage your software development activities in one place. With AWS CodeStar, you can set up your entire continuous delivery toolchain in minutes, so you can start releasing code faster.

When AWS CodeStar launched in April of this year, it used AWS CodeCommit as the hosted source repository. You can now choose between AWS CodeCommit or GitHub as the source control service for your CodeStar projects. In addition, your CodeStar project dashboard lets you centrally track GitHub activities, including commits, issues, and pull requests. This makes it easy to manage project activity across the components of your CI/CD toolchain. Adding the GitHub dashboard view will simplify development of your AWS applications.

In this section, I will show you how to use GitHub as the source provider for your CodeStar projects. I’ll also show you how to work with recent commits, issues, and pull requests in the CodeStar dashboard.

Sign in to the AWS Management Console and from the Services menu, choose CodeStar. In the CodeStar console, choose Create a new project. You should see the Choose a project template page.

CodeStar Project

Choose an option by programming language, application category, or AWS service. I am going to choose the Ruby on Rails web application that will be running on Amazon EC2.

On the Project details page, you’ll now see the GitHub option. Type a name for your project, and then choose Connect to GitHub.

Project details

You’ll see a message requesting authorization to connect to your GitHub repository. When prompted, choose Authorize, and then type your GitHub account password.

Authorize

This connects your GitHub identity to AWS CodeStar through OAuth. You can always review your settings by navigating to your GitHub application settings.

Installed GitHub Apps

You’ll see AWS CodeStar is now connected to GitHub:

Create project

You can choose a public or private repository. GitHub offers free accounts for users and organizations working on public and open source projects and paid accounts that offer unlimited private repositories and optional user management and security features.

In this example, I am going to choose the public repository option. Edit the repository description, if you like, and then choose Next.

Review your CodeStar project details, and then choose Create Project. On Choose an Amazon EC2 Key Pair, choose Create Project.

Key Pair

On the Review project details page, you’ll see Edit Amazon EC2 configuration. Choose this link to configure instance type, VPC, and subnet options. AWS CodeStar requires a service role to create and manage AWS resources and IAM permissions. This role will be created for you when you select the AWS CodeStar would like permission to administer AWS resources on your behalf check box.

Choose Create Project. It might take a few minutes to create your project and resources.

Review project details

When you create a CodeStar project, you’re added to the project team as an owner. If this is the first time you’ve used AWS CodeStar, you’ll be asked to provide the following information, which will be shown to others:

  • Your display name.
  • Your email address.

This information is used in your AWS CodeStar user profile. User profiles are not project-specific, but they are limited to a single AWS region. If you are a team member in projects in more than one region, you’ll have to create a user profile in each region.

User settings

User settings

Choose Next. AWS CodeStar will create a GitHub repository with your configuration settings (for example, https://github.com/biyer/ruby-on-rails-service).

When you integrate your integrated development environment (IDE) with AWS CodeStar, you can continue to write and develop code in your preferred environment. The changes you make will be included in the AWS CodeStar project each time you commit and push your code.

IDE

After setting up your IDE, choose Next to go to the CodeStar dashboard. Take a few minutes to familiarize yourself with the dashboard. You can easily track progress across your entire software development process, from your backlog of work items to recent code deployments.

Dashboard

After the application deployment is complete, choose the endpoint that will display the application.

Pipeline

This is what you’ll see when you open the application endpoint:

The Commit history section of the dashboard lists the commits made to the Git repository. If you choose the commit ID or the Open in GitHub option, you can use a hotlink to your GitHub repository.

Commit history

Your AWS CodeStar project dashboard is where you and your team view the status of your project resources, including the latest commits to your project, the state of your continuous delivery pipeline, and the performance of your instances. This information is displayed on tiles that are dedicated to a particular resource. To see more information about any of these resources, choose the details link on the tile. The console for that AWS service will open on the details page for that resource.

Issues

You can also filter issues based on their status and the assigned user.

Filter

AWS CodeBuild Now Supports Building GitHub Pull Requests

CodeBuild is a fully managed build service that compiles source code, runs tests, and produces software packages that are ready to deploy. With CodeBuild, you don’t need to provision, manage, and scale your own build servers. CodeBuild scales continuously and processes multiple builds concurrently, so your builds are not left waiting in a queue. You can use prepackaged build environments to get started quickly or you can create custom build environments that use your own build tools.

We recently announced support for GitHub pull requests in AWS CodeBuild. This functionality makes it easier to collaborate across your team while editing and building your application code with CodeBuild. You can use the AWS CodeBuild or AWS CodePipeline consoles to run AWS CodeBuild. You can also automate the running of AWS CodeBuild by using the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), the AWS SDKs, or the AWS CodeBuild Plugin for Jenkins.

AWS CodeBuild

In this section, I will show you how to trigger a build in AWS CodeBuild with a pull request from GitHub through webhooks.

Open the AWS CodeBuild console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/codebuild/. Choose Create project. If you already have a CodeBuild project, you can choose Edit project, and then follow along. CodeBuild can connect to AWS CodeCommit, S3, BitBucket, and GitHub to pull source code for builds. For Source provider, choose GitHub, and then choose Connect to GitHub.

Configure

After you’ve successfully linked GitHub and your CodeBuild project, you can choose a repository in your GitHub account. CodeBuild also supports connections to any public repository. You can review your settings by navigating to your GitHub application settings.

GitHub Apps

On Source: What to Build, for Webhook, select the Rebuild every time a code change is pushed to this repository check box.

Note: You can select this option only if, under Repository, you chose Use a repository in my account.

Source

In Environment: How to build, for Environment image, select Use an image managed by AWS CodeBuild. For Operating system, choose Ubuntu. For Runtime, choose Base. For Version, choose the latest available version. For Build specification, you can provide a collection of build commands and related settings, in YAML format (buildspec.yml) or you can override the build spec by inserting build commands directly in the console. AWS CodeBuild uses these commands to run a build. In this example, the output is the string “hello.”

Environment

On Artifacts: Where to put the artifacts from this build project, for Type, choose No artifacts. (This is also the type to choose if you are just running tests or pushing a Docker image to Amazon ECR.) You also need an AWS CodeBuild service role so that AWS CodeBuild can interact with dependent AWS services on your behalf. Unless you already have a role, choose Create a role, and for Role name, type a name for your role.

Artifacts

In this example, leave the advanced settings at their defaults.

If you expand Show advanced settings, you’ll see options for customizing your build, including:

  • A build timeout.
  • A KMS key to encrypt all the artifacts that the builds for this project will use.
  • Options for building a Docker image.
  • Elevated permissions during your build action (for example, accessing Docker inside your build container to build a Dockerfile).
  • Resource options for the build compute type.
  • Environment variables (built-in or custom). For more information, see Create a Build Project in the AWS CodeBuild User Guide.

Advanced settings

You can use the AWS CodeBuild console to create a parameter in Amazon EC2 Systems Manager. Choose Create a parameter, and then follow the instructions in the dialog box. (In that dialog box, for KMS key, you can optionally specify the ARN of an AWS KMS key in your account. Amazon EC2 Systems Manager uses this key to encrypt the parameter’s value during storage and decrypt during retrieval.)

Create parameter

Choose Continue. On the Review page, either choose Save and build or choose Save to run the build later.

Choose Start build. When the build is complete, the Build logs section should display detailed information about the build.

Logs

To demonstrate a pull request, I will fork the repository as a different GitHub user, make commits to the forked repo, check in the changes to a newly created branch, and then open a pull request.

Pull request

As soon as the pull request is submitted, you’ll see CodeBuild start executing the build.

Build

GitHub sends an HTTP POST payload to the webhook’s configured URL (highlighted here), which CodeBuild uses to download the latest source code and execute the build phases.

Build project

If you expand the Show all checks option for the GitHub pull request, you’ll see that CodeBuild has completed the build, all checks have passed, and a deep link is provided in Details, which opens the build history in the CodeBuild console.

Pull request

Summary:

In this post, I showed you how to use GitHub as the source provider for your CodeStar projects and how to work with recent commits, issues, and pull requests in the CodeStar dashboard. I also showed you how you can use GitHub pull requests to automatically trigger a build in AWS CodeBuild — specifically, how this functionality makes it easier to collaborate across your team while editing and building your application code with CodeBuild.


About the author:

Balaji Iyer is an Enterprise Consultant for the Professional Services Team at Amazon Web Services. In this role, he has helped several customers successfully navigate their journey to AWS. His specialties include architecting and implementing highly scalable distributed systems, serverless architectures, large scale migrations, operational security, and leading strategic AWS initiatives. Before he joined Amazon, Balaji spent more than a decade building operating systems, big data analytics solutions, mobile services, and web applications. In his spare time, he enjoys experiencing the great outdoors and spending time with his family.

 

Register for and Attend this September 28 Tech Talk: “How to Use AWS WAF to Mitigate OWASP Top 10 Attacks”

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/register-for-and-attend-this-september-28-tech-talk-how-to-use-aws-waf-to-mitigate-owasp-top-10-attacks/

AWS Online Tech Talks banner

As part of the AWS Online Tech Talks series, AWS will present How to Use AWS WAF to Mitigate OWASP Top 10 Attacks on Thursday, September 28. This tech talk will start at 9:00 A.M. Pacific Time and end at 9:40 A.M. Pacific Time.

The Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) Top 10 identifies the most critical vulnerabilities that web developers must address in their applications. AWS WAF, a web application firewall, helps you address the vulnerabilities identified in the OWASP Top 10. In this webinar, you will learn how to use AWS WAF to write rules to match common patterns of exploitation and block malicious requests from reaching your web servers.

You also will learn how to:

  • Secure your web applications.
  • Configure AWS Shield and AWS WAF.
  • Defend against the most common Layer 7 attacks.

This tech talk is free. Register today.

– Craig