Tag Archives: well architected framework

Well-Architected: “To thrive, to evolve, to delight”

Post Syndicated from Philip Fitzsimons original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/well-architected-to-thrive-to-evolve-to-delight/

Today we published a subtle but significant update to the AWS Well-Architected Framework. We looked to see where AWS Solutions Architects and customers diverged in how they judged something to be Well-Architected, and we restructured our questions and answers to help close that gap.

There are many definitions of IT architecture, but, at its core, a good architecture is like a well-designed building: It creates a space that we love to be in. In technology, good architecture creates a space that allows our code to thrive, to evolve, to delight. Bad architecture inhibits the ability of our code to meet our expectations, and it exposes us to risk, wasted effort, extra costs, and bad outcomes. How do you know if your architectures are good?

In 2012, we created the AWS Well-Architected Framework as a way to answer that question. AWS Solutions Architects review thousands of workloads every year using the framework. We learn from these reviews: new ideas, bad ideas, and constant innovation. We curate those learnings, from our customers and our teams, to create a framework that remains current but also tested and pragmatic.

We use Kaizen 改善to help us continually improve the framework. We bring data—your anecdotes and challenges—and use it to understand where we can improve the framework. We experiment, ask five whys, draw pictures of fish, and whiteboard, whiteboard, whiteboard. We draft guidelines for writing best practices, we shape our best practices to fit, we iterate. We have it reviewed by our principal community, taken for a spin by AWS Solutions Architects, and then we publish an update to the framework. We joyfully spin round a Deming cycle.

With this update every question has been refined, and some have been split into two to ensure they focus on a single topic. The framework has also been updated to reflect new services and features, and is available as a whitepaper PDF and free as Kindle books. We believe that if you follow the well-architected way, your architectures will create a space where your code and functionality will delight your customers. You can find free training and all of the whitepapers on the AWS Well-Architected homepage.

Philip Fitzsimons is the leader of the AWS Well-Architected Team

Serverless Architectures with AWS Lambda: Overview and Best Practices

Post Syndicated from Andrew Baird original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/serverless-architectures-with-aws-lambda-overview-and-best-practices/

For some organizations, the idea of “going serverless” can be daunting. But with an understanding of best practices – and the right tools — many serverless applications can be fully functional with only a few lines of code and little else.

Examples of fully-serverless-application use cases include:

  • Web or mobile backends – Create fully-serverless, mobile applications or websites by creating user-facing content in a native mobile application or static web content in an S3 bucket. Then have your front-end content integrate with Amazon API Gateway as a backend service API. Lambda functions will then execute the business logic you’ve written for each of the API Gateway methods in your backend API.
  • Chatbots and virtual assistants – Build new serverless ways to interact with your customers, like customer support assistants and bots ready to engage customers on your company-run social media pages. The Amazon Alexa Skills Kit (ASK) and Amazon Lex have the ability to apply natural-language understanding to user-voice and freeform-text input so that a Lambda function you write can intelligently respond and engage with them.
  • Internet of Things (IoT) backends – AWS IoT has direct-integration for device messages to be routed to and processed by Lambda functions. That means you can implement serverless backends for highly secure, scalable IoT applications for uses like connected consumer appliances and intelligent manufacturing facilities.

Using AWS Lambda as the logic layer of a serverless application can enable faster development speed and greater experimentation – and innovation — than in a traditional, server-based environment.

We recently published the “Serverless Architectures with AWS Lambda: Overview and Best Practices” whitepaper to provide the guidance and best practices you need to write better Lambda functions and build better serverless architectures.

Once you’ve finished reading the whitepaper, below are a couple additional resources I recommend as your next step:

  1. If you would like to better understand some of the architecture pattern possibilities for serverless applications: Thirty Serverless Architectures in 30 Minutes (re:Invent 2017 video)
  2. If you’re ready to get hands-on and build a sample serverless application: AWS Serverless Workshops (GitHub Repository)
  3. If you’ve already built a serverless application and you’d like to ensure your application has been Well Architected: The Serverless Application Lens: AWS Well Architected Framework (Whitepaper)

About the Author

 

Andrew Baird is a Sr. Solutions Architect for AWS. Prior to becoming a Solutions Architect, Andrew was a developer, including time as an SDE with Amazon.com. He has worked on large-scale distributed systems, public-facing APIs, and operations automation.

Well-Architected Lens: Focus on Specific Workload Types

Post Syndicated from Philip Fitzsimons original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/well-architected-lens-focus-on-specific-workload-types/

Customers have been building their innovations on AWS for over 11 years. During that time, our solutions architects have conducted tens of thousands of architecture reviews for our customers. In 2012 we created the “Well-Architected” initiative to share with you best practices for building in the cloud, and started publishing them in 2015. We recently released an updated Framework whitepaper, and a new Operational Excellence Pillar whitepaper to reflect what we learned from working with customers every day. Today, we are pleased to announce a new concept called a “lens” that allows you to focus on specific workload types from the well-architected perspective.

A well-architected review looks at a workload from a general technology perspective, which means it can’t provide workload-specific advice. For example, there are additional best practices when you are building high-performance computing (HPC) or serverless applications. Therefore, we created the concept of a lens to focus on what is different for those types of workloads.

In each lens, we document common scenarios we see — specific to that workload — providing reference architectures and a walkthrough. The lens also provides design principles to help you understand how to architect these types of workloads for the cloud, and questions for assessing your own architecture.

Today, we are releasing two lenses:

Well-Architected: High-Performance Computing (HPC) Lens <new>
Well-Architected: Serverless Applications Lens <new>

We expect to create more lenses over time, and evolve them based on customer feedback.

Philip Fitzsimons, Leader, AWS Well-Architected Team

On Architecture and the State of the Art

Post Syndicated from Philip Fitzsimons original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/on-architecture-and-the-state-of-the-art/

On the AWS Solutions Architecture team we know we’re following in the footsteps of other technical experts who pulled together the best practices of their eras. Around 22 BC the Roman Architect Vitruvius Pollio wrote On architecture (published as The Ten Books on Architecture), which became a seminal work on architectural theory. Vitruvius captured the best practices of his contemporaries and those who went before him (especially the Greek architects).

Closer to our time, in 1910, another technical expert, Henry Harrison Suplee, wrote Gas Turbine: progress in the design and construction of turbines operated by gases of combustion, from which we believe the phrase “state of the art” originates:

It has therefore been thought desirable to gather under one cover the most important papers which have appeared upon the subject of the gas turbine in England, France, Germany, and Switzerland, together with some account of the work in America, and to add to this such information upon actual experimental machines as can be secured.

In the present state of the art this is all that can be done, but it is believed that this will aid materially in the conduct of subsequent work, and place in the hands of the gas-power engineer a collection of material not generally accessible or available in convenient form.  

Source

Both authors wrote books that captured the current knowledge on design principles and best practices (in architecture and engineering) to improve awareness and adoption. Like these authors, we at AWS believe that capturing and sharing best practices leads to better outcomes. This follows a pattern we established internally, in our Principal Engineering community. In 2012 we started an initiative called “Well-Architected” to help share the best practices for architecting in the cloud with our customers.

Every year AWS Solution Architects dedicate hundreds of thousands of hours to helping customers build architectures that are cloud native. Through customer feedback, and real world experience we see what strategies, patterns, and approaches work for you.

“After our well-architected review and subsequent migration to the cloud, we saw the tremendous cost-savings potential of Amazon Web Services. By using the industry-standard service, we can invest the majority of our time and energy into enhancing our solutions. Thanks to (consulting partner) 1Strategy’s deep, technical AWS expertise and flexibility during our migration, we were able to leverage the strengths of AWS quickly.”

Paul Cooley, Chief Technology Officer for Imprev

This year we have again refreshed the AWS Well-Architected Framework, with a particular focus on Operational Excellence. Last year we announced the addition of Operational Excellence as a new pillar to AWS Well-Architected Framework. Having carried out thousands of reviews since then, we reexamined the pillar and are pleased to announce some significant changes. First, the pillar dives more deeply into people and process because this is an area where we see the most opportunities for teams to improve. Second, we’ve pivoted heavily to focusing on whether your team and your workload are ready for runtime operations. Key to this is ensuring that in the early phases of design that you think about how your architecture will be operated. Reflecting on this we realized that Operational Excellence should be the first pillar to support the “Architect for run-time operations” approach.

We’ve also added detail on how Amazon approaches technology architecture, covering topics such as our Principal Engineering Community and two-way doors and mechanisms. We refreshed the other pillars to reflect the evolution of AWS, and the best practices we are seeing in the field. We have also added detail on the review process, in the surprisingly named “The Review Process” section.

As part of refreshing the pillars are have also released a new Operational Excellence Pillar whitepaper, and have updated the whitepapers for all of the other pillars of the Framework. For example we have significantly updated the Reliability Pillar whitepaper to provide guidance on application design for high availability. New sections cover techniques for high availability including and beyond infrastructure implications, and considerations across the application lifecycle. This updated whitepaper also provides examples that show how to achieve availability goals in single and multi-region architectures.

You can find free training and all of the ”state of the art” whitepapers on the AWS Well-Architected homepage:

Philip Fitzsimons, Leader, AWS Well-Architected Team