All posts by Ahin Thomas

Wanted: Head of Publishing

Post Syndicated from Ahin Thomas original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/wanted-head-of-publishing/

Backblaze is Hiring

Since 2007, Backblaze has earned our reputation as a leader in data storage. Our products are astonishingly easy to use and affordable. In a market that includes some of the biggest corporations of our time, we have differentiated ourselves by being cleverly unconventional in how we do things.

Our success is tied to the principles of being open and fair. This approach extends to our marketing and, by extension, content efforts. We like to share the stories (and facts) behind what we’re doing. As an example, we open sourced (and promoted) our storage platform that provides the lowest cost of cloud storage on the planet. It explains how we can offer cloud storage at ¼ of the price of Amazon. This storytelling is the fuel of a content marketing machine that drives our top of funnel growth.

We have created a new role, our head of publishing, because as our team has grown, the opportunity to share stories about how people solve problems is getting bigger. Beyond our team of outstanding marketers, we have an organization (from Ops/Engineering/Support etc.) that believes in the spirit of storytelling. Our new head of publishing role has the mandate to act as the chief storytelling coach for all of our writers (substantive editing) as well as ensuring ruthless precision in our execution. In empowering this role, we hope to continually invest in Backblaze’s storytelling strength as fuel for our content marketing efforts.

The head of publishing reports to the VP of marketing and has one direct report, the content director.

The Primary Responsibilities for the Head of Publishing:

  • Editing: Nurture our tradition of creating widely loved and consumed content, with a primary focus on our blog.
    • Every piece of content that ships should be reviewed by the head of publishing. A representative monthly cadence involves the editing of eight blog posts, one case study, one to two webinar presentations and various web pages/knowledge base articles.
    • Drive the effort to create new content franchises — a topic area that can be revisited on a regular cadence (anywhere between quarterly and annual) told as a story that appeals to an audience that will then share it on Reddit, HackerNews, or similar social network. A franchise is unlikely to make a directly commercial pitch. Rather, its goal is brand awareness for Backblaze — create engagement amongst an audience that would plausibly use our products. We measure success through blog comments and social sharing.
      • Our product marketers are tasked with attempting to create one franchise effort each per quarter, our content director should be creating two per quarter. Given these resources, your job is to be a partner and editor for these efforts. We can’t control things that do and do not go viral, we do control our resource allocation and effort.
  • Empower our content director: Create clear processes and standards to enable our content director to do his best work as a writer and copy editor.
    • Our content director is responsible for our blog operations, writing four to six posts per month, and copy editing. You help make the content director successful through coaching, partnership, and creating clarity on standards.
  • Define & execute Corporate Communications: Given customer segments and key messaging from Product Marketing, the head of publishing is responsible for ensuring a compelling corporate communications cadence that meets our strategic requirements.
    • Maintenance of our 90 day content calendar.
    • Running our weekly content meeting so as to ensure that our storytelling is excellent, the content calendar meets the needs of our business lines, and that deliverables are being met.
  • Promote the blog content: Through a combination of your own efforts, and coordinating with the efforts of our social media team, SEO Team, and PR firm.
    • Be the day to day contact with our PR firm — make sure they are aware of our calendar and progress against agreed upon deliverables.
    • Where our PR firm’s mandate does not include blog content that is otherwise pitchable, directly reach out to journalists for coverage.
    • Partner with our social lead to make sure content is promoted.
    • Partner with our SEO lead to make sure content is optimized.
  • Be the storytelling coach for our company: Be a company-wide editorial resource for making our internal and external communications compelling.
    • The first priority of this role is enabling Marketing efforts. In the long run, we want to create a center of excellence inside of Marketing that the entire company can turn to for better storytelling.

Key Measurements of Success

Our activities, ultimately, should contribute to profitable revenue growth for Backblaze. The leading indicators of success, owned by our head of publishing, include:

  • Growth in our blog audience:
    • Increase in email subscribers → Measures the long term engagement with our stories (love of the content). Achieved through a balance of low unsubscribes and new emails collected from blogs and webinars.
    • Increase in blog pageviews → A reflection of the transactional consumption of our content.
  • Organic engagement/syndication of blog posts:
    • Blog post comments → Shows a readership engaged in the conversation.
    • Reddit/HackerNews shares → Measurement of the community finding our content noteworthy. This is the metric to measure the success of our attempts to create franchises.
  • Sales team utilization of content:
    • Qualitative → Does the team feel they have what is needed to succeed?
    • Quantitative → Do they utilize new content in their efforts?

The Traits of Our Perfect Head of Publishing:

  • Excels in digital publishing for both literary and commercial contexts.
  • Comfortable driving and delivering to deadlines.
  • Demonstrates a honed approach to the craft of storytelling.
  • Embraces the interpersonal dynamics of being an editor (coach, cajoler, armchair psychologist, etc.).
  • Held roles that included the dual responsibilities of substantive editing and copy editing.
  • Has innate intellectual curiosity with technical matters. Experience with storage is not a requirement, but we need to have a mutual belief that the subject matter will be interesting for you.

A Little Bit More About Backblaze

In over a decade of operations, we have taken in a total of $3m in invested capital. This bootstrapped approach has helped to create a culture where we’re able to focus on our team. We’re proud to have created a place where people actually like to come to work. Please check out our Careers page to learn a little more and for a quick video of our team talking about our culture.

Sound Interesting?

In fewer than 500 words, describe an interaction you had with an author to help bring out the author’s best work. Our internal screening scorecard is the bullet points articulated under our traits section. We think someone with that kind of background will be successful in the role and a happy member of our team (read: cultural fit).

Our process is to look at the combination homework and your resume to try and understand how many of the traits you possess and, of the ones that you may not obviously possess, try to determine if there’s a plausible translation of your background to what we’re looking for.

If you’re interested, please send your resume and the 500 words to jobscontact@backblaze.com.

The post Wanted: Head of Publishing appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Backblaze B2 Copy File Beta is Now Public

Post Syndicated from Ahin Thomas original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/backblaze-b2-copy-file-beta-is-now-public/

B2 Copy File Beta

Since introducing B2 Cloud Storage nearly four years ago, we’ve been busy adding enhancements and new functionality to the service. We continually look for ways to make B2 more useful for our customers, be it through service level enhancements, partnerships with leading Compute providers, or lowering the industry’s lowest download price to 1¢/GB. Today, we’re pleased to announce the beta release of our newest functionality: Copy File.

What You Can Do With B2 Copy File

This new capability enables you to create a new file (or new part of a large file) that is a copy of an existing file (or range of an existing file). You can either copy over the source file’s metadata or specify new metadata for the new file that is created. This all occurs without having to download or reupload any data.

This has been one of our most requested features, as it unlocks:

  • Rename/Re-organize. The new capabilities give customers the ability to reorganize their files without having to download and reupload. This is especially helpful when trying to mirror the contents of a file system to B2.
  • Synthetic Backup. With the ability to copy ranges of a file, users can now leverage B2 for synthetic backup, which is uploading a full backup but then only uploading incremental changes (as opposed to reuploading the whole file with every change). This is particularly helpful for uses such as backing up VMs, where reuploading the entirety of the file every time it changes creates user inefficiencies.

Where to Learn More About B2 Copy File

The endpoint documentation can be found here:

b2_copy_file:  https://www.backblaze.com/b2/docs/b2_copy_file.html
b2_copy_part:  https://www.backblaze.com/b2/docs/b2_copy_part.html

More About the Beta Program

We’re introducing these endpoints as a beta so that developers can provide us feedback before the endpoints go into production. Specifically, this means that the APIs may evolve as a result of the feedback we get. We encourage you to give Copy File a try and, if you have any comments, you can email our B2 beta team at b2beta@backblaze.com. Thanks!

The post Backblaze B2 Copy File Beta is Now Public appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

New for Business Backup: Single Sign-On (SSO)

Post Syndicated from Ahin Thomas original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/new-for-business-backup-single-sign-on-sso/

Single Sign-On (SSO) for Backblaze
In 2017, we relaunched our Business Backup platform with a focus on providing administrators better tools for managing their teams. We’ve been busy enhancing the platform since the addition of Groups and thought we’d take a moment to review some of our latest enhancements.

The most recent is our support of Single Sign-On (SSO) using G Suite by Google Cloud. This has been one of our most requested features and we’re happy to be able to launch it today.

SSO Support for Groups

Effective immediately, SSO via G Suite is available for all Groups. There is no fee for turning on SSO or for creating a Group.

We created our Business Backup platform to help make managing your team’s backups easier. Whether your team is inside your household or a globally distributed workforce like charity: water (or somewhere in between), we want to make the process of getting your data backed up astonishingly easy and affordable.

As your team uses more and more software-based solutions, the challenge of managing all the logins gets more difficult. And as your team grows, so do the security issues. In addition, the simple act of administering the services can get complex. Administrators want to know they can onboard and offboard easily and efficiently.

SSO can be enabled for a specific Group, a collection of Groups, or all of your Groups. The flexibility, coupled with the ability to control access privileges at a Group level, provides administrators more tools to accomplish their goals.

You can enable SSO for your Groups inside of your preferences panel where you control all of your Group level customizations.

Groups Preferences Pane — Enable SSO

For more detail & FAQs, please visit our Knowledge Base article on Enabling Single Sign-On (SSO) In Backblaze Groups.

With the addition of SSO, we provide one more tool to manage your teams as you wish. With this roll out we are supporting G Suite based credentials. In Q1 of 2019, we’ll add support for organizations using Office365 credentials.

Mass Install with Microsoft Group Policy & SCCM

Another set of challenges for administrators is the deployment of software. Most users would prefer if their IT team simply “took care of everything.” For the user, a glorious world of having your machine updated and working flawlessly is great. For anyone who’s been in the IT Admin role, you know that things aren’t quite that simple.

Many administrators seek what’s known as Mass Silent Install (MSI). This allows the deployment of software without any end user interaction. Some do the scripting themselves, while others use Remote Monitoring and Management (RMM) tools. We recently added SCCM support to our existing list of MSI options.

We are constantly striving to make getting your data backed up as easy as possible, and adding SSO is another strong step in that direction.

The post New for Business Backup: Single Sign-On (SSO) appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Credential Stuffing Attacks: What They Are and How to Protect Yourself

Post Syndicated from Ahin Thomas original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/how-to-protect-yourself-from-credential-stuffing-attacks/

a hacker wearing a hoodie running a credential stuffing attack
While we often see warnings about password best practices (different passwords for different services, change passwords frequently, 123456 is never a good password), we rarely get into why we need to do these things. Incremental security comes at a cost: usually convenience. Every individual must decide her personal tradeoffs. Today, we want to share one of the ways malicious actors try to take advantage of online services and poorly-crafted passwords: credential stuffing attacks.

What is a Credential Stuffing Attack?

A credential stuffing attack occurs when an attacker takes a set of stolen user credentials and automates the entry of those credentials into popular websites. Let’s unpack that:

Credentials
A user name and password combination used for logging in to service x.
Breached credentials
A list of user name/password combinations that have become public in some form. As an example, an enterprising cybercriminal exploits credentials from Adobe, Coachella, Dropbox, LinkedIn, Ticketfly, Yahoo and other sites that have leaked personal information for over 500 million accounts.
Automated entry
The cybercriminal will go to the login page on service x and systematically cycle through each user name and password combination hoping to get lucky enough to find a match. Some will even go further by using one email address and cycling through all the passwords in the database — the logic being that users tend to come up with similar passwords, such as 123456 or Pa$$word$.

What is Backblaze Doing to Defend Against Credential Stuffing Attacks?

Every service of scale, including Backblaze, has defense mechanisms to inhibit this sort of activity. For instance, when you see “too many attempts, try again later,” on a popular site, what is likely happening behind the scenes is something called rate limiting. This is when a web page has a rule akin to: if there are x number of login attempts in y seconds, it’s probably a robot; we should cut them off.

The problem is balancing security with the user experience. If we limited every account to two login attempts per hour, that would hamstring the efforts of any automated attack. However, it would also impede the efforts of legitimate users who made a simple typo when they were entering their password.

Revealing our exact rate limiting policies would pose a security risk to our users, allowing the attackers to fine-tune an attack. That said, we do have rate limiting, we do constantly monitor our systems, and we also have algorithms and humans that will adjust our rate limiting depending on a number of environmental variables that our security team monitors.

The Three Steps We Tell Everyone In Our Family to Take

With the large number of data breaches over the past few years, it’s more likely than not that you’ve been exposed. If you’ve been using the same email and password combination for three years and have a Comcast account that old, you could be exposed. It’s the same story for Ticketfly accounts older than May of 2018. We mention these not to single out any particular service, but to point out how prevalent these things are.

However, if you have different passwords for every website, you effectively protect yourself from being hacked as a result of leaks like these. While that might be true, trying to remember and manage all those different combinations is cumbersome.

How to Fight Back Against Credential Stuffing

Protecting yourself from credential stuffing attacks can be as simple as adopting the following three tactics:

1 — Monitor Your Email Addresses

Troy Hunt runs a phenomenal service called haveibeenpwned.com. He tracks major breaches and will let you know if your credentials were included in them. It’s free, although you can donate to the service. Signing up is one of the easiest ways to take control of your own security.

2 — Use Two Factor Verification

2FV, as it’s commonly called, is when you are asked for an incremental authentication — usually numbers generated by a dedicated app (including a password manager) — after you enter your password. Backblaze offers it as a complimentary service as do many other service providers. 2FV is a good defense mechanism against credential stuffing.

3 — Use a Password Manager

We highly recommend using a password manager such as Bitwarden, LastPass, or 1Password. Those services can help create new account credentials for every website you frequent, and help you manage those credentials when you visit those sites. Many people at Backblaze use these services and are quite happy with them.

One of the advantages of password managers is that they let you create passwords you can’t possibly remember. You just need to remember the master password to your password manager; they do the rest. That means you can set complicated passwords to any service. Each of the password managers integrate well into all major browsers and into Android and iOS devices. Not only will a password manager make your life secure, it makes your login experience much faster.

The Best Protection Against Credential Stuffing Is…

Of course, the best protection in the world is never being exposed in the first place. We encourage everyone to do business with vendors that can articulate how they protect their customers and have a sustained investment in doing so. At Backblaze, we’ve outlined our approach to security on our website.

All that said, the reality is we’ve all created accounts with service providers that may not have the best security practices. Even still, any website with the best intentions can still be felled by a skilled attacker, which is why the the need to protect ourselves and use credential best practices is very real. We hope, and strongly recommend, that everyone follow the three steps mentioned here.

If you have other other tips for the community, please feel free to share in the comments below!

The post Credential Stuffing Attacks: What They Are and How to Protect Yourself appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Introducing Backblaze’s Rapid Ingest Service: B2 Fireball

Post Syndicated from Ahin Thomas original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/introducing-backblazes-rapid-ingest-service-fireball/

Introducing Backblaze Fireball

Backblaze’s rapid ingest service, Fireball, graduates out of public beta. Our device holds 70 terabytes of customer data and is perfect for migrating large data sets to B2 Cloud Storage.

At Backblaze, we like to put ourselves in the customer’s shoes. Specifically, we ask questions like “how can we make cloud storage more useful?” There is a long list of things we can do to help — over the last few weeks, we’ve addressed some of them when we lowered the cost of downloading data to $0.01 / GB. Today, we are pleased to publicly release our rapid ingest service, Fireball.

What is the Backblaze B2 Fireball?

The Fireball is a hardware device, specifically a NAS device. Any Backblaze B2 customer can order it from inside their account. The Fireball device can hold up to 70 terabytes of data. Upon ordering, it ships from a Backblaze data center to you. When you receive it, you can transfer your data onto the Fireball using your internal network. Once your data transfer is complete, you send it back to a Backblaze data center. Finally, inside our secure data center, your data is uploaded from the Fireball to your account. Your data remains encrypted throughout the process. Step by step instructions can be found here.

What is Fireball?

Why Use the Fireball?

“We would not have been able to get this project off the ground without the B2 Fireball.” — James Cole, KLRU (Austin City Limits)

For most customers, transferring large quantities of data isn’t always simple. The need can arise as you migrate off of legacy systems (e.g. replacing LTO) or simply on a project basis (e.g. transferring video shot in the field to the cloud). An common approach is to upload your data via the internet to the cloud storage vendor of your choosing. While cloud storage vendors don’t charge for uploads, you have to pay your network provider for bandwidth. That’s assuming you are in a place where the bandwidth can be secured.

Your data is stored in megabytes (“MB”) but your bandwidth is measured in megabits per second (“Mbps”). The difference? An 80 Mbps upload connection will transfer no more than 10 MB per second. That means, in your best case scenario, you might be able to upload 50 terabytes in 50 days, assuming you use nearly all of your upload bandwidth for the upload.

If you’re looking to migrate old backups from LTO or even a large project, a 3 month lag time is not operationally viable. That’s why multiple cloud storage providers have introduced rapid ingest devices.

How It Compares: Backblaze B2 Fireball vs AWS Snowball vs GCS Transfer Appliance

“We found the B2 Fireball much simpler and easier to use than Amazon’s Snowball. WunderVu had been looking for a cloud solution for security and simplicity, and B2 hit every check box.” — Aaron Rhodes, Executive Producer, WunderVu

Every vendor that offers a rapid ingest service only lets you upload to that vendor’s cloud. For example, you can’t use an Amazon Snowball to upload to Google Cloud Storage. This means that when considering a rapid ingest service, you are also making a decision on what cloud storage vendor to use. As such, one should consider not only the cost of the rapid ingest service, but also how much that vendor is going to charge you to store and download your data.

Device CapacityService FeeShippingCloud Storage
$/GB/Month
Download
$/GB
Backblaze B270 TB$550
(30 day rental)
$75$0.005$0.01
Amazon S350 TB$200
(10 day rental)
$? *$0.021
+320%
$0.05+
+500%
Google Cloud100 TB$300
(10 day rental)
$500$0.020
+300%
$0.08+
+800%

*AWS does not estimate shipping fees at the time of the Snowball order.

To make the comparison easier, let’s create a hypothetical case and compare the costs incurred in the first year. Assume you have 100 TB as an initial upload. But that’s just the initial upload. Over the course of the year, let’s consider a usage pattern where every month you add 5 TB, delete 2 TBs, and download 10 TBs.

Transfer CostCloud Storage FeesTotal Transfer +
Cloud Storage Fees
Backblaze B2$1,250
(2 Fireballs)
$9,570$10,820
Amazon S3$400
(2 Snowballs)
$36,114$36,514
+337%
Google Cloud$800
(1 transit)
$39,684$40,484
+374%

Just looking at the first year, Amazon is 337% more expensive than Backblaze and Google is 374% more expensive than Backblaze.

Put simply, Backblaze offers the lowest cost, high performance cloud storage on the planet. During our public beta of the Fireball program we’ve had extremely positive feedback around how the Fireball enables customers to get their projects started in a time efficient and cost effective way. We hope you’ll give it a try!

The post Introducing Backblaze’s Rapid Ingest Service: B2 Fireball appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Introducing the B2 Snapshot Return Refund Program

Post Syndicated from Ahin Thomas original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/b2-snapshot-return-refund-program/

B2 Snapshot Return Refund Program

What Is the B2 Snapshot Return Refund Program?

Backblaze’s mission is making cloud storage astonishingly easy and affordable. That guides our focus — making our customers’ data more usable. Today, we’re pleased to introduce a trial of the B2 Snapshot Return Refund program. B2 customers have long been able to create a Snapshot of their data and order a hard drive with that data sent via FedEx anywhere in the world. Starting today, if the customer sends the drive back to Backblaze within 30 days, they will get a full refund. This new feature is available automatically for B2 customers when they order a Snapshot. There are no extra buttons to push or boxes to check — just send back the drive within 30 days and we’ll refund your money. To put it simply, we are offering the cloud storage industry’s only refundable rapid data egress service.

You Shouldn’t be Afraid to Use Your Own Data

Last week, we cut the price of B2 downloads in half — from 2¢ per GB to 1¢ per GB. That 50% reduction makes B2’s download price 1/5 that of Amazon’s S3 (with B2 storage pricing already 1/4 that of S3). The price reduction and today’s introduction of the B2 Snapshot Return Refund program are deliberate moves to eliminate the industry’s biggest barrier to entry — the cost of using data stored in the cloud.  Storage vendors who make it expensive to restore, or place time lag impediments to access, are reducing the usefulness of your data. We believe this is antithetical to encouraging the use of the cloud in the first place.

Learning From Our Customers

Our Computer Backup product already has a Restore Return Refund program. It’s incredibly popular, and we enjoy the almost daily “you just saved my bacon” letters that come back with the returned hard drives. Our customer surveys have repeatedly demonstrated that the ability to get data back is one of the things that has made our Computer Backup service one of the most popular in the industry. So, it made sense to us that our B2 customers could use a similar program.

There are many ways B2 customers can benefit from using the B2 Snapshot Return Refund program, here is a typical scenario.

Media and Entertainment Workflow Based Snapshots

Businesses in the Media and Entertainment (M&E) industry tend to have large quantities of digital media, and the amount of data will continue to increase in the coming years with more 4K and 8K cameras coming into regular use. When an organization needs to deliver or share that data, they typically have to manually download data from their internal storage system, and copy it on a thumb drive or hard drive, or perhaps create an LTO tape. Once that is done, they take their storage device, label it, and mail to their customer. Not only is this practice costly, time consuming, and potentially insecure, it doesn’t scale well with larger amounts of data.

With just a few clicks, you can easily distribute or share your digital media if it stored in the B2 Cloud. Here’s how the process works:

  1. Log in to your Backblaze B2 account.
  2. Navigate to the bucket where the data is located.
  3. Select the files, or the entire bucket, you wish to send and create a “Snapshot.”
  4. Once the Snapshot is complete you have choices:
    • Download the Snapshot and pay $0.01/GB for the download
    • Have Backblaze copy the Snapshot to an external hard drive and FedEx it anywhere in the world. This stores up to 3.5 TB and costs $189.00. Return the hard drive to Backblaze within 30 days and you’ll get your $189.00 back.
    • Have Backblaze copy the Snapshot to a flash drive and FedEx it anywhere in the world. This stores up to 110 GB and costs $99.00. FedEx shipping to the specified location is included. Return the flash drive to Backblaze within 30 days and you’ll get your $99.00 back.

You can always keep the hard drive or flash drive and Backblaze, of course, will keep your money.

Each drive containing a Snapshot is encrypted. The encryption key can be found in your Backblaze B2 account after you log in. The FedEX tracking number is there as well. When the hard drive arrives at its destination you can provide the encryption key to the recipient and they’ll be able to access the files. Note that the encryption key must be entered each time the hard drive is started, so the data remains protected even if the hard drive is returned to Backblaze.

The B2 Snapshot Return Refund program supports Snapshots as large as 3.5 terabytes. That means you can send about 50 hours of 4k video to a client or partner by selecting the hard drive option. If you select the flash drive option, a Snapshot can be up to 110 gigabytes, which is about 1hr and 45 min of 4k video.

While the example uses an M&E workflow, any workflow requiring the exchange or distribution of large amounts of data across distinct geographies will benefit from this service.

This is a Trial Program

Backblaze fully intends to offer the B2 Snapshot Return Refund Program for a long time. That said, there is no program like this in the industry and so we want to put some guardrails on it to ensure we can offer a sustainable program for all. Thus, the “fine print”:

  • Minimum Snapshot Size — a Snapshot must be greater than 10 GB to qualify for this program. Why? You can download a 10 GB Snapshot in a few minutes. Why pay us to do the same thing and have it take a couple of days??
  • The 30 Day Clock — The clock starts on the day the drive is marked as delivered to you by FedEx and the clock ends on the date postmarked on the package we receive. If that’s 30 days or less, your refund will be granted.
  • 5 Drive Refunds Per Year — We are initially setting a limit of 5 drive refunds per B2 account per year. By placing a cap on the number of drive refunds per year, we are able to provide a service that is responsive to our entire client base. We expect to change or remove this limit once we have enough data to understand the demand and can make sure we are staffed properly.

It is Your Data — Use It

Our industry has a habit of charging little to store data and then usurious amounts to get it back. There are certainly real costs involved in data retrieval. We outlined them in our post on the Cost of Cloud Storage. The industry rates charged for data retrieval are clearly strategic moves to try and lock customers in. To us, that runs counter to trying to do our part to make data useful and our customers’ lives easier. That viewpoint drives our efforts behind lowering our download pricing and the creation of this program.

We hope you enjoy the B2 Snapshot Return Refund program. If you have a moment, please tell us in the comments below how you might use it!

The post Introducing the B2 Snapshot Return Refund Program appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Backblaze Cuts B2 Download Price In Half

Post Syndicated from Ahin Thomas original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/backblaze-b2-drops-download-price-in-half/

Backblaze B2 downloads now cost 50% less
Backblaze is pleased to announce that, effective immediately, we are reducing the price of Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage downloads by 50%. This means that B2 download pricing drops from $0.02 to $0.01 per GB. As always, the first gigabyte of data downloaded each day remains free.

If some of this sounds familiar, that’s because a little under a year ago, we dropped our download price from $0.05 to $0.02. While that move solidified our position as the affordability leader in the high performance cloud storage space, we continue to innovate on our platform and are excited to provide this additional value to our customers.

This price reduction applies immediately to all existing and new customers. In keeping with Backblaze’s overall approach to providing services, there are no tiers or minimums. It’s automatic and it starts today.

Why Is Backblaze Lowering What Is Already The Industry’s Lowest Price?

Because it makes cloud storage more useful for more people.

When we decided to use Backblaze B2 as our cloud storage service, their download pricing at the time enabled us to offer our broadcasters unlimited audio uploads so they can upload past decades of preaching to our extensive library for streaming and downloading. With Backblaze cutting the bandwidth prices 50% to just one penny a gigabyte, we are excited about offering much higher quality video. — Ian Wagner, Senior Developer, Sermon Audio

Since our founding in 2007, Backblaze’s mission has been to make storing data astonishingly easy and affordable. We have a well documented, relentless pursuit of lowering storage costs — it starts with our storage pods and runs through everything we do. Today, we have over 500 petabytes of customer data stored. B2’s storage pricing already being 14 that of Amazon’s S3 has certainly helped us get there. Today’s pricing reduction puts our download pricing 15 that of S3. The “affordable” part of our story is well established.

I’d like to take a moment to discuss the “easy” part. Our industry has historically done a poor job of putting ourselves in our customers’ shoes. When customers are faced with the decision of where to put their data, price is certainly a factor. But it’s not just the price of storage that customers must consider. There’s a cost to download your data. The business need for providers to charge for this is reasonable — downloading data requires bandwidth, and bandwidth costs money. We discussed that in a prior post on the Cost of Cloud Storage.

But there’s a difference between the costs of bandwidth and what the industry is charging today. There’s a joke that some of the storage clouds are competing to become “Hotel California” — you can check out anytime you want, but your data can never leave.1 Services that make it expensive to restore data or place time lag impediments to data access are reducing the usefulness of your data. Customers should not have to wonder if they can afford to access their own data.

When replacing LTO with StarWind VTL and cloud storage, our customers had only one concern left: the possible cost of data retrieval. Backblaze just wiped this concern out of the way by lowering that cost to just one penny per gig. — Max Kolomyeytsev, Director of Product Management, StarWind

Many businesses have not yet been able to back up their data to the cloud because of the costs. Many of those companies are forced to continue backing up to tape. That tape is an inefficient means for data storage is clear. Solution providers like StarWind VTL specialize in helping businesses move off of antiquated tape libraries. However, as Max Kolomyeytsev, Director of Product Management at StarWind points out, “When replacing LTO with StarWind VTL and cloud storage our customers had only one concern left: the possible cost of data retrieval. Backblaze just wiped this concern out of the way by lowering that cost to just one penny per gig.”

Customers that have already adopted the cloud often are forced to make difficult tradeoffs between data they want to access and the cost associated with that access. Surrendering the use of your own data defeats many of the benefits that “the cloud” brings in the first place. Because of B2’s download price, Ian Wagner, a Senior Developer at Sermon Audio, is able to lower his costs and expand his product offering. “When we decided to use Backblaze B2 as our cloud storage service, their download pricing at the time enabled us to offer our broadcasters unlimited audio uploads so they can upload past decades of preaching to our extensive library for streaming and downloading. With Backblaze cutting the bandwidth prices 50% to just one penny a gigabyte, we are excited about offering much higher quality video.”

Better Download Pricing Also Helps Third Party Applications Deliver Customer Solutions

Many organizations use third party applications or devices to help manage their workflows. Those applications are the hub for customers getting their data to where it needs to go. Leaders in verticals like Media Asset Management, Server & NAS Backup, and Enterprise Storage have already chosen to integrate with B2.

With Backblaze lowering their download price to an amazing one penny a gigabyte, our CloudNAS is even a better fit for photographers, videographers and business owners who need to have their files at their fingertips, with an easy, reliable, low cost way to use Backblaze for unlimited primary storage and active archive. — Paul Tian, CEO, Morro Data

For Paul Tian, founder of Ready NAS and CEO of Morro Data, reasonable download pricing also helps his company better serve its customers. “With Backblaze lowering their download price to an amazing one penny a gigabyte, our CloudNAS is even a better fit for photographers, videographers and business owners who need to have their files at their fingertips, with an easy, reliable, low cost way to use Backblaze for unlimited primary storage and active archive.”

If you use an application that hasn’t yet integrated with B2, please ask your provider to add B2 Cloud Storage and mention the application in the comments below.

 

How Do the Major Cloud Storage Providers Compare on Pricing?

Not only is Backblaze B2 storage 14 the price of Amazon S3, Google Cloud, or Azure, but our download pricing is now 15 their price as well.

Pricing TierBackblaze B2Amazon S3Microsoft AzureGoogle Cloud
First 1 TB$0.01$0.09$0.09$0.12
Next 9 TB$0.01$0.09$0.09$0.11
Next 40 TB$0.01$0.085$0.09$0.08
Next 100 TB$0.01$0.07$0.07$0.08
Next 350 TB+$0.01$0.05$0.05$0.08

Using the chart above, let’s compute a few examples of download costs…

DataBackblaze B2Amazon S3Microsoft AzureGoogle Cloud
1 terabyte$10$90$90$120
10 terabytes$100$900$900$1,200
50 terabytes$500$4,300$4,500$4,310
500 terabytes$5,000$28,800$29,000$40,310
Not only is Backblaze B2 pricing dramatically lower cost, it’s also simple — one price for any amount of data downloaded to anywhere. In comparison, to compute the cost of downloading 500 TB of data with S3 you start with the following formula:
(($0.09 * 10) + ($0.085 * 40) + ($0.07 * 100) + ($0.05 * 350)) * 1,000
Want to see this comparison for the amount of data you manage?
Use our cloud storage calculator.

Customers Want to Avoid Vendor Lock In

Halving the price of downloads is a crazy move — the kind of crazy our customers will be excited about. When using our Transmit 5 app on the Mac to upload their data to B2 Cloud Storage, our users can sleep soundly knowing they’ll be getting a truly affordable price when they need to restore that data. Cool beans, Backblaze. — Cabel Sasser, Co-Founder, Panic

As the cloud storage industry grows, customers are increasingly concerned with getting locked in to one vendor. No business wants to be fully dependent on one vendor for anything. In addition, customers want multiple copies of their data to mitigate against a vendor outage or other issues.

Many vendors offer the ability for customers to replicate data across “regions.” This enables customers to store data in two physical locations of the customer’s choosing. Of course, customers pay for storing both copies of the data and for the data transfer between regions.

At 1¢ per GB, transferring data out of Backblaze is more affordable than transferring data between most other vendor regions. For example, if a customer is storing data in Amazon S3’s Northern California region (US West) and wants to replicate data to S3 in Northern Virginia (US East), she will pay 2¢ per GB to simply move the data.

However, if that same customer wanted to replicate data from Backblaze B2 to S3 in Northern Virginia, she would pay 1¢ per GB to move the data. She can achieve her replication strategy while also mitigating against vendor risk — all while cutting the bandwidth bill by 50%. Of course, this is also before factoring the savings on her storage bill as B2 storage is 14 of the price of S3.

How Is Backblaze Doing This?

Simple. We just changed our pricing table and updated our website.

The longer answer is that the cost of bandwidth is a function of a few factors, including how it’s being used and the volume of usage. With another year of data for B2, over a decade of experience in the cloud storage industry, and data growth exceeding 100 PB per quarter, we know we can sustainably offer this pricing to our customers; we also know how better download pricing can make our customers and partners more effective in their work. So it is an easy call to make.

Our pricing is simple. Storage is $0.005/GB/Month, Download costs are $0.01/GB. There are no tiers or minimums and you can get started any time you wish.

Our desire is to provide a great service at a fair price. We’re proud to be the affordability leader in the Cloud Storage space and hope you’ll give us the opportunity to show you what B2 Cloud Storage can enable for you.

Enjoy the service and I’d love to hear what this price reduction does for you in the comments below…or, if you are attending NAB this year, come by to visit and tell us in person!


1 For those readers who don’t get the Eagles reference there, please click here…I promise you won’t regret the next 7 minutes of your life.

The post Backblaze Cuts B2 Download Price In Half appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Cloud Storage Doesn’t have to be Convoluted, Complex, or Confusing

Post Syndicated from Ahin Thomas original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/cloud-storage-pricing-comparison/

business man frustrated over cloud storage pricing

So why do many vendors make it so hard to get information about how much you’re storing and how much you’re being charged?

Cloud storage is fast becoming the central repository for mission critical information, irreplaceable memories, and in some cases entire corporate and personal histories. Given this responsibility, we believe cloud storage vendors have an obligation to be transparent as possible in how they interact with their customers.

In that light we decided to challenge four cloud storage vendors and ask two simple questions:

  1. Can a customer understand how much data is stored?
  2. Can a customer understand the bill?

The detailed results are below, but if you wish to skip the details and the screen captures (TL;DR), we’ve summarized the results in the table below.

Summary of Cloud Storage Pricing Test

Our challenge was to upload 1 terabyte of data, store it for one month, and then download it.

Visibility to Data StoredEasy to Understand BillCost
Backblaze B2Accurate, intuitive display of storage information.Available on demand, and the site clearly defines what has and will be charged for.$25
Microsoft AzureStorage is being measured in KiB, but is billed by the GB. With a calculator, it is unclear how much storage we are using.Available, but difficult to find. The nearly 30 day lag in billing creates business and accounting challenges.$72
Amazon S3Incomplete. From the file browsing user interface, there is no reasonable way to understand how much data is being stored.Available on demand. While there are some line items that seem unnecessary for our test, the bill is generally straight-forward to understand.$71
Google Cloud ServiceIncomplete. From the file browsing user interface, there is no reasonable way to understand how much data is being stored.Available, but provides descriptions in units that are not on the pricing table nor commonly used.$100

Cloud Storage Test Details

For our tests, we choose Backblaze B2, Microsoft’s Azure, Amazon’s S3, and Google Cloud Storage. Our idea was simple: Upload 1 TB of data to the comparable service for each vendor, store it for 1 month, download that 1 TB, then document and share the results.

Let’s start with most obvious observation, the cost charged by each vendor for the test:

Cost
Backblaze B2$25
Microsoft Azure$72
Amazon S3$71
Google Cloud Service$100

Later in this post, we’ll see if we can determine the different cost components (storage, downloading, transactions, etc.) for each vendor, but our first step is to see if we can determine how much data we stored. In some cases, the answer is not as obvious as it would seem.

Test 1: Can a Customer Understand How Much Data Is Stored?

At the core, a provider of a service ought to be able to tell a customer how much of the service he or she is using. In this case, one might assume that providers of Cloud Storage would be able to tell customers how much data is being stored at any given moment. It turns out, it’s not that simple.

Backblaze B2
Logging into a Backblaze B2 account, one is presented with a summary screen that displays all “buckets.” Each bucket displays key summary information, including data currently stored.

B2 Cloud Storage Buckets screenshot

Clicking into a given bucket, one can browse individual files. Each file displays its size, and multiple files can be selected to create a size summary.

B2 file tree screenshot

Summary: Accurate, intuitive display of storage information.

Microsoft Azure

Moving on to Microsoft’s Azure, things get a little more “exciting.” There was no area that we could find where one can determine the total amount of data, in GB, stored with Azure.

There’s an area entitled “usage,” but that wasn’t helpful.

Microsoft Azure cloud storage screenshot

We then moved on to “Overview,” but had a couple challenges.The first issue was that we were presented with KiB (kibibyte) as a unit of measure. One GB (the unit of measure used in Azure’s pricing table) equates to roughly 976,563 KiB. It struck us as odd that things would be summarized by a unit of measure different from the billing unit of measure.

Microsoft Azure usage dashboard screenshot

Summary: Storage is being measured in KiB, but is billed by the GB. Even with a calculator, it is unclear how much storage we are using.

Amazon S3

Next we checked on the data we were storing in S3. We again ran into problems.

In the bucket overview, we were able to identify our buckets. However, we could not tell how much data was being stored.

Amazon S3 cloud storage buckets screenshot

Drilling into a bucket, the detail view does tell us file size. However, there was no method for summarizing the data stored within that bucket or for multiple files.

Amazon S3 cloud storage buckets usage screenshot

Summary: Incomplete. From the file browsing user interface, there is no reasonable way to understand how much data is being stored.

Google Cloud Storage (“GCS”)

GCS proved to have its own quirks, as well.

One can easily find the “bucket” summary, however, it does not provide information on data stored.

Google Cloud Storage Bucket screenshot

Clicking into the bucket, one can see files and the size of an individual file. However, no ability to see data total is provided.

Google Cloud Storage bucket files screenshot

Summary: Incomplete. From the file browsing user interface, there is no reasonable way to understand how much data is being stored.

Test 1 Conclusions

We knew how much storage we were uploading and, in many cases, the user will have some sense of the amount of data they are uploading. However, it strikes us as odd that many vendors won’t tell you how much data you have stored. Even stranger are the vendors that provide reporting in a unit of measure that is different from the units in their pricing table.

Test 2: Can a Customer Understand The Bill?

The cloud storage industry has done itself no favors with its tiered pricing that requires a calculator to figure out what’s going on. Setting that aside for a moment, one would presume that bills would be created in clear, auditable ways.

Backblaze

Inside of the Backblaze user interface, one finds a navigation link entitled “Billing.” Clicking on that, the user is presented with line items for previous bills, payments, and an estimate for the upcoming charges.

Backblaze B2 billing screenshot

One can expand any given row to see the the line item transactions composing each bill.

Backblaze B2 billing details screenshot

Summary: Available on demand, and the site clearly defines what has and will be charged for.

Azure

Trying to understand the Azure billing proved to be a bit tricky.

On August 6th, we logged into the billing console and were presented with this screen.

Microsoft Azure billing screenshot

As you can see, on Aug 6th, billing for the period of May-June was not available for download. For the period ending June 26th, we were charged nearly a month later, on July 24th. Clicking into that row item does display line item information.

Microsoft Azure cloud storage billing details screenshot

Summary: Available, but difficult to find. The nearly 30 day lag in billing creates business and accounting challenges.

Amazon S3

Amazon presents a clean billing summary and enables users to “drill down” into line items.

Going to the billing area of AWS, one can survey various monthly bills and is presented with a clean summary of billing charges.

AWS billing screenshot

Expanding into the billing detail, Amazon articulates each line item charge. Within each line item, charges are broken out into sub-line items for the different tiers of pricing.

AWS billing details screenshot

Summary: Available on demand. While there are some line items that seem unnecessary for our test, the bill is generally straight-forward to understand.

Google Cloud Storage (“GCS”)

This was an area where the GCS User Interface, which was otherwise relatively intuitive, became confusing.

Going to the Billing Overview page did not offer much in the way of an overview on charges.

Google Cloud Storage billing screenshot

However, moving down to the “Transactions” section did provide line item detail on all the charges incurred. However, similar to Azure introducing the concept of KiB, Google introduces the concept of the equally confusing Gibibyte (GiB). While all of Google’s pricing tables are listed in terms of GB, the line items reference GiB. 1 GiB is 1.07374 GBs.

Google Cloud Storage billing details screenshot

Summary: Available, but provides descriptions in units that are not on the pricing table nor commonly used.

Test 2 Conclusions

Clearly, some vendors do a better job than others in making their pricing available and understandable. From a transparency standpoint, it’s difficult to justify why a vendor would have their pricing table in units of X, but then put units of Y in the user interface.

Transparency: The Backblaze Way

Transparency isn’t easy. At Backblaze, we believe in investing time and energy into presenting the most intuitive user interfaces that we can create. We take pride in our heritage in the consumer backup space — servicing consumers has taught us how to make things understandable and usable. We do our best to apply those lessons to everything we do.

This philosophy reflects our desire to make our products usable, but it’s also part of a larger ethos of being transparent with our customers. We are being trusted with precious data. We want to repay that trust with, among other things, transparency.

It’s that spirit that was behind the decision to publish our hard drive performance stats, to open source the infrastructure that is behind us having the lowest cost of storage in the industry, and also to open source our erasure coding (the math that drives a significant portion of our redundancy for your data).

Why? We believe it’s not just about good user interface, it’s about the relationship we want to build with our customers.

The post Cloud Storage Doesn’t have to be Convoluted, Complex, or Confusing appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Balancing Convenience and Privacy

Post Syndicated from Ahin Thomas original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/privacy-vs-convenience/

balancing convenience and privacy

In early January of this year, in a conference room with a few other colleagues, we were at a point where we needed to decide how to balance convenience and privacy for our customers. The context being our team earnestly finalizing and prioritizing the launch features of our revamped Business Backup product. In the process, we introduced a piece of functionality that we call “Groups.” A Group is a mechanism that centralizes payment and simplifies management for multiple Backblaze users in a given organization or business. As with many services there were tradeoffs, but this one proved thornier than most.

The Trade-off Between Convenience and Privacy

The problem started as we considered the possibility of having a “Managed” Group. The concept is simple enough: Centralized billing is good, but there are clear use cases where a user would like to have someone act on their behalf. For instance, a business may want a System Administrator to create/manage restores on behalf of a group of employees. We have had many instances of someone from the home office ordering a hard drive restore for an employee in the field. Similarly, a Managed Service Provider (MSP) might provide, and potentially charge for, the service of creating/managing restores for their customers. In short, the idea of having an Administrator manage a defined collection of users (i.e. a Group) was compelling and added a level of convenience.

Great. It’s decided then, we need to introduce the concept of a Managed Group. And we’ll also have Unmanaged Groups. You can have infinite Groups of either kind, we’ll let the user decide!

Here’s the problem: The Managed Group feature could have easily been used for evil. For example, an overeager Administrator could restore an employee’s files, at anytime, for any reason — legitimate or nefarious. This felt wrong as we’re a backup company, not spyware company.

This is when the discussion got more interesting. By adding a convenience feature, we realized that there was potential for user privacy to be violated. As we worked through the use cases, we faced potential conflict between two of our guiding principles:

  • Make backup astonishingly easy. Whether you are a individual, family, or business (or some combination), we want to make your life easier.
  • Don’t be evil. With great data storage comes great responsibility. We are the custodians of sensitive data and take that seriously.

So how best to balance a feature that customers clearly want while enabling sane protections for all users? It was an interesting question internally — one where a fair amount of meetings, hallway conversations, and email exchanges were conducted in order to get it right.

Enabling Administration While Safeguarding Team Privacy

Management can be turned on for any Group at the time of Group Creation. As mentioned above, one Administrator can have as many Groups as desired and those Groups can be a mix of Managed and Unmanaged.

But there’s an interesting wrinkle — if Management is enabled, potential members of that Group are told that the feature is enabled before they join the Group.

Backblze for Business Group Invite

We’ve, in plain terms, disclosed what is happening before the person starts backing up. If you read that and choose to start backing up, then you have been armed with full information.

Unfortunately, life isn’t that cut and dry. What if your company selected Backblaze and insists that everyone join the Group? Sure, you were told there are Administrators. Fine, my Administrator is supposed to act in the constructive interest of the Group. But what if the Admin is, as the saying goes, “for badness”?

Our solution, while seemingly innocuous, felt like it introduced a level of transparency and auditability that made us comfortable moving forward. Before an Administrator can do a restore on a Group Member’s behalf, the Admin is presented with a pop up that looks like this:

Backblaze for Business Restore Notification

If the Admin is going to create a restore on a user’s behalf, then that user will be notified of the activity. A less than well intentioned Admin will have some reluctance if he knows the user will receive an email. Since permission for this type of activity was granted when the individual joined the Group, we do allow the Admin to proceed with the restore operation without further approval (convenience).

However, the user will get notified and can raise any questions or concerns as desired. There are no false positives, if the user gets an email, that means an Admin was going to restore data from the user’s account. In addition, because the mechanism is email, it creates an audit trail for the company. If there are users that don’t want the alerts, we recommend simply creating an email filter rule and putting them into a folder (in case some day you did want them).

Customer Adoption

The struggle for us was to strike the right balance between privacy and convenience. Specifically, we wanted to empower our users to set the mix where it is appropriate for them. In the case of Groups, it’s been interesting to see that 93% of Groups are of the “Managed” variety.

More importantly to us, we get consistently good feedback about the notification mechanisms in place. Even for organizations where one Admin may be taking a number of legitimate actions, we’re told that the notifications are appreciated in the spirit that they are intended. We’ll continue to solicit feedback and analyze usage to find ways to improve all of our features. But hearing and seeing customer satisfaction is a positive indicator that we’ve struck the appropriate balance between convenience and privacy.

The late 20th century philosopher, Judge Smails, once posited “the most important decision you can make right now is what do you stand for…? Goodness… or badness?”

We choose goodness. How do you think we did?

The post Balancing Convenience and Privacy appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Hiring a Content Director

Post Syndicated from Ahin Thomas original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hiring-content-director/


Backblaze is looking to hire a full time Content Director. This role is an essential piece of our team, reporting directly to our VP of Marketing. As the hiring manager, I’d like to tell you a little bit more about the role, how I’m thinking about the collaboration, and why I believe this to be a great opportunity.

A Little About Backblaze and the Role

Since 2007, Backblaze has earned a strong reputation as a leader in data storage. Our products are astonishingly easy to use and affordable to purchase. We have engaged customers and an involved community that helps drive our brand. Our audience numbers in the millions and our primary interaction point is the Backblaze blog. We publish content for engineers (data infrastructure, topics in the data storage world), consumers (how to’s, merits of backing up), and entrepreneurs (business insights). In all categories, our Content Director drives our earned positioned as leaders.

Backblaze has a culture focused on being fair and good (to each other and our customers). We have created a sustainable business that is profitable and growing. Our team places a premium on open communication, being cleverly unconventional, and helping each other out. The Content Director, specifically, balances our needs as a commercial enterprise (at the end of the day, we want to sell our products) with the custodianship of our blog (and the trust of our audience).

There’s a lot of ground to be covered at Backblaze. We have three discreet business lines:

  • Computer Backup -> a 10 year old business focusing on backing up consumer computers.
  • B2 Cloud Storage -> Competing with Amazon, Google, and Microsoft… just at ¼ of the price (but with the same performance characteristics).
  • Business Backup -> Both Computer Backup and B2 Cloud Storage, but focused on SMBs and enterprise.

The Best Candidate Is…

An excellent writer – possessing a solid academic understanding of writing, the creative process, and delivering against deadlines. You know how to write with multiple voices for multiple audiences. We do not expect our Content Director to be a storage infrastructure expert; we do expect a facility with researching topics, accessing our engineering and infrastructure team for guidance, and generally translating the technical into something easy to understand. The best Content Director must be an active participant in the business/ strategy / and editorial debates and then must execute with ruthless precision.

Our Content Director’s “day job” is making sure the blog is running smoothly and the sales team has compelling collateral (emails, case studies, white papers).

Specifically, the Perfect Content Director Excels at:

  • Creating well researched, elegantly constructed content on deadline. For example, each week, 2 articles should be published on our blog. Blog posts should rotate to address the constituencies for our 3 business lines – not all blog posts will appeal to everyone, but over the course of a month, we want multiple compelling pieces for each segment of our audience. Similarly, case studies (and outbound emails) should be tailored to our sales team’s proposed campaigns / audiences. The Content Director creates ~75% of all content but is responsible for editing 100%.
  • Understanding organic methods for weaving business needs into compelling content. The majority of our content (but not EVERY piece) must tie to some business strategy. We hate fluff and hold our promotional content to a standard of being worth someone’s time to read. To be effective, the Content Director must understand the target customer segments and use cases for our products.
  • Straddling both Consumer & SaaS mechanics. A key part of the job will be working to augment the collateral used by our sales team for both B2 Cloud Storage and Business Backup. This content should be compelling and optimized for converting leads. And our foundational business line, Computer Backup, deserves to be nurtured and grown.
  • Product marketing. The Content Director “owns” the blog. But also assists in writing cases studies / white papers, creating collateral (email, trade show). Each of these things has a variety of call to action(s) and audiences. Direct experience is a plus, experience that will plausibly translate to these areas is a requirement.
  • Articulating views on storage, backup, and cloud infrastructure. Not everyone has experience with this. That’s fine, but if you do, it’s strongly beneficial.

A Thursday In The Life:

  • Coordinate Collaborators – We are deliverables driven culture, not a meeting driven one. We expect you to collaborate with internal blog authors and the occasional guest poster.
  • Collaborate with Design – Ensure imagery for upcoming posts / collateral are on track.
  • Augment Sales team – Lock content for next week’s outbound campaign.
  • Self directed blog agenda – Feedback for next Tuesday’s post is addressed, next Thursday’s post is circulated to marketing team for feedback & SEO polish.
  • Review Editorial calendar, make any changes.

Oh! And We Have Great Perks:

  • Competitive healthcare plans
  • Competitive compensation and 401k
  • All employees receive Option grants
  • Unlimited vacation days
  • Strong coffee & fully stocked Micro kitchen
  • Catered breakfast and lunches
  • Awesome people who work on awesome projects
  • Childcare bonus
  • Normal work hours
  • Get to bring your pets into the office
  • San Mateo Office – located near Caltrain and Highways 101 & 280.

Interested in Joining Our Team?

Send us an email to [email protected] with the subject “Content Director”. Please include your resume and 3 brief abstracts for content pieces.
Some hints for each of your three abstracts:

  • Create a compelling headline
  • Write clearly and concisely
  • Be brief, each abstract should be 100 words or less – no longer
  • Target each abstract to a different specific audience that is relevant to our business lines

Thank you for taking the time to read and consider all this. I hope it sounds like a great opportunity for you or someone you know. Principles only need apply.

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