Tag Archives: networking

New Zealand Internet Connectivity to AWS

Post Syndicated from Cameron Tod original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/new-zealand-internet-connectivity-to-aws/

Amazon Web Services (AWS) serves more than a million private and public sector organizations all over the world from its extensive and expanding global infrastructure.

Like other countries, organizations all around New Zealand are using AWS to change the way they operate. For example, Xero, a Wellington-based online accountancy software vendor, now serves customers in more than 100 countries, while the Department of Conservation provides its end users with virtual desktops running in Amazon Workspaces.

New Zealand doesn’t currently have a dedicated AWS Region. Geographically, the closest is Asia Pacific (Sydney), which is 2,000 kilometers (km) away, across a deep sea. While customers rely on AWS for business-critical workloads, they are well-served by New Zealand’s international connectivity.

To connect to Amazon’s network, our New Zealand customers have a range of options:

  • Public internet endpoints
  • Managed or software Virtual Private Networks (VPN)
  • AWS Direct Connect (DX).

All rely on the extensive internet infrastructure connecting New Zealand to the world.

International Connectivity

The vast majority of internet traffic is carried over physical cables, while the percentage of traffic moving over satellite or wireless links is small by comparison.

Historically, cables were funded and managed by consortia of telecommunication providers. More recently, large infrastructure and service providers like AWS have contributed to or are building their own cable networks.

There are currently about 400 submarine cables in service globally. Modern submarine cables are fiber-optic, run for thousands of kilometers, and are protected by steel strands, plastic sheathing, copper, and a chemical water barrier. Over that distance, the signal can weaken—or attenuate—so signal repeaters are installed approximately every 50km to mitigate attenuation. Repeaters are powered by a charge running over the copper sheathing in the cable.

An example of submarine cable composition.. S

An example of submarine cable composition.. Source: WikiMedia Commons

For most of their run, these cables are about as thick as a standard garden hose. They are thicker, however, closer to shore and in areas where there’s a greater risk of damage by fishing nets, boat anchors, etc.

Cables can—and do—break, but redundancy is built into the network. According to Telegeography, there are 100 submarine cable faults globally every year. However, most faults don’t impact users meaningfully.

New Zealand is served by four main cables:

  1. Hawaiki : Sydney -> Mangawhai (Northland, NZ) -> Kapolei (Hawaii, USA) -> Hilsboro, Oregon (USA) – 44 Terabits per second (Tbps)
  2. Tasman Global Access: Raglan (Auckland, New Zealand) -> Narabeen (NSW, Australia) – 20 Tbps
  3. Southern Cross A: Whenuapai (Auckland, New Zealand) -> Alexandria (NSW, Australia) – 1.2 Tbps
  4. Southern Cross B: Takapuna (Auckland, New Zealand) -> Spencer Beach (Hawaii, USA) – 1.2 Tbps
A map of major submarine cables connecting to New Zealand.

A map of major submarine cables connecting to New Zealand. Source submarinecablemap.com

The four cables combined currently deliver 66 Tbps of available capacity. The Southern Cross NEXT cable is due to come online in 2020, which will add another 72 Tbps. These are, of course, potential capacities; it’s likely the “lit” capacity—the proportion of the cables’ overall capacity that is actually in use—is much lower.

Connecting to AWS from New Zealand

While understanding the physical infrastructure is important in practice, these details are not shared with customers. Connectivity options are evaluated on the basis of partner and AWS offerings, which include connectivity.

Customers connect to AWS in three main ways: over public endpoints, via site-to-site VPNs, and via Direct Connect (DX), all typically provided by partners.

Public Internet Endpoints

Customers can connect to public endpoints for AWS services over the public internet. Some services, like Amazon CloudFront, Amazon API Gateway, and Amazon WorkSpaces are generally used in this way.

Network-level access can be controlled via various means depending on the service, whether that is Endpoint Policies for API Gateway, Security Groups, and Network Access Control Lists for Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), or Resource Policies for services such as Amazon S3, Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), or Amazon Key Management Service (KMS).

All services offer TLS or IPsec connectivity for secure encryption-in-motion.

Site-to-Site Virtual Private Network

Many organizations use a VPN to connect to AWS. It’s the simplest and lowest cost entry point to expose resources deployed in private ranges in an Amazon VPC. Amazon VPC allows customers to provision a logically isolated network segment, with fine-grained control of IP ranges, filtering rules, and routing.

AWS offers a managed site-to-site VPN service, which creates secure, redundant Internet Protocol Security (IPSec) VPNs, and also handles maintenance and high-availability while integrating with Amazon CloudWatch for robust monitoring.

If using an AWS managed VPN, the AWS endpoints have publicly routable IPs. They can be connected to over the public internet or via a Public Virtual Interface over DX (outlined below).

Customers can also deploy VPN appliances onto Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances running in their VPC. These may be self-managed or provided by Amazon Marketplace sellers.

AWS also offers AWS Client VPN, for direct user access to AWS resources.

AWS Direct Connect

While connectivity over the internet is secure and flexible, it has one major disadvantage: it’s unpredictable. By design, traffic traversing the internet can take any path to reach its destination. Most of the time it works but occasionally routing conditions may reduce capacity or increase latency.

DX connections are either 1 or 10 Gigabits per second (Gbps). This capacity is dedicated to the customer; it isn’t shared, as other network users are never routed over the connection. This means customers can rely on consistent latency and bandwidth. The DX per-Gigabit transfer cost is lower than other egress mechanisms. For customers transferring large volumes of data, DX may be more cost effective than other means of connectivity.

Customers may publish their own 802.11q Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) tags across the DX, and advertise routes via Border Gateway Protocol (BGP). A dedicated connection supports up to 50 private or public virtual interfaces. New Zealand does not have a physical point-of-presence for DX—users must procure connectivity to our Sydney Region. Many AWS Partner Network (APN) members in New Zealand offer this connectivity.

For customers who don’t want or need to manage VLANs to AWS—or prefer 1 Gbps or smaller links —APN partners offer hosted connections or hosted virtual interfaces.  For more detail, please review our AWS Direct Connect Partners page.

Performance

There are physical limits to latency dictated by the speed of light, and the medium through which optical signals travel. Southern Cross publishes latency statistics, and it sees one-way latency of approximately 11 milliseconds (ms) over the 2,276km Alexandria to Whenuapai link. Double that for a round-trip to 22 ms.

In practice, we see customers achieving round-trip times from user workstations to Sydney in approximately 30-50 ms, assuming fair-weather internet conditions or DX links. Latency in Auckland (the largest city) tends to be on the lower end of that spectrum, while the rest of the country tends towards the higher end.

Bandwidth constraints are more often dictated by client hardware, but AWS and our partners offer up to 10 Gbps links, or smaller as required. For customers that require more than 10 Gbps over a single link, AWS supports Link Aggregation Groups (LAG).

As outlined above, there are a range of ways for customers to adopt AWS via secure, reliable, and performant networks. To discuss your use case, please contact an AWS Solutions Architect.

 

One to Many: Evolving VPC Design

Post Syndicated from Androski Spicer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/one-to-many-evolving-vpc-design/

Since its inception, the Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) has acted as the embodiment of security and privacy for customers who are looking to run their applications in a controlled, private, secure, and isolated environment.

This logically isolated space has evolved, and in its evolution has increased the avenues that customers can take to create and manage multi-tenant environments with multiple integration points for access to resources on-premises.

This blog is a two-part series that begins with a look at the Amazon VPC as a single unit of networking in the AWS Cloud but eventually takes you to a world in which simplified architectures for establishing a global network of VPCs are possible.

From One VPC: Single Unit of Networking

To be successful with the AWS Virtual Private Cloud you first have to define success for today and what success might look like as your organization’s adoption of the AWS cloud increases and matures. In essence, your VPCs should be designed to satisfy the needs of your applications today and must be scalable to accommodate future needs.

Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) notations are used to denote the size of your VPC. AWS allows you specify a CIDR block between /16 and /28. The largest, /16, provides you with 65,536 IP addresses and the smallest possible allowed CIDR block, /28, provides you with 16 IP addresses. Note, the first four IP addresses and the last IP address in each subnet CIDR block are not available for you to use, and cannot be assigned to an instance.

AWS VPC supports both IPv4 and IPv6. It is required that you specify an IPv4 CIDR range when creating a VPC. Specifying an IPv6 range is optional.

Customers can specify ANY IPv4 address space for their VPC. This includes but is not limited to RFC 1918 addresses.

After creating your VPC, you divide it into subnets. In an AWS VPC, subnets are not isolation boundaries around your application. Rather, they are containers for routing policies.

Isolation is achieved by attaching an AWS Security Group (SG) to the EC2 instances that host your application. SGs are stateful firewalls, meaning that connections are tracked to ensure return traffic is allowed. They control inbound and outbound access to the elastic network interfaces that are attached to an EC2 instance. These should be tightly configured, only allowing access as needed.

It is our best practice that subnets should be created in categories. There two main categories; public subnets and private subnets. At minimum they should be designed as outlined in the below diagrams for IPv4 and IPv6 subnet design.

Recommended IPv4 subnet design pattern

Recommended IPv6 subnet design pattern

Subnet types are denoted by the ability and inability for applications and users on the internet to directly initiate access to infrastructure within a subnet.

Public Subnets

Public subnets are attached to a route table that has a default route to the Internet via an Internet gateway.

Resources in a public subnet can have a public IP or Elastic IP (EIP) that has a NAT to the Elastic Network Interface (ENI) of the virtual machines or containers that hosts your application(s). This is a one-to-one NAT that is performed by the Internet gateway.

Illustration of public subnet access path to the Internet through the Internet Gateway (IGW)

Private Subnets

A private subnet contains infrastructure that isn’t directly accessible from the Internet. Unlike the public subnet, this infrastructure only has private IPs.

Infrastructure in a private subnet gain access to resources or users on the Internet through a NAT infrastructure of sorts.

AWS natively provides NAT capability through the use of the NAT Gateway service. Customers can also create NAT instances that they manage or leverage third-party NAT appliances from the AWS Marketplace.

In most scenarios, it is recommended to use the AWS NAT Gateway as it is highly available (in a single Availability Zone) and is provided as a managed service by AWS. It supports 5 Gbps of bandwidth per NAT gateway and automatically scales up to 45 Gbps.

An AWS NAT gateway’s high availability is confined to a single Availability Zone. For high availability across AZs, it is recommended to have a minimum of two NAT gateways (in different AZs). This allows you to switch to an available NAT gateway in the event that one should become unavailable.

This approach allows you to zone your Internet traffic, reducing cross Availability Zone connections to the Internet. More details on NAT gateway are available here.

Illustration of an environment with a single NAT Gateway (NAT-GW)

Illustration of high availability with a multiple NAT Gateways (NAT-GW) attached to their own route table

Illustration of the failure of one NAT Gateway and the fail over to an available NAT Gateway by the manual changing of the default route next hop in private subnet A route table

AWS allocated IPv6 addresses are Global Unicast Addresses by default. That said, you can privatize these subnets by using an Egress-Only Internet Gateway (E-IGW), instead of a regular Internet gateway. E-IGWs are purposely built to prevents users and applications on the Internet from initiating access to infrastructure in your IPv6 subnet(s).

Illustration of internet access for hybrid IPv6 subnets through an Egress-Only Internet Gateway (E-IGW)

Applications hosted on instances living within a private subnet can have different access needs. Some require access to the Internet while others require access to databases, applications, and users that are on-premises. For this type of access, AWS provides two avenues: the Virtual Gateway and the Transit Gateway. The Virtual Gateway can only support a single VPC at a time, while the Transit Gateway is built to simplify the interconnectivity of tens to hundreds of VPCs and then aggregating their connectivity to resources on-premises. Given that we are looking at the VPC as a single unit of networking, all diagrams below contain illustrations of the Virtual Gateway which acts a WAN concentrator for your VPC.

Illustration of private subnets connecting to data center via a Virtual Gateway (VGW)

 

Illustration of private subnets connecting to Data Center via a VGW

 

Illustration of private subnets connecting to Data Center using AWS Direct Connect as primary and IPsec as backup

The above diagram illustrates a WAN connection between a VGW attached to a VPC and a customer’s data center.

AWS provides two options for establishing a private connectivity between your VPC and on-premises network: AWS Direct Connect and AWS Site-to-Site VPN.

AWS Site-to-Site VPN configuration leverages IPSec with each connection providing two redundant IPSec tunnels. AWS support both static routing and dynamic routing (through the use of BGP).

BGP is recommended, as it allows dynamic route advertisement, high availability through failure detection, and fail over between tunnels in addition to decreased management complexity.

VPC Endpoints: Gateway & Interface Endpoints

Applications running inside your subnet(s) may need to connect to AWS public services (like Amazon S3, Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), Amazon API Gateway, etc.) or applications in another VPC that lives in another account. For example, you may have a database in another account that you would like to expose applications that lives in a completely different account and subnet.

For these scenarios you have the option to leverage an Amazon VPC Endpoint.

There are two types of VPC Endpoints: Gateway Endpoints and Interface Endpoints.

Gateway Endpoints only support Amazon S3 and Amazon DynamoDB. Upon creation, a gateway is added to your specified route table(s) and acts as the destination for all requests to the service it is created for.

Interface Endpoints differ significantly and can only be created for services that are powered by AWS PrivateLink.

Upon creation, AWS creates an interface endpoint consisting of one or more Elastic Network Interfaces (ENIs). Each AZ can support one interface endpoint ENI. This acts as a point of entry for all traffic destined to a specific PrivateLink service.

When an interface endpoint is created, associated DNS entries are created that point to the endpoint and each ENI that the endpoint contains. To access the PrivateLink service you must send your request to one of these hostnames.

As illustrated below, ensure the Private DNS feature is enabled for AWS public and Marketplace services:

Since interface endpoints leverage ENIs, customers can use cloud techniques they are already familiar with. The interface endpoint can be configured with a restrictive security group. These endpoints can also be easily accessed from both inside and outside the VPC. Access from outside a VPC can be accomplished through Direct Connect and VPN.

Illustration of a solution that leverages an interface and gateway endpoint

Customers can also create AWS Endpoint services for their applications or services running on-premises. This allows access to these services via an interface endpoint which can be extended to other VPCs (even if the VPCs themselves do not have Direct Connect configured).

VPC Sharing

At re:Invent 2018, AWS launched the feature VPC sharing, which helps customers control VPC sprawl by decoupling the boundary of an AWS account from the underlying VPC network that supports its infrastructure.

VPC sharing uses Amazon Resource Access Manager (RAM) to share subnets across accounts within the same AWS organization.

VPC sharing is defined as:

VPC sharing allows customers to centralize the management of network, its IP space and the access paths to resources external to the VPC. This method of centralization and reuse (of VPC components such as NAT Gateway and Direct Connect connections) results in a reduction of cost to manage and maintain this environment.

Great, but there are times when a customer needs to build networks with multiple VPCs in and across AWS regions. How should this be done and what are the best practices?

This will be answered in part two of this blog.

 

 

Learn about AWS Services & Solutions – September AWS Online Tech Talks

Post Syndicated from Jenny Hang original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/learn-about-aws-services-solutions-september-aws-online-tech-talks/

Learn about AWS Services & Solutions – September AWS Online Tech Talks

AWS Tech Talks

Join us this September to learn about AWS services and solutions. The AWS Online Tech Talks are live, online presentations that cover a broad range of topics at varying technical levels. These tech talks, led by AWS solutions architects and engineers, feature technical deep dives, live demonstrations, customer examples, and Q&A with AWS experts. Register Now!

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks this month:

 

Compute:

September 23, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTBuild Your Hybrid Cloud Architecture with AWS – Learn about the extensive range of services AWS offers to help you build a hybrid cloud architecture best suited for your use case.

September 26, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTSelf-Hosted WordPress: It’s Easier Than You Think – Learn how you can easily build a fault-tolerant WordPress site using Amazon Lightsail.

October 3, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTLower Costs by Right Sizing Your Instance with Amazon EC2 T3 General Purpose Burstable Instances – Get an overview of T3 instances, understand what workloads are ideal for them, and understand how the T3 credit system works so that you can lower your EC2 instance costs today.

 

Containers:

September 26, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTDevelop a Web App Using Amazon ECS and AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK) – Learn how to build your first app using CDK and AWS container services.

 

Data Lakes & Analytics:

September 26, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTBest Practices for Provisioning Amazon MSK Clusters and Using Popular Apache Kafka-Compatible Tooling – Learn best practices on running Apache Kafka production workloads at a lower cost on Amazon MSK.

 

Databases:

September 25, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTWhat’s New in Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility) – Learn what’s new in Amazon DocumentDB, a fully managed MongoDB compatible database service designed from the ground up to be fast, scalable, and highly available.

October 3, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTBest Practices for Enterprise-Class Security, High-Availability, and Scalability with Amazon ElastiCache – Learn about new enterprise-friendly Amazon ElastiCache enhancements like customer managed key and online scaling up or down to make your critical workloads more secure, scalable and available.

 

DevOps:

October 1, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PT – CI/CD for Containers: A Way Forward for Your DevOps Pipeline – Learn how to build CI/CD pipelines using AWS services to get the most out of the agility afforded by containers.

 

Enterprise & Hybrid:

September 24, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM PT Virtual Workshop: How to Monitor and Manage Your AWS Costs – Learn how to visualize and manage your AWS cost and usage in this virtual hands-on workshop.

October 2, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PT – Accelerate Cloud Adoption and Reduce Operational Risk with AWS Managed Services – Learn how AMS accelerates your migration to AWS, reduces your operating costs, improves security and compliance, and enables you to focus on your differentiating business priorities.

 

IoT:

September 25, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTComplex Monitoring for Industrial with AWS IoT Data Services – Learn how to solve your complex event monitoring challenges with AWS IoT Data Services.

 

Machine Learning:

September 23, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTTraining Machine Learning Models Faster – Learn how to train machine learning models quickly and with a single click using Amazon SageMaker.

September 30, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTUsing Containers for Deep Learning Workflows – Learn how containers can help address challenges in deploying deep learning environments.

October 3, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM PTVirtual Workshop: Getting Hands-On with Machine Learning and Ready to Race in the AWS DeepRacer League – Join DeClercq Wentzel, Senior Product Manager for AWS DeepRacer, for a presentation on the basics of machine learning and how to build a reinforcement learning model that you can use to join the AWS DeepRacer League.

 

AWS Marketplace:

September 30, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTAdvancing Software Procurement in a Containerized World – Learn how to deploy applications faster with third-party container products.

 

Migration:

September 24, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTApplication Migrations Using AWS Server Migration Service (SMS) – Learn how to use AWS Server Migration Service (SMS) for automating application migration and scheduling continuous replication, from your on-premises data centers or Microsoft Azure to AWS.

 

Networking & Content Delivery:

September 25, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTBuilding Highly Available and Performant Applications using AWS Global Accelerator – Learn how to build highly available and performant architectures for your applications with AWS Global Accelerator, now with source IP preservation.

September 30, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTAWS Office Hours: Amazon CloudFront – Just getting started with Amazon CloudFront and [email protected]? Get answers directly from our experts during AWS Office Hours.

 

Robotics:

October 1, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTRobots and STEM: AWS RoboMaker and AWS Educate Unite! – Come join members of the AWS RoboMaker and AWS Educate teams as we provide an overview of our education initiatives and walk you through the newly launched RoboMaker Badge.

 

Security, Identity & Compliance:

October 1, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTDeep Dive on Running Active Directory on AWS – Learn how to deploy Active Directory on AWS and start migrating your windows workloads.

 

Serverless:

October 2, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTDeep Dive on Amazon EventBridge – Learn how to optimize event-driven applications, and use rules and policies to route, transform, and control access to these events that react to data from SaaS apps.

 

Storage:

September 24, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTOptimize Your Amazon S3 Data Lake with S3 Storage Classes and Management Tools – Learn how to use the Amazon S3 Storage Classes and management tools to better manage your data lake at scale and to optimize storage costs and resources.

October 2, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTThe Great Migration to Cloud Storage: Choosing the Right Storage Solution for Your Workload – Learn more about AWS storage services and identify which service is the right fit for your business.

 

 

Optimizing Amazon ECS task density using awsvpc network mode

Post Syndicated from Ignacio Riesgo original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/optimizing-amazon-ecs-task-density-using-awsvpc-network-mode/

This post is contributed by Tony Pujals | Senior Developer Advocate, AWS

 

AWS recently increased the number of elastic network interfaces available when you run tasks on Amazon ECS. Use the account setting called awsvpcTrunking. If you use the Amazon EC2 launch type and task networking (awsvpc network mode), you can now run more tasks on an instance—5 to 17 times as many—as you did before.

As more of you embrace microservices architectures, you deploy increasing numbers of smaller tasks. AWS now offers you the option of more efficient packing per instance, potentially resulting in smaller clusters and associated savings.

 

Overview

To manage your own cluster of EC2 instances, use the EC2 launch type. Use task networking to run ECS tasks using the same networking properties as if tasks were distinct EC2 instances.

Task networking offers several benefits. Every task launched with awsvpc network mode has its own attached network interface, a primary private IP address, and an internal DNS hostname. This simplifies container networking and gives you more control over how tasks communicate, both with each other and with other services within their virtual private clouds (VPCs).

Task networking also lets you take advantage of other EC2 networking features like VPC Flow Logs. This feature lets you monitor traffic to and from tasks. It also provides greater security control for containers, allowing you to use security groups and network monitoring tools at a more granular level within tasks. For more information, see Introducing Cloud Native Networking for Amazon ECS Containers.

However, if you run container tasks on EC2 instances with task networking, you can face a networking limit. This might surprise you, particularly when an instance has plenty of free CPU and memory. The limit reflects the number of network interfaces available to support awsvpc network mode per container instance.

 

Raise network interface density limits with trunking

The good news is that AWS raised network interface density limits by implementing a networking feature on ECS called “trunking.” This is a technique for multiplexing data over a shared communication link.

If you’re migrating to microservices using AWS App Mesh, you should optimize network interface density. App Mesh requires awsvpc networking to provide routing control and visibility over an ever-expanding array of running tasks. In this context, increased network interface density might save money.

By opting for network interface trunking, you should see a significant increase in capacity—from 5 to 17 times more than the previous limit. For more information on the new task limits per container instance, see Supported Amazon EC2 Instance Types.

Applications with tasks not hitting CPU or memory limits also benefit from this feature through the more cost-effective “bin packing” of container instances.

 

Trunking is an opt-in feature

AWS chose to make the trunking feature opt-in due to the following factors:

  • Instance registration: While normal instance registration is straightforward with trunking, this feature increases the number of asynchronous instance registration steps that can potentially fail. Any such failures might add extra seconds to launch time.
  • Available IP addresses: The “trunk” belongs to the same subnet in which the instance’s primary network interface originates. This effectively reduces the available IP addresses and potentially the ability to scale out on other EC2 instances sharing the same subnet. The trunk consumes an IP address. With a trunk attached, there are two assigned IP addresses per instance, one for the primary interface and one for the trunk.
  • Differing customer preferences and infrastructure: If you have high CPU or memory workloads, you might not benefit from trunking. Or, you may not want awsvpc networking.

Consequently, AWS leaves it to you to decide if you want to use this feature. AWS might revisit this decision in the future, based on customer feedback. For now, your account roles or users must opt in to the awsvpcTrunking account setting to gain the benefits of increased task density per container instance.

 

Enable trunking

Enable the ECS elastic network interface trunking feature to increase the number of network interfaces that can be attached to supported EC2 container instance types. You must meet the following prerequisites before you can launch a container instance with the increased network interface limits:

  • Your account must have the AWSServiceRoleForECS service-linked role for ECS.
  • You must opt into the awsvpcTrunking  account setting.

 

Make sure that a service-linked role exists for ECS

A service-linked role is a unique type of IAM role linked to an AWS service (such as ECS). This role lets you delegate the permissions necessary to call other AWS services on your behalf. Because ECS is a service that manages resources on your behalf, you need this role to proceed.

In most cases, you won’t have to create a service-linked role. If you created or updated an ECS cluster, ECS likely created the service-linked role for you.

You can confirm that your service-linked role exists using the AWS CLI, as shown in the following code example:

$ aws iam get-role --role-name AWSServiceRoleForECS
{
    "Role": {
        "Path": "/aws-service-role/ecs.amazonaws.com/",
        "RoleName": "AWSServiceRoleForECS",
        "RoleId": "AROAJRUPKI7I2FGUZMJJY",
        "Arn": "arn:aws:iam::226767807331:role/aws-service-role/ecs.amazonaws.com/AWSServiceRoleForECS",
        "CreateDate": "2018-11-09T21:27:17Z",
        "AssumeRolePolicyDocument": {
            "Version": "2012-10-17",
            "Statement": [
                {
                    "Effect": "Allow",
                    "Principal": {
                        "Service": "ecs.amazonaws.com"
                    },
                    "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
                }
            ]
        },
        "Description": "Role to enable Amazon ECS to manage your cluster.",
        "MaxSessionDuration": 3600
    }
}

If the service-linked role does not exist, create it manually with the following command:

aws iam create-service-linked-role --aws-service-name ecs.amazonaws.com

For more information, see Using Service-Linked Roles for Amazon ECS.

 

Opt in to the awsvpcTrunking account setting

Your account, IAM user, or role must opt in to the awsvpcTrunking account setting. Select this setting using the AWS CLI or the ECS console. You can opt in for an account by making awsvpcTrunking  its default setting. Or, you can enable this setting for the role associated with the instance profile with which the instance launches. For instructions, see Account Settings.

 

Other considerations

After completing the prerequisites described in the preceding sections, launch a new container instance with increased network interface limits using one of the supported EC2 instance types.

Keep the following in mind:

  • It’s available with the latest variant of the ECS-optimized AMI.
  • It only affects creation of new container instances after opting into awsvpcTrunking.
  • It only affects tasks created with awsvpc network mode and EC2 launch type. Tasks created with the AWS Fargate launch type always have a dedicated network interface, no matter how many you launch.

For details, see ENI Trunking Considerations.

 

Summary

If you seek to optimize the usage of your EC2 container instances for clusters that you manage, enable the increased network interface density feature with awsvpcTrunking. By following the steps outlined in this post, you can launch tasks using significantly fewer EC2 instances. This is especially useful if you embrace a microservices architecture, with its increasing numbers of lighter tasks.

Hopefully, you found this post informative and the proposed solution intriguing. As always, AWS welcomes all feedback or comment.

Integrating AWS X-Ray with AWS App Mesh

Post Syndicated from Ignacio Riesgo original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/integrating-aws-x-ray-with-aws-app-mesh/

This post is contributed by Lulu Zhao | Software Development Engineer II, AWS

 

AWS X-Ray helps developers and DevOps engineers quickly understand how an application and its underlying services are performing. When it’s integrated with AWS App Mesh, the combination makes for a powerful analytical tool.

X-Ray helps to identify and troubleshoot the root causes of errors and performance issues. It’s capable of analyzing and debugging distributed applications, including those based on a microservices architecture. It offers insights into the impact and reach of errors and performance problems.

In this post, I demonstrate how to integrate it with App Mesh.

Overview

App Mesh is a service mesh based on the Envoy proxy that makes it easy to monitor and control microservices. App Mesh standardizes how your microservices communicate, giving you end-to-end visibility and helping to ensure high application availability.

With App Mesh, it’s easy to maintain consistent visibility and network traffic control for services built across multiple types of compute infrastructure. App Mesh configures each service to export monitoring data and implements consistent communications control logic across your application.

A service mesh is like a communication layer for microservices. All communication between services happens through the mesh. Customers use App Mesh to configure a service mesh that contains virtual services, virtual nodes, virtual routes, and corresponding routes.

However, it’s challenging to visualize the way that request traffic flows through the service mesh while attempting to identify latency and other types of performance issues. This is particularly true as the number of microservices increases.

It’s in exactly this area where X-Ray excels. To show a detailed workflow inside a service mesh, I implemented a tracing extension called X-Ray tracer inside Envoy. With it, I ensure that I’m tracing all inbound and outbound calls that are routed through Envoy.

Traffic routing with color app

The following example shows how X-Ray works with App Mesh. I used the Color App, a simple demo application, to showcase traffic routing.

This app has two Go applications that are included in the AWS X-Ray Go SDK: color-gateway and color-teller. The color-gateway application is exposed to external clients and responds to http://service-name:port/color, which retrieves color from color-teller. I deployed color-app using Amazon ECS. This image illustrates how color-gateway routes traffic into a virtual router and then into separate nodes using color-teller.

 

The following image shows client interactions with App Mesh in an X-Ray service map after requests have been made to the color-gateway and to color-teller.

Integration

There are two types of service nodes:

  • AWS::AppMesh::Proxy is generated by the X-Ray tracing extension inside Envoy.
  • AWS::ECS::Container is generated by the AWS X-Ray Go SDK.

The service graph arrows show the request workflow, which you may find helpful as you try to understand the relationships between services.

To send Envoy-generated segments into X-Ray, install the X-Ray daemon. The following code example shows the ECS task definition used to install the daemon into the container.

{
    "name": "xray-daemon",

    "image": "amazon/aws-xray-daemon",

    "user": "1337",

    "essential": true,

    "cpu": 32,

    "memoryReservation": 256,

    "portMappings": [

        {

            "hostPort": 2000,

            "containerPort": 2000,

            "protocol": "udp"

         }

After the Color app successfully launched, I made a request to color-gateway to fetch a color.

  • First, the Envoy proxy appmesh/colorgateway-vn in front of default-gateway received the request and routed it to the server default-gateway.
  • Then, default-gateway made a request to server default-colorteller-white to retrieve the color.
  • Instead of directly calling the color-teller server, the request went to the default-gateway Envoy proxy and the proxy routed the call to color-teller.

That’s the advantage of using the Envoy proxy. Envoy is a self-contained process that is designed to run in parallel with all application servers. All of the Envoy proxies form a transparent communication mesh through which each application sends and receives messages to and from localhost while remaining unaware of the broader network topology.

For App Mesh integration, the X-Ray tracer records the mesh name and virtual node name values and injects them into the segment JSON document. Here is an example:

“aws”: {
	“app_mesh”: {
		“mesh_name”: “appmesh”,
		“virtual_node_name”: “colorgateway-vn”
	}
},

To enable X-Ray tracing through App Mesh inside Envoy, you must set two environment variable configurations:

  • ENABLE_ENVOY_XRAY_TRACING
  • XRAY_DAEMON_PORT

The first one enables X-Ray tracing using 127.0.0.1:2000 as the default daemon endpoint to which generated segments are sent. If the daemon you installed listens on a different port, you can specify a port value to override the default X-Ray daemon port by using the second configuration.

Conclusion

Currently, AWS X-Ray supports SDKs written in multiple languages (including Java, Python, Go, .NET, and .NET Core, Node.js, and Ruby) to help you implement your services. For more information, see Getting Started with AWS X-Ray.

Introducing AWS App Mesh – service mesh for microservices on AWS

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/introducing-aws-app-mesh-service-mesh-for-microservices-on-aws/

AWS App Mesh is a service mesh that allows you to easily monitor and control communications across microservices applications on AWS. You can use App Mesh with microservices running on Amazon Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS), Amazon Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes (Amazon EKS), and Kubernetes running on Amazon EC2.

Today, App Mesh is available as a public preview. In the coming months, we plan to add new functionality and integrations.

Why App Mesh?

Many of our customers are building applications with microservices architectures, breaking applications into many separate, smaller pieces of software that are independently deployed and operated. Microservices help to increase the availability and scalability of an application by allowing each component to scale independently based on demand. Each microservice interacts with the other microservices through an API.

When you start building more than a few microservices within an application, it becomes difficult to identify and isolate issues. These can include high latencies, error rates, or error codes across the application. There is no dynamic way to route network traffic when there are failures or when new containers need to be deployed.

You can address these problems by adding custom code and libraries into each microservice and using open source tools that manage communications for each microservice. However, these solutions can be hard to install, difficult to update across teams, and complex to manage for availability and resiliency.

AWS App Mesh implements a new architectural pattern that helps solve many of these challenges and provides a consistent, dynamic way to manage the communications between microservices. With App Mesh, the logic for monitoring and controlling communications between microservices is implemented as a proxy that runs alongside each microservice, instead of being built into the microservice code. The proxy handles all of the network traffic into and out of the microservice and provides consistency for visibility, traffic control, and security capabilities to all of your microservices.

Use App Mesh to model how all of your microservices connect. App Mesh automatically computes and sends the appropriate configuration information to each microservice proxy. This gives you standardized, easy-to-use visibility and traffic controls across your entire application.  App Mesh uses Envoy, an open source proxy. That makes it compatible with a wide range of AWS partner and open source tools for monitoring microservices.

Using App Mesh, you can export observability data to multiple AWS and third-party tools, including Amazon CloudWatch, AWS X-Ray, or any third-party monitoring and tracing tool that integrates with Envoy. You can configure new traffic routing controls to enable dynamic blue/green canary deployments for your services.

Getting started

Here’s a sample application with two services, where service A receives traffic from the internet and uses service B for some backend processing. You want to route traffic dynamically between services B and B’, a new version of B deployed to act as the canary.

First, create a mesh, a namespace that groups related microservices that must interact.

Next, create virtual nodes to represent services in the mesh. A virtual node can represent a microservice or a specific microservice version. In this example, service A and B participate in the mesh and you manage the traffic to service B using App Mesh.

Now, deploy your services with the required Envoy proxy and with a mapping to the node in the mesh.

After you have defined your virtual nodes, you can define how the traffic flows between your microservices. To do this, define a virtual router and routes for communications between microservices.

A virtual router handles traffic for your microservices. After you create a virtual router, you create routes to direct traffic appropriately. These routes include the connection requests that the route should accept, where they should go, and the weighted amount of traffic to send. All of these changes to adjust traffic between services is computed and sent dynamically to the appropriate proxies by App Mesh to execute your deployment.

You now have a virtual router set up that accepts all traffic from virtual node A sending to the existing version of service B, as well some traffic to the new version, B’.

Exporting metrics, logs, and traces

One of benefits about placing a proxy in front of every microservice is that you can automatically capture metrics, logs, and traces about the communication between your services. App Mesh enables you to easily collect and export this data to the tools of your choice. Envoy is already integrated with several tools like Prometheus and Datadog.

During the preview, we are adding support for AWS services such as Amazon CloudWatch and AWS X-Ray. We have a lot more integrations planned as well.

Available now

AWS App Mesh is available as a public preview and you can start using it today in the North Virginia, Ohio, Oregon, and Ireland AWS Regions. During the preview, we plan to add new features and want to hear your feedback. You can check out our GitHub repository for examples and our roadmap.

— Nate

A simpler way to assess the network exposure of EC2 instances: AWS releases new network reachability assessments in Amazon Inspector

Post Syndicated from Catherine Dodge original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/amazon-inspector-assess-network-exposure-ec2-instances-aws-network-reachability-assessments/

Performing network security assessments allows you to understand your cloud infrastructure and identify risks, but this process traditionally takes a lot of time and effort. You might need to run network port-scanning tools to test routing and firewall configurations, then validate what processes are listening on your instance network ports, before finally mapping the IPs identified in the port scan back to the host’s owner. To make this process simpler for our customers, AWS recently released the Network Reachability rules package in Amazon Inspector, our automated security assessment service that enables you to understand and improve the security and compliance of applications deployed on AWS. The existing Amazon Inspector host assessment rules packages check the software and configurations on your Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instances for vulnerabilities and deviations from best practices.

The new Network Reachability rules package analyzes your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) network configuration to determine whether your EC2 instances can be reached from external networks such as the Internet, a virtual private gateway, AWS Direct Connect, or from a peered VPC. In other words, it informs you of potential external access to your hosts. It does this by analyzing all of your network configurations—like security groups, network access control lists (ACLs), route tables, and internet gateways (IGWs)—together to infer reachability. No packets need to be sent across the VPC network, nor must attempts be made to connect to EC2 instance network ports—it’s like packet-less network mapping and reconnaissance!

This new rules package is the first Amazon Inspector rules package that doesn’t require an Amazon Inspector agent to be installed on your Amazon EC2 instances. If you do optionally install the Amazon Inspector agent on your EC2 instances, the network reachability assessment will also report on the processes listening on those ports. In addition, installing the agent allows you to use Amazon Inspector host rules packages to check for vulnerabilities and security exposures in your EC2 instances.

To determine what is reachable, the Network Reachability rules package uses the latest technology from the AWS Provable Security initiative, referring to a suite of AWS technology powered by automated reasoning. It analyzes your AWS network configurations such as Amazon Virtual Private Clouds (VPCs), security groups, network access control lists (ACLs), and route tables to prove reachability of ports. What is automated reasoning, you ask? It’s fancy math that proves things are working as expected. In more technical terms, it’s a method of formal verification that automatically generates and checks mathematical proofs, which help to prove systems are functioning correctly. Note that Network Reachability only analyzes network configurations, so any other network controls, like on-instance IP filters or external firewalls, are not accounted for in the assessment. See documentation for more details.

Tim Kropp, Technology & Security Lead at Bridgewater Associates talked about how Bridgewater benefitted from Network Reachability Rules. “AWS provides tools for organizations to know if all their compliance, security, and availability requirements are being met. Technology created by the AWS Automated Reasoning Group, such as the Network Reachability Rules, allow us to continuously evaluate our live networks against these requirements. This grants us peace of mind that our most sensitive workloads exist on a network that we deeply understand.”

Network reachability assessments are priced per instance per assessment (instance-assessment). The free trial offers the first 250 instance-assessments for free within your first 90 days of usage. After the free trial, pricing is tiered based on your monthly volume. You can see pricing details here.

Using the Network Reachability rules package

Amazon Inspector makes it easy for you to run agentless network reachability assessments on all of your EC2 instances. You can do this with just a couple of clicks on the Welcome page of the Amazon Inspector console. First, use the check box to Enable network assessments, then select Run Once to run a single assessment or Run Weekly to run a weekly recurring assessment.
 

Figure 1: Assessment setup

Figure 1: Assessment setup

Customizing the Network Reachability rules package

If you want to target a subset of your instances or modify the recurrence of assessments, you can select Advanced setup for guided steps to set up and run a custom assessment. For full customization options including getting notifications for findings, select Cancel and use the following steps.

  1. Navigate to the Assessment targets page of the Amazon Inspector console to create an assessment target. You can select the option to include all instances within your account and AWS region, or you can assess a subset of your instances by adding tags to them in the EC2 console and inputting those tags when you create the assessment target. Give your target a name and select Save.
     
    Figure 2: Assessment target

    Figure 2: Assessment target

    Optional agent installation: To get information about the processes listening on reachable ports, you’ll need to install the Amazon Inspector agent on your EC2 instances. If your instances allow the Systems Manager Run command, you can select the Install Agents option while creating your assessment target. Otherwise, you can follow the instructions here to install the Amazon Inspector agent on your instances before setting up and running the Amazon Inspector assessments using the steps above. In addition, installing the agent allows you to use Amazon Inspector host rules packages to check for vulnerabilities and security exposures in your EC2 instances.

  2. Go to the Assessment templates page of the Amazon Inspector console. In the Target name field, select the assessment target that you created in step 1. From the Rules packages drop-down, select the Network Reachability-1.1 rules package. You can also set up a recurring schedule and notifications to your Amazon Simple Notification Service topic. (Learn more about Amazon SNS topics here). Now, select Create and Run. That’s it!

    Alternately, you can run the assessment by selecting the template you just created from the Assessment templates page and then selecting Run, or by using the Amazon Inspector API.

You can view your findings on the Findings page in the Amazon Inspector console. You can also download a CSV of the findings from Amazon Inspector by using the Download button on the page, or you can use the AWS application programming interface (API) to retrieve findings in another application.

Note: You can create any CloudWatch Events rule and add your Amazon Inspector assessment as the target using the assessment template’s Amazon Resource Name (ARN), which is available in the console. You can use CloudWatch Events rules to automatically trigger assessment runs on a schedule or based on any other event. For example, you can trigger a network reachability assessment whenever there is a change to a security group or another VPC configuration, allowing you to automatically be alerted about insecure network exposure.

Understanding your EC2 instance network exposure

You can use this new rules package to analyze the accessibility of critical ports, as well as all other network ports. For critical ports, Amazon Inspector will show the exposure of each and will offer findings per port. When critical, well-known ports (based on Amazon’s standard guidance) are reachable, findings will be created with higher severities. When the Amazon Inspector agent is installed on the instance, each reachable port with a listener will also be reported. The following examples show network exposure from the Internet. There are analogous findings for network exposure via VPN, Direct Connect, or VPC peering. Read more about the finding types here.

Example finding for a well-known port open to the Internet, without installation of the Amazon Inspector Agent:
 

Figure 3: Finding for a well-known port open to the Internet

Figure 3: Finding for a well-known port open to the Internet

Example finding for a well-known port open to the Internet, with the Amazon Inspector Agent installed and a listening process (SSH):
 

Figure 4: Finding for a well-known port open to the Internet, with the Amazon Inspector Agent installed and a listening process (SSH)

Figure 4: Finding for a well-known port open to the Internet, with the Amazon Inspector Agent installed and a listening process (SSH)

Note that the findings provide the details on exactly how network access is allowed, including which VPC and subnet the instance is in. This makes tracking down the root cause of the network access straightforward. The recommendation includes information about exactly which Security Group you can edit to remove the access. And like all Amazon Inspector findings, these can be published to an SNS topic for additional processing, whether that’s to a ticketing system or to a custom AWS Lambda function. (See our blog post on automatic remediation of findings for guidance on how to do this.) For example, you could use Lambda to automatically remove ingress rules in the Security Group to address a network reachability finding.

Summary

With this new functionality from Amazon Inspector, you now have an easy way of assessing the network exposure of your EC2 instances and identifying and resolving unwanted exposure. We’ll continue to tailor findings to align with customer feedback. We encourage you to try out the Network Reachability Rules Package yourself and post any questions in the Amazon Inspector forum.

Want more AWS Security news? Follow us on Twitter.

Author

Catherine Dodge

Catherine is a Senior Technical Program Manager in AWS Security. She helps teams use cutting edge AI technology to build security products to delight customers. She has over 15 years of experience in the cybersecurity field, mostly spent at the assembly level, either pulling apart malware or piecing together shellcode. In her spare time, she’s always tearing something down around the house, preferably ivy or drywall.

Author

Stephen Quigg

Stephen — known as “Squigg,” internally — is a Principal Security Solutions Architect at AWS. His job is helping customers understand AWS security and how they can meet their most demanding security requirements when using the AWS platform. It’s not all about solving hard problems though, he gets just as much delight when an AWS customer creates their first VPC! When he’s not with his customers, you can find him up in his loft making bleeping noises on a bunch of old synthesizers.

AWS Online Tech Talks – June 2018

Post Syndicated from Devin Watson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-june-2018/

AWS Online Tech Talks – June 2018

Join us this month to learn about AWS services and solutions. New this month, we have a fireside chat with the GM of Amazon WorkSpaces and our 2nd episode of the “How to re:Invent” series. We’ll also cover best practices, deep dives, use cases and more! Join us and register today!

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks featured this month:

 

Analytics & Big Data

June 18, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTGet Started with Real-Time Streaming Data in Under 5 Minutes – Learn how to use Amazon Kinesis to capture, store, and analyze streaming data in real-time including IoT device data, VPC flow logs, and clickstream data.
June 20, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT – Insights For Everyone – Deploying Data across your Organization – Learn how to deploy data at scale using AWS Analytics and QuickSight’s new reader role and usage based pricing.

 

AWS re:Invent
June 13, 2018 | 05:00 PM – 05:30 PM PTEpisode 2: AWS re:Invent Breakout Content Secret Sauce – Hear from one of our own AWS content experts as we dive deep into the re:Invent content strategy and how we maintain a high bar.
Compute

June 25, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTAccelerating Containerized Workloads with Amazon EC2 Spot Instances – Learn how to efficiently deploy containerized workloads and easily manage clusters at any scale at a fraction of the cost with Spot Instances.

June 26, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTEnsuring Your Windows Server Workloads Are Well-Architected – Get the benefits, best practices and tools on running your Microsoft Workloads on AWS leveraging a well-architected approach.

 

Containers
June 25, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTRunning Kubernetes on AWS – Learn about the basics of running Kubernetes on AWS including how setup masters, networking, security, and add auto-scaling to your cluster.

 

Databases

June 18, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTOracle to Amazon Aurora Migration, Step by Step – Learn how to migrate your Oracle database to Amazon Aurora.
DevOps

June 20, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTSet Up a CI/CD Pipeline for Deploying Containers Using the AWS Developer Tools – Learn how to set up a CI/CD pipeline for deploying containers using the AWS Developer Tools.

 

Enterprise & Hybrid
June 18, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTDe-risking Enterprise Migration with AWS Managed Services – Learn how enterprise customers are de-risking cloud adoption with AWS Managed Services.

June 19, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTLaunch AWS Faster using Automated Landing Zones – Learn how the AWS Landing Zone can automate the set up of best practice baselines when setting up new

 

AWS Environments

June 21, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTLeading Your Team Through a Cloud Transformation – Learn how you can help lead your organization through a cloud transformation.

June 21, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTEnabling New Retail Customer Experiences with Big Data – Learn how AWS can help retailers realize actual value from their big data and deliver on differentiated retail customer experiences.

June 28, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTFireside Chat: End User Collaboration on AWS – Learn how End User Compute services can help you deliver access to desktops and applications anywhere, anytime, using any device.
IoT

June 27, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTAWS IoT in the Connected Home – Learn how to use AWS IoT to build innovative Connected Home products.

 

Machine Learning

June 19, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTIntegrating Amazon SageMaker into your Enterprise – Learn how to integrate Amazon SageMaker and other AWS Services within an Enterprise environment.

June 21, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTBuilding Text Analytics Applications on AWS using Amazon Comprehend – Learn how you can unlock the value of your unstructured data with NLP-based text analytics.

 

Management Tools

June 20, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTOptimizing Application Performance and Costs with Auto Scaling – Learn how selecting the right scaling option can help optimize application performance and costs.

 

Mobile
June 25, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTDrive User Engagement with Amazon Pinpoint – Learn how Amazon Pinpoint simplifies and streamlines effective user engagement.

 

Security, Identity & Compliance

June 26, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTUnderstanding AWS Secrets Manager – Learn how AWS Secrets Manager helps you rotate and manage access to secrets centrally.
June 28, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTUsing Amazon Inspector to Discover Potential Security Issues – See how Amazon Inspector can be used to discover security issues of your instances.

 

Serverless

June 19, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTProductionize Serverless Application Building and Deployments with AWS SAM – Learn expert tips and techniques for building and deploying serverless applications at scale with AWS SAM.

 

Storage

June 26, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTDeep Dive: Hybrid Cloud Storage with AWS Storage Gateway – Learn how you can reduce your on-premises infrastructure by using the AWS Storage Gateway to connecting your applications to the scalable and reliable AWS storage services.
June 27, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTChanging the Game: Extending Compute Capabilities to the Edge – Discover how to change the game for IIoT and edge analytics applications with AWS Snowball Edge plus enhanced Compute instances.
June 28, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTBig Data and Analytics Workloads on Amazon EFS – Get best practices and deployment advice for running big data and analytics workloads on Amazon EFS.

DNS over HTTPS in Firefox

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/756262/rss

The Mozilla blog has an
article
describing the addition of DNS over HTTPS (DoH) as an optional
feature in the Firefox browser. “DoH support has been added to
Firefox 62 to improve the way Firefox interacts with DNS. DoH uses
encrypted networking to obtain DNS information from a server that is
configured within Firefox. This means that DNS requests sent to the DoH
cloud server are encrypted while old style DNS requests are not
protected.
” The configured server is hosted by Cloudflare, which
has posted this
privacy agreement
about the service.

Replacing macOS Server with Synology NAS

Post Syndicated from Roderick Bauer original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/replacing-macos-server-with-synology-nas/

Synology NAS boxes backed up to the cloud

Businesses and organizations that rely on macOS server for essential office and data services are facing some decisions about the future of their IT services.

Apple recently announced that it is deprecating a significant portion of essential network services in macOS Server, as they described in a support statement posted on April 24, 2018, “Prepare for changes to macOS Server.” Apple’s note includes:

macOS Server is changing to focus more on management of computers, devices, and storage on your network. As a result, some changes are coming in how Server works. A number of services will be deprecated, and will be hidden on new installations of an update to macOS Server coming in spring 2018.

The note lists the services that will be removed in a future release of macOS Server, including calendar and contact support, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Domain Name Services (DNS), mail, instant messages, virtual private networking (VPN), NetInstall, Web server, and the Wiki.

Apple assures users who have already configured any of the listed services that they will be able to use them in the spring 2018 macOS Server update, but the statement ends with links to a number of alternative services, including hosted services, that macOS Server users should consider as viable replacements to the features it is removing. These alternative services are all FOSS (Free and Open-Source Software).

As difficult as this could be for organizations that use macOS server, this is not unexpected. Apple left the server hardware space back in 2010, when Steve Jobs announced the company was ending its line of Xserve rackmount servers, which were introduced in May, 2002. Since then, macOS Server has hardly been a prominent part of Apple’s product lineup. It’s not just the product itself that has lost some luster, but the entire category of SMB office and business servers, which has been undergoing a gradual change in recent years.

Some might wonder how important the news about macOS Server is, given that macOS Server represents a pretty small share of the server market. macOS Server has been important to design shops, agencies, education users, and small businesses that likely have been on Macs for ages, but it’s not a significant part of the IT infrastructure of larger organizations and businesses.

What Comes After macOS Server?

Lovers of macOS Server don’t have to fear having their Mac minis pried from their cold, dead hands quite yet. Installed services will continue to be available. In the fall of 2018, new installations and upgrades of macOS Server will require users to migrate most services to other software. Since many of the services of macOS Server were already open-source, this means that a change in software might not be required. It does mean more configuration and management required from those who continue with macOS Server, however.

Users can continue with macOS Server if they wish, but many will see the writing on the wall and look for a suitable substitute.

The Times They Are A-Changin’

For many people working in organizations, what is significant about this announcement is how it reflects the move away from the once ubiquitous server-based IT infrastructure. Services that used to be centrally managed and office-based, such as storage, file sharing, communications, and computing, have moved to the cloud.

In selecting the next office IT platforms, there’s an opportunity to move to solutions that reflect and support how people are working and the applications they are using both in the office and remotely. For many, this means including cloud-based services in office automation, backup, and business continuity/disaster recovery planning. This includes Software as a Service, Platform as a Service, and Infrastructure as a Service (Saas, PaaS, IaaS) options.

IT solutions that integrate well with the cloud are worth strong consideration for what comes after a macOS Server-based environment.

Synology NAS as a macOS Server Alternative

One solution that is becoming popular is to replace macOS Server with a device that has the ability to provide important office services, but also bridges the office and cloud environments. Using Network-Attached Storage (NAS) to take up the server slack makes a lot of sense. Many customers are already using NAS for file sharing, local data backup, automatic cloud backup, and other uses. In the case of Synology, their operating system, Synology DiskStation Manager (DSM), is Linux based, and integrates the basic functions of file sharing, centralized backup, RAID storage, multimedia streaming, virtual storage, and other common functions.

Synology NAS box

Synology NAS

Since DSM is based on Linux, there are numerous server applications available, including many of the same ones that are available for macOS Server, which shares conceptual roots with Linux as it comes from BSD Unix.

Synology DiskStation Manager Package Center screenshot

Synology DiskStation Manager Package Center

According to Ed Lukacs, COO at 2FIFTEEN Systems Management in Salt Lake City, their customers have found the move from macOS Server to Synology NAS not only painless, but positive. DSM works seamlessly with macOS and has been faster for their customers, as well. Many of their customers are running Adobe Creative Suite and Google G Suite applications, so a workflow that combines local storage, remote access, and the cloud, is already well known to them. Remote users are supported by Synology’s QuickConnect or VPN.

Business continuity and backup are simplified by the flexible storage capacity of the NAS. Synology has built-in backup to Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage with Synology’s Cloud Sync, as well as a choice of a number of other B2-compatible applications, such as Cloudberry, Comet, and Arq.

Customers have been able to get up and running quickly, with only initial data transfers requiring some time to complete. After that, management of the NAS can be handled in-house or with the support of a Managed Service Provider (MSP).

Are You Sticking with macOS Server or Moving to Another Platform?

If you’re affected by this change in macOS Server, please let us know in the comments how you’re planning to cope. Are you using Synology NAS for server services? Please tell us how that’s working for you.

The post Replacing macOS Server with Synology NAS appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

All Systems Go! 2018 CfP Open

Post Syndicated from Lennart Poettering original http://0pointer.net/blog/all-systems-go-2018-cfp-open.html

The All Systems Go! 2018 Call for Participation is Now Open!

The Call for Participation (CFP) for All Systems Go!
2018
is now open. We’d like to invite you
to submit your proposals for consideration to the CFP submission
site
.

ASG image

The CFP will close on July 30th. Notification of acceptance and
non-acceptance will go out within 7 days of the closing of the CFP.

All topics relevant to foundational open-source Linux technologies are
welcome. In particular, however, we are looking for proposals
including, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Low-level container executors and infrastructure
  • IoT and embedded OS infrastructure
  • BPF and eBPF filtering
  • OS, container, IoT image delivery and updating
  • Building Linux devices and applications
  • Low-level desktop technologies
  • Networking
  • System and service management
  • Tracing and performance measuring
  • IPC and RPC systems
  • Security and Sandboxing

While our focus is definitely more on the user-space side of things,
talks about kernel projects are welcome, as long as they have a clear
and direct relevance for user-space.

For more information please visit our conference
website
!

Connect, collaborate, and learn at AWS Global Summits in 2018

Post Syndicated from Tina Kelleher original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/connect-collaborate-and-learn-at-aws-global-summits-in-2018/

Regardless of your career path, there’s no denying that attending industry events can provide helpful career development opportunities — not only for improving and expanding your skill sets, but for networking as well. According to this article from PayScale.com, experts estimate that somewhere between 70-85% of new positions are landed through networking.

Narrowing our focus to networking opportunities with cloud computing professionals who’re working on tackling some of today’s most innovative and exciting big data solutions, attending big data-focused sessions at an AWS Global Summit is a great place to start.

AWS Global Summits are free events that bring the cloud computing community together to connect, collaborate, and learn about AWS. As the name suggests, these summits are held in major cities around the world, and attract technologists from all industries and skill levels who’re interested in hearing from AWS leaders, experts, partners, and customers.

In addition to networking opportunities with top cloud technology providers, consultants and your peers in our Partner and Solutions Expo, you’ll also hone your AWS skills by attending and participating in a multitude of education and training opportunities.

Here’s a brief sampling of some of the upcoming sessions relevant to big data professionals:

May 31st : Big Data Architectural Patterns and Best Practices on AWS | AWS Summit – Mexico City

June 6th-7th: Various (click on the “Big Data & Analytics” header) | AWS Summit – Berlin

June 20-21st : [email protected] | Public Sector Summit – Washington DC

June 21st: Enabling Self Service for Data Scientists with AWS Service Catalog | AWS Summit – Sao Paulo

Be sure to check out the main page for AWS Global Summits, where you can see which cities have AWS Summits planned for 2018, register to attend an upcoming event, or provide your information to be notified when registration opens for a future event.

[$] An introduction to MQTT

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/753705/rss

I was sure that somewhere there must be
physically-lightweight sensors with simple power, simple networking, and
a lightweight protocol that allowed them to squirt their data down the
network with a minimum of overhead. So my interest was piqued when Jan-Piet Mens spoke at FLOSS
UK’s Spring
Conference
on “Small Things for Monitoring”. Once he started passing
working demonstration systems around the room without interrupting the
demonstration, it was clear that MQTT was what I’d been looking for.

AWS Online Tech Talks – May and Early June 2018

Post Syndicated from Devin Watson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-may-and-early-june-2018/

AWS Online Tech Talks – May and Early June 2018  

Join us this month to learn about some of the exciting new services and solution best practices at AWS. We also have our first re:Invent 2018 webinar series, “How to re:Invent”. Sign up now to learn more, we look forward to seeing you.

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks featured this month:

Analytics & Big Data

May 21, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT Integrating Amazon Elasticsearch with your DevOps Tooling – Learn how you can easily integrate Amazon Elasticsearch Service into your DevOps tooling and gain valuable insight from your log data.

May 23, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTData Warehousing and Data Lake Analytics, Together – Learn how to query data across your data warehouse and data lake without moving data.

May 24, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTData Transformation Patterns in AWS – Discover how to perform common data transformations on the AWS Data Lake.

Compute

May 29, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT – Creating and Managing a WordPress Website with Amazon Lightsail – Learn about Amazon Lightsail and how you can create, run and manage your WordPress websites with Amazon’s simple compute platform.

May 30, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTAccelerating Life Sciences with HPC on AWS – Learn how you can accelerate your Life Sciences research workloads by harnessing the power of high performance computing on AWS.

Containers

May 24, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT – Building Microservices with the 12 Factor App Pattern on AWS – Learn best practices for building containerized microservices on AWS, and how traditional software design patterns evolve in the context of containers.

Databases

May 21, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTHow to Migrate from Cassandra to Amazon DynamoDB – Get the benefits, best practices and guides on how to migrate your Cassandra databases to Amazon DynamoDB.

May 23, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PT5 Hacks for Optimizing MySQL in the Cloud – Learn how to optimize your MySQL databases for high availability, performance, and disaster resilience using RDS.

DevOps

May 23, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT.NET Serverless Development on AWS – Learn how to build a modern serverless application in .NET Core 2.0.

Enterprise & Hybrid

May 22, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTHybrid Cloud Customer Use Cases on AWS – Learn how customers are leveraging AWS hybrid cloud capabilities to easily extend their datacenter capacity, deliver new services and applications, and ensure business continuity and disaster recovery.

IoT

May 31, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTUsing AWS IoT for Industrial Applications – Discover how you can quickly onboard your fleet of connected devices, keep them secure, and build predictive analytics with AWS IoT.

Machine Learning

May 22, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTUsing Apache Spark with Amazon SageMaker – Discover how to use Apache Spark with Amazon SageMaker for training jobs and application integration.

May 24, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTIntroducing AWS DeepLens – Learn how AWS DeepLens provides a new way for developers to learn machine learning by pairing the physical device with a broad set of tutorials, examples, source code, and integration with familiar AWS services.

Management Tools

May 21, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTGaining Better Observability of Your VMs with Amazon CloudWatch – Learn how CloudWatch Agent makes it easy for customers like Rackspace to monitor their VMs.

Mobile

May 29, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT – Deep Dive on Amazon Pinpoint Segmentation and Endpoint Management – See how segmentation and endpoint management with Amazon Pinpoint can help you target the right audience.

Networking

May 31, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTMaking Private Connectivity the New Norm via AWS PrivateLink – See how PrivateLink enables service owners to offer private endpoints to customers outside their company.

Security, Identity, & Compliance

May 30, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PT – Introducing AWS Certificate Manager Private Certificate Authority (CA) – Learn how AWS Certificate Manager (ACM) Private Certificate Authority (CA), a managed private CA service, helps you easily and securely manage the lifecycle of your private certificates.

June 1, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTIntroducing AWS Firewall Manager – Centrally configure and manage AWS WAF rules across your accounts and applications.

Serverless

May 22, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTBuilding API-Driven Microservices with Amazon API Gateway – Learn how to build a secure, scalable API for your application in our tech talk about API-driven microservices.

Storage

May 30, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTAccelerate Productivity by Computing at the Edge – Learn how AWS Snowball Edge support for compute instances helps accelerate data transfers, execute custom applications, and reduce overall storage costs.

June 1, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTLearn to Build a Cloud-Scale Website Powered by Amazon EFS – Technical deep dive where you’ll learn tips and tricks for integrating WordPress, Drupal and Magento with Amazon EFS.

 

 

 

 

EC2 Price Reduction – H1 Instances

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/ec2-price-reduction-h1-instances/

EC2’s H1 instances offer 2 to 16 terabytes of fast, dense storage for big data applications, optimized to deliver high throughput for sequential I/O. Enhanced Networking, 32 to 256 gigabytes of RAM, and Intel Xeon E5-2686 v4 processors running at a base frequency of 2.3 GHz round out the feature set.

I am happy to announce that we are reducing the On-Demand and Reserved Instance prices for H1 instances in the US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), and EU (Ireland) Regions by 15%, effective immediately.

Jeff;

 

Invent new sounds with Google’s NSynth Super

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/google-nsynth-super/

Discover new sounds and explore the role of machine learning in music production and sound research with the NSynth Super, an ongoing project from Google’s Magenta research team that you can build at home.

Google Open NSynth Super Testing

Uploaded by AB Open on 2018-04-17.

What is the NSynth Super?

Part of the ongoing Magenta research project within Google, NSynth Super explores the ways in which machine learning tools help artists and musicians be creative.

Google Nsynth Super Raspberry Pi

“Technology has always played a role in creating new types of sounds that inspire musicians — from the sounds of distortion to the electronic sounds of synths,” explains the team behind the NSynth Super. “Today, advances in machine learning and neural networks have opened up new possibilities for sound generation.”

Using TensorFlow, the Magenta team builds tools and interfaces that let  artists and musicians use machine learning in their work. The NSynth Super AI algorithm uses deep neural networking to investigate the character of sounds. It then builds new sounds based on these characteristics instead of simply mixing sounds together.

Using an autoencoder, it extracts 16 defining temporal features from each input. These features are then interpolated linearly to create new embeddings (mathematical representations of each sound). These new embeddings are then decoded into new sounds, which have the acoustic qualities of both inputs.

The team publishes all hardware designs and software that are part of their ongoing research under open-source licences, allowing you to build your own synth.

Build your own NSynth Super

Using these open-source tools, Andrew Black has produced his own NSynth Super, demoed in the video above. Andrew’s list of build materials includes a Raspberry Pi 3, potentiometers, rotary encoders, and the Adafruit 1.3″ OLED display. Magenta also provides Gerber files for you to fabricate your own PCB.

Google Nsynth Super Raspberry Pi

Once fabricated, the PCB includes a table of contents for adding components.

The build isn’t easy — it requires soldering skills or access to someone who can assemble PCBs. Take a look at Andrew’s blog post and the official NSynth GitHub repo to see whether you’re up to the challenge.

Google Nsynth Super Raspberry Pi
Google Nsynth Super Raspberry Pi
Google Nsynth Super Raspberry Pi

Music and Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi has been widely used for music production and music builds. Be it retrofitting a boombox, distributing music atop Table Mountain, or coding tracks with Sonic Pi, the Pi offers endless opportunities for musicians and music lovers to expand their repertoire of builds and instruments.

If you’d like to try more music-based projects using the Raspberry Pi, you can check out our free resources. And if you’ve used a Raspberry Pi in your own musical project, please share it with us in the comments or via our social network accounts.

The post Invent new sounds with Google’s NSynth Super appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

OMG The Stupid It Burns

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original https://blog.erratasec.com/2018/04/omg-stupid-it-burns.html

This article, pointed out by @TheGrugq, is stupid enough that it’s worth rebutting.

The article starts with the question “Why did the lessons of Stuxnet, Wannacry, Heartbleed and Shamoon go unheeded?“. It then proceeds to ignore the lessons of those things.
Some of the actual lessons should be things like how Stuxnet crossed air gaps, how Wannacry spread through flat Windows networking, how Heartbleed comes from technical debt, and how Shamoon furthers state aims by causing damage.
But this article doesn’t cover the technical lessons. Instead, it thinks the lesson should be the moral lesson, that we should take these things more seriously. But that’s stupid. It’s the sort of lesson people teach you that know nothing about the topic. When you have nothing of value to contribute to a topic you can always take the moral high road and criticize everyone for being morally weak for not taking it more seriously. Obviously, since doctors haven’t cured cancer yet, it’s because they don’t take the problem seriously.
The article continues to ignore the lesson of these cyber attacks and instead regales us with a list of military lessons from WW I and WW II. This makes the same flaw that many in the military make, trying to understand cyber through analogies with the real world. It’s not that such lessons could have no value, it’s that this article contains a poor list of them. It seems to consist of a random list of events that appeal to the author rather than events that have bearing on cybersecurity.
Then, in case we don’t get the point, the article bullies us with hyperbole, cliches, buzzwords, bombastic language, famous quotes, and citations. It’s hard to see how most of them actually apply to the text. Rather, it seems like they are included simply because he really really likes them.
The article invests much effort in discussing the buzzword “OODA loop”. Most attacks in cyberspace don’t have one. Instead, attackers flail around, trying lots of random things, overcoming defense with brute-force rather than an understanding of what’s going on. That’s obviously the case with Wannacry: it was an accident, with the perpetrator experimenting with what would happen if they added the ETERNALBLUE exploit to their existing ransomware code. The consequence was beyond anybody’s ability to predict.
You might claim that this is just the first stage, that they’ll loop around, observe Wannacry’s effects, orient themselves, decide, then act upon what they learned. Nope. Wannacry burned the exploit. It’s essentially removed any vulnerable systems from the public Internet, thereby making it impossible to use what they learned. It’s still active a year later, with infected systems behind firewalls busily scanning the Internet so that if you put a new system online that’s vulnerable, it’ll be taken offline within a few hours, before any other evildoer can take advantage of it.
See what I’m doing here? Learning the actual lessons of things like Wannacry? The thing the above article fails to do??
The article has a humorous paragraph on “defense in depth”, misunderstanding the term. To be fair, it’s the cybersecurity industry’s fault: they adopted then redefined the term. That’s why there’s two separate articles on Wikipedia: one for the old military term (as used in this article) and one for the new cybersecurity term.
As used in the cybersecurity industry, “defense in depth” means having multiple layers of security. Many organizations put all their defensive efforts on the perimeter, and none inside a network. The idea of “defense in depth” is to put more defenses inside the network. For example, instead of just one firewall at the edge of the network, put firewalls inside the network to segment different subnetworks from each other, so that a ransomware infection in the customer support computers doesn’t spread to sales and marketing computers.
The article talks about exploiting WiFi chips to bypass the defense in depth measures like browser sandboxes. This is conflating different types of attacks. A WiFi attack is usually considered a local attack, from somebody next to you in bar, rather than a remote attack from a server in Russia. Moreover, far from disproving “defense in depth” such WiFi attacks highlight the need for it. Namely, phones need to be designed so that successful exploitation of other microprocessors (namely, the WiFi, Bluetooth, and cellular baseband chips) can’t directly compromise the host system. In other words, once exploited with “Broadpwn”, a hacker would need to extend the exploit chain with another vulnerability in the hosts Broadcom WiFi driver rather than immediately exploiting a DMA attack across PCIe. This suggests that if PCIe is used to interface to peripherals in the phone that an IOMMU be used, for “defense in depth”.
Cybersecurity is a young field. There are lots of useful things that outsider non-techies can teach us. Lessons from military history would be well-received.
But that’s not this story. Instead, this story is by an outsider telling us we don’t know what we are doing, that they do, and then proceeds to prove they don’t know what they are doing. Their argument is based on a moral suasion and bullying us with what appears on the surface to be intellectual rigor, but which is in fact devoid of anything smart.
My fear, here, is that I’m going to be in a meeting where somebody has read this pretentious garbage, explaining to me why “defense in depth” is wrong and how we need to OODA faster. I’d rather nip this in the bud, pointing out if you found anything interesting from that article, you are wrong.

[$] Zero-copy TCP receive

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/752188/rss

In the performance-conscious world of high-speed networking, anything that
can be done to avoid copying packet data is welcome. The MSG_ZEROCOPY feature added in 4.14
enables zero-copy transmission of data, but does not address the receive
side of the equation. It now appears that the 4.18 kernel will include a zero-copy receive mechanism by Eric Dumazet
to close that gap, at least for some relatively specialized applications.