Tag Archives: AWS re:Invent

New – Encryption at Rest for DynamoDB

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-encryption-at-rest-for-dynamodb/

At AWS re:Invent 2017, Werner encouraged his audience to “Dance like nobody is watching, and to encrypt like everyone is:

The AWS team is always eager to add features that make it easier for you to protect your sensitive data and to help you to achieve your compliance objectives. For example, in 2017 we launched encryption at rest for SQS and EFS, additional encryption options for S3, and server-side encryption of Kinesis Data Streams.

Today we are giving you another data protection option with the introduction of encryption at rest for Amazon DynamoDB. You simply enable encryption when you create a new table and DynamoDB takes care of the rest. Your data (tables, local secondary indexes, and global secondary indexes) will be encrypted using AES-256 and a service-default AWS Key Management Service (KMS) key. The encryption adds no storage overhead and is completely transparent; you can insert, query, scan, and delete items as before. The team did not observe any changes in latency after enabling encryption and running several different workloads on an encrypted DynamoDB table.

Creating an Encrypted Table
You can create an encrypted table from the AWS Management Console, API (CreateTable), or CLI (create-table). I’ll use the console! I enter the name and set up the primary key as usual:

Before proceeding, I uncheck Use default settings, scroll down to the Encrypytion section, and check Enable encryption. Then I click Create and my table is created in encrypted form:

I can see the encryption setting for the table at a glance:

When my compliance team asks me to show them how DynamoDB uses the key to encrypt the data, I can create a AWS CloudTrail trail, insert an item, and then scan the table to see the calls to the AWS KMS API. Here’s an extract from the trail:

{
  "eventTime": "2018-01-24T00:06:34Z",
  "eventSource": "kms.amazonaws.com",
  "eventName": "Decrypt",
  "awsRegion": "us-west-2",
  "sourceIPAddress": "dynamodb.amazonaws.com",
  "userAgent": "dynamodb.amazonaws.com",
  "requestParameters": {
    "encryptionContext": {
      "aws:dynamodb:tableName": "reg-users",
      "aws:dynamodb:subscriberId": "1234567890"
    }
  },
  "responseElements": null,
  "requestID": "7072def1-009a-11e8-9ab9-4504c26bd391",
  "eventID": "3698678a-d04e-48c7-96f2-3d734c5c7903",
  "readOnly": true,
  "resources": [
    {
      "ARN": "arn:aws:kms:us-west-2:1234567890:key/e7bd721d-37f3-4acd-bec5-4d08c765f9f5",
      "accountId": "1234567890",
      "type": "AWS::KMS::Key"
    }
  ]
}

Available Now
This feature is available now in the US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), and EU (Ireland) Regions and you can start using it today.

There’s no charge for the encryption; you will be charged for the calls that DynamoDB makes to AWS KMS on your behalf.

Jeff;

 

Give Your WordPress Blog a Voice With Our New Amazon Polly Plugin

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/give-your-wordpress-blog-a-voice-with-our-new-amazon-polly-plugin/

I first told you about Polly in late 2016 in my post Amazon Polly – Text to Speech in 47 Voices and 24 Languages. After that AWS re:Invent launch, we added support for Korean, five new voices, and made Polly available in all Regions in the aws partition. We also added whispering, speech marks, a timbre effect, and dynamic range compression.

New WordPress Plugin
Today we are launching a WordPress plugin that uses Polly to create high-quality audio versions of your blog posts. You can access the audio from within the post or in podcast form using a feature that we call Amazon Pollycast! Both options make your content more accessible and can help you to reach a wider audience. This plugin was a joint effort between the AWS team our friends at AWS Advanced Technology Partner WP Engine.

As you will see, the plugin is easy to install and configure. You can use it with installations of WordPress that you run on your own infrastructure or on AWS. Either way, you have access to all of Polly’s voices along with a wide variety of configuration options. The generated audio (an MP3 file for each post) can be stored alongside your WordPress content, or in Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), with optional support for content distribution via Amazon CloudFront.

Installing the Plugin
I did not have an existing WordPress-powered blog, so I begin by launching a Lightsail instance using the WordPress 4.8.1 blueprint:

Then I follow these directions to access my login credentials:

Credentials in hand, I log in to the WordPress Dashboard:

The plugin makes calls to AWS, and needs to have credentials in order to do so. I hop over to the IAM Console and created a new policy. The policy allows the plugin to access a carefully selected set of S3 and Polly functions (find the full policy in the README):

Then I create an IAM user (wp-polly-user). I enter the name and indicate that it will be used for Programmatic Access:

Then I attach the policy that I just created, and click on Review:

I review my settings (not shown) and then click on Create User. Then I copy the two values (Access Key ID and Secret Access Key) into a secure location. Possession of these keys allows the bearer to make calls to AWS so I take care not to leave them lying around.

Now I am ready to install the plugin! I go back to the WordPress Dashboard and click on Add New in the Plugins menu:

Then I click on Upload Plugin and locate the ZIP file that I downloaded from the WordPress Plugins site. After I find it I click on Install Now to proceed:

WordPress uploads and installs the plugin. Now I click on Activate Plugin to move ahead:

With the plugin installed, I click on Settings to set it up:

I enter my keys and click on Save Changes:

The General settings let me control the sample rate, voice, player position, the default setting for new posts, and the autoplay option. I can leave all of the settings as-is to get started:

The Cloud Storage settings let me store audio in S3 and to use CloudFront to distribute the audio:

The Amazon Pollycast settings give me control over the iTunes parameters that are included in the generated RSS feed:

Finally, the Bulk Update button lets me regenerate all of the audio files after I change any of the other settings:

With the plugin installed and configured, I can create a new post. As you can see, the plugin can be enabled and customized for each post:

I can see how much it will cost to convert to audio with a click:

When I click on Publish, the plugin breaks the text into multiple blocks on sentence boundaries, calls the Polly SynthesizeSpeech API for each block, and accumulates the resulting audio in a single MP3 file. The published blog post references the file using the <audio> tag. Here’s the post:

I can’t seem to use an <audio> tag in this post, but you can download and play the MP3 file yourself if you’d like.

The Pollycast feature generates an RSS file with links to an MP3 file for each post:

Pricing
The plugin will make calls to Amazon Polly each time the post is saved or updated. Pricing is based on the number of characters in the speech requests, as described on the Polly Pricing page. Also, the AWS Free Tier lets you process up to 5 million characters per month at no charge, for a period of one year that starts when you make your first call to Polly.

Going Further
The plugin is available on GitHub in source code form and we are looking forward to your pull requests! Here are a couple of ideas to get you started:

Voice Per Author – Allow selection of a distinct Polly voice for each author.

Quoted Text – For blogs that make frequent use of embedded quotes, use a distinct voice for the quotes.

Translation – Use Amazon Translate to translate the texts into another language, and then use Polly to generate audio in that language.

Other Blogging Engines – Build a similar plugin for your favorite blogging engine.

SSML Support – Figure out an interesting way to use Polly’s SSML tags to add additional character to the audio.

Let me know what you come up with!

Jeff;

 

Recent EC2 Goodies – Launch Templates and Spread Placement

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/recent-ec2-goodies-launch-templates-and-spread-placement/

We launched some important new EC2 instance types and features at AWS re:Invent. I’ve already told you about the M5, H1, T2 Unlimited and Bare Metal instances, and about Spot features such as Hibernation and the New Pricing Model. Randall told you about the Amazon Time Sync Service. Today I would like to tell you about two of the features that we launched: Spread placement groups and Launch Templates. Both features are available in the EC2 Console and from the EC2 APIs, and can be used in all of the AWS Regions in the “aws” partition:

Launch Templates
You can use launch templates to store the instance, network, security, storage, and advanced parameters that you use to launch EC2 instances, and can also include any desired tags. Each template can include any desired subset of the full collection of parameters. You can, for example, define common configuration parameters such as tags or network configurations in a template, and allow the other parameters to be specified as part of the actual launch.

Templates give you the power to set up a consistent launch environment that spans instances launched in On-Demand and Spot form, as well as through EC2 Auto Scaling and as part of a Spot Fleet. You can use them to implement organization-wide standards and to enforce best practices, and you can give your IAM users the ability to launch instances via templates while withholding the ability to do so via the underlying APIs.

Templates are versioned and you can use any desired version when you launch an instance. You can create templates from scratch, base them on the previous version, or copy the parameters from a running instance.

Here’s how you create a launch template in the Console:

Here’s how to include network interfaces, storage volumes, tags, and security groups:

And here’s how to specify advanced and specialized parameters:

You don’t have to specify values for all of these parameters in your templates; enter the values that are common to multiple instances or launches and specify the rest at launch time.

When you click Create launch template, the template is created and can be used to launch On-Demand instances, create Auto Scaling Groups, and create Spot Fleets:

The Launch Instance button now gives you the option to launch from a template:

Simply choose the template and the version, and finalize all of the launch parameters:

You can also manage your templates and template versions from the Console:

To learn more about this feature, read Launching an Instance from a Launch Template.

Spread Placement Groups
Spread placement groups indicate that you do not want the instances in the group to share the same underlying hardware. Applications that rely on a small number of critical instances can launch them in a spread placement group to reduce the odds that one hardware failure will impact more than one instance. Here are a couple of things to keep in mind when you use spread placement groups:

  • Availability Zones – A single spread placement group can span multiple Availability Zones. You can have a maximum of seven running instances per Availability Zone per group.
  • Unique Hardware – Launch requests can fail if there is insufficient unique hardware available. The situation changes over time as overall usage changes and as we add additional hardware; you can retry failed requests at a later time.
  • Instance Types – You can launch a wide variety of M4, M5, C3, R3, R4, X1, X1e, D2, H1, I2, I3, HS1, F1, G2, G3, P2, and P3 instances types in spread placement groups.
  • Reserved Instances – Instances launched into a spread placement group can make use of reserved capacity. However, you cannot currently reserve capacity for a placement group and could receive an ICE (Insufficient Capacity Error) even if you have some RI’s available.
  • Applicability – You cannot use spread placement groups in conjunction with Dedicated Instances or Dedicated Hosts.

You can create and use spread placement groups from the AWS Management Console, the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI), the AWS Tools for Windows PowerShell, and the AWS SDKs. The console has a new feature that will help you to learn how to use the command line:

You can specify an existing placement group or create a new one when you launch an EC2 instance:

To learn more, read about Placement Groups.

Jeff;

AWS IoT, Greengrass, and Machine Learning for Connected Vehicles at CES

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-iot-greengrass-and-machine-learning-for-connected-vehicles-at-ces/

Last week I attended a talk given by Bryan Mistele, president of Seattle-based INRIX. Bryan’s talk provided a glimpse into the future of transportation, centering around four principle attributes, often abbreviated as ACES:

Autonomous – Cars and trucks are gaining the ability to scan and to make sense of their environments and to navigate without human input.

Connected – Vehicles of all types have the ability to take advantage of bidirectional connections (either full-time or intermittent) to other cars and to cloud-based resources. They can upload road and performance data, communicate with each other to run in packs, and take advantage of traffic and weather data.

Electric – Continued development of battery and motor technology, will make electrics vehicles more convenient, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly.

Shared – Ride-sharing services will change usage from an ownership model to an as-a-service model (sound familiar?).

Individually and in combination, these emerging attributes mean that the cars and trucks we will see and use in the decade to come will be markedly different than those of the past.

On the Road with AWS
AWS customers are already using our AWS IoT, edge computing, Amazon Machine Learning, and Alexa products to bring this future to life – vehicle manufacturers, their tier 1 suppliers, and AutoTech startups all use AWS for their ACES initiatives. AWS Greengrass is playing an important role here, attracting design wins and helping our customers to add processing power and machine learning inferencing at the edge.

AWS customer Aptiv (formerly Delphi) talked about their Automated Mobility on Demand (AMoD) smart vehicle architecture in a AWS re:Invent session. Aptiv’s AMoD platform will use Greengrass and microservices to drive the onboard user experience, along with edge processing, monitoring, and control. Here’s an overview:

Another customer, Denso of Japan (one of the world’s largest suppliers of auto components and software) is using Greengrass and AWS IoT to support their vision of Mobility as a Service (MaaS). Here’s a video:

AWS at CES
The AWS team will be out in force at CES in Las Vegas and would love to talk to you. They’ll be running demos that show how AWS can help to bring innovation and personalization to connected and autonomous vehicles.

Personalized In-Vehicle Experience – This demo shows how AWS AI and Machine Learning can be used to create a highly personalized and branded in-vehicle experience. It makes use of Amazon Lex, Polly, and Amazon Rekognition, but the design is flexible and can be used with other services as well. The demo encompasses driver registration, login and startup (including facial recognition), voice assistance for contextual guidance, personalized e-commerce, and vehicle control. Here’s the architecture for the voice assistance:

Connected Vehicle Solution – This demo shows how a connected vehicle can combine local and cloud intelligence, using edge computing and machine learning at the edge. It handles intermittent connections and uses AWS DeepLens to train a model that responds to distracted drivers. Here’s the overall architecture, as described in our Connected Vehicle Solution:

Digital Content Delivery – This demo will show how a customer uses a web-based 3D configurator to build and personalize their vehicle. It will also show high resolution (4K) 3D image and an optional immersive AR/VR experience, both designed for use within a dealership.

Autonomous Driving – This demo will showcase the AWS services that can be used to build autonomous vehicles. There’s a 1/16th scale model vehicle powered and driven by Greengrass and an overview of a new AWS Autonomous Toolkit. As part of the demo, attendees drive the car, training a model via Amazon SageMaker for subsequent on-board inferencing, powered by Greengrass ML Inferencing.

To speak to one of my colleagues or to set up a time to see the demos, check out the Visit AWS at CES 2018 page.

Some Resources
If you are interested in this topic and want to learn more, the AWS for Automotive page is a great starting point, with discussions on connected vehicles & mobility, autonomous vehicle development, and digital customer engagement.

When you are ready to start building a connected vehicle, the AWS Connected Vehicle Solution contains a reference architecture that combines local computing, sophisticated event rules, and cloud-based data processing and storage. You can use this solution to accelerate your own connected vehicle projects.

Jeff;

Serverless @ re:Invent 2017

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/serverless-reinvent-2017/

At re:Invent 2014, we announced AWS Lambda, what is now the center of the serverless platform at AWS, and helped ignite the trend of companies building serverless applications.

This year, at re:Invent 2017, the topic of serverless was everywhere. We were incredibly excited to see the energy from everyone attending 7 workshops, 15 chalk talks, 20 skills sessions and 27 breakout sessions. Many of these sessions were repeated due to high demand, so we are happy to summarize and provide links to the recordings and slides of these sessions.

Over the course of the week leading up to and then the week of re:Invent, we also had over 15 new features and capabilities across a number of serverless services, including AWS Lambda, Amazon API Gateway, AWS [email protected], AWS SAM, and the newly announced AWS Serverless Application Repository!

AWS Lambda

Amazon API Gateway

  • Amazon API Gateway Supports Endpoint Integrations with Private VPCs – You can now provide access to HTTP(S) resources within your VPC without exposing them directly to the public internet. This includes resources available over a VPN or Direct Connect connection!
  • Amazon API Gateway Supports Canary Release Deployments – You can now use canary release deployments to gradually roll out new APIs. This helps you more safely roll out API changes and limit the blast radius of new deployments.
  • Amazon API Gateway Supports Access Logging – The access logging feature lets you generate access logs in different formats such as CLF (Common Log Format), JSON, XML, and CSV. The access logs can be fed into your existing analytics or log processing tools so you can perform more in-depth analysis or take action in response to the log data.
  • Amazon API Gateway Customize Integration Timeouts – You can now set a custom timeout for your API calls as low as 50ms and as high as 29 seconds (the default is 30 seconds).
  • Amazon API Gateway Supports Generating SDK in Ruby – This is in addition to support for SDKs in Java, JavaScript, Android and iOS (Swift and Objective-C). The SDKs that Amazon API Gateway generates save you development time and come with a number of prebuilt capabilities, such as working with API keys, exponential back, and exception handling.

AWS Serverless Application Repository

Serverless Application Repository is a new service (currently in preview) that aids in the publication, discovery, and deployment of serverless applications. With it you’ll be able to find shared serverless applications that you can launch in your account, while also sharing ones that you’ve created for others to do the same.

AWS [email protected]

[email protected] now supports content-based dynamic origin selection, network calls from viewer events, and advanced response generation. This combination of capabilities greatly increases the use cases for [email protected], such as allowing you to send requests to different origins based on request information, showing selective content based on authentication, and dynamically watermarking images for each viewer.

AWS SAM

Twitch Launchpad live announcements

Other service announcements

Here are some of the other highlights that you might have missed. We think these could help you make great applications:

AWS re:Invent 2017 sessions

Coming up with the right mix of talks for an event like this can be quite a challenge. The Product, Marketing, and Developer Advocacy teams for Serverless at AWS spent weeks reading through dozens of talk ideas to boil it down to the final list.

From feedback at other AWS events and webinars, we knew that customers were looking for talks that focused on concrete examples of solving problems with serverless, how to perform common tasks such as deployment, CI/CD, monitoring, and troubleshooting, and to see customer and partner examples solving real world problems. To that extent we tried to settle on a good mix based on attendee experience and provide a track full of rich content.

Below are the recordings and slides of breakout sessions from re:Invent 2017. We’ve organized them for those getting started, those who are already beginning to build serverless applications, and the experts out there already running them at scale. Some of the videos and slides haven’t been posted yet, and so we will update this list as they become available.

Find the entire Serverless Track playlist on YouTube.

Talks for people new to Serverless

Advanced topics

Expert mode

Talks for specific use cases

Talks from AWS customers & partners

Looking to get hands-on with Serverless?

At re:Invent, we delivered instructor-led skills sessions to help attendees new to serverless applications get started quickly. The content from these sessions is already online and you can do the hands-on labs yourself!
Build a Serverless web application

Still looking for more?

We also recently completely overhauled the main Serverless landing page for AWS. This includes a new Resources page containing case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more Getting Started tutorials. Check it out!

AWS Training & Certification Update – Free Digital Training + Certified Cloud Practitioner Exam

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-training-certification-update-free-digital-training-certified-cloud-practitioner-exam/

We recently made some updates to AWS Training and Certification to make it easier for you to build your cloud skills and to learn about many of the new services that we launched at AWS re:Invent.

Free AWS Digital Training
You can now find over 100 new digital training classes at aws.training, all with unlimited access at no charge.

The courses were built by AWS experts and allow you to learn AWS at your own pace, helping you to build foundational knowledge for dozens of AWS services and solutions. You can also access some more advanced training on Machine Learning and Storage.

Here are some of the new digital training topics:

You can browse through the available topics, enroll in one that interests you, watch it, and track your progress by looking at your transcript:

AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner
Our newest certification exam, AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner, lets you validate your overall understanding of the AWS Cloud with an industry-recognized credential. It covers four domains: cloud concepts, security, technology, and billing and pricing. We recommend that you have at least six months of experience (or equivalent training) with the AWS Cloud in any role, including technical, managerial, sales, purchasing, or financial.

To help you prepare for this exam, take our new AWS Cloud Practitioner Essentials course , one of the new AWS digital training courses. This course will give you an overview of cloud concepts, AWS services, security, architecture, pricing, and support. In addition to helping you validate your overall understanding of the AWS Cloud, AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner also serves as a new prerequisite option for the Big Data Specialty and Advanced Networking Specialty certification exams.

Go For It!
I’d like to encourage you to check out aws.training and to enroll in our free digital training in order to learn more about AWS and our newest services. You can strengthen your skills, add to your knowledge base, and set a goal of earning your AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner certification in the new year.

Jeff;

Amazon Linux 2 – Modern, Stable, and Enterprise-Friendly

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-linux-2-modern-stable-and-enterprise-friendly/

I’m getting ready to wrap up my work for the year, cleaning up my inbox and catching up on a few recent AWS launches that happened at and shortly after AWS re:Invent.

Last week we launched Amazon Linux 2. This is modern version of Linux, designed to meet the security, stability, and productivity needs of enterprise environments while giving you timely access to new tools and features. It also includes all of the things that made the Amazon Linux AMI popular, including AWS integration, cloud-init, a secure default configuration, regular security updates, and AWS Support. From that base, we have added many new features including:

Long-Term Support – You can use Amazon Linux 2 in situations where you want to stick with a single major version of Linux for an extended period of time, perhaps to avoid re-qualifying your applications too frequently. This build (2017.12) is a candidate for LTS status; the final determination will be made based on feedback in the Amazon Linux Discussion Forum. Long-term support for the Amazon Linux 2 LTS build will include security updates, bug fixes, user-space Application Binary Interface (ABI), and user-space Application Programming Interface (API) compatibility for 5 years.

Extras Library – You can now get fast access to fresh, new functionality while keeping your base OS image stable and lightweight. The Amazon Linux Extras Library eliminates the age-old tradeoff between OS stability and access to fresh software. It contains open source databases, languages, and more, each packaged together with any needed dependencies.

Tuned Kernel – You have access to the latest 4.9 LTS kernel, with support for the latest EC2 features and tuned to run efficiently in AWS and other virtualized environments.

SystemdAmazon Linux 2 includes the systemd init system, designed to provide better boot performance and increased control over individual services and groups of interdependent services. For example, you can indicate that Service B must be started only after Service A is fully started, or that Service C should start on a change in network connection status.

Wide AvailabiltyAmazon Linux 2 is available in all AWS Regions in AMI and Docker image form. Virtual machine images for Hyper-V, KVM, VirtualBox, and VMware are also available. You can build and test your applications on your laptop or in your own data center and then deploy them to AWS.

Launching an Instance
You can launch an instance in all of the usual ways – AWS Management Console, AWS Command Line Interface (CLI), AWS Tools for Windows PowerShell, RunInstances, and via a AWS CloudFormation template. I’ll use the Console:

I’m interested in the Extras Library; here’s how I see which topics (lists of packages) are available:

As you can see, the library includes languages, editors, and web tools that receive frequent updates. Each topic contains all of dependencies that are needed to install the package on Amazon Linux 2. For example, the Rust topic includes the cmake build system for Rust, cargo for Rust package maintenance, and the LLVM-based compiler toolchain for Rust.

Here’s how I install a topic (Emacs 25.3):

SNS Updates
Many AWS customers use the Amazon Linux AMIs as a starting point for their own AMIs. If you do this and would like to kick off your build process whenever a new AMI is released, you can subscribe to an SNS topic:

You can be notified by email, invoke a AWS Lambda function, and so forth.

Available Now
Amazon Linux 2 is available now and you can start using it in the cloud and on-premises today! To learn more, read the Amazon Linux 2 LTS Candidate (2017.12) Release Notes.

Jeff;

 

Amazon EC2 Price Reduction in the Asia Pacific (Mumbai) Region

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-ec2-price-reduction-in-the-asia-pacific-mumbai-region/

Whew – I am just getting back in to blogging after a quick recovery from AWS re:Invent!

I’m happy to start things off with yet another AWS price reduction, this one for four instance families in the Asia Pacific (Mumbai) Region. Effective December 1, 2017 we are reducing prices for On-Demand and Reserved Instances as follows:

  • M4 – Up to 15%.
  • T2 – Up to 15%.
  • R4 – Up to 15%.
  • C4 – Up to 10%.

The pricing pages have been updated. Enjoy!

Jeff;

 

Introducing the New GDPR Center and “Navigating GDPR Compliance on AWS” Whitepaper

Post Syndicated from Chad Woolf original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/introducing-the-new-gdpr-center-and-navigating-gdpr-compliance-on-aws-whitepaper/

European Union flag

At AWS re:Invent 2017, the AWS Compliance team participated in excellent engagements with AWS customers about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), including discussions that generated helpful input. Today, I am announcing resulting enhancements to our recently launched GDPR Center and the release of a new whitepaper, Navigating GDPR Compliance on AWS. The resources available on the GDPR Center are designed to give you GDPR basics, and provide some ideas as you work out the details of the regulation and find a path to compliance.

In this post, I focus on two of these new GDPR requirements in terms of articles in the GDPR, and explain some of the AWS services and other resources that can help you meet these requirements.

Background about the GDPR

The GDPR is a European privacy law that will become enforceable on May 25, 2018, and is intended to harmonize data protection laws throughout the European Union (EU) by applying a single data protection law that is binding throughout each EU member state. The GDPR not only applies to organizations located within the EU, but also to organizations located outside the EU if they offer goods or services to, or monitor the behavior of, EU data subjects. All AWS services will comply with the GDPR in advance of the May 25, 2018, enforcement date.

We are already seeing customers move personal data to AWS to help solve challenges in complying with the EU’s GDPR because of AWS’s advanced toolset for identifying, securing, and managing all types of data, including personal data. Steve Schmidt, the AWS CISO, has already written about the internal and external work we have been undertaking to help you use AWS services to meet your own GDPR compliance goals.

Article 25 – Data Protection by Design and by Default (Privacy by Design)

Privacy by Design is the integration of data privacy and compliance into the systems development process, enabling applications, systems, and accounts, among other things, to be secure by default. To secure your AWS account, we offer a script to evaluate your AWS account against the full Center for Internet Security (CIS) Amazon Web Services Foundations Benchmark 1.1. You can access this public benchmark on GitHub. Additionally, AWS Trusted Advisor is an online resource to help you improve security by optimizing your AWS environment. Among other things, Trusted Advisor lists a number of security-related controls you should be monitoring. AWS also offers AWS CloudTrail, a logging tool to track usage and API activity. Another example of tooling that enables data protection is Amazon Inspector, which includes a knowledge base of hundreds of rules (regularly updated by AWS security researchers) mapped to common security best practices and vulnerability definitions. Examples of built-in rules include checking for remote root login being enabled or vulnerable software versions installed. These and other tools enable you to design an environment that protects customer data by design.

An accurate inventory of all the GDPR-impacting data is important but sometimes difficult to assess. AWS has some advanced tooling, such as Amazon Macie, to help you determine where customer data is present in your AWS resources. Macie uses advanced machine learning to automatically discover and classify data so that you can protect data, per Article 25.

Article 32 – Security of Processing

You can use many AWS services and features to secure the processing of data regulated by the GDPR. Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) lets you provision a logically isolated section of the AWS Cloud where you can launch resources in a virtual network that you define. You have complete control over your virtual networking environment, including the selection of your own IP address range, creation of subnets, and configuration of route tables and network gateways. With Amazon VPC, you can make the Amazon Cloud a seamless extension of your existing on-premises resources.

AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) is a managed service that makes it easy for you to create and control the encryption keys used to encrypt your data, and uses hardware security modules (HSMs) to help protect your keys. Managing keys with AWS KMS allows you to choose to encrypt data either on the server side or the client side. AWS KMS is integrated with several other AWS services to help you protect the data you store with these services. AWS KMS is also integrated with CloudTrail to provide you with logs of all key usage to help meet your regulatory and compliance needs. You can also use the AWS Encryption SDK to correctly generate and use encryption keys, as well as protect keys after they have been used.

We also recently announced new encryption and security features for Amazon S3, including default encryption and a detailed inventory report. Services of this type as well as additional GDPR enablers will be published regularly on our GDPR Center.

Other resources

As you prepare for GDPR, you may want to visit our AWS Customer Compliance Center or Tools for Amazon Web Services to learn about options for building anything from small scripts that delete data to a full orchestration framework that uses AWS Code services.

-Chad

How to Manage Amazon GuardDuty Security Findings Across Multiple Accounts

Post Syndicated from Tom Stickle original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-manage-amazon-guardduty-security-findings-across-multiple-accounts/

Introduced at AWS re:Invent 2017, Amazon GuardDuty is a managed threat detection service that continuously monitors for malicious or unauthorized behavior to help you protect your AWS accounts and workloads. In an AWS Blog post, Jeff Barr shows you how to enable GuardDuty to monitor your AWS resources continuously. That blog post shows how to get started with a single GuardDuty account and provides an overview of the features of the service. Your security team, though, will probably want to use GuardDuty to monitor a group of AWS accounts continuously.

In this post, I demonstrate how to use GuardDuty to monitor a group of AWS accounts and have their findings routed to another AWS account—the master account—that is owned by a security team. The method I demonstrate in this post is especially useful if your security team is responsible for monitoring a group of AWS accounts over which it does not have direct access—known as member accounts. In this solution, I simplify the work needed to enable GuardDuty in member accounts and configure findings by simplifying the process, which I do by enabling GuardDuty in the master account and inviting member accounts.

Enable GuardDuty in a master account and invite member accounts

To get started, you must enable GuardDuty in the master account, which will receive GuardDuty findings. The master account should be managed by your security team, and it will display the findings from all member accounts. The master account can be reverted later by removing any member accounts you add to it. Adding member accounts is a two-way handshake mechanism to ensure that administrators from both the master and member accounts formally agree to establish the relationship.

To enable GuardDuty in the master account and add member accounts:

  1. Navigate to the GuardDuty console.
  2. In the navigation pane, choose Accounts.
    Screenshot of the Accounts choice in the navigation pane
  1. To designate this account as the GuardDuty master account, start adding member accounts:
    • You can add individual accounts by choosing Add Account, or you can add a list of accounts by choosing Upload List (.csv).
  1. Now, add the account ID and email address of the member account, and choose Add. (If you are uploading a list of accounts, choose Browse, choose the .csv file with the member accounts [one email address and account ID per line], and choose Add accounts.)
    Screenshot of adding an account

For security reasons, AWS checks to make sure each account ID is valid and that you’ve entered each member account’s email address that was used to create the account. If a member account’s account ID and email address do not match, GuardDuty does not send an invitation.
Screenshot showing the Status of Invite

  1. After you add all the member accounts you want to add, you will see them listed in the Member accounts table with a Status of Invite. You don’t have to individually invite each account—you can choose a group of accounts and when you choose to invite one account in the group, all accounts are invited.
  2. When you choose Invite for each member account:
    1. AWS checks to make sure the account ID is valid and the email address provided is the email address of the member account.
    2. AWS sends an email to the member account email address with a link to the GuardDuty console, where the member account owner can accept the invitation. You can add a customized message from your security team. Account owners who receive the invitation must sign in to their AWS account to accept the invitation. The service also sends an invitation through the AWS Personal Health Dashboard in case the member email address is not monitored. This invitation appears in the member account under the AWS Personal Health Dashboard alert bell on the AWS Management Console.
    3. A pending-invitation indicator is shown on the GuardDuty console of the member account, as shown in the following screenshot.
      Screenshot showing the pending-invitation indicator

When the invitation is sent by email, it is sent to the account owner of the GuardDuty member account.
Screenshot of the invitation sent by email

The account owner can click the link in the email invitation or the AWS Personal Health Dashboard message, or the account owner can sign in to their account and navigate to the GuardDuty console. In all cases, the member account displays the pending invitation in the member account’s GuardDuty console with instructions for accepting the invitation. The GuardDuty console walks the account owner through accepting the invitation, including enabling GuardDuty if it is not already enabled.

If you prefer to work in the AWS CLI, you can enable GuardDuty and accept the invitation. To do this, call CreateDetector to enable GuardDuty, and then call AcceptInvitation, which serves the same purpose as accepting the invitation in the GuardDuty console.

  1. After the member account owner accepts the invitation, the Status in the master account is changed to Monitored. The status helps you track the status of each AWS account that you invite.
    Screenshot showing the Status change to Monitored

You have enabled GuardDuty on the member account, and all findings will be forwarded to the master account. You can now monitor the findings about GuardDuty member accounts from the GuardDuty console in the master account.

The member account owner can see GuardDuty findings by default and can control all aspects of the experience in the member account with AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) permissions. Users with the appropriate permissions can end the multi-account relationship at any time by toggling the Accept button on the Accounts page. Note that ending the relationship changes the Status of the account to Resigned and also triggers a security finding on the side of the master account so that the security team knows the member account is no longer linked to the master account.

Working with GuardDuty findings

Most security teams have ticketing systems, chat operations, security information event management (SIEM) systems, or other security automation systems to which they would like to push GuardDuty findings. For this purpose, GuardDuty sends all findings as JSON-based messages through Amazon CloudWatch Events, a scalable service to which you can subscribe and to which AWS services can stream system events. To access these events, navigate to the CloudWatch Events console and create a rule that subscribes to the GuardDuty-related findings. You then can assign a target such as Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose that can place the findings in a number of services such as Amazon S3. The following screenshot is of the CloudWatch Events console, where I have a rule that pulls all events from GuardDuty and pushes them to a preconfigured AWS Lambda function.

Screenshot of a CloudWatch Events rule

The following example is a subset of GuardDuty findings that includes relevant context and information about the nature of a threat that was detected. In this example, the instanceId, i-00bb62b69b7004a4c, is performing Secure Shell (SSH) brute-force attacks against IP address 172.16.0.28. From a Lambda function, you can access any of the following fields such as the title of the finding and its description, and send those directly to your ticketing system.

Example GuardDuty findings

You can use other AWS services to build custom analytics and visualizations of your security findings. For example, you can connect Kinesis Data Firehose to CloudWatch Events and write events to an S3 bucket in a standard format, which can be encrypted with AWS Key Management Service and then compressed. You also can use Amazon QuickSight to build ad hoc dashboards by using AWS Glue and Amazon Athena. Similarly, you can place the data from Kinesis Data Firehose in Amazon Elasticsearch Service, with which you can use tools such as Kibana to build your own visualizations and dashboards.

Like most other AWS services, GuardDuty is a regional service. This means that when you enable GuardDuty in an AWS Region, all findings are generated and delivered in that region. If you are regulated by a compliance regime, this is often an important requirement to ensure that security findings remain in a specific jurisdiction. Because customers have let us know they would prefer to be able to enable GuardDuty globally and have all findings aggregated in one place, we intend to give the choice of regional or global isolation as we evolve this new service.

Summary

In this blog post, I have demonstrated how to use GuardDuty to monitor a group of GuardDuty member accounts and aggregate security findings in a central master GuardDuty account. You can use this solution whether or not you have direct control over the member accounts.

If you have comments about this blog post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about using GuardDuty, start a thread in the GuardDuty forum or contact AWS Support.

-Tom

Glenn’s Take on re:Invent 2017 – Part 3

Post Syndicated from Glenn Gore original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/glenns-take-on-reinvent-2017-part-3/

Glenn Gore here, Chief Architect for AWS. I was in Las Vegas last week — with 43K others — for re:Invent 2017. I checked in to the Architecture blog here and here with my take on what was interesting about some of the bigger announcements from a cloud-architecture perspective.

In the excitement of so many new services being launched, we sometimes overlook feature updates that, while perhaps not as exciting as Amazon DeepLens, have significant impact on how you architect and develop solutions on AWS.

Amazon DynamoDB is used by more than 100,000 customers around the world, handling over a trillion requests every day. From the start, DynamoDB has offered high availability by natively spanning multiple Availability Zones within an AWS Region. As more customers started building and deploying truly-global applications, there was a need to replicate a DynamoDB table to multiple AWS Regions, allowing for read/write operations to occur in any region where the table was replicated. This update is important for providing a globally-consistent view of information — as users may transition from one region to another — or for providing additional levels of availability, allowing for failover between AWS Regions without loss of information.

There are some interesting concurrency-design aspects you need to be aware of and ensure you can handle correctly. For example, we support the “last writer wins” reconciliation where eventual consistency is being used and an application updates the same item in different AWS Regions at the same time. If you require strongly-consistent read/writes then you must perform all of your read/writes in the same AWS Region. The details behind this can be found in the DynamoDB documentation. Providing a globally-distributed, replicated DynamoDB table simplifies many different use cases and allows for the logic of replication, which may have been pushed up into the application layers to be simplified back down into the data layer.

The other big update for DynamoDB is that you can now back up your DynamoDB table on demand with no impact to performance. One of the features I really like is that when you trigger a backup, it is available instantly, regardless of the size of the table. Behind the scenes, we use snapshots and change logs to ensure a consistent backup. While backup is instant, restoring the table could take some time depending on its size and ranges — from minutes to hours for very large tables.

This feature is super important for those of you who work in regulated industries that often have strict requirements around data retention and backups of data, which sometimes limited the use of DynamoDB or required complex workarounds to implement some sort of backup feature in the past. This often incurred significant, additional costs due to increased read transactions on their DynamoDB tables.

Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) was our first-released AWS service over 11 years ago, and it proved the simplicity and scalability of true API-driven architectures in the cloud. Today, Amazon S3 stores trillions of objects, with transactional requests per second reaching into the millions! Dealing with data as objects opened up an incredibly diverse array of use cases ranging from libraries of static images, game binary downloads, and application log data, to massive data lakes used for big data analytics and business intelligence. With Amazon S3, when you accessed your data in an object, you effectively had to write/read the object as a whole or use the range feature to retrieve a part of the object — if possible — in your individual use case.

Now, with Amazon S3 Select, an SQL-like query language is used that can work with delimited text and JSON files, as well as work with GZIP compressed files. We don’t support encryption during the preview of Amazon S3 Select.

Amazon S3 Select provides two major benefits:

  • Faster access
  • Lower running costs

Serverless Lambda functions, where every millisecond matters when you are being charged, will benefit greatly from Amazon S3 Select as data retrieval and processing of your Lambda function will experience significant speedups and cost reductions. For example, we have seen 2x speed improvement and 80% cost reduction with the Serverless MapReduce code.

Other AWS services such as Amazon Athena, Amazon Redshift, and Amazon EMR will support Amazon S3 Select as well as partner offerings including Cloudera and Hortonworks. If you are using Amazon Glacier for longer-term data archival, you will be able to use Amazon Glacier Select to retrieve a subset of your content from within Amazon Glacier.

As the volume of data that can be stored within Amazon S3 and Amazon Glacier continues to scale on a daily basis, we will continue to innovate and develop improved and optimized services that will allow you to work with these magnificently-large data sets while reducing your costs (retrieval and processing). I believe this will also allow you to simplify the transformation and storage of incoming data into Amazon S3 in basic, semi-structured formats as a single copy vs. some of the duplication and reformatting of data sometimes required to do upfront optimizations for downstream processing. Amazon S3 Select largely removes the need for this upfront optimization and instead allows you to store data once and process it based on your individual Amazon S3 Select query per application or transaction need.

Thanks for reading!

Glenn contemplating why CSV format is still relevant in 2017 (Italy).

Glenn’s Take on re:Invent Part 2

Post Syndicated from Glenn Gore original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/glenns-take-on-reinvent-part-2/

Glenn Gore here, Chief Architect for AWS. I’m in Las Vegas this week — with 43K others — for re:Invent 2017. We’ve got a lot of exciting announcements this week. I’m going to check in to the Architecture blog with my take on what’s interesting about some of the announcements from an cloud architectural perspective. My first post can be found here.

The Media and Entertainment industry has been a rapid adopter of AWS due to the scale, reliability, and low costs of our services. This has enabled customers to create new, online, digital experiences for their viewers ranging from broadcast to streaming to Over-the-Top (OTT) services that can be a combination of live, scheduled, or ad-hoc viewing, while supporting devices ranging from high-def TVs to mobile devices. Creating an end-to-end video service requires many different components often sourced from different vendors with different licensing models, which creates a complex architecture and a complex environment to support operationally.

AWS Media Services
Based on customer feedback, we have developed AWS Media Services to help simplify distribution of video content. AWS Media Services is comprised of five individual services that can either be used together to provide an end-to-end service or individually to work within existing deployments: AWS Elemental MediaConvert, AWS Elemental MediaLive, AWS Elemental MediaPackage, AWS Elemental MediaStore and AWS Elemental MediaTailor. These services can help you with everything from storing content safely and durably to setting up a live-streaming event in minutes without having to be concerned about the underlying infrastructure and scalability of the stream itself.

In my role, I participate in many AWS and industry events and often work with the production and event teams that put these shows together. With all the logistical tasks they have to deal with, the biggest question is often: “Will the live stream work?” Compounding this fear is the reality that, as users, we are also quick to jump on social media and make noise when a live stream drops while we are following along remotely. Worse is when I see event organizers actively selecting not to live stream content because of the risk of failure and and exposure — leading them to decide to take the safe option and not stream at all.

With AWS Media Services addressing many of the issues around putting together a high-quality media service, live streaming, and providing access to a library of content through a variety of mechanisms, I can’t wait to see more event teams use live streaming without the concern and worry I’ve seen in the past. I am excited for what this also means for non-media companies, as video becomes an increasingly common way of sharing information and adding a more personalized touch to internally- and externally-facing content.

AWS Media Services will allow you to focus more on the content and not worry about the platform. Awesome!

Amazon Neptune
As a civilization, we have been developing new ways to record and store information and model the relationships between sets of information for more than a thousand years. Government census data, tax records, births, deaths, and marriages were all recorded on medium ranging from knotted cords in the Inca civilization, clay tablets in ancient Babylon, to written texts in Western Europe during the late Middle Ages.

One of the first challenges of computing was figuring out how to store and work with vast amounts of information in a programmatic way, especially as the volume of information was increasing at a faster rate than ever before. We have seen different generations of how to organize this information in some form of database, ranging from flat files to the Information Management System (IMS) used in the 1960s for the Apollo space program, to the rise of the relational database management system (RDBMS) in the 1970s. These innovations drove a lot of subsequent innovations in information management and application development as we were able to move from thousands of records to millions and billions.

Today, as architects and developers, we have a vast variety of database technologies to select from, which have different characteristics that are optimized for different use cases:

  • Relational databases are well understood after decades of use in the majority of companies who required a database to store information. Amazon Relational Database (Amazon RDS) supports many popular relational database engines such as MySQL, Microsoft SQL Server, PostgreSQL, MariaDB, and Oracle. We have even brought the traditional RDBMS into the cloud world through Amazon Aurora, which provides MySQL and PostgreSQL support with the performance and reliability of commercial-grade databases at 1/10th the cost.
  • Non-relational databases (NoSQL) provided a simpler method of storing and retrieving information that was often faster and more scalable than traditional RDBMS technology. The concept of non-relational databases has existed since the 1960s but really took off in the early 2000s with the rise of web-based applications that required performance and scalability that relational databases struggled with at the time. AWS published this Dynamo whitepaper in 2007, with DynamoDB launching as a service in 2012. DynamoDB has quickly become one of the critical design elements for many of our customers who are building highly-scalable applications on AWS. We continue to innovate with DynamoDB, and this week launched global tables and on-demand backup at re:Invent 2017. DynamoDB excels in a variety of use cases, such as tracking of session information for popular websites, shopping cart information on e-commerce sites, and keeping track of gamers’ high scores in mobile gaming applications, for example.
  • Graph databases focus on the relationship between data items in the store. With a graph database, we work with nodes, edges, and properties to represent data, relationships, and information. Graph databases are designed to make it easy and fast to traverse and retrieve complex hierarchical data models. Graph databases share some concepts from the NoSQL family of databases such as key-value pairs (properties) and the use of a non-SQL query language such as Gremlin. Graph databases are commonly used for social networking, recommendation engines, fraud detection, and knowledge graphs. We released Amazon Neptune to help simplify the provisioning and management of graph databases as we believe that graph databases are going to enable the next generation of smart applications.

A common use case I am hearing every week as I talk to customers is how to incorporate chatbots within their organizations. Amazon Lex and Amazon Polly have made it easy for customers to experiment and build chatbots for a wide range of scenarios, but one of the missing pieces of the puzzle was how to model decision trees and and knowledge graphs so the chatbot could guide the conversation in an intelligent manner.

Graph databases are ideal for this particular use case, and having Amazon Neptune simplifies the deployment of a graph database while providing high performance, scalability, availability, and durability as a managed service. Security of your graph database is critical. To help ensure this, you can store your encrypted data by running AWS in Amazon Neptune within your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) and using encryption at rest integrated with AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS). Neptune also supports Amazon VPC and AWS Identity and Access Management (AWS IAM) to help further protect and restrict access.

Our customers now have the choice of many different database technologies to ensure that they can optimize each application and service for their specific needs. Just as DynamoDB has unlocked and enabled many new workloads that weren’t possible in relational databases, I can’t wait to see what new innovations and capabilities are enabled from graph databases as they become easier to use through Amazon Neptune.

Look for more on DynamoDB and Amazon S3 from me on Monday.

 

Glenn at Tour de Mont Blanc

 

 

AWS Cloud9 – Cloud Developer Environments

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-cloud9-cloud-developer-environments/

One of the first things you learn when you start programming is that, just like any craftsperson, your tools matter. Notepad.exe isn’t going to cut it. A powerful editor and testing pipeline supercharge your productivity. I still remember learning to use Vim for the first time and being able to zip around systems and complex programs. Do you remember how hard it was to setup all your compilers and dependencies on a new machine? How many cycles have you wasted matching versions, tinkering with configs, and then writing documentation to onboard a new developer to a project?

Today we’re launching AWS Cloud9, an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) for writing, running, and debugging code, all from your web browser. Cloud9 comes prepackaged with essential tools for many popular programming languages (Javascript, Python, PHP, etc.) so you don’t have to tinker with installing various compilers and toolchains. Cloud9 also provides a seamless experience for working with serverless applications allowing you to quickly switch between local and remote testing or debugging. Based on the popular open source Ace Editor and c9.io IDE (which we acquired last year), AWS Cloud9 is designed to make collaborative cloud development easy with extremely powerful pair programming features. There are more features than I could ever cover in this post but to give a quick breakdown I’ll break the IDE into 3 components: The editor, the AWS integrations, and the collaboration.

Editing


The Ace Editor at the core of Cloud9 is what lets you write code quickly, easily, and beautifully. It follows a UNIX philosophy of doing one thing and doing it well: writing code.

It has all the typical IDE features you would expect: live syntax checking, auto-indent, auto-completion, code folding, split panes, version control integration, multiple cursors and selections, and it also has a few unique features I want to highlight. First of all, it’s fast, even for large (100000+ line) files. There’s no lag or other issues while typing. It has over two dozen themes built-in (solarized!) and you can bring all of your favorite themes from Sublime Text or TextMate as well. It has built-in support for 40+ language modes and customizable run configurations for your projects. Most importantly though, it has Vim mode (or emacs if your fingers work that way). It also has a keybinding editor that allows you to bend the editor to your will.

The editor supports powerful keyboard navigation and commands (similar to Sublime Text or vim plugins like ctrlp). On a Mac, with ⌘+P you can open any file in your environment with fuzzy search. With ⌘+. you can open up the command pane which allows you to do invoke any of the editor commands by typing the name. It also helpfully displays the keybindings for a command in the pane, for instance to open to a terminal you can press ⌥+T. Oh, did I mention there’s a terminal? It ships with the AWS CLI preconfigured for access to your resources.

The environment also comes with pre-installed debugging tools for many popular languages – but you’re not limited to what’s already installed. It’s easy to add in new programs and define new run configurations.

The editor is just one, admittedly important, component in an IDE though. I want to show you some other compelling features.

AWS Integrations

The AWS Cloud9 IDE is the first IDE I’ve used that is truly “cloud native”. The service is provided at no additional charge, and you only charged for the underlying compute and storage resources. When you create an environment you’re prompted for either: an instance type and an auto-hibernate time, or SSH access to a machine of your choice.

If you’re running in AWS the auto-hibernate feature will stop your instance shortly after you stop using your IDE. This can be a huge cost savings over running a more permanent developer desktop. You can also launch it within a VPC to give it secure access to your development resources. If you want to run Cloud9 outside of AWS, or on an existing instance, you can provide SSH access to the service which it will use to create an environment on the external machine. Your environment is provisioned with automatic and secure access to your AWS account so you don’t have to worry about copying credentials around. Let me say that again: you can run this anywhere.

Serverless Development with AWS Cloud9

I spend a lot of time on Twitch developing serverless applications. I have hundreds of lambda functions and APIs deployed. Cloud9 makes working with every single one of these functions delightful. Let me show you how it works.


If you look in the top right side of the editor you’ll see an AWS Resources tab. Opening this you can see all of the lambda functions in your region (you can see functions in other regions by adjusting your region preferences in the AWS preference pane).

You can import these remote functions to your local workspace just by double-clicking them. This allows you to edit, test, and debug your serverless applications all locally. You can create new applications and functions easily as well. If you click the Lambda icon in the top right of the pane you’ll be prompted to create a new lambda function and Cloud9 will automatically create a Serverless Application Model template for you as well. The IDE ships with support for the popular SAM local tool pre-installed. This is what I use in most of my local testing and serverless development. Since you have a terminal, it’s easy to install additional tools and use other serverless frameworks.

 

Launching an Environment from AWS CodeStar

With AWS CodeStar you can easily provision an end-to-end continuous delivery toolchain for development on AWS. Codestar provides a unified experience for building, testing, deploying, and managing applications using AWS CodeCommit, CodeBuild, CodePipeline, and CodeDeploy suite of services. Now, with a few simple clicks you can provision a Cloud9 environment to develop your application. Your environment will be pre-configured with the code for your CodeStar application already checked out and git credentials already configured.

You can easily share this environment with your coworkers which leads me to another extremely useful set of features.

Collaboration

One of the many things that sets AWS Cloud9 apart from other editors are the rich collaboration tools. You can invite an IAM user to your environment with a few clicks.

You can see what files they’re working on, where their cursors are, and even share a terminal. The chat features is useful as well.

Things to Know

  • There are no additional charges for this service beyond the underlying compute and storage.
  • c9.io continues to run for existing users. You can continue to use all the features of c9.io and add new team members if you have a team account. In the future, we will provide tools for easy migration of your c9.io workspaces to AWS Cloud9.
  • AWS Cloud9 is available in the US West (Oregon), US East (Ohio), US East (N.Virginia), EU (Ireland), and Asia Pacific (Singapore) regions.

I can’t wait to see what you build with AWS Cloud9!

Randall

Announcing Alexa for Business: Using Amazon Alexa’s Voice Enabled Devices for Workplaces

Post Syndicated from Tara Walker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/launch-announcing-alexa-for-business-using-amazon-alexas-voice-enabled-devices-for-workplaces/

There are only a few things more integrated into my day-to-day life than Alexa. I use my Echo device and the enabled Alexa Skills for turning on lights in my home, checking video from my Echo Show to see who is ringing my doorbell, keeping track of my extensive to-do list on a weekly basis, playing music, and lots more. I even have my family members enabling Alexa skills on their Echo devices for all types of activities that they now cannot seem to live without. My mother, who is in a much older generation (please don’t tell her I said that), uses her Echo and the custom Alexa skill I built for her to store her baking recipes. She also enjoys exploring skills that have the latest health and epicurean information. It’s no wonder then, that when I go to work I feel like something is missing. For example, I would love to be able to ask Alexa to read my flash briefing when I get to the office.

 

 

For those of you that would love to have Alexa as your intelligent assistant at work, I have exciting news. I am delighted to announce Alexa for Business, a new service that enables businesses and organizations to bring Alexa into the workplace at scale. Alexa for Business not only brings Alexa into your workday to boost your productivity, but also provides tools and resources for organizations to set up and manage Alexa devices at scale, enable private skills, and enroll users.

Making Workplaces Smarter with Alexa for Business

Alexa for Business brings the Alexa you know and love into the workplace to help all types of workers to be more productive and organized on both personal and shared Echo devices. In the workplace, shared devices can be placed in common areas for anyone to use, and workers can use their personal devices to connect at work and at home.

End users can use shared devices or personal devices. Here’s what they can do from each.

Shared devices

  1. Join meetings in conference rooms: You can simply say “Alexa, start the meeting”. Alexa turns on the video conferencing equipment, dials into your conference call, and gets the meeting going.
  2. Help around the office: access custom skills to help with directions around the office, finding an open conference room, reporting a building equipment problem, or ordering new supplies.

Personal devices

  1. Enable calling and messaging: Alexa helps make phone calls, hands free and can also send messages on your behalf.
  2. Automatically dial into conference calls: Alexa can join any meeting with a conference call number via voice from home, work, or on the go.
  3. Intelligent assistant: Alexa can quickly check calendars, help schedule meetings, manage to-do lists, and set reminders.
  4. Find information: Alexa can help find information in popular business applications like Salesforce, Concur, or Splunk.

Here are some of the controls available to administrators:

  1. Provision & Manage Shared Alexa Devices: You can provision and manage shared devices around your workplace using the Alexa for Business console. For each device you can set a location, such as a conference room designation, and assign public and private skills for the device.
  2. Configure Conference Room Settings: Kick off your meetings with a simple “Alexa, start the meeting.” Alexa for Business allows you to configure your conference room settings so you can use Alexa to start your meetings and control your conference room equipment, or dial in directly from the Amazon Echo device in the room.
  3. Manage Users: You can invite users in your organization to enroll their personal Alexa account with your Alexa for Business account. Once your users have enrolled, you can enable your custom private skills for them to use on any of the devices in their personal Alexa account, at work or at home.
  4. Manage Skills: You can assign public skills and custom private skills your organization has created to your shared devices, and make private skills available to your enrolled users.  You can create skills groups, which you can then assign to specific shared devices.
  5. Build Private Skills & Use Alexa for Business APIs:  Dig into the Alexa Skills Kit and build your own skills.  Then you can make these available to the shared devices and enrolled users in your Alexa for Business account, all without having to publish them in the public Alexa Skills Store.  Alexa for Business offers additional APIs, which you can use to add context to your skills and automate administrative tasks.

Let’s take a quick journey into Alexa for Business. I’ll first log into the AWS Console and go to the Alexa for Business service.

 

Once I log in to the service, I am presented with the Alexa for Business dashboard. As you can see, I have access to manage Rooms, Shared devices, Users, and Skills, as well as the ability to control conferencing, calendars, and user invitations.

First, I’ll start by setting up my Alexa devices. Alexa for Business provides a Device Setup Tool to setup multiple devices, connect them to your Wi-Fi network, and register them with your Alexa for Business account. This is quite different from the setup process for personal Alexa devices. With Alexa for Business, you can provision 25 devices at a time.

Once my devices are provisioned, I can create location profiles for the locations where I want to put these devices (such as in my conference rooms). We call these locations “Rooms” in our Alexa for Business console. I can go to the Room profiles menu and create a Room profile. A Room profile contains common settings for the Alexa device in your room, such as the wake word for the device, the address, time zone, unit of measurement, and whether I want to enable outbound calling.

The next step is to enable skills for the devices I set up. I can enable any skill from the Alexa Skills store, or use the private skills feature to enable skills I built myself and made available to my Alexa for Business account. To enable skills for my shared devices, I can go to the Skills menu option and enable skills. After I have enabled skills, I can add them to a skill group and assign the skill group to my rooms.

Something I really like about Alexa for Business, is that I can use Alexa to dial into conference calls. To enable this, I go to the Conferencing menu option and select Add provider. At Amazon we use Amazon Chime, but you can choose from a list of different providers, or you can even add your own provider if you want to.

Once I’ve set this up, I can say “Alexa, join my meeting”; Alexa asks for my Amazon Chime meeting ID, after which my Echo device will automatically dial into my Amazon Chime meeting. Alexa for Business also provides an intelligent way to start any meeting quickly. We’ve all been in the situation where we walk into a meeting room and can’t find the meeting ID or conference call number. With Alexa for Business, I can link to my corporate calendar, so Alexa can figure out the meeting information for me, and automatically dial in – I don’t even need my meeting ID. Here’s how you do that:

Alexa can also control the video conferencing equipment in the room. To do this, all I need to do is select the skill for the equipment that I have, select the equipment provider, and enable it for my conference rooms. Now when I ask Alexa to join my meeting, Alexa will dial-in from the equipment in the room, and turn on the video conferencing system, without me needing to do anything else.

 

Let’s switch to enrolled users next.

I’ll start by setting up the User Invitation for my organization so that I can invite users to my Alexa for Business account. To allow a user to use Alexa for Business within an organization, you invite them to enroll their personal Alexa account with the service by sending a user invitation via email from the management console. If I choose, I can customize the user enrollment email to contain additional content. For example, I can add information about my organization’s Alexa skills that can be enabled after they’ve accepted the invitation and completed the enrollment process. My users must join in order to use the features of Alexa for Business, such as auto dialing into conference calls, linking their Microsoft Exchange calendars, or using private skills.

Now that I have customized my User Invitation, I will invite users to take advantage of Alexa for Business for my organization by going to the Users menu on the Dashboard and entering their email address.  This will send an email with a link that can be used to join my organization. Users will join using the Amazon account that their personal Alexa devices are registered to. Let’s invite Jeff Barr to join my Alexa for Business organization.

After Jeff has enrolled in my Alexa for Business account, he can discover the private skills I’ve enabled for enrolled users, and he can access his work skills and join conference calls from any of his personal devices, including the Echo in his home office.

Summary

We’ve only scratched the surface in our brief review of the Alexa for Business console and service features.  You can learn more about Alexa for Business by viewing the Alexa for Business website, reading the admin and API guides in the AWS documentation, or by watching the Getting Started videos within the Alexa for Business console.

You can learn more about Alexa for Business by viewing the Alexa for Business website, watching the Alexa for Business overview video, reading the admin and API guides in the AWS documentation, or by watching the Getting Started videos within the Alexa for Business console.

Alexa, Say Goodbye and Sign off the Blog Post.”

Tara