Tag Archives: squid

Friday Squid Blogging: Squid Can Edit Their Own Genome

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/03/friday_squid_bl_722.html

Amazing:

Revealing yet another super-power in the skillful squid, scientists have discovered that squid massively edit their own genetic instructions not only within the nucleus of their neurons, but also within the axon — the long, slender neural projections that transmit electrical impulses to other neurons. This is the first time that edits to genetic information have been observed outside of the nucleus of an animal cell.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

Friday Squid Blogging: Squid Eggs

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/02/friday_squid_bl_718.html

Cool photo.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

EDITED TO ADD (3/4): I just deleted a slew of comments about COVID 19. I may reinstate some of them later; right now I want some time to think about what is relevant and what is not. Surely lots of things are relevant to this blog — fear, risk management, surveillance, containment measures — but most of the talk about the virus are not. I would like to suggest that those who wish to talk about the virus do so elsewhere, and those who want to talk specifically about the security/risk implications continue to do so, politely and respectfully.

Friday Squid Blogging: 13-foot Giant Squid Caught off New Zealand Coast

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/02/friday_squid_bl_717.html

It’s probably a juvenile:

Researchers aboard the New Zealand-based National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Ltd (NIWA) research vessel Tangaroa were on an expedition to survey hoki, New Zealand’s most valuable commercial fish, in the Chatham Rise ­ an area of ocean floor to the east of New Zealand that makes up part of the “lost continent” of Zealandia.

At 7.30am on the morning of January 21, scientists were hauling up their trawler net from a depth of 442 meters (1,450 feet) when they were surprised to spot tentacles in amongst their catch. Large tentacles.

According to voyage leader and NIWA fisheries scientist Darren Stevens, who was on watch, it took six members of staff to lift the giant squid out of the net. Despite the squid being 4 meters long and weighing about 110 kilograms (240 pounds), Stevens said he thought the squid was “on the smallish side,” compared to other behemoths caught.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

Friday Squid Blogging: An MRI Scan of a Squid’s Brain

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/02/friday_squid_bl_715.html

This paper is filled with brain science that I do not understand (news article), but fails to answer what I consider to be the important question: how do you keep a live squid still for long enough to do an MRI scan on them?

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

Friday Squid Blogging: Giant Squid Genome Analyzed

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/01/friday_squid_bl_712.html

This is fantastic work:

In total, the researchers identified approximately 2.7 billion DNA base pairs, which is around 90 percent the size of the human genome. There’s nothing particularly special about that size, especially considering that the axolotl genome is 10 times larger than the human genome. It’s going to take some time to fully understand and appreciate the intricacies of the giant squid’s genetic profile, but these preliminary results are already helping to explain some of its more remarkable features.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

Friday Squid Blogging: Giant Squid Video from the Gulf of Mexico

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/01/friday_squid_bl_710.html

Fantastic video:

Scientists had used a specialized camera system developed by Widder called the Medusa, which uses red light undetectable to deep sea creatures and has allowed scientists to discover species and observe elusive ones.

The probe was outfitted with a fake jellyfish that mimicked the invertebrates’ bioluminescent defense mechanism, which can signal to larger predators that a meal may be nearby, to lure the squid and other animals to the camera.

With days to go until the end of the two-week expedition, 100 miles (160 kilometers) southeast of New Orleans, a giant squid took the bait.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.