Tag Archives: squid

Friday Squid Blogging: Shark vs. Squid

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/06/friday_squid_bl_732.html

National Geographic has a photo of a 7-foot long shark that fought a giant squid and lived to tell the tale. Or, at least, lived to show off the suction marks on his skin.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

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Friday Squid Blogging: Squid Can Edit Their Own Genomes

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/05/friday_squid_bl_730.html

This is new news:

Revealing yet another super-power in the skillful squid, scientists have discovered that squid massively edit their own genetic instructions not only within the nucleus of their neurons, but also within the axon — the long, slender neural projections that transmit electrical impulses to other neurons. This is the first time that edits to genetic information have been observed outside of the nucleus of an animal cell.

[…]

The discovery provides another jolt to the central dogma of molecular biology, which states that genetic information is passed faithfully from DNA to messenger RNA to the synthesis of proteins. In 2015, Rosenthal and colleagues discovered that squid “edit” their messenger RNA instructions to an extraordinary degree — orders of magnitude more than humans do — allowing them to fine-tune the type of proteins that will be produced in the nervous system.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

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Friday Squid Blogging: Jurassic Squid Attack

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/05/friday_squid_bl_728.html

It’s the oldest squid attack on record:

An ancient squid-like creature with 10 arms covered in hooks had just crushed the skull of its prey in a vicious attack when disaster struck, killing both predator and prey, according to a Jurassic period fossil of the duo found on the southern coast of England.

This 200 million-year-old fossil was originally discovered in the 19th century, but a new analysis reveals that it’s the oldest known example of a coleoid, or a class of cephalopods that includes octopuses, squid and cuttlefish, attacking prey.

More news.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

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Friday Squid Blogging: Cocaine Smuggled in Squid

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/05/friday_squid_bl_727.html

Makes sense; there’s room inside a squid’s body cavity:

Latin American drug lords have sent bumper shipments of cocaine to Europe in recent weeks, including one in a cargo of squid, even though the coronavirus epidemic has stifled legitimate transatlantic trade, senior anti-narcotics officials say.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

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Friday Squid Blogging: Humboldt Squid Backlight Themselves to Communicate More Clearly

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/04/friday_squid_bl_726.html

This is neat:

Deep in the Pacific Ocean, six-foot-long Humboldt squid are known for being aggressive, cannibalistic and, according to new research, good communicators.

Known as “red devils,” the squid can rapidly change the color of their skin, making different patterns to communicate, something other squid species are known to do.

But Humboldt squid live in almost total darkness more than 1,000 feet below the surface, so their patterns aren’t very visible. Instead, according to a new study, they create backlighting for the patterns by making their bodies glow, like the screen of an e-reader.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

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Friday Squid Blogging: On Squid Communication

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/04/friday_squid_bl_723.html

They can communicate using bioluminescent flashes:

New research published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences presents evidence for a previously unknown semantic-like ability in Humboldt squid. What’s more, these squid can enhance the visibility of their skin patterns by using their bodies as a kind of backlight, which may allow them to convey messages of surprising complexity, according to the new paper. Together, this could explain how Humboldt squid­ — and possibly other closely related squid­ — are able to facilitate group behaviors in light-restricted environments, such as evading predators, finding places to forage, signaling that it’s time to feed, and deciding who gets priority at the dinner table, among other things.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

Friday Squid Blogging: Squid Can Edit Their Own Genome

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/03/friday_squid_bl_722.html

Amazing:

Revealing yet another super-power in the skillful squid, scientists have discovered that squid massively edit their own genetic instructions not only within the nucleus of their neurons, but also within the axon — the long, slender neural projections that transmit electrical impulses to other neurons. This is the first time that edits to genetic information have been observed outside of the nucleus of an animal cell.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

Friday Squid Blogging: Squid Eggs

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/02/friday_squid_bl_718.html

Cool photo.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

EDITED TO ADD (3/4): I just deleted a slew of comments about COVID 19. I may reinstate some of them later; right now I want some time to think about what is relevant and what is not. Surely lots of things are relevant to this blog — fear, risk management, surveillance, containment measures — but most of the talk about the virus are not. I would like to suggest that those who wish to talk about the virus do so elsewhere, and those who want to talk specifically about the security/risk implications continue to do so, politely and respectfully.

Friday Squid Blogging: 13-foot Giant Squid Caught off New Zealand Coast

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/02/friday_squid_bl_717.html

It’s probably a juvenile:

Researchers aboard the New Zealand-based National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Ltd (NIWA) research vessel Tangaroa were on an expedition to survey hoki, New Zealand’s most valuable commercial fish, in the Chatham Rise ­ an area of ocean floor to the east of New Zealand that makes up part of the “lost continent” of Zealandia.

At 7.30am on the morning of January 21, scientists were hauling up their trawler net from a depth of 442 meters (1,450 feet) when they were surprised to spot tentacles in amongst their catch. Large tentacles.

According to voyage leader and NIWA fisheries scientist Darren Stevens, who was on watch, it took six members of staff to lift the giant squid out of the net. Despite the squid being 4 meters long and weighing about 110 kilograms (240 pounds), Stevens said he thought the squid was “on the smallish side,” compared to other behemoths caught.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.