Tag Archives: announcements

The Raspberry Pi Foundation and Bebras

Post Syndicated from Sue Sentance original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/bebras-partnership/

We are delighted to announce a new partnership that will ensure the long-term growth and success of the free, annual UK Bebras Computational Thinking Challenge.

Bebras UK logo

‘Bebras’ means ‘beaver’ in Lithuanian; Prof. Valentina Dagiene named the competition after this hard-working, intelligent, and lively animal.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has teamed up with Oxford University to support the Bebras Challenge, which every November invites students to use computational thinking to solve classical computer science problems re-worked into accessible and interesting questions.

Bebras is:

  • Open to students aged 6 to 18 (and it’s quite good fun for adults too)
  • A great whole-school activity
  • Completely free
  • Easy to sign up to and take part in online
  • Open for two weeks every November; this year it runs from 4 to 15 November and you’ve still got until 31 October to register!

Woman teacher and female students at a computer

Why should I get involved in the Bebras Challenge?

Bebras is an international challenge that started in Lithuania in 2004. Participating in Bebras is a great way to engage students of all ages in the fun of problem solving, and to give them an insight into computing and what it’s all about. Computing principles are highlighted in the answers, so Bebras can be quite educational for teachers too.

Male teacher and female student at a computer
Male teacher and male students at a computer
Woman teacher and female student at a laptop

The UK became involved in Bebras for the first time in 2013, and the numbers of participating students have increased from 21,000 in the first year to 202,000 last year. Internationally, more than 2.78 million learners took part in 2018.

  • Bebras runs from 4 to 15 November this year
  • The challenge takes 40 minutes to complete
  • Use the practice questions on the website to get your students used to what they’ll encounter in challenge
  • All the marking is done for you
  • The results are sent to you the week after the challenge ends, along with an answer booklet, so that you can go through the answers with your learners
  • The highest-achieving students in each age group are invited to Oxford University to take part in the second round over a weekend in January

To give you a taste of what Bebras involves, try this example question!

You’ve still got three more days to sign up for this year’s Bebras Challenge.

Support computational thinking at your school throughout the year with Bebras

The annual challenge is only one part of the equation: questions from previous years are available as a resource with which teachers can create self-marking quizzes to use with their classes! This means you can support the computational thinking part of the school curriculum throughout the whole year.

Male teacher and male students at a computer

 

You can also use the Bebras App to try 100 computational thinking problems, and download sets of Bebras Cards for primary schools.

Follow @bebrasuk to stay up to date with what’s on offer for you.

The post The Raspberry Pi Foundation and Bebras appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Improve Your App Testing With Amplify Console’s Pull Requests Previews and Cypress Testing

Post Syndicated from Sébastien Stormacq original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/improve-your-app-testing-with-amplify-consoles-pull-requests-previews-and-cypress-testing/

Amplify Console allows developers to easly configure a Git-based workflow for continuous deployment and hosting of fullstack serverless web apps. Fullstack serverless apps comprise of backend resources such as GraphQL APIs, Data and File Storage, Authentication, or Analytics, integrated with a frontend framework such as React, Gatsby, or Angular. You can read more about the Amplify Console in a previous article I wrote.

Today, we are announcing the ability to create preview URLs and to run end-to-end tests on pull requests before releasing code to production.

Pull Request previews
You can now configure Amplify Console to deploy your application to a unique URL every time a developer submits a pull request to your Git repository. The preview URL is completely different from the one used by the production site. You can see how changes look before merging the pull request into the main branch of your code repository, triggering a new release in the Amplify Console. For fullstack apps with backend environments provisioned via the Amplify CLI, every pull request spins up an ephemeral backend that is deleted when the pull request is closed. You can test changes in complete isolation from the production environment. Amplify Console creates backend infrastructures for pull requests on private git repositories only. This allows to avoid incurring extra costs in case of unsolicited pull requests.

To learn how it works, let’s start a web application with a cloud-based authentication backend, and deploy it on Amplify Console. I first create a React application (check here to learn how to install React).

npx create-react-app amplify-console-demo                                                
cd amplify-console-demo

I initialize the Amplify environment (learn how to install the Amplify CLI first). I add a cloud based authentication backend powered by Amazon Cognito. I accept all the defaults answers proposed by Amplify CLI.

npm install aws-amplify aws-amplify-react
amplify init
amplify add auth
amplify push

I then modify src/App.js to add the front end authentication user interface. The code is available in the AWS Amplify documentation. Once ready, I start the local development server to test the application locally.

npm run start

I point my browser to http://localhost:8080 to verify the scafolding (the below screenshot is taken from my AWS Cloud 9 development environment). I click Create account to create a user, verify the SignUp flow, and authenticate to the app.

After signing up, I see the application page.

There are two important details to note. First, I am using a private GitHub repository. Amplify Console only creates backend infrastructure on pull requests for private repositories, to avoid creating unnecessary infrastructure for unsollicited pull requests. Second, the Amplify Console build process looks for dependencies in package-lock.json only. This is why I added the amplify packages with npm and not with yarn.

When I am happy with my app, I push the code to a GitHub repo (let’s assume I already did git remote add origin ...).

git add amplify
git commit -am "initial commit"
git push origin master

The next step consists of configuring Amplify Console to build and deploy my app on every git commit. I login to the Amplify Console, click Connect App, choose GitHub as repository and click Continue (the first time I do this, I need to authenticate on GitHub, using my GitHub username and password)

I select my repository and the branch I want to use as source:

Amplify Console detects the type of project and proposes a build file. I select the name of my environment (dev). The first time I use Amplify Console, I follow the instructions to create a new service role. This role authorises Amplify Console to access AWS backend services on my behalf.

I click Next. I review the settings and click Save and Deploy. After a few seconds or minutes, my application is ready. I can point my browser to the deployment URL and verify the app is working correctly.

Now, let’s enable previews for pull requests. Click Preview on the left menu and Enable Previews. To enable the previews, Amplify Console requires an app to be installed in my GitHub account. I follow the instructions provided by the console to configure my GitHub account. Once set up, I select a branch, click Manage to enable / disable the pull request previews. (At anytime, I can uninstall the Amplify app from my GitHub account by visiting the Applications section of my GitHub account’s settings.)

Now that the mechanism is in place, let’s create a pull request.

I edit App.js directly on GitHub. I customize the withAuthenticator component to change the color of the Sign In button from orange to green. I save the changes and I create a pull request.

On the Pull Request detail page, I click Show all checks to get the status of the Amplify Console test. I see AWS Amplify Console Web Preview in progress. Amplify Console creates a full backend environment to test the pull request, to build and to deploy the frontend.

Eventually, I see All checks have passed and a green mark. I click Details to get the preview url. In case of an error, you can see the detailled log file of the build phase in the Amplify Console.

I can also check the status of the preview in the Amplify Console.

I point my browser to the preview URL to test my change. I can see the green Sign In button instead of the orange one.

When I try to authenticate using the username and password I created previously, I receive an User does not exist error message because this preview URL points to a different backend than the main application. I can see two Cognito user pools in the Cognito console, one for each environment.

I can control who can access the preview URL using similar access control settings that I use for the main URL.

When I am happy with the proposed changes, I merge the pull request on GitHub to trigger a new build and to deploy the change to the production environment. Amplify Console deletes the preview environment upon merging. The ephemeral backend environment created for the pull request also gets deleted.

Cypress testing
In addition to previewing changes before merging them to the main branch, we also added the capability to run end to end tests during your build process. You can use your favorite test framework to add unit or end-to-end tests to your application and automatically run the tests during the build phase. When you use Cypress test framework, Amplify Console detects the tests in your source tree and automatically adds the testing phase in your application build process.

Only projects that are passing all tests are pushed down your pipeline to the deployment phase. You can learn more about this and follow step by step instructions we posted a few weeks ago.

These two additions to Amplify Console allow you to gain higher confidence in the robustness of your pipeline and the quality of the code delivered to your production environment.

Availability
Web previews are available in all Regions where AWS Amplify Console is available today, at no additional cost on top of the regular Amplify Console pricing. With the AWS Free Usage Tier, you can get started for free. Upon sign up, new AWS customers receive 1,000 build minutes per month for the build and deploy feature, and 15 GB served per month and 5 GB data storage per month for the hosting.

— seb

Learn From Your VPC Flow Logs With Additional Meta-Data

Post Syndicated from Sébastien Stormacq original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/learn-from-your-vpc-flow-logs-with-additional-meta-data/

Flow Logs for Amazon Virtual Private Cloud enables you to capture information about the IP traffic going to and from network interfaces in your VPC. Flow Logs data can be published to Amazon CloudWatch Logs or Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3).

Since we launched VPC Flow Logs in 2015, you have been using it for variety of use-cases like troubleshooting connectivity issues across your VPCs, intrusion detection, anomaly detection, or archival for compliance purposes. Until today, VPC Flow Logs provided information that included source IP, source port, destination IP, destination port, action (accept, reject) and status. Once enabled, a VPC Flow Log entry looks like the one below.

While this information was sufficient to understand most flows, it required additional computation and lookup to match IP addresses to instance IDs or to guess the directionality of the flow to come to meaningful conclusions.

Today we are announcing the availability of additional meta data to include in your Flow Logs records to better understand network flows. The enriched Flow Logs will allow you to simplify your scripts or remove the need for postprocessing altogether, by reducing the number of computations or lookups required to extract meaningful information from the log data.

When you create a new VPC Flow Log, in addition to existing fields, you can now choose to add the following meta-data:

  • vpc-id : the ID of the VPC containing the source Elastic Network Interface (ENI).
  • subnet-id : the ID of the subnet containing the source ENI.
  • instance-id : the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instance ID of the instance associated with the source interface. When the ENI is placed by AWS services (for example, AWS PrivateLink, NAT Gateway, Network Load Balancer etc) this field will be “-
  • tcp-flags : the bitmask for TCP Flags observed within the aggregation period. For example, FIN is 0x01 (1), SYN is 0x02 (2), ACK is 0x10 (16), SYN + ACK is 0x12 (18), etc. (the bits are specified in “Control Bits” section of RFC793 “Transmission Control Protocol Specification”).
    This allows to understand who initiated or terminated the connection. TCP uses a three way handshake to establish a connection. The connecting machine sends a SYN packet to the destination, the destination replies with a SYN + ACK and, finally, the connecting machine sends an ACK. In the Flow Logs, the handshake is shown as two lines, with tcp-flags values of 2 (SYN), 18 (SYN + ACK).  ACK is reported only when it is accompanied with SYN (otherwise it would be too much noise for you to filter out).
  • type : the type of traffic : IPV4, IPV6 or Elastic Fabric Adapter.
  • pkt-srcaddr : the packet-level IP address of the source. You typically use this field in conjunction with srcaddr to distinguish between the IP address of an intermediate layer through which traffic flows, such as a NAT gateway.
  • pkt-dstaddr : the packet-level destination IP address, similar to the previous one, but for destination IP addresses.

To create a VPC Flow Log, you can use the AWS Management Console, the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) or the CreateFlowLogs API and select which additional information and the order you want to consume the fields, for example:

Or using the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) as below:

$ aws ec2 create-flow-logs --resource-type VPC \
                            --region eu-west-1 \
                            --resource-ids vpc-12345678 \
                            --traffic-type ALL  \
                            --log-destination-type s3 \
                            --log-destination arn:aws:s3:::sst-vpc-demo \
                            --log-format '${version} ${vpc-id} ${subnet-id} ${instance-id} ${interface-id} ${account-id} ${type} ${srcaddr} ${dstaddr} ${srcport} ${dstport} ${pkt-srcaddr} ${pkt-dstaddr} ${protocol} ${bytes} ${packets} ${start} ${end} ${action} ${tcp-flags} ${log-status}'

# be sure to replace the bucket name and VPC ID !

{
    "ClientToken": "1A....HoP=",
    "FlowLogIds": [
        "fl-12345678123456789"
    ],
    "Unsuccessful": [] 
}

Enriched VPC Flow Logs are delivered to S3. We will automatically add the required S3 Bucket Policy to authorize VPC Flow Logs to write to your S3 bucket. VPC Flow Logs does not capture real-time log streams for your network interface, it might take several minutes to begin collecting and publishing data to the chosen destinations. Your logs will eventually be available on S3 at s3://<bucket name>/AWSLogs/<account id>/vpcflowlogs/<region>/<year>/<month>/<day>/

An SSH connection from my laptop with IP address 90.90.0.200 to an EC2 instance would appear like this :

3 vpc-exxxxxx2 subnet-8xxxxf3 i-0bfxxxxxxaf eni-08xxxxxxa5 48xxxxxx93 IPv4 172.31.22.145 90.90.0.200 22 62897 172.31.22.145 90.90.0.200 6 5225 24 1566328660 1566328672 ACCEPT 18 OK
3 vpc-exxxxxx2 subnet-8xxxxf3 i-0bfxxxxxxaf eni-08xxxxxxa5 48xxxxxx93 IPv4 90.90.0.200 172.31.22.145 62897 22 90.90.0.200 172.31.22.145 6 4877 29 1566328660 1566328672 ACCEPT 2 OK

172.31.22.145 is the private IP address of the EC2 instance, the one you see when you type ifconfig on the instance.  All flags are “OR”ed during aggregation period. When connection is short, probably both SYN and FIN (3), as well as SYN+ACK and FIN (19) will be set for the same lines.

Once a Flow Log is created, you can not add additional fields or modify the structure of the log to ensure you will not accidently break scripts consuming this data. Any modification will require you to delete and recreate the VPC Flow Logs. There is no additional cost to capture the extra information in the VPC Flow Logs, normal VPC Flow Log pricing applies, remember that Enriched VPC Flow Log records might consume more storage when selecting all fields.  We do recommend to select only the fields relevant to your use-cases.

Enriched VPC Flow Logs is available in all regions where VPC Flow logs is available, you can start to use it today.

— seb

PS: I heard from the team they are working on adding additional meta-data to the logs, stay tuned for updates.

Amazon Transcribe Streaming Now Supports WebSockets

Post Syndicated from Brandon West original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-transcribe-streaming-now-supports-websockets/

I love services like Amazon Transcribe. They are the kind of just-futuristic-enough technology that excites my imagination the same way that magic does. It’s incredible that we have accurate, automatic speech recognition for a variety of languages and accents, in real-time. There are so many use-cases, and nearly all of them are intriguing. Until now, the Amazon Transcribe Streaming API available has been available using HTTP/2 streaming. Today, we’re adding WebSockets as another integration option for bringing real-time voice capabilities to the things you build.

In this post, we are going to transcribe speech in real-time using only client-side JavaScript in a browser. But before we can build, we need a foundation. We’ll review just enough information about Amazon Transcribe, WebSockets, and the Amazon Transcribe Streaming API to broadly explain the demo. For more detailed information, check out the Amazon Transcribe docs.

If you are itching to see things in action, you can head directly to the demo, but I recommend taking a quick read through this post first.

What is Amazon Transcribe?

Amazon Transcribe applies machine learning models to convert speech in audio to text transcriptions. One of the most powerful features of Amazon Transcribe is the ability to perform real-time transcription of audio. Until now, this functionality has been available via HTTP/2 streams. Today, we’re announcing the ability to connect to Amazon Transcribe using WebSockets as well.

For real-time transcription, Amazon Transcribe currently supports British English (en-GB), US English (en-US), French (fr-FR), Canadian French (fr-CA), and US Spanish (es-US).

What are WebSockets?

WebSockets are a protocol built on top of TCP, like HTTP. While HTTP is great for short-lived requests, it hasn’t historically been good at handling situations that require persistent real-time communications. While an HTTP connection is normally closed at the end of the message, a WebSocket connection remains open. This means that messages can be sent bi-directionally with no bandwidth or latency added by handshaking and negotiating a connection. WebSocket connections are full-duplex, meaning that the server can client can both transmit data at the same time. They were also designed for cross-domain usage, so there’s no messing around with cross-origin resource sharing (CORS) as there is with HTTP.

HTTP/2 streams solve a lot of the issues that HTTP had with real-time communications, and the first Amazon Transcribe Streaming API available uses HTTP/2. WebSocket support opens Amazon Transcribe Streaming up to a wider audience, and makes integrations easier for customers that might have existing WebSocket-based integrations or knowledge.

How the Amazon Transcribe Streaming API Works

Authorization

The first thing we need to do is authorize an IAM user to use Amazon Transcribe Streaming WebSockets. In the AWS Management Console, attach the following policy to your user:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Sid": "transcribestreaming",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": "transcribe:StartStreamTranscriptionWebSocket",
            "Resource": "*"
        }
    ]
}

Authentication

Transcribe uses AWS Signature Version 4 to authenticate requests. For WebSocket connections, use a pre-signed URL, that contains all of the necessary information is passed as query parameters in the URL. This gives us an authenticated endpoint that we can use to establish our WebSocket.

Required Parameters

All of the required parameters are included in our pre-signed URL as part of the query string. These are:

  • language-code: The language code. One of en-US, en-GB, fr-FR, fr-CA, es-US.
  • sample-rate: The sample rate of the audio, in Hz. Max of 16000 for en-US and es-US, and 8000 for the other languages.
  • media-encoding: Currently only pcm is valid.
  • vocabulary-name: Amazon Transcribe allows you to define custom vocabularies for uncommon or unique words that you expect to see in your data. To use a custom vocabulary, reference it here.

Audio Data Requirements

There are a few things that we need to know before we start sending data. First, Transcribe expects audio to be encoded as PCM data. The sample rate of a digital audio file relates to the quality of the captured audio. It is the number of times per second (Hz) that the analog signal is checked in order to generate the digital signal. For high-quality data, a sample rate of 16,000 Hz or higher is recommended. For lower-quality audio, such as a phone conversation, use a sample rate of 8,000 Hz. Currently, US English (en-US) and US Spanish (es-US) support sample rates up to 48,000 Hz. Other languages support rates up to 16,000 Hz.

In our demo, the file lib/audioUtils.js contains a downsampleBuffer() function for reducing the sample rate of the incoming audio bytes from the browser, and a pcmEncode() function that takes the raw audio bytes and converts them to PCM.

Request Format

Once we’ve got our audio encoding as PCM data with the right sample rate, we need to wrap it in an envelope before we send it across the WebSocket connection. Each messages consists of three headers, followed by the PCM-encoded audio bytes in the message body. The entire message is then encoded as a binary event stream message and sent. If you’ve used the HTTP/2 API before, there’s one difference that I think makes using WebSockets a bit more straightforward, which is that you don’t need to cryptographically sign each chunk of audio data you send.

Response Format

The messages we receive follow the same general format: they are binary-encoded event stream messages, with three headers and a body. But instead of audio bytes, the message body contains a Transcript object. Partial responses are returned until a natural stopping point in the audio is determined. For more details on how this response is formatted, check out the docs and have a look at the handleEventStreamMessage() function in main.js.

Let’s See the Demo!

Now that we’ve got some context, let’s try out a demo. I’ve deployed it using AWS Amplify Console – take a look, or push the button to deploy your own copy. Enter the Access ID and Secret Key for the IAM User you authorized earlier, hit the Start Transcription button, and start speaking into your microphone.

Deploy to Amplify Console

The complete project is available on GitHub. The most important file is lib/main.js. This file defines all our required dependencies, wires up the buttons and form fields in index.html, accesses the microphone stream, and pushes the data to Transcribe over the WebSocket. The code has been thoroughly commented and will hopefully be easy to understand, but if you have questions, feel free to open issues on the GitHub repo and I’ll be happy to help. I’d like to extend a special thanks to Karan Grover, Software Development Engineer on the Transcribe team, for providing the code that formed that basis of this demo.

New Regions, New Features, and a New Web Site

Post Syndicated from Brent Meyer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/messaging-and-targeting/new-regions-new-features-and-a-new-web-site/

It’s a busy time here on the Digital User Engagement Team at AWS!

Last week, we made Amazon Pinpoint available in the Asia Pacific (Mumbai) and Asia Pacific (Sydney) AWS Regions. This is great news for new Pinpoint customers in these areas of the globe who were previously concerned with issues related to latency and data residency. Existing Amazon Pinpoint customers can also use these new Regions to increase availability and create geographical redundancy.

On Tuesday of this week, we also launched two exciting improvements to the Amazon Pinpoint console. The first improvement is a tool that you can use to import customer segments in just a few clicks. Previously, if you wanted to import customer data into Pinpoint, you had to save the data in a CSV or JSON file, upload it to an S3 bucket, create a segment in Pinpoint, and enter the full path to the S3 bucket. Now, you can drag and drop files right into the segment importer. To learn more, see the Pinpoint User Guide.

The other new feature that we released this week is an improved email editor. Our previous email editor only allowed you to include a limited set of HTML tags in your emails. With our new editor, however, you can include any HTML tags that you want. The new editor also includes a helpful side-by-side view that renders your message in real-time, as shown in the following image.

Users who don’t want to work with HTML code can also use the Design view to create and modify emails in an intuitive, WYSIWYG interface. For more information, see the Pinpoint User Guide.

Finally, we launched a new website for Amazon Pinpoint at https://aws.amazon.com/pinpoint. On our new site, you can learn more about the capabilities of Amazon Pinpoint. You’ll find in-depth information about all of the features, channels, and use cases that Amazon Pinpoint supports.

Every day, we’re amazed by the things that our customers do with Amazon Pinpoint. We hope these changes help you do even more incredible things!

Compute Module 3+ on sale now from $25

Post Syndicated from James Adams original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/compute-module-3-on-sale-now-from-25/

Today we bring you the latest iteration of the Raspberry Pi Compute Module series: Compute Module 3+ (CM3+). This newest version of our flexible board for industrial applications offers over ten times the ARM performance, twice the RAM capacity, and up to eight times the Flash capacity of the original Compute Module.

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+

A long time ago…

On 7 April 2014 we launched the original Compute Module (CM1), with a Broadcom BCM2835 application processor, a single-core ARM11 at 700MHz, 512MB of RAM, and 4GB of eMMC Flash. Although it seems like yesterday, that was nearly half a decade ago! At that point I had no kids, looked significantly younger (probably because I had no kids), and had more hair (fortunately I’m still better off in that department than Eben). [This is fair – Ed.]

Just under three years later we launched Compute Module 3 (CM3) based on the quad-core BCM2837A1, and now, almost exactly two years on, we bring you the CM3+.

The Compute Module has evolved

While we’ve greatly improved the performance, RAM capacity, and Flash capacity of the Compute Module, some things remain the same: CM3+ is an evolution of CM3 and CM1, bringing new features while keeping the form factor, electrical compatibility, price point, and ease of use of the earlier products.

Our aim for the Compute Module was to deliver the core Raspberry Pi technology in a form factor that allowed others to incorporate it into their own products cheaply and easily. If someone wanted to create a Raspberry Pi-based product but found the Model A or B Raspberry Pi boards did not fit their needs, they could use a Compute Module, create a simple low-tech carrier PCB, and make their own thing.

It’s for enterprises of all sizes

We limit the price so that the “maker in a shed” is not disadvantaged when producing only a few hundred products relative to professionals with much larger production runs. The Compute Module takes care of the high-tech bits (fine-pitched BGAs, high-speed memory interfaces, and core power supply), allowing the designer to focus on the differentiating features they really care about. The eMMC Flash device on a Compute Module is more reliable and robust than normal SD cards, so it is more suited to industrial applications. The Compute Module also provides more interfaces than the regular Raspberry Pi, supporting two cameras and two displays, as well as extra GPIO.

A Compute Module 3+ inserted into a Compute Module IO board

CM3+ in CMIO board

CM1 and CM3 have proven very popular, with sales increasing steadily. We don’t generally get to see what the majority of our module customers are using them for, because they’re often companies that understandably want to keep the insides of their products secret, but one nice example application is Revolution Pi from Kunbus. Many NEC digital-signage displays incorporate a socket for CM3, and there are some excellent community efforts too, of which our current favourite is this nifty dual camera board. We’ve also seen enterprising companies start offering turnkey design services using the Compute Module, such as that offered by Kunst Engineering.

So what is Compute Module 3+?

CM3+ is derived from the CM3 board, but incorporates the improved thermal design and Broadcom BCM2837B0 application processor from Raspberry Pi 3B+. This means that, with the exception of a small increase in z-height, CM3+ is a drop-in replacement for CM3 from an electrical and form-factor perspective. Note that due to power-supply limitations the maximum processor speed remains at 1.2GHz, compared to 1.4GHz for Raspberry Pi 3B+.

One of the most frequent requests from users and customers is for Compute Module variants with more on-board Flash memory. CM1 and CM3 both came with 4GB of Flash, and although we are fans of the Henry Ford philosophy of customer choice (“you can have any colour, as long as it’s black”), it was obvious that there was a need for more official options.

With CM3+ we are making available three different eMMC Flash sizes, in addition to a Flash-less “Lite” variant, all at competitive prices:

ProductUnit price
CM3+/Lite$25
CM3+/8GB$30
CM3+/16GB$35
CM3+/32GB$40

As CM3+ is a new product, it will need a recent version of the Raspberry Pi firmware (and operating system such as Raspbian) to operate correctly.

Thermals

Due to the improved PCB thermal design and BCM2837B0 processor, the CM3+ has better thermal behaviour under load. It has more thermal mass and can draw heat away from the processor faster than CM3. This can translate into lower average temperatures and/or longer sustained operation under heavy load before the processor hits 80°C and begins to reduce its clock speed.

Note that CM3+ will still output the same amount of heat as CM3 for any given application, so performance (and particularly sustained performance) will depend heavily on the design of the carrier PCB and enclosure. As always, we recommend that product designers pay careful attention to thermal performance under expected use cases.

Having characterised the behaviour of the new product, we have broadened the rated ambient temperature range to -20°C to 70°C.

Development Kit

We are also releasing a refreshed Compute Module 3+ Development Kit today. This kit contains 1 x Lite and 1 x 32GB CM3+ module, a Compute Module IO board, camera and display adapters, jumper wires, and a programming cable.

Updated datasheet

Our Compute Module datasheets have been updated to include a new one for CM3+.

Long-term availability

CM3+ will be available until at least January 2026.

We are also moving the “legacy” CM1, CM3 and CM3 Lite products to “not recommended for new designs” status. They will continue to be available until at least January 2023 as previously stated, but we recommend customers use CM3+ for new designs, and where possible move existing designs to CM3+ for improved performance and longer availability.

Compute Module 3+ is, like Raspberry Pi 3B+, the last in a line of 40nm-based Raspberry Pi products. We feel that it’s a fitting end to the line, rolling in the best bits of Raspberry Pi 3B+ and providing users with more design flexibility in an all‑round better product. We hope you enjoy it.

The post Compute Module 3+ on sale now from $25 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

We’re hosting the UK’s first-ever Scratch Conference Europe

Post Syndicated from Helen Drury original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/announcing-scratch-conference-europe-2019/

We are excited to announce that we will host the first-ever Scratch Conference Europe in the UK this summer: from Friday 23 to Sunday 25 August at Churchill College, Cambridge!

A graphic highlighting the Scratch Conference Europe 2019 - taking place at Friday 23 to Sunday 25 August at Churchill College, Cambridge

Scratch Conference is a participatory event that gives hundreds of educators the chance to explore the creative ways in which people are programming and learning with Scratch. In even-numbered years, the conference is held at the MIT Media Lab, the birthplace of Scratch; in odd-numbered years, it takes place in other places around the globe.

Another graphic highlighting the Scratch Conference Europe 2019

Since 2019 is also the launch year of Scratch 3, we think it’s a fantastic opportunity for us to bring Scratch Conference Europe to the UK for the first time.

What you can look forward to

  • Hands-on, easy-to-follow workshops across a range of topics, including the new Scratch 3
  • Interactive projects to play with
  • Thought-provoking talks and keynotes
  • Plenty of informal chats, meetups, and opportunities for you to connect with other educators

Join us to become part of a growing community, discover how the Raspberry Pi Foundation can support you further, and develop your skills with Scratch as a creative tool for helping your students learn to code.

Contribute to Scratch Conference Europe

Would you like to contribute your own content at the event? We are looking for you in the community to share or host:

  • Project demos
  • Posters
  • Workshops
  • Discussion sessions
  • Presentations
  • Ignite talks

We warmly welcome young people under 18 as content contributors; they must be supported by an adult. All content contributors will be able to attend the whole event for free.

An over view of two people taking electronics pieces out of a box in order to try their hand at digital making using a Raspberry Pi and Scratch.

Find more details and apply to participate in this short online form.

Attend the conference

Tickets for Scratch Conference Europe will go on sale in April.

For updates, subscribe to Raspberry Pi LEARN, our monthly newsletter for educators, and keep an eye on @Raspberry_Pi on Twitter!

An update on Raspberry Fields

Since we’re hosting Scratch Conference Europe this year, our digital making festival Raspberry Fields will be back in 2020, even bigger and more packed with interactive family fun!

A young girl tries out a digital project at the Raspberry Pi event, Raspberry Fields 2018

Scratch is a project of the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the MIT Media Lab. It is available for free at scratch.mit.edu.

The post We’re hosting the UK’s first-ever Scratch Conference Europe appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

New product: Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ on sale now at $25

Post Syndicated from Eben Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/new-product-raspberry-pi-3-model-a/

TL;DR: you can now get the 1.4GHz clock speed, 5GHz wireless networking and improved thermals of Raspberry Pi 3B+ in a smaller form factor, and at the smaller price of $25. Meet the Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+.

New Product Alert: Raspberry Pi 3A+

You can now get the 1.4GHz clock speed, 5GHz wireless networking and improved thermals of Raspberry Pi 3B+ in a smaller form factor, and at the smaller price of $25. Meet the Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+.

Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+

Long-time readers will recall that back in 2014 the original Raspberry Pi 1 Model B+ was followed closely by a cut-down Model A+. By halving the RAM to 256MB, and removing the USB hub and Ethernet controller, we were able to hit a lower price point, and squeeze the product down to the size of a HAT.

Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+

Small but perfectly formed

Although we didn’t make A+ form-factor versions of Raspberry Pi 2 or 3, it has been one of our most frequently requested “missing” products. Now, with Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ shipping in volume, we’re able to fill that gap by releasing Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+.

Phenomenal cosmic powers! Itty-bitty living space

Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ incorporates most of the neat enhancements we made to its big brother, and features:

  • A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU
  • 512MB LPDDR2 SDRAM
  • Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2/BLE
  • Improved USB mass-storage booting
  • Improved thermal management

Like its big brother, the entire board is certified as a radio module under FCC rules, which in turn will significantly reduce the cost of conformance testing Raspberry Pi–based products.

In some ways this is rather a poignant product for us. Back in March, we explained that the 3+ platform is the final iteration of the “classic” Raspberry Pi: whatever we do next will of necessity be less of an evolution, because it will need new core silicon, on a new process node, with new memory technology. So 3A+ is about closing things out in style, answering one of our most frequent customer requests, and clearing the decks so we can start to think seriously about what comes next.

Just in case

Our official cases for Raspberry Pi 3B and 3B+ and Raspberry Pi Zero have been very popular, so of course we wanted to offer a case for this new device.

Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ in case without lid
Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ in case without lid
Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ in case

Unfortunately it’s not quite ready yet, but as you can see it’s rather pretty: we’re expecting it to be available from the start of December, just in time to serve as a stocking filler for the geek in your life.

The post New product: Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ on sale now at $25 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

A world-class computing education

Post Syndicated from Philip Colligan original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/world-class-computing-education/

I am delighted to share some big news today. The Raspberry Pi Foundation is part of a consortium that has secured over £78 million in government funding to make sure every child in every school in England has access to a world-leading computing education.

National Centre for Computing Education

Working with our partners, STEM Learning and the British Computer Society, we will establish a new National Centre for Computing Education, and deliver a comprehensive programme of support for computing teachers in primary and secondary schools. This will include resources, training, research, certification, and more.

A teacher works at a computer, smiling delightedly. Another adult, standing in the background, observes. national centre for computing education

All of the online resources and courses will be completely free for anyone to use. Face-to-face training will be available at no cost to teachers in priority schools, and at very low cost to teachers in other schools. We will also provide bursaries to ensure that schools can release teachers to take part in professional development.

Several children, some smiling broadly and some concentrating intently, work with Raspberry PI computers and electronic components in a classroom

An unprecedented level of investment

This level of investment in computing education is unprecedented anywhere in the world. It is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to transform the way we teach computing and computer science.

The announcement follows the Royal Society’s report from last November, which drew attention to the scale of the challenge. The report was quickly followed by a commitment from the Chancellor in last year’s budget statement that the government would invest £100 million in computing education across the UK. Earlier this year, the Department for Education launched a procurement process focused on England, and today’s announcement is the outcome of that process.

national centre for computing education

The consortium has been tasked with delivering three pieces of work:

  • A National Centre for Computing Education, which will establish a network of Computing Hubs to provide continuing professional development (CPD) and resources for computing teachers in primary and secondary schools and colleges. The Centre will also facilitate strong links with industry.
  • A teacher training programme to upskill existing teachers to teach GCSE Computer Science.
  • A programme to support AS- and A-level Computer Science students and teachers with high-quality resources and CPD.

national centre for computing education

A powerful coalition

One of the things I am most excited about is the amazing coalition of partners that has come together around the plans. The consortium brings together subject expertise and knowledge, significant experience of creating brilliant learning experiences and resources, and a track record of delivering high-quality professional development for educators. But we can’t do it on our own.

For example, we’re working with the University of Cambridge team that created Isaac Physics to adapt and extend that platform and programme to support teachers and students of Computer Science A Level.

Our friends at Google have provided practical support and a grant of £1 million to help us create free online courses that will help teachers develop the knowledge and skills to teach computing and computer science.

national centre for computing education

We’re working with the Behavioural Insights Team to make it as easy as possible for teachers to get involved with the programme, and with FutureLearn to provide high-quality online courses.

We’ll also be working in partnership with industry, universities, and non-profits, pooling our expertise and resources to provide the support that educators and schools desperately want. That’s not just a vague promise. As part of the bid process, we secured specific commitments from over 60 organisations who pledged to work with us to make our vision a reality.

A woman and a man sit at a desk, evidently collaborating on work on a laptop. The woman is smiling and the man is grinning and making an "A-OK" hand gesture.

Get involved

Over the coming weeks we’ll be sharing more about our plans. In the meantime, here’s how you can get involved:

  1. Check out the launch website for the National Centre for Computing Education and register your email for updates.
  2. Spread the word to teachers, school leaders, industry, non-profits, and anyone else you think might be interested. Send them a link to this blog, or share it on social media.
  3. Help us find amazing, talented people who can join the team to bring this all to life.

national centre for computing education

A message to readers outside England

Improving computing education should be a priority for every education system and every government in the world. This announcement is focused on computing in schools in England because it’s about funding that has come from the government for that purpose.

I am proud that the Raspberry Pi Foundation will be playing its part in transforming computing education in England. But our mission is global, and our commitment is that the resources and online courses we create will be freely available to anyone, anywhere in the world.

If you are a policy maker outside of England and want to talk about how we could collaborate to advance computing education in your country, please get in touch. We’d love to help.

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How to seamlessly domain join Amazon EC2 instances to a single AWS Managed Microsoft AD Directory from multiple accounts and VPCs

Post Syndicated from Peter Pereira original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-domain-join-amazon-ec2-instances-aws-managed-microsoft-ad-directory-multiple-accounts-vpcs/

You can now share a single AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory (also known as an AWS Managed Microsoft AD) with multiple AWS accounts within an AWS Region. This capability makes it easier and more cost-effective for you to manage directory-aware workloads from a single directory across accounts and Amazon Virtual Private Clouds (Amazon VPC). Instead of needing to manually domain join your Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud instances (EC2 instances) or create one directory per account and VPC, you can use your directory from any AWS account and from any VPC within an AWS Region.

In this post, I show you how to launch two EC2 instances, each in a separate Amazon VPC within the same AWS account (the directory consumer account), and then seamlessly domain-join both instances to a directory in another account (the directory owner account). You’ll accomplish this in four steps:

  1. Create an AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory.
  2. Establish networking connectivity between VPCs.
  3. Share the directory with the directory consumer account.
  4. Launch Amazon EC2 instances and seamlessly domain join to the directory.

Solution architecture

The following diagram shows the steps you’ll follow to use a single AWS Managed Microsoft AD in multiple accounts. Note that when you complete Step 3, AWS Microsoft Managed AD will create a shared directory in the directory consumer account. The shared directory contains the metadata that enables the EC2 seamless domain join to locate the directory in the directory owner account. Note that there are additional charges for directory sharing.
 

Figure 1: Architecture diagram showing directory sharing

Figure 1: Architecture diagram showing directory sharing

Step 1: Create an AWS Microsoft AD directory

First, follow the steps to create an AWS Microsoft AD directory in your directory owner AWS Account and Amazon VPC. In the examples I use throughout this post, my domain name is example.com, but remember to replace this with your own domain name.

When you create your directory, you’ll have the option in Step 3: Choose VPC and subnets to choose the subnets in which to deploy your domain controllers. AWS Microsoft AD ensures that you select subnets from different Availability Zones. In my example, I have no subnet preference, so I choose No Preference from the Subnets drop-down list.
 

Figure 2: Selecting Subnet preference

Figure 2: Selecting Subnet preference

Select Next to review your configuration, and then select Create directory. It can take 20-45 minutes for the directory creation process to finish. While AWS Managed Microsoft AD creates the directory, you can move on to the next step.

Step 2: Establish networking connectivity between VPCs

To domain join your Amazon EC2 instances to your directory, you need to establish networking connectivity between the VPCs. There are multiple methods of establishing networking connectivity between two VPCs. In this post, I’ll show you how to use Amazon VPC peering by performing the following steps:

  1. Create one VPC peering connection between the directory owner VPC-0 and directory consumer VPC-1, then create another connection between the directory owner VPC-0 and directory consumer VPC-2. For reference, here are my own VPC details:

    VPCCIDR block
    Directory owner VPC-0172.31.0.0/16
    Directory consumer VPC-110.0.0.0/16
    Directory consumer VPC-210.100.0.0/16
  2. Enable traffic routing between the peered VPCs by adding a route to your VPC route table that points to the VPC peering connection to route traffic to the other VPC in the peering connection. I’ve configured my directory owner VPC-0 route table by adding the following VPC peering connections:

    DestinationTarget
    172.31.0.0/16Local
    10.0.0.0/16pcx-0
    10.100.0.0/16pcx-1
  3. Configure each of the directory consumer VPC route tables by adding the peering connection with the directory owner VPC-0. If you want, you can also create and attach an Internet Gateway to your directory consumer VPCs. This enables the instances in the directory consumer VPCs to communicate with the AWS System Manager (SSM) agent that performs the domain join. Here are my directory consumer VPC route table configurations:
    VPC-1 route table:

    DestinationTarget
    10.0.0.0/16Local
    172.31.0.0/16pcx-0
    0.0.0.0/0igw-0

    VPC-2 route table:

    DestinationTarget
    10.100.10.10/16Local
    172.31.0.0/16pcx-1
    0.0.0.0/0igw-1
  4. Next, configure your directory consumer VPCs’ security group to enable outbound traffic by adding the Active Directory protocols and ports to the outbound rules table.

Step 3: Share the directory with the directory consumer account

Now that your networking is in place, you must make your directory visible to the directory consumer account. You can accomplish this by sharing your directory with the directory consumer account. Directory sharing works at the account level, which also makes the directory visible to all VPCs within the directory consumer account.

AWS Managed Microsoft AD provides two directory sharing methods: AWS Organizations and Handshake:

  • AWS Organizations makes it easier to share the directory within your organization because you can browse and validate the directory consumer accounts. To use this option, your organization must have all features enabled, and your directory must be in the organization master account. This method of sharing simplifies your setup because it doesn’t require the directory consumer accounts to accept your directory sharing request.
  • Handshake enables directory sharing when you aren’t using AWS Organizations. The handshake method requires the directory consumer account to accept the directory sharing request.

In my example, I’ll walk you through the steps to use AWS Organizations to share a directory:

  1. Open the AWS Management Console, then select Directory Service and select the directory you want to share (in my case, example.com). Select the Actions button, and then the Share directory option.
  2. Select Share this directory with AWS accounts inside your organization, then choose the Enable Access to AWS Organizations button. This allows your AWS account to list all accounts in your Organizations in the AWS Directory Service console.
  3. Select your directory consumer account (in my example, Consumer Example) from the Organization accounts browser, then select the Add button.
     
    Figure 3: Select the account and then select "Add"

    Figure 3: Select the account and then select “Add”

  4. You should now be able to see your directory consumer account in the Selected Accounts table. Select the Share button to share your directory with that account:
     
    Figure 4: Selected accounts and the "Share" button

    Figure 4: Selected accounts and the “Share” button

    To share your directory with multiple directory consumer accounts, you can repeat steps 3 and 4 for each account.

    When you’re finished sharing, AWS Managed Microsoft AD will create a shared directory in each directory consumer account. The shared directory contains the metadata to locate the directory in the directory owner account. Each shared directory has a unique identifier (Shared directory ID). After you’ve shared your directory, you can find your shared directory IDs in the Scale & Share tab in the AWS Directory Service console. In my example, AWS Managed Microsoft AD created the shared directory ID d-90673f8d56 in the Consumer Example account:
     

    Figure 5: Confirmation notification about successful sharing

    Figure 5: Confirmation notification about successful sharing

    You can see the shared directory details in your directory consumer account by opening the AWS Management Console, choosing Directory Service, selecting the Directories shared with me option in the left menu, and then choosing the appropriate Shared directory ID link:
     

    Figure 6: Shared account details example

    Figure 6: Shared account details example

Step 4: Launch Amazon EC2 instances and seamlessly domain join to the directory

Now that you’ve established the networking between your VPCs and shared the directory, you’re ready to launch EC2 instances in your directory consumer VPCs and seamlessly domain join to your directory. In my example, I use the Amazon EC2 console but you can also use AWS Systems Manager.

Follow the prompts of the Amazon EC2 launch instance wizard to select a Windows server instance type. When you reach Step 3: Configure Instance Details, select the shared directory that locates your domain in the directory owner account. (I’ve chosen d-926726739b, which will locate the domain example.com.) Then select the textEC2DomainJoin IAM role. Choose the Review and Launch button, and then the Launch button on the following screen.
 

Figure 7: The "Review and Launch" button

Figure 7: The “Review and Launch” button

Now that you’ve joined your Amazon EC2 instance to the domain, you can log into your instance using a Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) client with the credentials from your AD user account.

You can then install and run AD-aware workloads such as Microsoft SharePoint on the instance, and the application will use your directory. To launch your second instance, just repeat Step 4: Launch Amazon EC2 instances and seamlessly domain join to the directory, selecting the VPC-2 instead of VPC-1. This makes it easier and quicker for you to deploy and manage EC2 instances using the credentials from a single AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory across multiple accounts and VPCs.

Summary

In this blog post, I demonstrate how to seamlessly domain join Amazon EC2 instances from multiple accounts and VPCs to a single AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory. By sharing the directory with multiple accounts, you can simplify the management and deployment of directory-aware workloads on Amazon EC2 instances. This eliminates the need to manually domain join the instances or create one directory per account and VPC. In addition, with AWS Managed Microsoft AD and AWS Systems Manager, you can automate your Amazon EC2 deployments and seamlessly domain join to your single directory from any account and VPC without the need to write PowerShell code using AWS Command Line Interface or application programming interfaces.

To learn more about AWS Directory Service, see the AWS Directory Service home page. If you have questions, post them on the Directory Service forum.

Want more AWS Security news? Follow us on Twitter.

Peter Pereira

Peter is a Senior Technical Product Manager working on AWS Directory Service. He enjoys the customer obsession culture at Amazon because it relates with his previous experience of managing IT in multiple industries, including engineering, manufacturing, and education. Outside work he is the “Dad Master Grill” and loves to spend time with his family. He holds an MBA from BYU and an undergraduate degree from the University of State of Santa Catarina.

Working with the Scout Association on digital skills for life

Post Syndicated from Philip Colligan original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/working-with-scout-association-digital-skills-for-life/

Today we’re launching a new partnership between the Scouts and the Raspberry Pi Foundation that will help tens of thousands of young people learn crucial digital skills for life. In this blog post, I want to explain what we’ve got planned, why it matters, and how you can get involved.

This is personal

First, let me tell you why this partnership matters to me. As a child growing up in North Wales in the 1980s, Scouting changed my life. My time with 2nd Rhyl provided me with countless opportunities to grow and develop new skills. It taught me about teamwork and community in ways that continue to shape my decisions today.

As my own kids (now seven and ten) have joined Scouting, I’ve seen the same opportunities opening up for them, and like so many parents, I’ve come back to the movement as a volunteer to support their local section. So this is deeply personal for me, and the same is true for many of my colleagues at the Raspberry Pi Foundation who in different ways have been part of the Scouting movement.

That shouldn’t come as a surprise. Scouting and Raspberry Pi share many of the same values. We are both community-led movements that aim to help young people develop the skills they need for life. We are both powered by an amazing army of volunteers who give their time to support that mission. We both care about inclusiveness, and pride ourselves on combining fun with learning by doing.

Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi started life in 2008 as a response to the problem that too many young people were growing up without the skills to create with technology. Our goal is that everyone should be able to harness the power of computing and digital technologies, for work, to solve problems that matter to them, and to express themselves creatively.

In 2012 we launched our first product, the world’s first $35 computer. Just six years on, we have sold over 20 million Raspberry Pi computers and helped kickstart a global movement for digital skills.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation now runs the world’s largest network of volunteer-led computing clubs (Code Clubs and CoderDojos), and creates free educational resources that are used by millions of young people all over the world to learn how to create with digital technologies. And lots of what we are able to achieve is because of partnerships with fantastic organisations that share our goals. For example, through our partnership with the European Space Agency, thousands of young people have written code that has run on two Raspberry Pi computers that Tim Peake took to the International Space Station as part of his Mission Principia.

Digital makers

Today we’re launching the new Digital Maker Staged Activity Badge to help tens of thousands of young people learn how to create with technology through Scouting. Over the past few months, we’ve been working with the Scouts all over the UK to develop and test the new badge requirements, along with guidance, project ideas, and resources that really make them work for Scouting. We know that we need to get two things right: relevance and accessibility.

Relevance is all about making sure that the activities and resources we provide are a really good fit for Scouting and Scouting’s mission to equip young people with skills for life. From the digital compass to nature cameras and the reinvented wide game, we’ve had a lot of fun thinking about ways we can bring to life the crucial role that digital technologies can play in the outdoors and adventure.

Compass Coding with Raspberry Pi

We are beyond excited to be launching a new partnership with the Raspberry Pi Foundation, which will help tens of thousands of young people learn digital skills for life.

We also know that there are great opportunities for Scouts to use digital technologies to solve social problems in their communities, reflecting the movement’s commitment to social action. Today we’re launching the first set of project ideas and resources, with many more to follow over the coming weeks and months.

Accessibility is about providing every Scout leader with the confidence, support, and kit to enable them to offer the Digital Maker Staged Activity Badge to their young people. A lot of work and care has gone into designing activities that require very little equipment: for example, activities at Stages 1 and 2 can be completed with a laptop without access to the internet. For the activities that do require kit, we will be working with Scout Stores and districts to make low-cost kit available to buy or loan.

We’re producing accessible instructions, worksheets, and videos to help leaders run sessions with confidence, and we’ll also be planning training for leaders. We will work with our network of Code Clubs and CoderDojos to connect them with local sections to organise joint activities, bringing both kit and expertise along with them.




Get involved

Today’s launch is just the start. We’ll be developing our partnership over the next few years, and we can’t wait for you to join us in getting more young people making things with technology.

Take a look at the brand-new Raspberry Pi resources designed especially for Scouts, to get young people making and creating right away.

The post Working with the Scout Association on digital skills for life appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Backblaze at NAB 2018 in Las Vegas

Post Syndicated from Roderick Bauer original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/backblaze-at-nab-2018-in-las-vegas/

Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage NAB Booth

Backblaze just returned from exhibiting at NAB in Las Vegas, April 9-12, where the response to our recent announcements was tremendous. In case you missed the news, Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage continues to extend its lead as the most affordable, high performance cloud on the planet.

Backblaze’s News at NAB

Backblaze at NAB 2018 in Las Vegas

The Backblaze booth just before opening

What We Were Asked at NAB

Our booth was busy from start to finish with attendees interested in learning more about Backblaze and B2 Cloud Storage. Here are the questions we were asked most often in the booth.

Q. How long has Backblaze been in business?
A. The company was founded in 2007. Today, we have over 500 petabytes of data from customers in over 150 countries.

B2 Partners at NAB 2018

Q. Where is your data stored?
A. We have data centers in California and Arizona and expect to expand to Europe by the end of the year.

Q. How can your services be so inexpensive?
A. Backblaze’s goal from the beginning was to offer cloud backup and storage that was easy to use and affordable. All the existing options were simply too expensive to be viable, so we created our own infrastructure. Our purpose-built storage system — the Backblaze’s Storage Pod — is recognized as one of the most cost efficient storage platforms available.

Q. Tell me about your hardware.
A. Backblaze’s Storage Pods hold 60 HDDs each, containing as much as 720TB data per pod, stored using Reed-Solomon error correction. Storage Pods are arranged in Tomes with twenty Storage Pods making up a Vault.

Q. Where do you fit in the data workflow?
A. People typically use B2 in for archiving completed projects. All data is readily available for download from B2, making it more convenient than off-line storage. In addition, DAM and MAM systems such as CatDV, axle ai, Cantemo, and others have integrated with B2 to store raw images behind the proxies.

Q. Who uses B2 in the M&E business?
A. KLRU-TV, the PBS station in Austin Texas, uses B2 to archive their entire 43 year catalog of Austin City Limits episodes and related materials. WunderVu, the production house for Pixvana, uses B2 to back up and archive their local storage systems on which they build virtual reality experiences for their customers.

Q. You’re the company that publishes the hard drive stats, right?
A. Yes, we are!

Backblaze Case Studies and Swag at NAB 2018 in Las Vegas

Were You at NAB?

If you were, we hope you stopped by the Backblaze booth to say hello. We’d like to hear what you saw at the show that was interesting or exciting. Please tell us in the comments.

The post Backblaze at NAB 2018 in Las Vegas appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ on sale now at $35

Post Syndicated from Eben Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-3-model-bplus-sale-now-35/

Here’s a long post. We think you’ll find it interesting. If you don’t have time to read it all, we recommend you watch this video, which will fill you in with everything you need, and then head straight to the product page to fill yer boots. (We recommend the video anyway, even if you do have time for a long read. ‘Cos it’s fab.)

A BRAND-NEW PI FOR π DAY

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is now on sale now for $35, featuring: – A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU – Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2 – Faster Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0) – Power-over-Ethernet support (with separate PoE HAT) – Improved PXE network and USB mass-storage booting – Improved thermal management Alongside a 200MHz increase in peak CPU clock frequency, we have roughly three times the wired and wireless network throughput, and the ability to sustain high performance for much longer periods.

If you’ve been a Raspberry Pi watcher for a while now, you’ll have a bit of a feel for how we update our products. Just over two years ago, we released Raspberry Pi 3 Model B. This was our first 64-bit product, and our first product to feature integrated wireless connectivity. Since then, we’ve sold over nine million Raspberry Pi 3 units (we’ve sold 19 million Raspberry Pis in total), which have been put to work in schools, homes, offices and factories all over the globe.

Those Raspberry Pi watchers will know that we have a history of releasing improved versions of our products a couple of years into their lives. The first example was Raspberry Pi 1 Model B+, which added two additional USB ports, introduced our current form factor, and rolled up a variety of other feedback from the community. Raspberry Pi 2 didn’t get this treatment, of course, as it was superseded after only one year; but it feels like it’s high time that Raspberry Pi 3 received the “plus” treatment.

So, without further ado, Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is now on sale for $35 (the same price as the existing Raspberry Pi 3 Model B), featuring:

  • A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU
  • Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2
  • Faster Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0)
  • Power-over-Ethernet support (with separate PoE HAT)
  • Improved PXE network and USB mass-storage booting
  • Improved thermal management

Alongside a 200MHz increase in peak CPU clock frequency, we have roughly three times the wired and wireless network throughput, and the ability to sustain high performance for much longer periods.

Behold the shiny

Raspberry Pi 3B+ is available to buy today from our network of Approved Resellers.

New features, new chips

Roger Thornton did the design work on this revision of the Raspberry Pi. Here, he and I have a chat about what’s new.

Introducing the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is now on sale now for $35, featuring: – A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU – Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2 – Faster Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0) – Power-over-Ethernet support (with separate PoE HAT) – Improved PXE network and USB mass-storage booting – Improved thermal management Alongside a 200MHz increase in peak CPU clock frequency, we have roughly three times the wired and wireless network throughput, and the ability to sustain high performance for much longer periods.

The new product is built around BCM2837B0, an updated version of the 64-bit Broadcom application processor used in Raspberry Pi 3B, which incorporates power integrity optimisations, and a heat spreader (that’s the shiny metal bit you can see in the photos). Together these allow us to reach higher clock frequencies (or to run at lower voltages to reduce power consumption), and to more accurately monitor and control the temperature of the chip.

Dual-band wireless LAN and Bluetooth are provided by the Cypress CYW43455 “combo” chip, connected to a Proant PCB antenna similar to the one used on Raspberry Pi Zero W. Compared to its predecessor, Raspberry Pi 3B+ delivers somewhat better performance in the 2.4GHz band, and far better performance in the 5GHz band, as demonstrated by these iperf results from LibreELEC developer Milhouse.

Tx bandwidth (Mb/s)Rx bandwidth (Mb/s)
Raspberry Pi 3B35.735.6
Raspberry Pi 3B+ (2.4GHz)46.746.3
Raspberry Pi 3B+ (5GHz)102102

The wireless circuitry is encapsulated under a metal shield, rather fetchingly embossed with our logo. This has allowed us to certify the entire board as a radio module under FCC rules, which in turn will significantly reduce the cost of conformance testing Raspberry Pi-based products.

We’ll be teaching metalwork next.

Previous Raspberry Pi devices have used the LAN951x family of chips, which combine a USB hub and 10/100 Ethernet controller. For Raspberry Pi 3B+, Microchip have supported us with an upgraded version, LAN7515, which supports Gigabit Ethernet. While the USB 2.0 connection to the application processor limits the available bandwidth, we still see roughly a threefold increase in throughput compared to Raspberry Pi 3B. Again, here are some typical iperf results.

Tx bandwidth (Mb/s)Rx bandwidth (Mb/s)
Raspberry Pi 3B94.195.5
Raspberry Pi 3B+315315

We use a magjack that supports Power over Ethernet (PoE), and bring the relevant signals to a new 4-pin header. We will shortly launch a PoE HAT which can generate the 5V necessary to power the Raspberry Pi from the 48V PoE supply.

There… are… four… pins!

Coming soon to a Raspberry Pi 3B+ near you

Raspberry Pi 3B was our first product to support PXE Ethernet boot. Testing it in the wild shook out a number of compatibility issues with particular switches and traffic environments. Gordon has rolled up fixes for all known issues into the BCM2837B0 boot ROM, and PXE boot is now enabled by default.

Clocking, voltages and thermals

The improved power integrity of the BCM2837B0 package, and the improved regulation accuracy of our new MaxLinear MxL7704 power management IC, have allowed us to tune our clocking and voltage rules for both better peak performance and longer-duration sustained performance.

Below 70°C, we use the improvements to increase the core frequency to 1.4GHz. Above 70°C, we drop to 1.2GHz, and use the improvements to decrease the core voltage, increasing the period of time before we reach our 80°C thermal throttle; the reduction in power consumption is such that many use cases will never reach the throttle. Like a modern smartphone, we treat the thermal mass of the device as a resource, to be spent carefully with the goal of optimising user experience.

This graph, courtesy of Gareth Halfacree, demonstrates that Raspberry Pi 3B+ runs faster and at a lower temperature for the duration of an eight‑minute quad‑core Sysbench CPU test.

Note that Raspberry Pi 3B+ does consume substantially more power than its predecessor. We strongly encourage you to use a high-quality 2.5A power supply, such as the official Raspberry Pi Universal Power Supply.

FAQs

We’ll keep updating this list over the next couple of days, but here are a few to get you started.

Are you discontinuing earlier Raspberry Pi models?

No. We have a lot of industrial customers who will want to stick with the existing products for the time being. We’ll keep building these models for as long as there’s demand. Raspberry Pi 1B+, Raspberry Pi 2B, and Raspberry Pi 3B will continue to sell for $25, $35, and $35 respectively.

What about Model A+?

Raspberry Pi 1A+ continues to be the $20 entry-level “big” Raspberry Pi for the time being. We are considering the possibility of producing a Raspberry Pi 3A+ in due course.

What about the Compute Module?

CM1, CM3 and CM3L will continue to be available. We may offer versions of CM3 and CM3L with BCM2837B0 in due course, depending on customer demand.

Are you still using VideoCore?

Yes. VideoCore IV 3D is the only publicly-documented 3D graphics core for ARM‑based SoCs, and we want to make Raspberry Pi more open over time, not less.

Credits

A project like this requires a vast amount of focused work from a large team over an extended period. Particular credit is due to Roger Thornton, who designed the board and ran the exhaustive (and exhausting) RF compliance campaign, and to the team at the Sony UK Technology Centre in Pencoed, South Wales. A partial list of others who made major direct contributions to the BCM2837B0 chip program, CYW43455 integration, LAN7515 and MxL7704 developments, and Raspberry Pi 3B+ itself follows:

James Adams, David Armour, Jonathan Bell, Maria Blazquez, Jamie Brogan-Shaw, Mike Buffham, Rob Campling, Cindy Cao, Victor Carmon, KK Chan, Nick Chase, Nigel Cheetham, Scott Clark, Nigel Clift, Dominic Cobley, Peter Coyle, John Cronk, Di Dai, Kurt Dennis, David Doyle, Andrew Edwards, Phil Elwell, John Ferdinand, Doug Freegard, Ian Furlong, Shawn Guo, Philip Harrison, Jason Hicks, Stefan Ho, Andrew Hoare, Gordon Hollingworth, Tuomas Hollman, EikPei Hu, James Hughes, Andy Hulbert, Anand Jain, David John, Prasanna Kerekoppa, Shaik Labeeb, Trevor Latham, Steve Le, David Lee, David Lewsey, Sherman Li, Xizhe Li, Simon Long, Fu Luo Larson, Juan Martinez, Sandhya Menon, Ben Mercer, James Mills, Max Passell, Mark Perry, Eric Phiri, Ashwin Rao, Justin Rees, James Reilly, Matt Rowley, Akshaye Sama, Ian Saturley, Serge Schneider, Manuel Sedlmair, Shawn Shadburn, Veeresh Shivashimper, Graham Smith, Ben Stephens, Mike Stimson, Yuree Tchong, Stuart Thomson, John Wadsworth, Ian Watch, Sarah Williams, Jason Zhu.

If you’re not on this list and think you should be, please let me know, and accept my apologies.

The post Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ on sale now at $35 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

How to Delegate Administration of Your AWS Managed Microsoft AD Directory to Your On-Premises Active Directory Users

Post Syndicated from Vijay Sharma original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-delegate-administration-of-your-aws-managed-microsoft-ad-directory-to-your-on-premises-active-directory-users/

You can now enable your on-premises users administer your AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory, also known as AWS Managed Microsoft AD. Using an Active Directory (AD) trust and the new AWS delegated AD security groups, you can grant administrative permissions to your on-premises users by managing group membership in your on-premises AD directory. This simplifies how you manage who can perform administration. It also makes it easier for your administrators because they can sign in to their existing workstation with their on-premises AD credential to administer your AWS Managed Microsoft AD.

AWS created new domain local AD security groups (AWS delegated groups) in your AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory. Each AWS delegated group has unique AD administrative permissions. Users that are members in the new AWS delegated groups get permissions to perform administrative tasks, such as add users, configure fine-grained password policies and enable Microsoft enterprise Certificate Authority. Because the AWS delegated groups are domain local in scope, you can use them through an AD Trust to your on-premises AD. This eliminates the requirement to create and use separate identities to administer your AWS Managed Microsoft AD. Instead, by adding selected on-premises users to desired AWS delegated groups, you can grant your administrators some or all of the permissions. You can simplify this even further by adding on-premises AD security groups to the AWS delegated groups. This enables you to add and remove users from your on-premises AD security group so that they can manage administrative permissions in your AWS Managed Microsoft AD.

In this blog post, I will show you how to delegate permissions to your on-premises users to perform an administrative task–configuring fine-grained password policies–in your AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory. You can follow the steps in this post to delegate other administrative permissions, such as configuring group Managed Service Accounts and Kerberos constrained delegation, to your on-premises users.

Background

Until now, AWS Managed Microsoft AD delegated administrative permissions for your directory by creating AD security groups in your Organization Unit (OU) and authorizing these AWS delegated groups for common administrative activities. The admin user in your directory created user accounts within your OU, and granted these users permissions to administer your directory by adding them to one or more of these AWS delegated groups.

However, if you used your AWS Managed Microsoft AD with a trust to an on-premises AD forest, you couldn’t add users from your on-premises directory to these AWS delegated groups. This is because AWS created the AWS delegated groups with global scope, which restricts adding users from another forest. This necessitated that you create different user accounts in AWS Managed Microsoft AD for the purpose of administration. As a result, AD administrators typically had to remember additional credentials for AWS Managed Microsoft AD.

To address this, AWS created new AWS delegated groups with domain local scope in a separate OU called AWS Delegated Groups. These new AWS delegated groups with domain local scope are more flexible and permit adding users and groups from other domains and forests. This allows your admin user to delegate your on-premises users and groups administrative permissions to your AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory.

Note: If you already have an existing AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory containing the original AWS delegated groups with global scope, AWS preserved the original AWS delegated groups in the event you are currently using them with identities in AWS Managed Microsoft AD. AWS recommends that you transition to use the new AWS delegated groups with domain local scope. All newly created AWS Managed Microsoft AD directories have the new AWS delegated groups with domain local scope only.

Now, I will show you the steps to delegate administrative permissions to your on-premises users and groups to configure fine-grained password policies in your AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory.

Prerequisites

For this post, I assume you are familiar with AD security groups and how security group scope rules work. I also assume you are familiar with AD trusts.

The instructions in this blog post require you to have the following components running:

Solution overview

I will now show you how to manage which on-premises users have delegated permissions to administer your directory by efficiently using on-premises AD security groups to manage these permissions. I will do this by:

  1. Adding on-premises groups to an AWS delegated group. In this step, you sign in to management instance connected to AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory as admin user and add on-premises groups to AWS delegated groups.
  2. Administer your AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory as on-premises user. In this step, you sign in to a workstation connected to your on-premises AD using your on-premises credentials and administer your AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory.

For the purpose of this blog, I already have an on-premises AD directory (in this case, on-premises.com). I also created an AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory (in this case, corp.example.com) that I use with Amazon RDS for SQL Server. To enable Integrated Windows Authentication to my on-premises.com domain, I established a one-way outgoing trust from my AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory to my on-premises AD directory. To administer my AWS Managed Microsoft AD, I created an Amazon EC2 for Windows Server instance (in this case, Cloud Management). I also have an on-premises workstation (in this case, On-premises Management), that is connected to my on-premises AD directory.

The following diagram represents the relationships between the on-premises AD and the AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory.

The left side represents the AWS Cloud containing AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory. I connected the directory to the on-premises AD directory via a 1-way forest trust relationship. When AWS created my AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory, AWS created a group called AWS Delegated Fine Grained Password Policy Administrators that has permissions to configure fine-grained password policies in AWS Managed Microsoft AD.

The right side of the diagram represents the on-premises AD directory. I created a global AD security group called On-premises fine grained password policy admins and I configured it so all members can manage fine grained password policies in my on-premises AD. I have two administrators in my company, John and Richard, who I added as members of On-premises fine grained password policy admins. I want to enable John and Richard to also manage fine grained password policies in my AWS Managed Microsoft AD.

While I could add John and Richard to the AWS Delegated Fine Grained Password Policy Administrators individually, I want a more efficient way to delegate and remove permissions for on-premises users to manage fine grained password policies in my AWS Managed Microsoft AD. In fact, I want to assign permissions to the same people that manage password policies in my on-premises directory.

Diagram showing delegation of administrative permissions to on-premises users

To do this, I will:

  1. As admin user, add the On-premises fine grained password policy admins as member of the AWS Delegated Fine Grained Password Policy Administrators security group from my Cloud Management machine.
  2. Manage who can administer password policies in my AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory by adding and removing users as members of the On-premises fine grained password policy admins. Doing so enables me to perform all my delegation work in my on-premises directory without the need to use a remote desktop protocol (RDP) session to my Cloud Management instance. In this case, Richard, who is a member of On-premises fine grained password policy admins group can now administer AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory from On-premises Management workstation.

Although I’m showing a specific case using fine grained password policy delegation, you can do this with any of the new AWS delegated groups and your on-premises groups and users.

Let’s get started.

Step 1 – Add on-premises groups to AWS delegated groups

In this step, open an RDP session to the Cloud Management instance and sign in as the admin user in your AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory. Then, add your users and groups from your on-premises AD to AWS delegated groups in AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory. In this example, I do the following:

  1. Sign in to the Cloud Management instance with the user name admin and the password that you set for the admin user when you created your directory.
  2. Open the Microsoft Windows Server Manager and navigate to Tools > Active Directory Users and Computers.
  3. Switch to the tree view and navigate to corp.example.com > AWS Delegated Groups. Right-click AWS Delegated Fine Grained Password Policy Administrators and select Properties.
  4. In the AWS Delegated Fine Grained Password Policy window, switch to Members tab and choose Add.
  5. In the Select Users, Contacts, Computers, Service Accounts, or Groups window, choose Locations.
  6. In the Locations window, select on-premises.com domain and choose OK.
  7. In the Enter the object names to select box, enter on-premises fine grained password policy admins and choose Check Names.
  8. Because I have a 1-way trust from AWS Managed Microsoft AD to my on-premises AD, Windows prompts me to enter credentials for an on-premises user account that has permissions to complete the search. If I had a 2-way trust and the admin account in my AWS Managed Microsoft AD has permissions to read my on-premises directory, Windows will not prompt me.In the Windows Security window, enter the credentials for an account with permissions for on-premises.com and choose OK.
  9. Click OK to add On-premises fine grained password policy admins group as a member of the AWS Delegated Fine Grained Password Policy Administrators group in your AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory.

At this point, any user that is a member of On-premises fine grained password policy admins group has permissions to manage password policies in your AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory.

Step 2 – Administer your AWS Managed Microsoft AD as on-premises user

Any member of the on-premises group(s) that you added to an AWS delegated group inherited the permissions of the AWS delegated group.

In this example, Richard signs in to the On-premises Management instance. Because Richard inherited permissions from Delegated Fine Grained Password Policy Administrators, he can now administer fine grained password policies in the AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory using on-premises credentials.

  1. Sign in to the On-premises Management instance as Richard.
  2. Open the Microsoft Windows Server Manager and navigate to Tools > Active Directory Users and Computers.
  3. Switch to the tree view, right-click Active Directory Users and Computers, and then select Change Domain.
  4. In the Change Domain window, enter corp.example.com, and then choose OK.
  5. You’ll be connected to your AWS Managed Microsoft AD domain:

Richard can now administer the password policies. Because John is also a member of the AWS delegated group, John can also perform password policy administration the same way.

In future, if Richard moves to another division within the company and you hire Judy as a replacement for Richard, you can simply remove Richard from On-premises fine grained password policy admins group and add Judy to this group. Richard will no longer have administrative permissions, while Judy can now administer password policies for your AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory.

Summary

We’ve tried to make it easier for you to administer your AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory by creating AWS delegated groups with domain local scope. You can add your on-premises AD groups to the AWS delegated groups. You can then control who can administer your directory by managing group membership in your on-premises AD directory. Your administrators can sign in to their existing on-premises workstations using their on-premises credentials and administer your AWS Managed Microsoft AD directory. I encourage you to explore the new AWS delegated security groups by using Active Directory Users and Computers from the management instance for your AWS Managed Microsoft AD. To learn more about AWS Directory Service, see the AWS Directory Service home page. If you have questions, please post them on the Directory Service forum. If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below.

 

Amazon Redshift – 2017 Recap

Post Syndicated from Larry Heathcote original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/amazon-redshift-2017-recap/

We have been busy adding new features and capabilities to Amazon Redshift, and we wanted to give you a glimpse of what we’ve been doing over the past year. In this article, we recap a few of our enhancements and provide a set of resources that you can use to learn more and get the most out of your Amazon Redshift implementation.

In 2017, we made more than 30 announcements about Amazon Redshift. We listened to you, our customers, and delivered Redshift Spectrum, a feature of Amazon Redshift, that gives you the ability to extend analytics to your data lake—without moving data. We launched new DC2 nodes, doubling performance at the same price. We also announced many new features that provide greater scalability, better performance, more automation, and easier ways to manage your analytics workloads.

To see a full list of our launches, visit our what’s new page—and be sure to subscribe to our RSS feed.

Major launches in 2017

Amazon Redshift Spectrumextend analytics to your data lake, without moving data

We launched Amazon Redshift Spectrum to give you the freedom to store data in Amazon S3, in open file formats, and have it available for analytics without the need to load it into your Amazon Redshift cluster. It enables you to easily join datasets across Redshift clusters and S3 to provide unique insights that you would not be able to obtain by querying independent data silos.

With Redshift Spectrum, you can run SQL queries against data in an Amazon S3 data lake as easily as you analyze data stored in Amazon Redshift. And you can do it without loading data or resizing the Amazon Redshift cluster based on growing data volumes. Redshift Spectrum separates compute and storage to meet workload demands for data size, concurrency, and performance. Redshift Spectrum scales processing across thousands of nodes, so results are fast, even with massive datasets and complex queries. You can query open file formats that you already use—such as Apache Avro, CSV, Grok, ORC, Apache Parquet, RCFile, RegexSerDe, SequenceFile, TextFile, and TSV—directly in Amazon S3, without any data movement.

For complex queries, Redshift Spectrum provided a 67 percent performance gain,” said Rafi Ton, CEO, NUVIAD. “Using the Parquet data format, Redshift Spectrum delivered an 80 percent performance improvement. For us, this was substantial.

To learn more about Redshift Spectrum, watch our AWS Summit session Intro to Amazon Redshift Spectrum: Now Query Exabytes of Data in S3, and read our announcement blog post Amazon Redshift Spectrum – Exabyte-Scale In-Place Queries of S3 Data.

DC2 nodes—twice the performance of DC1 at the same price

We launched second-generation Dense Compute (DC2) nodes to provide low latency and high throughput for demanding data warehousing workloads. DC2 nodes feature powerful Intel E5-2686 v4 (Broadwell) CPUs, fast DDR4 memory, and NVMe-based solid state disks (SSDs). We’ve tuned Amazon Redshift to take advantage of the better CPU, network, and disk on DC2 nodes, providing up to twice the performance of DC1 at the same price. Our DC2.8xlarge instances now provide twice the memory per slice of data and an optimized storage layout with 30 percent better storage utilization.

Redshift allows us to quickly spin up clusters and provide our data scientists with a fast and easy method to access data and generate insights,” said Bradley Todd, technology architect at Liberty Mutual. “We saw a 9x reduction in month-end reporting time with Redshift DC2 nodes as compared to DC1.”

Read our customer testimonials to see the performance gains our customers are experiencing with DC2 nodes. To learn more, read our blog post Amazon Redshift Dense Compute (DC2) Nodes Deliver Twice the Performance as DC1 at the Same Price.

Performance enhancements— 3x-5x faster queries

On average, our customers are seeing 3x to 5x performance gains for most of their critical workloads.

We introduced short query acceleration to speed up execution of queries such as reports, dashboards, and interactive analysis. Short query acceleration uses machine learning to predict the execution time of a query, and to move short running queries to an express short query queue for faster processing.

We launched results caching to deliver sub-second response times for queries that are repeated, such as dashboards, visualizations, and those from BI tools. Results caching has an added benefit of freeing up resources to improve the performance of all other queries.

We also introduced late materialization to reduce the amount of data scanned for queries with predicate filters by batching and factoring in the filtering of predicates before fetching data blocks in the next column. For example, if only 10 percent of the table rows satisfy the predicate filters, Amazon Redshift can potentially save 90 percent of the I/O for the remaining columns to improve query performance.

We launched query monitoring rules and pre-defined rule templates. These features make it easier for you to set metrics-based performance boundaries for workload management (WLM) queries, and specify what action to take when a query goes beyond those boundaries. For example, for a queue that’s dedicated to short-running queries, you might create a rule that aborts queries that run for more than 60 seconds. To track poorly designed queries, you might have another rule that logs queries that contain nested loops.

Customer insights

Amazon Redshift and Redshift Spectrum serve customers across a variety of industries and sizes, from startups to large enterprises. Visit our customer page to see the success that customers are having with our recent enhancements. Learn how companies like Liberty Mutual Insurance saw a 9x reduction in month-end reporting time using DC2 nodes. On this page, you can find case studies, videos, and other content that show how our customers are using Amazon Redshift to drive innovation and business results.

In addition, check out these resources to learn about the success our customers are having building out a data warehouse and data lake integration solution with Amazon Redshift:

Partner solutions

You can enhance your Amazon Redshift data warehouse by working with industry-leading experts. Our AWS Partner Network (APN) Partners have certified their solutions to work with Amazon Redshift. They offer software, tools, integration, and consulting services to help you at every step. Visit our Amazon Redshift Partner page and choose an APN Partner. Or, use AWS Marketplace to find and immediately start using third-party software.

To see what our Partners are saying about Amazon Redshift Spectrum and our DC2 nodes mentioned earlier, read these blog posts:

Resources

Blog posts

Visit the AWS Big Data Blog for a list of all Amazon Redshift articles.

YouTube videos

GitHub

Our community of experts contribute on GitHub to provide tips and hints that can help you get the most out of your deployment. Visit GitHub frequently to get the latest technical guidance, code samples, administrative task automation utilities, the analyze & vacuum schema utility, and more.

Customer support

If you are evaluating or considering a proof of concept with Amazon Redshift, or you need assistance migrating your on-premises or other cloud-based data warehouse to Amazon Redshift, our team of product experts and solutions architects can help you with architecting, sizing, and optimizing your data warehouse. Contact us using this support request form, and let us know how we can assist you.

If you are an Amazon Redshift customer, we offer a no-cost health check program. Our team of database engineers and solutions architects give you recommendations for optimizing Amazon Redshift and Amazon Redshift Spectrum for your specific workloads. To learn more, email us at [email protected].

If you have any questions, email us at [email protected].

 


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Amazon Redshift Spectrum – Exabyte-Scale In-Place Queries of S3 Data, Using Amazon Redshift for Fast Analytical Reports and How to Migrate Your Oracle Data Warehouse to Amazon Redshift Using AWS SCT and AWS DMS.


About the Author

Larry Heathcote is a Principle Product Marketing Manager at Amazon Web Services for data warehousing and analytics. Larry is passionate about seeing the results of data-driven insights on business outcomes. He enjoys family time, home projects, grilling out and the taste of classic barbeque.

 

 

 

[$] A look at the handling of Meltdown and Spectre

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/743363/rss

The Meltdown/Spectre debacle has,
deservedly, reached the mainstream press
and, likely, most of the public that has even a remote interest in computers
and security. It only took a day or so from the accelerated disclosure
date of January 3—it was originally scheduled for
January 9—before the bugs
were making big headlines. But Spectre has been known for at least six
months and Meltdown for nearly as long—at least to some in the industry.
Others that were affected were completely blindsided by the
announcements and have joined the scramble to mitigate these hardware bugs
before they bite users. Whatever else can be said about Meltdown and Spectre,
the handling (or, in truth, mishandling) of this whole incident has been a
horrific failure.

AWS Direct Connect Update – Ten New Locations Added in Late 2017

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-direct-connect-update-ten-new-locations-added-in-late-2017/

Happy 2018! I am looking forward to getting back to my usual routine, working with our teams to learn about their upcoming launches and then writing blog posts to bring the news to you. Right now I am still catching up on a few launches and announcements from late 2017.

First on the list for today is our most recent round of new cities for AWS Direct Connect. AWS customers all over the world use Direct Connect to create dedicated network connections from their premises to AWS in order to reduce their network costs, increase throughput, and to pursue a more consistent network experience.

We added ten new locations to our Direct Connect roster in December, all of which offer both 1 Gbps and 10 Gbps connectivity, along with partner-supplied options for speeds below 1 Gbps. Here are the newest locations, along withe the data centers and associated AWS Regions:

  • Bangalore, India – NetMagic DC2Asia Pacific (Mumbai).
  • Cape Town, South Africa – Teraco Ct1EU (Ireland).
  • Johannesburg, South Africa – Teraco JB1EU (Ireland).
  • London, UK – Telehouse North TwoEU (London).
  • Miami, Florida, US – Equinix MI1US East (Northern Virginia).
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota, US – Cologix MIN3US East (Ohio)
  • Ningxia, China – Shapotou IDC – China (Ningxia).
  • Ningxia, China – Industrial Park IDC – China (Ningxia).
  • Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – Equinix RJ2South America (São Paulo).
  • Tokyo, Japan – AT Tokyo ChuoAsia Pacific (Tokyo).

You can use these new locations in conjunction with the AWS Direct Connect Gateway to set up connectivity that spans Virtual Private Clouds (VPCs) spread across multiple AWS Regions (this does not apply to the AWS Regions in China).

If you are interested in putting Direct Connect to use, be sure to check out our ever-growing list of Direct Connect Partners.

Jeff;

Serverless @ re:Invent 2017

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/serverless-reinvent-2017/

At re:Invent 2014, we announced AWS Lambda, what is now the center of the serverless platform at AWS, and helped ignite the trend of companies building serverless applications.

This year, at re:Invent 2017, the topic of serverless was everywhere. We were incredibly excited to see the energy from everyone attending 7 workshops, 15 chalk talks, 20 skills sessions and 27 breakout sessions. Many of these sessions were repeated due to high demand, so we are happy to summarize and provide links to the recordings and slides of these sessions.

Over the course of the week leading up to and then the week of re:Invent, we also had over 15 new features and capabilities across a number of serverless services, including AWS Lambda, Amazon API Gateway, AWS [email protected], AWS SAM, and the newly announced AWS Serverless Application Repository!

AWS Lambda

Amazon API Gateway

  • Amazon API Gateway Supports Endpoint Integrations with Private VPCs – You can now provide access to HTTP(S) resources within your VPC without exposing them directly to the public internet. This includes resources available over a VPN or Direct Connect connection!
  • Amazon API Gateway Supports Canary Release Deployments – You can now use canary release deployments to gradually roll out new APIs. This helps you more safely roll out API changes and limit the blast radius of new deployments.
  • Amazon API Gateway Supports Access Logging – The access logging feature lets you generate access logs in different formats such as CLF (Common Log Format), JSON, XML, and CSV. The access logs can be fed into your existing analytics or log processing tools so you can perform more in-depth analysis or take action in response to the log data.
  • Amazon API Gateway Customize Integration Timeouts – You can now set a custom timeout for your API calls as low as 50ms and as high as 29 seconds (the default is 30 seconds).
  • Amazon API Gateway Supports Generating SDK in Ruby – This is in addition to support for SDKs in Java, JavaScript, Android and iOS (Swift and Objective-C). The SDKs that Amazon API Gateway generates save you development time and come with a number of prebuilt capabilities, such as working with API keys, exponential back, and exception handling.

AWS Serverless Application Repository

Serverless Application Repository is a new service (currently in preview) that aids in the publication, discovery, and deployment of serverless applications. With it you’ll be able to find shared serverless applications that you can launch in your account, while also sharing ones that you’ve created for others to do the same.

AWS [email protected]

[email protected] now supports content-based dynamic origin selection, network calls from viewer events, and advanced response generation. This combination of capabilities greatly increases the use cases for [email protected], such as allowing you to send requests to different origins based on request information, showing selective content based on authentication, and dynamically watermarking images for each viewer.

AWS SAM

Twitch Launchpad live announcements

Other service announcements

Here are some of the other highlights that you might have missed. We think these could help you make great applications:

AWS re:Invent 2017 sessions

Coming up with the right mix of talks for an event like this can be quite a challenge. The Product, Marketing, and Developer Advocacy teams for Serverless at AWS spent weeks reading through dozens of talk ideas to boil it down to the final list.

From feedback at other AWS events and webinars, we knew that customers were looking for talks that focused on concrete examples of solving problems with serverless, how to perform common tasks such as deployment, CI/CD, monitoring, and troubleshooting, and to see customer and partner examples solving real world problems. To that extent we tried to settle on a good mix based on attendee experience and provide a track full of rich content.

Below are the recordings and slides of breakout sessions from re:Invent 2017. We’ve organized them for those getting started, those who are already beginning to build serverless applications, and the experts out there already running them at scale. Some of the videos and slides haven’t been posted yet, and so we will update this list as they become available.

Find the entire Serverless Track playlist on YouTube.

Talks for people new to Serverless

Advanced topics

Expert mode

Talks for specific use cases

Talks from AWS customers & partners

Looking to get hands-on with Serverless?

At re:Invent, we delivered instructor-led skills sessions to help attendees new to serverless applications get started quickly. The content from these sessions is already online and you can do the hands-on labs yourself!
Build a Serverless web application

Still looking for more?

We also recently completely overhauled the main Serverless landing page for AWS. This includes a new Resources page containing case studies, webinars, whitepapers, customer stories, reference architectures, and even more Getting Started tutorials. Check it out!

Now Open AWS EU (Paris) Region

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-open-aws-eu-paris-region/

Today we are launching our 18th AWS Region, our fourth in Europe. Located in the Paris area, AWS customers can use this Region to better serve customers in and around France.

The Details
The new EU (Paris) Region provides a broad suite of AWS services including Amazon API Gateway, Amazon Aurora, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon CloudWatch, CloudWatch Events, Amazon CloudWatch Logs, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), EC2 Container Registry, Amazon ECS, Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon EMR, Amazon ElastiCache, Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Amazon Glacier, Amazon Kinesis Streams, Polly, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), Amazon Route 53, Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF), Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, Auto Scaling, AWS Certificate Manager (ACM), AWS CloudFormation, AWS CloudTrail, AWS CodeDeploy, AWS Config, AWS Database Migration Service, AWS Direct Connect, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), AWS Key Management Service (KMS), AWS Lambda, AWS Marketplace, AWS OpsWorks Stacks, AWS Personal Health Dashboard, AWS Server Migration Service, AWS Service Catalog, AWS Shield Standard, AWS Snowball, AWS Snowball Edge, AWS Snowmobile, AWS Storage Gateway, AWS Support (including AWS Trusted Advisor), Elastic Load Balancing, and VM Import.

The Paris Region supports all sizes of C5, M5, R4, T2, D2, I3, and X1 instances.

There are also four edge locations for Amazon Route 53 and Amazon CloudFront: three in Paris and one in Marseille, all with AWS WAF and AWS Shield. Check out the AWS Global Infrastructure page to learn more about current and future AWS Regions.

The Paris Region will benefit from three AWS Direct Connect locations. Telehouse Voltaire is available today. AWS Direct Connect will also become available at Equinix Paris in early 2018, followed by Interxion Paris.

All AWS infrastructure regions around the world are designed, built, and regularly audited to meet the most rigorous compliance standards and to provide high levels of security for all AWS customers. These include ISO 27001, ISO 27017, ISO 27018, SOC 1 (Formerly SAS 70), SOC 2 and SOC 3 Security & Availability, PCI DSS Level 1, and many more. This means customers benefit from all the best practices of AWS policies, architecture, and operational processes built to satisfy the needs of even the most security sensitive customers.

AWS is certified under the EU-US Privacy Shield, and the AWS Data Processing Addendum (DPA) is GDPR-ready and available now to all AWS customers to help them prepare for May 25, 2018 when the GDPR becomes enforceable. The current AWS DPA, as well as the AWS GDPR DPA, allows customers to transfer personal data to countries outside the European Economic Area (EEA) in compliance with European Union (EU) data protection laws. AWS also adheres to the Cloud Infrastructure Service Providers in Europe (CISPE) Code of Conduct. The CISPE Code of Conduct helps customers ensure that AWS is using appropriate data protection standards to protect their data, consistent with the GDPR. In addition, AWS offers a wide range of services and features to help customers meet the requirements of the GDPR, including services for access controls, monitoring, logging, and encryption.

From Our Customers
Many AWS customers are preparing to use this new Region. Here’s a small sample:

Societe Generale, one of the largest banks in France and the world, has accelerated their digital transformation while working with AWS. They developed SG Research, an application that makes reports from Societe Generale’s analysts available to corporate customers in order to improve the decision-making process for investments. The new AWS Region will reduce latency between applications running in the cloud and in their French data centers.

SNCF is the national railway company of France. Their mobile app, powered by AWS, delivers real-time traffic information to 14 million riders. Extreme weather, traffic events, holidays, and engineering works can cause usage to peak at hundreds of thousands of users per second. They are planning to use machine learning and big data to add predictive features to the app.

Radio France, the French public radio broadcaster, offers seven national networks, and uses AWS to accelerate its innovation and stay competitive.

Les Restos du Coeur, a French charity that provides assistance to the needy, delivering food packages and participating in their social and economic integration back into French society. Les Restos du Coeur is using AWS for its CRM system to track the assistance given to each of their beneficiaries and the impact this is having on their lives.

AlloResto by JustEat (a leader in the French FoodTech industry), is using AWS to to scale during traffic peaks and to accelerate their innovation process.

AWS Consulting and Technology Partners
We are already working with a wide variety of consulting, technology, managed service, and Direct Connect partners in France. Here’s a partial list:

AWS Premier Consulting PartnersAccenture, Capgemini, Claranet, CloudReach, DXC, and Edifixio.

AWS Consulting PartnersABC Systemes, Atos International SAS, CoreExpert, Cycloid, Devoteam, LINKBYNET, Oxalide, Ozones, Scaleo Information Systems, and Sopra Steria.

AWS Technology PartnersAxway, Commerce Guys, MicroStrategy, Sage, Software AG, Splunk, Tibco, and Zerolight.

AWS in France
We have been investing in Europe, with a focus on France, for the last 11 years. We have also been developing documentation and training programs to help our customers to improve their skills and to accelerate their journey to the AWS Cloud.

As part of our commitment to AWS customers in France, we plan to train more than 25,000 people in the coming years, helping them develop highly sought after cloud skills. They will have access to AWS training resources in France via AWS Academy, AWSome days, AWS Educate, and webinars, all delivered in French by AWS Technical Trainers and AWS Certified Trainers.

Use it Today
The EU (Paris) Region is open for business now and you can start using it today!

Jeff;