Tag Archives: AWS Lambda

Introducing Cost Allocation Tags for Amazon SQS

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/introducing-cost-allocation-tags-for-amazon-sqs/

You have long had the ability to tag your AWS resources and to see cost breakouts on a per-tag basis. Cost allocation was launched in 2012 (see AWS Cost Allocation for Customer Bills) and we have steadily added support for additional services, most recently DynamoDB (Introducing Cost Allocation Tags for Amazon DynamoDB), Lambda (AWS Lambda Supports Tagging and Cost Allocations), and EBS (New – Cost Allocation for AWS Snapshots).

Today, we are launching tag-based cost allocation for Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS). You can now assign tags to your queues and use them to manage your costs at any desired level: application, application stage (for a loosely coupled application that communicates via queues), project, department, or developer. After you have tagged your queues, you can use the AWS Tag Editor to search queues that have tags of interest.

Here’s how I would add three tags (app, stage, and department) to one of my queues:

This feature is available now in all AWS Regions and you can start using in today! To learn more about tagging, read Tagging Your Amazon SQS Queues. To learn more about cost allocation via tags, read Using Cost Allocation Tags. To learn more about how to use message queues to build loosely coupled microservices for modern applications, read our blog post (Building Loosely Coupled, Scalable, C# Applications with Amazon SQS and Amazon SNS) and watch the recording of our recent webinar, Decouple and Scale Applications Using Amazon SQS and Amazon SNS.

If you are coming to AWS re:Invent, plan to attend session ARC 330: How the BBC Built a Massive Media Pipeline Using Microservices. In the talk you will find out how they used SNS and SQS to improve the elasticity and reliability of the BBC iPlayer architecture.

Jeff;

Implementing Default Directory Indexes in Amazon S3-backed Amazon CloudFront Origins Using [email protected]

Post Syndicated from Ronnie Eichler original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/implementing-default-directory-indexes-in-amazon-s3-backed-amazon-cloudfront-origins-using-lambdaedge/

With the recent launch of [email protected], it’s now possible for you to provide even more robust functionality to your static websites. Amazon CloudFront is a content distribution network service. In this post, I show how you can use [email protected] along with the CloudFront origin access identity (OAI) for Amazon S3 and still provide simple URLs (such as www.example.com/about/ instead of www.example.com/about/index.html).

Background

Amazon S3 is a great platform for hosting a static website. You don’t need to worry about managing servers or underlying infrastructure—you just publish your static to content to an S3 bucket. S3 provides a DNS name such as <bucket-name>.s3-website-<AWS-region>.amazonaws.com. Use this name for your website by creating a CNAME record in your domain’s DNS environment (or Amazon Route 53) as follows:

www.example.com -> <bucket-name>.s3-website-<AWS-region>.amazonaws.com

You can also put CloudFront in front of S3 to further scale the performance of your site and cache the content closer to your users. CloudFront can enable HTTPS-hosted sites, by either using a custom Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificate or a managed certificate from AWS Certificate Manager. In addition, CloudFront also offers integration with AWS WAF, a web application firewall. As you can see, it’s possible to achieve some robust functionality by using S3, CloudFront, and other managed services and not have to worry about maintaining underlying infrastructure.

One of the key concerns that you might have when implementing any type of WAF or CDN is that you want to force your users to go through the CDN. If you implement CloudFront in front of S3, you can achieve this by using an OAI. However, in order to do this, you cannot use the HTTP endpoint that is exposed by S3’s static website hosting feature. Instead, CloudFront must use the S3 REST endpoint to fetch content from your origin so that the request can be authenticated using the OAI. This presents some challenges in that the REST endpoint does not support redirection to a default index page.

CloudFront does allow you to specify a default root object (index.html), but it only works on the root of the website (such as http://www.example.com > http://www.example.com/index.html). It does not work on any subdirectory (such as http://www.example.com/about/). If you were to attempt to request this URL through CloudFront, CloudFront would do a S3 GetObject API call against a key that does not exist.

Of course, it is a bad user experience to expect users to always type index.html at the end of every URL (or even know that it should be there). Until now, there has not been an easy way to provide these simpler URLs (equivalent to the DirectoryIndex Directive in an Apache Web Server configuration) to users through CloudFront. Not if you still want to be able to restrict access to the S3 origin using an OAI. However, with the release of [email protected], you can use a JavaScript function running on the CloudFront edge nodes to look for these patterns and request the appropriate object key from the S3 origin.

Solution

In this example, you use the compute power at the CloudFront edge to inspect the request as it’s coming in from the client. Then re-write the request so that CloudFront requests a default index object (index.html in this case) for any request URI that ends in ‘/’.

When a request is made against a web server, the client specifies the object to obtain in the request. You can use this URI and apply a regular expression to it so that these URIs get resolved to a default index object before CloudFront requests the object from the origin. Use the following code:

'use strict';
exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
    
    // Extract the request from the CloudFront event that is sent to [email protected] 
    var request = event.Records[0].cf.request;

    // Extract the URI from the request
    var olduri = request.uri;

    // Match any '/' that occurs at the end of a URI. Replace it with a default index
    var newuri = olduri.replace(/\/$/, '\/index.html');
    
    // Log the URI as received by CloudFront and the new URI to be used to fetch from origin
    console.log("Old URI: " + olduri);
    console.log("New URI: " + newuri);
    
    // Replace the received URI with the URI that includes the index page
    request.uri = newuri;
    
    // Return to CloudFront
    return callback(null, request);

};

To get started, create an S3 bucket to be the origin for CloudFront:

Create bucket

On the other screens, you can just accept the defaults for the purposes of this walkthrough. If this were a production implementation, I would recommend enabling bucket logging and specifying an existing S3 bucket as the destination for access logs. These logs can be useful if you need to troubleshoot issues with your S3 access.

Now, put some content into your S3 bucket. For this walkthrough, create two simple webpages to demonstrate the functionality:  A page that resides at the website root, and another that is in a subdirectory.

<s3bucketname>/index.html

<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Root home page</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p>Hello, this page resides in the root directory.</p>
    </body>
</html>

<s3bucketname>/subdirectory/index.html

<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Subdirectory home page</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p>Hello, this page resides in the /subdirectory/ directory.</p>
    </body>
</html>

When uploading the files into S3, you can accept the defaults. You add a bucket policy as part of the CloudFront distribution creation that allows CloudFront to access the S3 origin. You should now have an S3 bucket that looks like the following:

Root of bucket

Subdirectory in bucket

Next, create a CloudFront distribution that your users will use to access the content. Open the CloudFront console, and choose Create Distribution. For Select a delivery method for your content, under Web, choose Get Started.

On the next screen, you set up the distribution. Below are the options to configure:

  • Origin Domain Name:  Select the S3 bucket that you created earlier.
  • Restrict Bucket Access: Choose Yes.
  • Origin Access Identity: Create a new identity.
  • Grant Read Permissions on Bucket: Choose Yes, Update Bucket Policy.
  • Object Caching: Choose Customize (I am changing the behavior to avoid having CloudFront cache objects, as this could affect your ability to troubleshoot while implementing the Lambda code).
    • Minimum TTL: 0
    • Maximum TTL: 0
    • Default TTL: 0

You can accept all of the other defaults. Again, this is a proof-of-concept exercise. After you are comfortable that the CloudFront distribution is working properly with the origin and Lambda code, you can re-visit the preceding values and make changes before implementing it in production.

CloudFront distributions can take several minutes to deploy (because the changes have to propagate out to all of the edge locations). After that’s done, test the functionality of the S3-backed static website. Looking at the distribution, you can see that CloudFront assigns a domain name:

CloudFront Distribution Settings

Try to access the website using a combination of various URLs:

http://<domainname>/:  Works

› curl -v http://d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net/
*   Trying 54.192.192.214...
* TCP_NODELAY set
* Connected to d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net (54.192.192.214) port 80 (#0)
> GET / HTTP/1.1
> Host: d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net
> User-Agent: curl/7.51.0
> Accept: */*
>
< HTTP/1.1 200 OK
< ETag: "cb7e2634fe66c1fd395cf868087dd3b9"
< Accept-Ranges: bytes
< Server: AmazonS3
< X-Cache: Miss from cloudfront
< X-Amz-Cf-Id: -D2FSRwzfcwyKZKFZr6DqYFkIf4t7HdGw2MkUF5sE6YFDxRJgi0R1g==
< Content-Length: 209
< Content-Type: text/html
< Last-Modified: Wed, 19 Jul 2017 19:21:16 GMT
< Via: 1.1 6419ba8f3bd94b651d416054d9416f1e.cloudfront.net (CloudFront), 1.1 iad6-proxy-3.amazon.com:80 (Cisco-WSA/9.1.2-010)
< Connection: keep-alive
<
<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Root home page</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p>Hello, this page resides in the root directory.</p>
    </body>
</html>
* Curl_http_done: called premature == 0
* Connection #0 to host d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net left intact

This is because CloudFront is configured to request a default root object (index.html) from the origin.

http://<domainname>/subdirectory/:  Doesn’t work

› curl -v http://d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net/subdirectory/
*   Trying 54.192.192.214...
* TCP_NODELAY set
* Connected to d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net (54.192.192.214) port 80 (#0)
> GET /subdirectory/ HTTP/1.1
> Host: d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net
> User-Agent: curl/7.51.0
> Accept: */*
>
< HTTP/1.1 200 OK
< ETag: "d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e"
< x-amz-server-side-encryption: AES256
< Accept-Ranges: bytes
< Server: AmazonS3
< X-Cache: Miss from cloudfront
< X-Amz-Cf-Id: Iqf0Gy8hJLiW-9tOAdSFPkL7vCWBrgm3-1ly5tBeY_izU82ftipodA==
< Content-Length: 0
< Content-Type: application/x-directory
< Last-Modified: Wed, 19 Jul 2017 19:21:24 GMT
< Via: 1.1 6419ba8f3bd94b651d416054d9416f1e.cloudfront.net (CloudFront), 1.1 iad6-proxy-3.amazon.com:80 (Cisco-WSA/9.1.2-010)
< Connection: keep-alive
<
* Curl_http_done: called premature == 0
* Connection #0 to host d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net left intact

If you use a tool such like cURL to test this, you notice that CloudFront and S3 are returning a blank response. The reason for this is that the subdirectory does exist, but it does not resolve to an S3 object. Keep in mind that S3 is an object store, so there are no real directories. User interfaces such as the S3 console present a hierarchical view of a bucket with folders based on the presence of forward slashes, but behind the scenes the bucket is just a collection of keys that represent stored objects.

http://<domainname>/subdirectory/index.html:  Works

› curl -v http://d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net/subdirectory/index.html
*   Trying 54.192.192.130...
* TCP_NODELAY set
* Connected to d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net (54.192.192.130) port 80 (#0)
> GET /subdirectory/index.html HTTP/1.1
> Host: d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net
> User-Agent: curl/7.51.0
> Accept: */*
>
< HTTP/1.1 200 OK
< Date: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 20:35:15 GMT
< ETag: "ddf87c487acf7cef9d50418f0f8f8dae"
< Accept-Ranges: bytes
< Server: AmazonS3
< X-Cache: RefreshHit from cloudfront
< X-Amz-Cf-Id: bkh6opXdpw8pUomqG3Qr3UcjnZL8axxOH82Lh0OOcx48uJKc_Dc3Cg==
< Content-Length: 227
< Content-Type: text/html
< Last-Modified: Wed, 19 Jul 2017 19:21:45 GMT
< Via: 1.1 3f2788d309d30f41de96da6f931d4ede.cloudfront.net (CloudFront), 1.1 iad6-proxy-3.amazon.com:80 (Cisco-WSA/9.1.2-010)
< Connection: keep-alive
<
<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Subdirectory home page</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p>Hello, this page resides in the /subdirectory/ directory.</p>
    </body>
</html>
* Curl_http_done: called premature == 0
* Connection #0 to host d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net left intact

This request works as expected because you are referencing the object directly. Now, you implement the [email protected] function to return the default index.html page for any subdirectory. Looking at the example JavaScript code, here’s where the magic happens:

var newuri = olduri.replace(/\/$/, '\/index.html');

You are going to use a JavaScript regular expression to match any ‘/’ that occurs at the end of the URI and replace it with ‘/index.html’. This is the equivalent to what S3 does on its own with static website hosting. However, as I mentioned earlier, you can’t rely on this if you want to use a policy on the bucket to restrict it so that users must access the bucket through CloudFront. That way, all requests to the S3 bucket must be authenticated using the S3 REST API. Because of this, you implement a [email protected] function that takes any client request ending in ‘/’ and append a default ‘index.html’ to the request before requesting the object from the origin.

In the Lambda console, choose Create function. On the next screen, skip the blueprint selection and choose Author from scratch, as you’ll use the sample code provided.

Next, configure the trigger. Choosing the empty box shows a list of available triggers. Choose CloudFront and select your CloudFront distribution ID (created earlier). For this example, leave Cache Behavior as * and CloudFront Event as Origin Request. Select the Enable trigger and replicate box and choose Next.

Lambda Trigger

Next, give the function a name and a description. Then, copy and paste the following code:

'use strict';
exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
    
    // Extract the request from the CloudFront event that is sent to [email protected] 
    var request = event.Records[0].cf.request;

    // Extract the URI from the request
    var olduri = request.uri;

    // Match any '/' that occurs at the end of a URI. Replace it with a default index
    var newuri = olduri.replace(/\/$/, '\/index.html');
    
    // Log the URI as received by CloudFront and the new URI to be used to fetch from origin
    console.log("Old URI: " + olduri);
    console.log("New URI: " + newuri);
    
    // Replace the received URI with the URI that includes the index page
    request.uri = newuri;
    
    // Return to CloudFront
    return callback(null, request);

};

Next, define a role that grants permissions to the Lambda function. For this example, choose Create new role from template, Basic Edge Lambda permissions. This creates a new IAM role for the Lambda function and grants the following permissions:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "logs:CreateLogGroup",
                "logs:CreateLogStream",
                "logs:PutLogEvents"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:logs:*:*:*"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

In a nutshell, these are the permissions that the function needs to create the necessary CloudWatch log group and log stream, and to put the log events so that the function is able to write logs when it executes.

After the function has been created, you can go back to the browser (or cURL) and re-run the test for the subdirectory request that failed previously:

› curl -v http://d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net/subdirectory/
*   Trying 54.192.192.202...
* TCP_NODELAY set
* Connected to d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net (54.192.192.202) port 80 (#0)
> GET /subdirectory/ HTTP/1.1
> Host: d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net
> User-Agent: curl/7.51.0
> Accept: */*
>
< HTTP/1.1 200 OK
< Date: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 21:18:44 GMT
< ETag: "ddf87c487acf7cef9d50418f0f8f8dae"
< Accept-Ranges: bytes
< Server: AmazonS3
< X-Cache: Miss from cloudfront
< X-Amz-Cf-Id: rwFN7yHE70bT9xckBpceTsAPcmaadqWB9omPBv2P6WkIfQqdjTk_4w==
< Content-Length: 227
< Content-Type: text/html
< Last-Modified: Wed, 19 Jul 2017 19:21:45 GMT
< Via: 1.1 3572de112011f1b625bb77410b0c5cca.cloudfront.net (CloudFront), 1.1 iad6-proxy-3.amazon.com:80 (Cisco-WSA/9.1.2-010)
< Connection: keep-alive
<
<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title>Subdirectory home page</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p>Hello, this page resides in the /subdirectory/ directory.</p>
    </body>
</html>
* Curl_http_done: called premature == 0
* Connection #0 to host d3gt20ea1hllb.cloudfront.net left intact

You have now configured a way for CloudFront to return a default index page for subdirectories in S3!

Summary

In this post, you used [email protected] to be able to use CloudFront with an S3 origin access identity and serve a default root object on subdirectory URLs. To find out some more about this use-case, see [email protected] integration with CloudFront in our documentation.

If you have questions or suggestions, feel free to comment below. For troubleshooting or implementation help, check out the Lambda forum.

How to Automatically Revert and Receive Notifications About Changes to Your Amazon VPC Security Groups

Post Syndicated from Rob Barnes original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-automatically-revert-and-receive-notifications-about-changes-to-your-amazon-vpc-security-groups/

In a previous AWS Security Blog post, Jeff Levine showed how you can monitor changes to your Amazon EC2 security groups. The methods he describes in that post are examples of detective controls, which can help you determine when changes are made to security controls on your AWS resources.

In this post, I take that approach a step further by introducing an example of a responsive control, which you can use to automatically respond to a detected security event by applying a chosen security mitigation. I demonstrate a solution that continuously monitors changes made to an Amazon VPC security group, and if a new ingress rule (the same as an inbound rule) is added to that security group, the solution removes the rule and then sends you a notification after the changes have been automatically reverted.

The scenario

Let’s say you want to reduce your infrastructure complexity by replacing your Secure Shell (SSH) bastion hosts with Amazon EC2 Systems Manager (SSM). SSM allows you to run commands on your hosts remotely, removing the need to manage bastion hosts or rely on SSH to execute commands. To support this objective, you must prevent your staff members from opening SSH ports to your web server’s Amazon VPC security group. If one of your staff members does modify the VPC security group to allow SSH access, you want the change to be automatically reverted and then receive a notification that the change to the security group was automatically reverted. If you are not yet familiar with security groups, see Security Groups for Your VPC before reading the rest of this post.

Solution overview

This solution begins with a directive control to mandate that no web server should be accessible using SSH. The directive control is enforced using a preventive control, which is implemented using a security group rule that prevents ingress from port 22 (typically used for SSH). The detective control is a “listener” that identifies any changes made to your security group. Finally, the responsive control reverts changes made to the security group and then sends a notification of this security mitigation.

The detective control, in this case, is an Amazon CloudWatch event that detects changes to your security group and triggers the responsive control, which in this case is an AWS Lambda function. I use AWS CloudFormation to simplify the deployment.

The following diagram shows the architecture of this solution.

Solution architecture diagram

Here is how the process works:

  1. Someone on your staff adds a new ingress rule to your security group.
  2. A CloudWatch event that continually monitors changes to your security groups detects the new ingress rule and invokes a designated Lambda function (with Lambda, you can run code without provisioning or managing servers).
  3. The Lambda function evaluates the event to determine whether you are monitoring this security group and reverts the new security group ingress rule.
  4. Finally, the Lambda function sends you an email to let you know what the change was, who made it, and that the change was reverted.

Deploy the solution by using CloudFormation

In this section, you will click the Launch Stack button shown below to launch the CloudFormation stack and deploy the solution.

Prerequisites

  • You must have AWS CloudTrail already enabled in the AWS Region where you will be deploying the solution. CloudTrail lets you log, continuously monitor, and retain events related to API calls across your AWS infrastructure. See Getting Started with CloudTrail for more information.
  • You must have a default VPC in the region in which you will be deploying the solution. AWS accounts have one default VPC per AWS Region. If you’ve deleted your VPC, see Creating a Default VPC to recreate it.

Resources that this solution creates

When you launch the CloudFormation stack, it creates the following resources:

  • A sample VPC security group in your default VPC, which is used as the target for reverting ingress rule changes.
  • A CloudWatch event rule that monitors changes to your AWS infrastructure.
  • A Lambda function that reverts changes to the security group and sends you email notifications.
  • A permission that allows CloudWatch to invoke your Lambda function.
  • An AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) role with limited privileges that the Lambda function assumes when it is executed.
  • An Amazon SNS topic to which the Lambda function publishes notifications.

Launch the CloudFormation stack

The link in this section uses the us-east-1 Region (the US East [N. Virginia] Region). Change the region if you want to use this solution in a different region. See Selecting a Region for more information about changing the region.

To deploy the solution, click the following Launch Stack button to launch the stack. After you click the button, you must sign in to the AWS Management Console if you have not already done so.

Click this "Launch Stack" button

Then:

  1. Choose Next to proceed to the Specify Details page.
  2. On the Specify Details page, type your email address in the Send notifications to box. This is the email address to which change notifications will be sent. (After the stack is launched, you will receive a confirmation email that you must accept before you can receive notifications.)
  3. Choose Next until you get to the Review page, and then choose the I acknowledge that AWS CloudFormation might create IAM resources check box. This confirms that you are aware that the CloudFormation template includes an IAM resource.
  4. Choose Create. CloudFormation displays the stack status, CREATE_COMPLETE, when the stack has launched completely, which should take less than two minutes.Screenshot showing that the stack has launched completely

Testing the solution

  1. Check your email for the SNS confirmation email. You must confirm this subscription to receive future notification emails. If you don’t confirm the subscription, your security group ingress rules still will be automatically reverted, but you will not receive notification emails.
  2. Navigate to the EC2 console and choose Security Groups in the navigation pane.
  3. Choose the security group created by CloudFormation. Its name is Web Server Security Group.
  4. Choose the Inbound tab in the bottom pane of the page. Note that only one rule allows HTTPS ingress on port 443 from 0.0.0.0/0 (from anywhere).Screenshot showing the "Inbound" tab in the bottom pane of the page
  1. Choose Edit to display the Edit inbound rules dialog box (again, an inbound rule and an ingress rule are the same thing).
  2. Choose Add Rule.
  3. Choose SSH from the Type drop-down list.
  4. Choose My IP from the Source drop-down list. Your IP address is populated for you. By adding this rule, you are simulating one of your staff members violating your organization’s policy (in this blog post’s hypothetical example) against allowing SSH access to your EC2 servers. You are testing the solution created when you launched the CloudFormation stack in the previous section. The solution should remove this newly created SSH rule automatically.
    Screenshot of editing inbound rules
  5. Choose Save.

Adding this rule creates an EC2 AuthorizeSecurityGroupIngress service event, which triggers the Lambda function created in the CloudFormation stack. After a few moments, choose the refresh button ( The "refresh" icon ) to see that the new SSH ingress rule that you just created has been removed by the solution you deployed earlier with the CloudFormation stack. If the rule is still there, wait a few more moments and choose the refresh button again.

Screenshot of refreshing the page to see that the SSH ingress rule has been removed

You should also receive an email to notify you that the ingress rule was added and subsequently reverted.

Screenshot of the notification email

Cleaning up

If you want to remove the resources created by this CloudFormation stack, you can delete the CloudFormation stack:

  1. Navigate to the CloudFormation console.
  2. Choose the stack that you created earlier.
  3. Choose the Actions drop-down list.
  4. Choose Delete Stack, and then choose Yes, Delete.
  5. CloudFormation will display a status of DELETE_IN_PROGRESS while it deletes the resources created with the stack. After a few moments, the stack should no longer appear in the list of completed stacks.
    Screenshot of stack "DELETE_IN_PROGRESS"

Other applications of this solution

I have shown one way to use multiple AWS services to help continuously ensure that your security controls haven’t deviated from your security baseline. However, you also could use the CIS Amazon Web Services Foundations Benchmarks, for example, to establish a governance baseline across your AWS accounts and then use the principles in this blog post to automatically mitigate changes to that baseline.

To scale this solution, you can create a framework that uses resource tags to identify particular resources for monitoring. You also can use a consolidated monitoring approach by using cross-account event delivery. See Sending and Receiving Events Between AWS Accounts for more information. You also can extend the principle of automatic mitigation to detect and revert changes to other resources such as IAM policies and Amazon S3 bucket policies.

Summary

In this blog post, I demonstrated how you can automatically revert changes to a VPC security group and have a notification sent about the changes. You can use this solution in your own AWS accounts to enforce your security requirements continuously.

If you have comments about this blog post or other ideas for ways to use this solution, submit a comment in the “Comments” section below. If you have implementation questions, start a new thread in the EC2 forum or contact AWS Support.

– Rob

Things Go Better With Step Functions

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/things-go-better-with-step-functions/

I often give presentations on Amazon’s culture of innovation, and start out with a slide that features a revealing quote from Amazon founder Jeff Bezos:

I love to sit down with our customers and to learn how we have empowered their creativity and to pursue their dreams. Earlier this year I chatted with Patrick from The Coca-Cola Company in order to learn how they used AWS Step Functions and other AWS services to support the Coke.com Vending Pass program. This program includes drink rewards earned by purchasing products at vending machines equipped to support mobile payments using the Coca-Cola Vending Pass. Participants swipe their NFC-enabled phones to complete an Apple Pay or Android Pay purchase, identifying themselves to the vending machine and earning credit towards future free vending purchases in the process

After the swipe, a combination of SNS topics and AWS Lambda functions initiated a pair of calls to some existing backend code to count the vending points and update the participant’s record. Unfortunately, the backend code was slow to react and had some timing dependencies, leading to missing updates that had the potential to confuse Vending Pass participants. The initial solution to this issue was very simple: modify the Lambda code to include a 90 second delay between the two calls. This solved the problem, but ate up process time for no good reason (billing for the use of Lambda functions is based on the duration of the request, in 100 ms intervals).

In order to make their solution more cost-effective, the team turned to AWS Step Functions, building a very simple state machine. As I wrote in an earlier blog post, Step Functions coordinate the components of distributed applications and microservices at scale, using visual workflows that are easy to build.

Coke built a very simple state machine to simplify their business logic and reduce their costs. Yours can be equally simple, or they can make use of other Step Function features such as sequential and parallel execution and the ability to make decisions and choose alternate states. The Coke state machine looks like this:

The FirstState and the SecondState states (Task states) call the appropriate Lambda functions while Step Functions implements the 90 second delay (a Wait state). This modification simplified their logic and reduced their costs. Here’s how it all fits together:

 

What’s Next
This initial success led them to take a closer look at serverless computing and to consider using it for other projects. Patrick told me that they have already seen a boost in productivity and developer happiness. Developers no longer need to wait for servers to be provisioned, and can now (as Jeff says) unleash their creativity and pursue their dreams. They expect to use Step Functions to improve the scalability, functionality, and reliability of their applications, going far beyond the initial use for the Coca-Cola Vending Pass. For example, Coke has built a serverless solution for publishing nutrition information to their food service partners using Lambda, Step Functions, and API Gateway.

Patrick and his team are now experimenting with machine learning and artificial intelligence. They built a prototype application to analyze a stream of photos from Instagram and extract trends in tastes and flavors. The application (built as a quick, one-day prototype) made use of Lambda, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon API Gateway, and Amazon Rekognition and was, in Patrick’s words, a “big win and an enabler.”

In order to build serverless applications even more quickly, the development team has created an internal CI/CD reference architecture that builds on the Serverless Application Framework. The architecture includes a guided tour of Serverless and some boilerplate code to access internal services and assets. Patrick told me that this model allows them to easily scale promising projects from “a guy with a computer” to an entire development team.

Patrick will be on stage at AWS re:Invent next to my colleague Tim Bray. To meet them in person, be sure to attend SRV306 – State Machines in the Wild! How Customers Use AWS Step Functions.

Jeff;

Improved Testing on the AWS Lambda Console

Post Syndicated from Orr Weinstein original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/improved-testing-on-the-aws-lambda-console/

(This post has been written by Chris Tate, SDE on the Lambda Console team)

Today, AWS Lambda released three console enhancements:

  • A quicker creation flow that lets you quickly create a function with the minimum working configuration, so that you can start iterating faster.
  • A streamlined configuration page with Lambda function settings logically grouped into cards, which makes locating and making changes much easier.
  • Persisting multiple events to help test your function.

This post focuses on persisting test events, and I discuss how I’ve been using this new feature. Now when you are testing on the Lambda console, you can save up to 10 test events per function, and each event can be up to 6 megabytes in size, the maximum payload size for synchronous invocations. The events are saved for the logged-in user, so that two different users in the same account have their own set of events.

Testing Lambda functions

As a Lambda console developer, when I work on side projects at home, I sometimes use our development server. I’ve been using this new feature to test a Lambda function in one of my projects. The function is probably more complicated than it should be, because it can be triggered by an Alexa skill, Amazon CloudWatch schedule, or an Amazon API Gateway API. If you have had a similarly complicated function, you may have run into the same problem I did:  How do you test?

For quick testing, I used the console but the console used to save only one test event at a time. To work around this, my solution was a text file with three different JSON events, one for each trigger. I would copy whatever event I needed into the Lambda console, tweak it, and choose Test. This would become particularly annoying when I wanted to quickly test all three.

I also switch between my laptop and desktop depending on my mood. For that reason, I needed to make sure this text file with the events were shared in some way, as the console only locally saved one test event to the current browser. But now you don’t have to worry about any of that.

Walkthrough

In the Lambda console, go to the detail page of any function, and select Configure test events from the test events dropdown (the dropdown beside the orange test button). In the dialog box, you can manage 10 test events for your function. First, paste your Alexa trigger event in the dialog box and type an event name, such as AlexaTrigger.

Choose Create. After it saves, you see AlexaTrigger in the Test list.

When you open the dialog box again by choosing Configure test events, you are in edit mode.

To add another event, choose Create new test event. Now you can choose from a list of templates or any of your previously saved test events. This is very useful for a couple of reasons:

  • First, when you want to slightly tweak one of your existing events and still keep the earlier version intact.
  • Second, when you are not sure how to structure a particular event from an event source. You can use one of the sample event templates and tweak them to your needs. Skip it when you know what your event should be.

Paste in your CloudWatch schedule event, give it a name, and choose Create. Repeat for API Gateway.

Now that you have three events saved, you can quickly switch between them and repeatedly test. Furthermore, if you’re on your desktop but you created the test events on your laptop, there’s no problem. You can still see all your events and you can switch back and forth seamlessly between different computers.

Conclusion

This feature should allow you to more easily test your Lambda functions through the console. If you have more suggestions, add a comment to this post or submit feedback through the console. We actually read the feedback, believe it!

Creating a Cost-Efficient Amazon ECS Cluster for Scheduled Tasks

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/creating-a-cost-efficient-amazon-ecs-cluster-for-scheduled-tasks/

Madhuri Peri
Sr. DevOps Consultant

When you use Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS), depending on the logging levels on the RDS instances and the volume of transactions, you could generate a lot of log data. To ensure that everything is running smoothly, many customers search for log error patterns using different log aggregation and visualization systems, such as Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Splunk, or other tool of their choice. A module needs to periodically retrieve the RDS logs using the SDK, and then send them to Amazon S3. From there, you can stream them to your log aggregation tool.

One option is writing an AWS Lambda function to retrieve the log files. However, because of the time that this function needs to execute, depending on the volume of log files retrieved and transferred, it is possible that Lambda could time out on many instances.  Another approach is launching an Amazon EC2 instance that runs this job periodically. However, this would require you to run an EC2 instance continuously, not an optimal use of time or money.

Using the new Amazon CloudWatch integration with Amazon EC2 Container Service, you can trigger this job to run in a container on an existing Amazon ECS cluster. Additionally, this would allow you to improve costs by running containers on a fleet of Spot Instances.

In this post, I will show you how to use the new scheduled tasks (cron) feature in Amazon ECS and launch tasks using CloudWatch events, while leveraging Spot Fleet to maximize availability and cost optimization for containerized workloads.

Architecture

The following diagram shows how the various components described schedule a task that retrieves log files from Amazon RDS database instances, and deposits the logs into an S3 bucket.

Amazon ECS cluster container instances are using Spot Fleet, which is a perfect match for the workload that needs to run when it can. This improves cluster costs.

The task definition defines which Docker image to retrieve from the Amazon EC2 Container Registry (Amazon ECR) repository and run on the Amazon ECS cluster.

The container image has Python code functions to make AWS API calls using boto3. It iterates over the RDS database instances, retrieves the logs, and deposits them in the S3 bucket. Many customers choose these logs to be delivered to their centralized log-store. CloudWatch Events defines the schedule for when the container task has to be launched.

Walkthrough

To provide the basic framework, we have built an AWS CloudFormation template that creates the following resources:

  • Amazon ECR repository for storing the Docker image to be used in the task definition
  • S3 bucket that holds the transferred logs
  • Task definition, with image name and S3 bucket as environment variables provided via input parameter
  • CloudWatch Events rule
  • Amazon ECS cluster
  • Amazon ECS container instances using Spot Fleet
  • IAM roles required for the container instance profiles

Before you begin

Ensure that Git, Docker, and the AWS CLI are installed on your computer.

In your AWS account, instantiate one Amazon Aurora instance using the console. For more information, see Creating an Amazon Aurora DB Cluster.

Implementation Steps

  1. Clone the code from GitHub that performs RDS API calls to retrieve the log files.
    git clone https://github.com/awslabs/aws-ecs-scheduled-tasks.git
  2. Build and tag the image.
    cd aws-ecs-scheduled-tasks/container-code/src && ls

    Dockerfile		rdslogsshipper.py	requirements.txt

    docker build -t rdslogsshipper .

    Sending build context to Docker daemon 9.728 kB
    Step 1 : FROM python:3
     ---> 41397f4f2887
    Step 2 : WORKDIR /usr/src/app
     ---> Using cache
     ---> 59299c020e7e
    Step 3 : COPY requirements.txt ./
     ---> 8c017e931c3b
    Removing intermediate container df09e1bed9f2
    Step 4 : COPY rdslogsshipper.py /usr/src/app
     ---> 099a49ca4325
    Removing intermediate container 1b1da24a6699
    Step 5 : RUN pip install --no-cache-dir -r requirements.txt
     ---> Running in 3ed98b30901d
    Collecting boto3 (from -r requirements.txt (line 1))
      Downloading boto3-1.4.6-py2.py3-none-any.whl (128kB)
    Collecting botocore (from -r requirements.txt (line 2))
      Downloading botocore-1.6.7-py2.py3-none-any.whl (3.6MB)
    Collecting s3transfer<0.2.0,>=0.1.10 (from boto3->-r requirements.txt (line 1))
      Downloading s3transfer-0.1.10-py2.py3-none-any.whl (54kB)
    Collecting jmespath<1.0.0,>=0.7.1 (from boto3->-r requirements.txt (line 1))
      Downloading jmespath-0.9.3-py2.py3-none-any.whl
    Collecting python-dateutil<3.0.0,>=2.1 (from botocore->-r requirements.txt (line 2))
      Downloading python_dateutil-2.6.1-py2.py3-none-any.whl (194kB)
    Collecting docutils>=0.10 (from botocore->-r requirements.txt (line 2))
      Downloading docutils-0.14-py3-none-any.whl (543kB)
    Collecting six>=1.5 (from python-dateutil<3.0.0,>=2.1->botocore->-r requirements.txt (line 2))
      Downloading six-1.10.0-py2.py3-none-any.whl
    Installing collected packages: six, python-dateutil, docutils, jmespath, botocore, s3transfer, boto3
    Successfully installed boto3-1.4.6 botocore-1.6.7 docutils-0.14 jmespath-0.9.3 python-dateutil-2.6.1 s3transfer-0.1.10 six-1.10.0
     ---> f892d3cb7383
    Removing intermediate container 3ed98b30901d
    Step 6 : COPY . .
     ---> ea7550c04fea
    Removing intermediate container b558b3ebd406
    Successfully built ea7550c04fea
  3. Run the CloudFormation stack and get the names for the Amazon ECR repo and S3 bucket. In the stack, choose Outputs.
  4. Open the ECS console and choose Repositories. The rdslogs repo has been created. Choose View Push Commands and follow the instructions to connect to the repository and push the image for the code that you built in Step 2. The screenshot shows the final result:
  5. Associate the CloudWatch scheduled task with the created Amazon ECS Task Definition, using a new CloudWatch event rule that is scheduled to run at intervals. The following rule is scheduled to run every 15 minutes:
    aws --profile default --region us-west-2 events put-rule --name demo-ecs-task-rule  --schedule-expression "rate(15 minutes)"

    {
        "RuleArn": "arn:aws:events:us-west-2:12345678901:rule/demo-ecs-task-rule"
    }
  6. CloudWatch requires IAM permissions to place a task on the Amazon ECS cluster when the CloudWatch event rule is executed, in addition to an IAM role that can be assumed by CloudWatch Events. This is done in three steps:
    1. Create the IAM role to be assumed by CloudWatch.
      aws --profile default --region us-west-2 iam create-role --role-name Test-Role --assume-role-policy-document file://event-role.json

      {
          "Role": {
              "AssumeRolePolicyDocument": {
                  "Version": "2012-10-17", 
                  "Statement": [
                      {
                          "Action": "sts:AssumeRole", 
                          "Effect": "Allow", 
                          "Principal": {
                              "Service": "events.amazonaws.com"
                          }
                      }
                  ]
              }, 
              "RoleId": "AROAIRYYLDCVZCUACT7FS", 
              "CreateDate": "2017-07-14T22:44:52.627Z", 
              "RoleName": "Test-Role", 
              "Path": "/", 
              "Arn": "arn:aws:iam::12345678901:role/Test-Role"
          }
      }

      The following is an example of the event-role.json file used earlier:

      {
          "Version": "2012-10-17",
          "Statement": [
              {
                  "Effect": "Allow",
                  "Principal": {
                    "Service": "events.amazonaws.com"
                  },
                  "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
              }
          ]
      }
    2. Create the IAM policy defining the ECS cluster and task definition. You need to get these values from the CloudFormation outputs and resources.
      aws --profile default --region us-west-2 iam create-policy --policy-name test-policy --policy-document file://event-policy.json

      {
          "Policy": {
              "PolicyName": "test-policy", 
              "CreateDate": "2017-07-14T22:51:20.293Z", 
              "AttachmentCount": 0, 
              "IsAttachable": true, 
              "PolicyId": "ANPAI7XDIQOLTBUMDWGJW", 
              "DefaultVersionId": "v1", 
              "Path": "/", 
              "Arn": "arn:aws:iam::123455678901:policy/test-policy", 
              "UpdateDate": "2017-07-14T22:51:20.293Z"
          }
      }

      The following is an example of the event-policy.json file used earlier:

      {
          "Version": "2012-10-17",
          "Statement": [
            {
                "Effect": "Allow",
                "Action": [
                    "ecs:RunTask"
                ],
                "Resource": [
                    "arn:aws:ecs:*::task-definition/"
                ],
                "Condition": {
                    "ArnLike": {
                        "ecs:cluster": "arn:aws:ecs:*::cluster/"
                    }
                }
            }
          ]
      }
    3. Attach the IAM policy to the role.
      aws --profile default --region us-west-2 iam attach-role-policy --role-name Test-Role --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::1234567890:policy/test-policy
  7. Associate the CloudWatch rule created earlier to place the task on the ECS cluster. The following command shows an example. Replace the AWS account ID and region with your settings.
    aws events put-targets --rule demo-ecs-task-rule --targets "Id"="1","Arn"="arn:aws:ecs:us-west-2:12345678901:cluster/test-cwe-blog-ecsCluster-15HJFWCH4SP67","EcsParameters"={"TaskDefinitionArn"="arn:aws:ecs:us-west-2:12345678901:task-definition/test-cwe-blog-taskdef:8"},"RoleArn"="arn:aws:iam::12345678901:role/Test-Role"

    {
        "FailedEntries": [], 
        "FailedEntryCount": 0
    }

That’s it. The logs now run based on the defined schedule.

To test this, open the Amazon ECS console, select the Amazon ECS cluster that you created, and then choose Tasks, Run New Task. Select the task definition created by the CloudFormation template, and the cluster should be selected automatically. As this runs, the S3 bucket should be populated with the RDS logs for the instance.

Conclusion

In this post, you’ve seen that the choices for workloads that need to run at a scheduled time include Lambda with CloudWatch events or EC2 with cron. However, sometimes the job could run outside of Lambda execution time limits or be not cost-effective for an EC2 instance.

In such cases, you can schedule the tasks on an ECS cluster using CloudWatch rules. In addition, you can use a Spot Fleet cluster with Amazon ECS for cost-conscious workloads that do not have hard requirements on execution time or instance availability in the Spot Fleet. For more information, see Powering your Amazon ECS Cluster with Amazon EC2 Spot Instances and Scheduled Events.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

Using Enhanced Request Authorizers in Amazon API Gateway

Post Syndicated from Stefano Buliani original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/using-enhanced-request-authorizers-in-amazon-api-gateway/

Recently, AWS introduced a new type of authorizer in Amazon API Gateway, enhanced request authorizers. Previously, custom authorizers received only the bearer token included in the request and the ARN of the API Gateway method being called. Enhanced request authorizers receive all of the headers, query string, and path parameters as well as the request context. This enables you to make more sophisticated authorization decisions based on parameters such as the client IP address, user agent, or a query string parameter alongside the client bearer token.

Enhanced request authorizer configuration

From the API Gateway console, you can declare a new enhanced request authorizer by selecting the Request option as the AWS Lambda event payload:

Create enhanced request authorizer

 

Just like normal custom authorizers, API Gateway can cache the policy returned by your Lambda function. With enhanced request authorizers, however, you can also specify the values that form the unique key of a policy in the cache. For example, if your authorization decision is based on both the bearer token and the IP address of the client, both values should be part of the unique key in the policy cache. The identity source parameter lets you specify these values as mapping expressions:

  • The bearer token appears in the Authorization header
  • The client IP address is stored in the sourceIp parameter of the request context.

Configure identity sources

 

Using enhanced request authorizers with Swagger

You can also define enhanced request authorizers in your Swagger (Open API) definitions. In the following example, you can see that all of the options configured in the API Gateway console are available as custom extensions in the API definition. For example, the identitySource field is a comma-separated list of mapping expressions.

securityDefinitions:
  IpAuthorizer:
    type: "apiKey"
    name: "IpAuthorizer"
    in: "header"
    x-amazon-apigateway-authtype: "custom"
    x-amazon-apigateway-authorizer:
      authorizerResultTtlInSeconds: 300
      identitySource: "method.request.header.Authorization, context.identity.sourceIp"
      authorizerUri: "arn:aws:apigateway:us-east-1:lambda:path/2015-03-31/functions/arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:XXXXXXXXXX:function:py-ip-authorizer/invocations"
      type: "request"

After you have declared your authorizer in the security definitions section, you can use it in your API methods:

---
swagger: "2.0"
info:
  title: "request-authorizer-demo"
basePath: "/dev"
paths:
  /hello:
    get:
      security:
      - IpAuthorizer: []
...

Enhanced request authorizer Lambda functions

Enhanced request authorizer Lambda functions receive an event object that is similar to proxy integrations. It contains all of the information about a request, excluding the body.

{
    "methodArn": "arn:aws:execute-api:us-east-1:XXXXXXXXXX:xxxxxx/dev/GET/hello",
    "resource": "/hello",
    "requestContext": {
        "resourceId": "xxxx",
        "apiId": "xxxxxxxxx",
        "resourcePath": "/hello",
        "httpMethod": "GET",
        "requestId": "9e04ff18-98a6-11e7-9311-ef19ba18fc8a",
        "path": "/dev/hello",
        "accountId": "XXXXXXXXXXX",
        "identity": {
            "apiKey": "",
            "sourceIp": "58.240.196.186"
        },
        "stage": "dev"
    },
    "queryStringParameters": {},
    "httpMethod": "GET",
    "pathParameters": {},
    "headers": {
        "cache-control": "no-cache",
        "x-amzn-ssl-client-hello": "AQACJAMDAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA…",
        "Accept-Encoding": "gzip, deflate",
        "X-Forwarded-For": "54.240.196.186, 54.182.214.90",
        "Accept": "*/*",
        "User-Agent": "PostmanRuntime/6.2.5",
        "Authorization": "hello"
    },
    "stageVariables": {},
    "path": "/hello",
    "type": "REQUEST"
}

The following enhanced request authorizer snippet is written in Python and compares the source IP address against a list of valid IP addresses. The comments in the code explain what happens in each step.

...
VALID_IPS = ["58.240.195.186", "201.246.162.38"]

def lambda_handler(event, context):

    # Read the client’s bearer token.
    jwtToken = event["headers"]["Authorization"]
    
    # Read the source IP address for the request form 
    # for the API Gateway context object.
    clientIp = event["requestContext"]["identity"]["sourceIp"]
    
    # Verify that the client IP address is allowed.
    # If it’s not valid, raise an exception to make sure
    # that API Gateway returns a 401 status code.
    if clientIp not in VALID_IPS:
        raise Exception('Unauthorized')
    
    # Only allow hello users in!
    if not validate_jwt(userId):
        raise Exception('Unauthorized')

    # Use the values from the event object to populate the 
    # required parameters in the policy object.
    policy = AuthPolicy(userId, event["requestContext"]["accountId"])
    policy.restApiId = event["requestContext"]["apiId"]
    policy.region = event["methodArn"].split(":")[3]
    policy.stage = event["requestContext"]["stage"]
    
    # Use the scopes from the bearer token to make a 
    # decision on which methods to allow in the API.
    policy.allowMethod(HttpVerb.GET, '/hello')

    # Finally, build the policy.
    authResponse = policy.build()

    return authResponse
...

Conclusion

API Gateway customers build complex APIs, and authorization decisions often go beyond the simple properties in a JWT token. For example, users may be allowed to call the “list cars” endpoint but only with a specific subset of filter parameters. With enhanced request authorizers, you have access to all request parameters. You can centralize all of your application’s access control decisions in a Lambda function, making it easier to manage your application security.

Skill up on how to perform CI/CD with AWS Developer tools

Post Syndicated from Chirag Dhull original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/skill-up-on-how-to-perform-cicd-with-aws-devops-tools/

This is a guest post from Paul Duvall, CTO of Stelligent, a division of HOSTING.

I co-founded Stelligent, a technology services company that provides DevOps Automation on AWS as a result of my own frustration in implementing all the “behind the scenes” infrastructure (including builds, tests, deployments, etc.) on software projects on which I was developing software. At Stelligent, we have worked with numerous customers looking to get software delivered to users quicker and with greater confidence. This sounds simple but it often consists of properly configuring and integrating myriad tools including, but not limited to, version control, build, static analysis, testing, security, deployment, and software release orchestration. What some might not realize is that there’s a new breed of build, deploy, test, and release tools that help reduce much of the undifferentiated heavy lifting of deploying and releasing software to users.

 
I’ve been using AWS since 2009 and I, along with many at Stelligent – have worked with the AWS Service Teams as part of the AWS Developer Tools betas that are now generally available (including AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodeBuild, and AWS CodeDeploy). I’ve combined the experience we’ve had with customers along with this specialized knowledge of the AWS Developer and Management Tools to provide a unique course that shows multiple ways to use these services to deliver software to users quicker and with confidence.

 
In DevOps Essentials on AWS, you’ll learn how to accelerate software delivery and speed up feedback loops by learning how to use AWS Developer Tools to automate infrastructure and deployment pipelines for applications running on AWS. The course demonstrates solutions for various DevOps use cases for Amazon EC2, AWS OpsWorks, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, AWS Lambda (Serverless), Amazon ECS (Containers), while defining infrastructure as code and learning more about AWS Developer Tools including AWS CodeStar, AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodeBuild, AWS CodePipeline, and AWS CodeDeploy.

 
In this course, you see me use the AWS Developer and Management Tools to create comprehensive continuous delivery solutions for a sample application using many types of AWS service platforms. You can run the exact same sample and/or fork the GitHub repository (https://github.com/stelligent/devops-essentials) and extend or modify the solutions. I’m excited to share how you can use AWS Developer Tools to create these solutions for your customers as well. There’s also an accompanying website for the course (http://www.devopsessentialsaws.com/) that I use in the video to walk through the course examples which link to resources located in GitHub or Amazon S3. In this course, you will learn how to:

  • Use AWS Developer and Management Tools to create a full-lifecycle software delivery solution
  • Use AWS CloudFormation to automate the provisioning of all AWS resources
  • Use AWS CodePipeline to orchestrate the deployments of all applications
  • Use AWS CodeCommit while deploying an application onto EC2 instances using AWS CodeBuild and AWS CodeDeploy
  • Deploy applications using AWS OpsWorks and AWS Elastic Beanstalk
  • Deploy an application using Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) along with AWS CloudFormation
  • Deploy serverless applications that use AWS Lambda and API Gateway
  • Integrate all AWS Developer Tools into an end-to-end solution with AWS CodeStar

To learn more, see DevOps Essentials on AWS video course on Udemy. For a limited time, you can enroll in this course for $40 and save 80%, a $160 saving. Simply use the code AWSDEV17.

 
Stelligent, an AWS Partner Network Advanced Consulting Partner holds the AWS DevOps Competency and over 100 AWS technical certifications. To stay updated on DevOps best practices, visit www.stelligent.com.

How to Query Personally Identifiable Information with Amazon Macie

Post Syndicated from Chad Woolf original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-query-personally-identifiable-information-with-amazon-macie/

Amazon Macie logo

In August 2017 at the AWS Summit New York, AWS launched a new security and compliance service called Amazon Macie. Macie uses machine learning to automatically discover, classify, and protect sensitive data in AWS. In this blog post, I demonstrate how you can use Macie to help enable compliance with applicable regulations, starting with data retention.

How to query retained PII with Macie

Data retention and mandatory data deletion are common topics across compliance frameworks, so knowing what is stored and how long it has been or needs to be stored is of critical importance. For example, you can use Macie for Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) 3.2, requirement 3, “Protect stored cardholder data,” which mandates a “quarterly process for identifying and securely deleting stored cardholder data that exceeds defined retention.” You also can use Macie for ISO 27017 requirement 12.3.1, which calls for “retention periods for backup data.” In each of these cases, you can use Macie’s built-in queries to identify the age of data in your Amazon S3 buckets and to help meet your compliance needs.

To get started with Macie and run your first queries of personally identifiable information (PII) and sensitive data, follow the initial setup as described in the launch post on the AWS Blog. After you have set up Macie, walk through the following steps to start running queries. Start by focusing on the S3 buckets that you want to inventory and capture important compliance related activity and data.

To start running Macie queries:

  1. In the AWS Management Console, launch the Macie console (you can type macie to find the console).
  2. Click Dashboard in the navigation pane. This shows you an overview of the risk level and data classification type of all inventoried S3 buckets, categorized by date and type.
    Screenshot of "Dashboard" in the navigation pane
  3. Choose S3 objects by PII priority. This dashboard lets you sort by PII priority and PII types.
    Screenshot of "S3 objects by PII priority"
  4. In this case, I want to find information about credit card numbers. I choose the magnifying glass for the type cc_number (note that PII types can be used for custom queries). This view shows the events where PII classified data has been uploaded to S3. When I scroll down, I see the individual files that have been identified.
    Screenshot showing the events where PII classified data has been uploaded to S3
  5. Before looking at the files, I want to continue to build the query by only showing items with high priority. To do so, I choose the row called Object PII Priority and then the magnifying glass icon next to High.
    Screenshot of refining the query for high priority events
  6. To view the results matching these queries, I scroll down and choose any file listed. This shows vital information such as creation date, location, and object access control list (ACL).
  7. The piece I am most interested in this case is the Object PII details line to understand more about what was found in the file. In this case, I see name and credit card information, which is what caused the high priority. Scrolling up again, I also see that the query fields have updated as I interacted with the UI.
    Screenshot showing "Object PII details"

Let’s say that I want to get an alert every time Macie finds new data matching this query. This alert can be used to automate response actions by using AWS Lambda and Amazon CloudWatch Events.

  1. I choose the left green icon called Save query as alert.
    Screenshot of "Save query as alert" button
  2. I can customize the alert and change things like category or severity to fit my needs based on the alert data.
  3. Another way to find the information I am looking for is to run custom queries. To start using custom queries, I choose Research in the navigation pane.
    1. To learn more about custom Macie queries and what you can do on the Research tab, see Using the Macie Research Tab.
  4. I change the type of query I want to run from CloudTrail data to S3 objects in the drop-down list menu.
    Screenshot of choosing "S3 objects" from the drop-down list menu
  5. Because I want PII data, I start typing in the query box, which has an autocomplete feature. I choose the pii_types: query. I can now type the data I want to look for. In this case, I want to see all files matching the credit card filter so I type cc_number and press Enter. The query box now says, pii_types:cc_number. I press Enter again to enable autocomplete, and then I type AND pii_types:email to require both a credit card number and email address in a single object.
    The query looks for all files matching the credit card filter ("cc_number")
  6. I choose the magnifying glass to search and Macie shows me all S3 objects that are tagged as PII of type Credit Cards. I can further specify that I only want to see PII of type Credit Card that are classified as High priority by adding AND and pii_impact:high to the query.
    Screenshot showing narrowing the query results furtherAs before, I can save this new query as an alert by clicking Save query as alert, which will be triggered by data matching the query going forward.

Advanced tip

Try the following advanced queries using Lucene query syntax and save the queries as alerts in Macie.

  • Use a regular-expression based query to search for a minimum of 10 credit card numbers and 10 email addresses in a single object:
    • pii_explain.cc_number:/([1-9][0-9]|[0-9]{3,}) distinct Credit Card Numbers.*/ AND pii_explain.email:/([1-9][0-9]|[0-9]{3,}) distinct Email Addresses.*/
  • Search for objects containing at least one credit card, name, and email address that have an object policy enabling global access (searching for S3 AllUsers or AuthenticatedUsers permissions):
    • (object_acl.Grants.Grantee.URI:”http\://acs.amazonaws.com/groups/global/AllUsers” OR  object_acl.Grants.Grantee.URI:”http\://acs.amazonaws.com/groups/global/AllUsers”) AND (pii_types.cc_number AND pii_types.email AND pii_types.name)

These are two ways to identify and be alerted about PII by using Macie. In a similar way, you can create custom alerts for various AWS CloudTrail events by choosing a different data set on which to run the queries again. In the examples in this post, I identified credit cards stored in plain text (all data in this post is example data only), determined how long they had been stored in S3 by viewing the result details, and set up alerts to notify or trigger actions on new sensitive data being stored. With queries like these, you can build a reliable data validation program.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about how to use Macie, start a new thread on the Macie forum or contact AWS Support.

-Chad

Using AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeBuild, and AWS Lambda for Serverless Automated UI Testing

Post Syndicated from Prakash Palanisamy original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/using-aws-codepipeline-aws-codebuild-and-aws-lambda-for-serverless-automated-ui-testing/

Testing the user interface of a web application is an important part of the development lifecycle. In this post, I’ll explain how to automate UI testing using serverless technologies, including AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeBuild, and AWS Lambda.

I built a website for UI testing that is hosted in S3. I used Selenium to perform cross-browser UI testing on Chrome, Firefox, and PhantomJS, a headless WebKit browser with Ghost Driver, an implementation of the WebDriver Wire Protocol. I used Python to create test cases for ChromeDriver, FirefoxDriver, or PhatomJSDriver based the browser against which the test is being executed.

Resources referred to in this post, including the AWS CloudFormation template, test and status websites hosted in S3, AWS CodeBuild build specification files, AWS Lambda function, and the Python script that performs the test are available in the serverless-automated-ui-testing GitHub repository.

S3 Hosted Test Website:

AWS CodeBuild supports custom containers so we can use the Selenium/standalone-Firefox and Selenium/standalone-Chrome containers, which include prebuild Firefox and Chrome browsers, respectively. Xvfb performs the graphical operation in virtual memory without any display hardware. It will be installed in the CodeBuild containers during the install phase.

Build Spec for Chrome and Firefox

The build specification for Chrome and Firefox testing includes multiple phases:

  • The environment variables section contains a set of default variables that are overridden while creating the build project or triggering the build.
  • As part of install phase, required packages like Xvfb and Selenium are installed using yum.
  • During the pre_build phase, the test bed is prepared for test execution.
  • During the build phase, the appropriate DISPLAY is set and the tests are executed.
version: 0.2

env:
  variables:
    BROWSER: "chrome"
    WebURL: "https://sampletestweb.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/website/index.html"
    ArtifactBucket: "codebuild-demo-artifact-repository"
    MODULES: "mod1"
    ModuleTable: "test-modules"
    StatusTable: "blog-test-status"

phases:
  install:
    commands:
      - apt-get update
      - apt-get -y upgrade
      - apt-get install xvfb python python-pip build-essential -y
      - pip install --upgrade pip
      - pip install selenium
      - pip install awscli
      - pip install requests
      - pip install boto3
      - cp xvfb.init /etc/init.d/xvfb
      - chmod +x /etc/init.d/xvfb
      - update-rc.d xvfb defaults
      - service xvfb start
      - export PATH="$PATH:`pwd`/webdrivers"
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - python prepare_test.py
  build:
    commands:
      - export DISPLAY=:5
      - cd tests
      - echo "Executing simple test..."
      - python testsuite.py

Because Ghost Driver runs headless, it can be executed on AWS Lambda. In keeping with a fire-and-forget model, I used CodeBuild to create the PhantomJS Lambda function and trigger the test invocations on Lambda in parallel. This is powerful because many tests can be executed in parallel on Lambda.

Build Spec for PhantomJS

The build specification for PhantomJS testing also includes multiple phases. It is a little different from the preceding example because we are using AWS Lambda for the test execution.

  • The environment variables section contains a set of default variables that are overridden while creating the build project or triggering the build.
  • As part of install phase, the required packages like Selenium and the AWS CLI are installed using yum.
  • During the pre_build phase, the test bed is prepared for test execution.
  • During the build phase, a zip file that will be used to create the PhantomJS Lambda function is created and tests are executed on the Lambda function.
version: 0.2

env:
  variables:
    BROWSER: "phantomjs"
    WebURL: "https://sampletestweb.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/website/index.html"
    ArtifactBucket: "codebuild-demo-artifact-repository"
    MODULES: "mod1"
    ModuleTable: "test-modules"
    StatusTable: "blog-test-status"
    LambdaRole: "arn:aws:iam::account-id:role/role-name"

phases:
  install:
    commands:
      - apt-get update
      - apt-get -y upgrade
      - apt-get install python python-pip build-essential -y
      - apt-get install zip unzip -y
      - pip install --upgrade pip
      - pip install selenium
      - pip install awscli
      - pip install requests
      - pip install boto3
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - python prepare_test.py
  build:
    commands:
      - cd lambda_function
      - echo "Packaging Lambda Function..."
      - zip -r /tmp/lambda_function.zip ./*
      - func_name=`echo $CODEBUILD_BUILD_ID | awk -F ':' '{print $1}'`-phantomjs
      - echo "Creating Lambda Function..."
      - chmod 777 phantomjs
      - |
         func_list=`aws lambda list-functions | grep FunctionName | awk -F':' '{print $2}' | tr -d ', "'`
         if echo "$func_list" | grep -qw $func_name
         then
             echo "Lambda function already exists."
         else
             aws lambda create-function --function-name $func_name --runtime "python2.7" --role $LambdaRole --handler "testsuite.lambda_handler" --zip-file fileb:///tmp/lambda_function.zip --timeout 150 --memory-size 1024 --environment Variables="{WebURL=$WebURL, StatusTable=$StatusTable}" --tags Name=$func_name
         fi
      - export PhantomJSFunction=$func_name
      - cd ../tests/
      - python testsuite.py

The list of test cases and the test modules that belong to each case are stored in an Amazon DynamoDB table. Based on the list of modules passed as an argument to the CodeBuild project, CodeBuild gets the test cases from that table and executes them. The test execution status and results are stored in another Amazon DynamoDB table. It will read the test status from the status table in DynamoDB and display it.

AWS CodeBuild and AWS Lambda perform the test execution as individual tasks. AWS CodePipeline plays an important role here by enabling continuous delivery and parallel execution of tests for optimized testing.

Here’s how to do it:

In AWS CodePipeline, create a pipeline with four stages:

  • Source (AWS CodeCommit)
  • UI testing (AWS Lambda and AWS CodeBuild)
  • Approval (manual approval)
  • Production (AWS Lambda)

Pipeline stages, the actions in each stage, and transitions between stages are shown in the following diagram.

This design implemented in AWS CodePipeline looks like this:

CodePipeline automatically detects a change in the source repository and triggers the execution of the pipeline.

In the UITest stage, there are two parallel actions:

  • DeployTestWebsite invokes a Lambda function to deploy the test website in S3 as an S3 website.
  • DeployStatusPage invokes another Lambda function to deploy in parallel the status website in S3 as an S3 website.

Next, there are three parallel actions that trigger the CodeBuild project:

  • TestOnChrome launches a container to perform the Selenium tests on Chrome.
  • TestOnFirefox launches another container to perform the Selenium tests on Firefox.
  • TestOnPhantomJS creates a Lambda function and invokes individual Lambda functions per test case to execute the test cases in parallel.

You can monitor the status of the test execution on the status website, as shown here:

When the UI testing is completed successfully, the pipeline continues to an Approval stage in which a notification is sent to the configured SNS topic. The designated team member reviews the test status and approves or rejects the deployment. Upon approval, the pipeline continues to the Production stage, where it invokes a Lambda function and deploys the website to a production S3 bucket.

I used a CloudFormation template to set up my continuous delivery pipeline. The automated-ui-testing.yaml template, available from GitHub, sets up a full-featured pipeline.

When I use the template to create my pipeline, I specify the following:

  • AWS CodeCommit repository.
  • SNS topic to send approval notification.
  • S3 bucket name where the artifacts will be stored.

The stack name should follow the rules for S3 bucket naming because it will be part of the S3 bucket name.

When the stack is created successfully, the URLs for the test website and status website appear in the Outputs section, as shown here:

Conclusion

In this post, I showed how you can use AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeBuild, AWS Lambda, and a manual approval process to create a continuous delivery pipeline for serverless automated UI testing. Websites running on Amazon EC2 instances or AWS Elastic Beanstalk can also be tested using similar approach.


About the author

Prakash Palanisamy is a Solutions Architect for Amazon Web Services. When he is not working on Serverless, DevOps or Alexa, he will be solving problems in Project Euler. He also enjoys watching educational documentaries.

Automating Amazon EBS Snapshot Management with AWS Step Functions and Amazon CloudWatch Events

Post Syndicated from Andy Katz original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/automating-amazon-ebs-snapshot-management-with-aws-step-functions-and-amazon-cloudwatch-events/

Brittany Doncaster, Solutions Architect

Business continuity is important for building mission-critical workloads on AWS. As an AWS customer, you might define recovery point objectives (RPO) and recovery time objectives (RTO) for different tier applications in your business. After the RPO and RTO requirements are defined, it is up to your architects to determine how to meet those requirements.

You probably store persistent data in Amazon EBS volumes, which live within a single Availability Zone. And, following best practices, you take snapshots of your EBS volumes to back up the data on Amazon S3, which provides 11 9’s of durability. If you are following these best practices, then you’ve probably recognized the need to manage the number of snapshots you keep for a particular EBS volume and delete older, unneeded snapshots. Doing this cleanup helps save on storage costs.

Some customers also have policies stating that backups need to be stored a certain number of miles away as part of a disaster recovery (DR) plan. To meet these requirements, customers copy their EBS snapshots to the DR region. Then, the same snapshot management and cleanup has to also be done in the DR region.

All of this snapshot management logic consists of different components. You would first tag your snapshots so you could manage them. Then, determine how many snapshots you currently have for a particular EBS volume and assess that value against a retention rule. If the number of snapshots was greater than your retention value, then you would clean up old snapshots. And finally, you might copy the latest snapshot to your DR region. All these steps are just an example of a simple snapshot management workflow. But how do you automate something like this in AWS? How do you do it without servers?

One of the most powerful AWS services released in 2016 was Amazon CloudWatch Events. It enables you to build event-driven IT automation, based on events happening within your AWS infrastructure. CloudWatch Events integrates with AWS Lambda to let you execute your custom code when one of those events occurs. However, the actions to take based on those events aren’t always composed of a single Lambda function. Instead, your business logic may consist of multiple steps (like in the case of the example snapshot management flow described earlier). And you may want to run those steps in sequence or in parallel. You may also want to have retry logic or exception handling for each step.

AWS Step Functions serves just this purpose―to help you coordinate your functions and microservices. Step Functions enables you to simplify your effort and pull the error handling, retry logic, and workflow logic out of your Lambda code. Step Functions integrates with Lambda to provide a mechanism for building complex serverless applications. Now, you can kick off a Step Functions state machine based on a CloudWatch event.

In this post, I discuss how you can target Step Functions in a CloudWatch Events rule. This allows you to have event-driven snapshot management based on snapshot completion events firing in CloudWatch Event rules.

As an example of what you could do with Step Functions and CloudWatch Events, we’ve developed a reference architecture that performs management of your EBS snapshots.

Automating EBS Snapshot Management with Step Functions

This architecture assumes that you have already set up CloudWatch Events to create the snapshots on a schedule or that you are using some other means of creating snapshots according to your needs.

This architecture covers the pieces of the workflow that need to happen after a snapshot has been created.

  • It creates a CloudWatch Events rule to invoke a Step Functions state machine execution when an EBS snapshot is created.
  • The state machine then tags the snapshot, cleans up the oldest snapshots if the number of snapshots is greater than the defined number to retain, and copies the snapshot to a DR region.
  • When the DR region snapshot copy is completed, another state machine kicks off in the DR region. The new state machine has a similar flow and uses some of the same Lambda code to clean up the oldest snapshots that are greater than the defined number to retain.
  • Also, both state machines demonstrate how you can use Step Functions to handle errors within your workflow. Any errors that are caught during execution result in the execution of a Lambda function that writes a message to an SNS topic. Therefore, if any errors occur, you can subscribe to the SNS topic and get notified.

The following is an architecture diagram of the reference architecture:

Creating the Lambda functions and Step Functions state machines

First, pull the code from GitHub and use the AWS CLI to create S3 buckets for the Lambda code in the primary and DR regions. For this example, assume that the primary region is us-west-2 and the DR region is us-east-2. Run the following commands, replacing the italicized text in <> with your own unique bucket names.

git clone https://github.com/awslabs/aws-step-functions-ebs-snapshot-mgmt.git

cd aws-step-functions-ebs-snapshot-mgmt/

aws s3 mb s3://<primary region bucket name> --region us-west-2

aws s3 mb s3://<DR region bucket name> --region us-east-2

Next, use the Serverless Application Model (SAM), which uses AWS CloudFormation to deploy the Lambda functions and Step Functions state machines in the primary and DR regions. Replace the italicized text in <> with the S3 bucket names that you created earlier.

aws cloudformation package --template-file PrimaryRegionTemplate.yaml --s3-bucket <primary region bucket name>  --output-template-file tempPrimary.yaml --region us-west-2

aws cloudformation deploy --template-file tempPrimary.yaml --stack-name ebsSnapshotMgmtPrimary --capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM --region us-west-2

aws cloudformation package --template-file DR_RegionTemplate.yaml --s3-bucket <DR region bucket name> --output-template-file tempDR.yaml  --region us-east-2

aws cloudformation deploy --template-file tempDR.yaml --stack-name ebsSnapshotMgmtDR --capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM --region us-east-2

CloudWatch event rule verification

The CloudFormation templates deploy the following resources:

  • The Lambda functions that are coordinated by Step Functions
  • The Step Functions state machine
  • The SNS topic
  • The CloudWatch Events rules that trigger the state machine execution

So, all of the CloudWatch event rules have been created for you by performing the preceding commands. The next section demonstrates how you could create the CloudWatch event rule manually. To jump straight to testing the workflow, see the “Testing in your Account” section. Otherwise, you begin by setting up the CloudWatch event rule in the primary region for the createSnapshot event and also the CloudWatch event rule in the DR region for the copySnapshot command.

First, open the CloudWatch console in the primary region.

Choose Create Rule and create a rule for the createSnapshot command, with your newly created Step Function state machine as the target.

For Event Source, choose Event Pattern and specify the following values:

  • Service Name: EC2
  • Event Type: EBS Snapshot Notification
  • Specific Event: createSnapshot

For Target, choose Step Functions state machine, then choose the state machine created by the CloudFormation commands. Choose Create a new role for this specific resource. Your completed rule should look like the following:

Choose Configure Details and give the rule a name and description.

Choose Create Rule. You now have a CloudWatch Events rule that triggers a Step Functions state machine execution when the EBS snapshot creation is complete.

Now, set up the CloudWatch Events rule in the DR region as well. This looks almost same, but is based off the copySnapshot event instead of createSnapshot.

In the upper right corner in the console, switch to your DR region. Choose CloudWatch, Create Rule.

For Event Source, choose Event Pattern and specify the following values:

  • Service Name: EC2
  • Event Type: EBS Snapshot Notification
  • Specific Event: copySnapshot

For Target, choose Step Functions state machine, then select the state machine created by the CloudFormation commands. Choose Create a new role for this specific resource. Your completed rule should look like in the following:

As in the primary region, choose Configure Details and then give this rule a name and description. Complete the creation of the rule.

Testing in your account

To test this setup, open the EC2 console and choose Volumes. Select a volume to snapshot. Choose Actions, Create Snapshot, and then create a snapshot.

This results in a new execution of your state machine in the primary and DR regions. You can view these executions by going to the Step Functions console and selecting your state machine.

From there, you can see the execution of the state machine.

Primary region state machine:

DR region state machine:

I’ve also provided CloudFormation templates that perform all the earlier setup without using git clone and running the CloudFormation commands. Choose the Launch Stack buttons below to launch the primary and DR region stacks in Dublin and Ohio, respectively. From there, you can pick up at the Testing in Your Account section above to finish the example. All of the code for this example architecture is located in the aws-step-functions-ebs-snapshot-mgmt AWSLabs repo.

Launch EBS Snapshot Management into Ireland with CloudFormation
Primary Region eu-west-1 (Ireland)

Launch EBS Snapshot Management into Ohio with CloudFormation
DR Region us-east-2 (Ohio)

Summary

This reference architecture is just an example of how you can use Step Functions and CloudWatch Events to build event-driven IT automation. The possibilities are endless:

  • Use this pattern to perform other common cleanup type jobs such as managing Amazon RDS snapshots, old versions of Lambda functions, or old Amazon ECR images—all triggered by scheduled events.
  • Use Trusted Advisor events to identify unused EC2 instances or EBS volumes, then coordinate actions on them, such as alerting owners, stopping, or snapshotting.

Happy coding and please let me know what useful state machines you build!

New – Per-Second Billing for EC2 Instances and EBS Volumes

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-per-second-billing-for-ec2-instances-and-ebs-volumes/

Back in the old days, you needed to buy or lease a server if you needed access to compute power. When we launched EC2 back in 2006, the ability to use an instance for an hour, and to pay only for that hour, was big news. The pay-as-you-go model inspired our customers to think about new ways to develop, test, and run applications of all types.

Today, services like AWS Lambda prove that we can do a lot of useful work in a short time. Many of our customers are dreaming up applications for EC2 that can make good use of a large number of instances for shorter amounts of time, sometimes just a few minutes.

Per-Second Billing for EC2 and EBS
Effective October 2nd, usage of Linux instances that are launched in On-Demand, Reserved, and Spot form will be billed in one-second increments. Similarly, provisioned storage for EBS volumes will be billed in one-second increments.

Per-second billing also applies to Amazon EMR and AWS Batch:

Amazon EMR – Our customers add capacity to their EMR clusters in order to get their results more quickly. With per-second billing for the EC2 instances in the clusters, adding nodes is more cost-effective than ever.

AWS Batch – Many of the batch jobs that our customers run complete in less than an hour. AWS Batch already launches and terminates Spot Instances; with per-second billing batch processing will become even more economical.

Some of our more sophisticated customers have built systems to get the most value from EC2 by strategically choosing the most advantageous target instances when managing their gaming, ad tech, or 3D rendering fleets. Per-second billing obviates the need for this extra layer of instance management, and brings the costs savings to all customers and all workloads.

While this will result in a price reduction for many workloads (and you know we love price reductions), I don’t think that’s the most important aspect of this change. I believe that this change will inspire you to innovate and to think about your compute-bound problems in new ways. How can you use it to improve your support for continuous integration? Can it change the way that you provision transient environments for your dev and test workloads? What about your analytics, batch processing, and 3D rendering?

One of the many advantages of cloud computing is the elastic nature of provisioning or deprovisioning resources as you need them. By billing usage down to the second we will enable customers to level up their elasticity, save money, and customers will be positioned to take advantage of continuing advances in computing.

Things to Know
This change is effective in all AWS Regions and will be effective October 2, for all Linux instances that are newly launched or already running. Per-second billing is not currently applicable to instances running Microsoft Windows or Linux distributions that have a separate hourly charge. There is a 1 minute minimum charge per-instance.

List prices and Spot Market prices are still listed on a per-hour basis, but bills are calculated down to the second, as is Reserved Instance usage (you can launch, use, and terminate multiple instances within an hour and get the Reserved Instance Benefit for all of the instances). Also, bills will show times in decimal form, like this:

The Dedicated Per Region Fee, EBS Snapshots, and products in AWS Marketplace are still billed on an hourly basis.

Jeff;

 

Automate Your IT Operations Using AWS Step Functions and Amazon CloudWatch Events

Post Syndicated from Andy Katz original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/automate-your-it-operations-using-aws-step-functions-and-amazon-cloudwatch-events/


Rob Percival, Associate Solutions Architect

Are you interested in reducing the operational overhead of your AWS Cloud infrastructure? One way to achieve this is to automate the response to operational events for resources in your AWS account.

Amazon CloudWatch Events provides a near real-time stream of system events that describe the changes and notifications for your AWS resources. From this stream, you can create rules to route specific events to AWS Step Functions, AWS Lambda, and other AWS services for further processing and automated actions.

In this post, learn how you can use Step Functions to orchestrate serverless IT automation workflows in response to CloudWatch events sourced from AWS Health, a service that monitors and generates events for your AWS resources. As a real-world example, I show automating the response to a scenario where an IAM user access key has been exposed.

Serverless workflows with Step Functions and Lambda

Step Functions makes it easy to develop and orchestrate components of operational response automation using visual workflows. Building automation workflows from individual Lambda functions that perform discrete tasks lets you develop, test, and modify the components of your workflow quickly and seamlessly. As serverless services, Step Functions and Lambda also provide the benefits of more productive development, reduced operational overhead, and no costs incurred outside of when the workflows are actively executing.

Example workflow

As an example, this post focuses on automating the response to an event generated by AWS Health when an IAM access key has been publicly exposed on GitHub. This is a diagram of the automation workflow:

AWS proactively monitors popular code repository sites for IAM access keys that have been publicly exposed. Upon detection of an exposed IAM access key, AWS Health generates an AWS_RISK_CREDENTIALS_EXPOSED event in the AWS account related to the exposed key. A configured CloudWatch Events rule detects this event and invokes a Step Functions state machine. The state machine then orchestrates the automated workflow that deletes the exposed IAM access key, summarizes the recent API activity for the exposed key, and sends the summary message to an Amazon SNS topic to notify the subscribers―in that order.

The corresponding Step Functions state machine diagram of this automation workflow can be seen below:

While this particular example focuses on IT automation workflows in response to the AWS_RISK_CREDENTIALS_EXPOSEDevent sourced from AWS Health, it can be generalized to integrate with other events from these services, other event-generating AWS services, and even run on a time-based schedule.

Walkthrough

To follow along, use the code and resources found in the aws-health-tools GitHub repo. The code and resources include an AWS CloudFormation template, in addition to instructions on how to use it.

Launch Stack into N. Virginia with CloudFormation

The Step Functions state machine execution starts with the exposed keys event details in JSON, a sanitized example of which is provided below:

{
    "version": "0",
    "id": "121345678-1234-1234-1234-123456789012",
    "detail-type": "AWS Health Event",
    "source": "aws.health",
    "account": "123456789012",
    "time": "2016-06-05T06:27:57Z",
    "region": "us-east-1",
    "resources": [],
    "detail": {
        "eventArn": "arn:aws:health:us-east-1::event/AWS_RISK_CREDENTIALS_EXPOSED_XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX",
        "service": "RISK",
        "eventTypeCode": "AWS_RISK_CREDENTIALS_EXPOSED",
        "eventTypeCategory": "issue",
        "startTime": "Sat, 05 Jun 2016 15:10:09 GMT",
        "eventDescription": [
            {
                "language": "en_US",
                "latestDescription": "A description of the event is provided here"
            }
        ],
        "affectedEntities": [
            {
                "entityValue": "ACCESS_KEY_ID_HERE"
            }
        ]
    }
}

After it’s invoked, the state machine execution proceeds as follows.

Step 1: Delete the exposed IAM access key pair

The first thing you want to do when you determine that an IAM access key has been exposed is to delete the key pair so that it can no longer be used to make API calls. This Step Functions task state deletes the exposed access key pair detailed in the incoming event, and retrieves the IAM user associated with the key to look up API activity for the user in the next step. The user name, access key, and other details about the event are passed to the next step as JSON.

This state contains a powerful error-handling feature offered by Step Functions task states called a catch configuration. Catch configurations allow you to reroute and continue state machine invocation at new states depending on potential errors that occur in your task function. In this case, the catch configuration skips to Step 3. It immediately notifies your security team that errors were raised in the task function of this step (Step 1), when attempting to look up the corresponding IAM user for a key or delete the user’s access key.

Note: Step Functions also offers a retry configuration for when you would rather retry a task function that failed due to error, with the option to specify an increasing time interval between attempts and a maximum number of attempts.

Step 2: Summarize recent API activity for key

After you have deleted the access key pair, you’ll want to have some immediate insight into whether it was used for malicious activity in your account. Another task state, this step uses AWS CloudTrail to look up and summarize the most recent API activity for the IAM user associated with the exposed key. The summary is in the form of counts for each API call made and resource type and name affected. This summary information is then passed to the next step as JSON. This step requires information that you obtained in Step 1. Step Functions ensures the successful completion of Step 1 before moving to Step 2.

Step 3: Notify security

The summary information gathered in the last step can provide immediate insight into any malicious activity on your account made by the exposed key. To determine this and further secure your account if necessary, you must notify your security team with the gathered summary information.

This final task state generates an email message providing in-depth detail about the event using the API activity summary, and publishes the message to an SNS topic subscribed to by the members of your security team.

If the catch configuration of the task state in Step 1 was triggered, then the security notification email instead directs your security team to log in to the console and navigate to the Personal Health Dashboard to view more details on the incident.

Lessons learned

When implementing this use case with Step Functions and Lambda, consider the following:

  • One of the most important parts of implementing automation in response to operational events is to ensure visibility into the response and resolution actions is retained. Step Functions and Lambda enable you to orchestrate your granular response and resolution actions that provides direct visibility into the state of the automation workflow.
  • This basic workflow currently executes these steps serially with a catch configuration for error handling. More sophisticated workflows can leverage the parallel execution, branching logic, and time delay functionality provided by Step Functions.
  • Catch and retry configurations for task states allow for orchestrating reliable workflows while maintaining the granularity of each Lambda function. Without leveraging a catch configuration in Step 1, you would have had to duplicate code from the function in Step 3 to ensure that your security team was notified on failure to delete the access key.
  • Step Functions and Lambda are serverless services, so there is no cost for these services when they are not running. Because this IT automation workflow only runs when an IAM access key is exposed for this account (which is hopefully rare!), the total monthly cost for this workflow is essentially $0.

Conclusion

Automating the response to operational events for resources in your AWS account can free up the valuable time of your engineers. Step Functions and Lambda enable granular IT automation workflows to achieve this result while gaining direct visibility into the orchestration and state of the automation.

For more examples of how to use Step Functions to automate the operations of your AWS resources, or if you’d like to see how Step Functions can be used to build and orchestrate serverless applications, visit Getting Started on the Step Functions website.

Parallel Processing in Python with AWS Lambda

Post Syndicated from Oz Akan original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/parallel-processing-in-python-with-aws-lambda/

If you develop an AWS Lambda function with Node.js, you can call multiple web services without waiting for a response due to its asynchronous nature.  All requests are initiated almost in parallel, so you can get results much faster than a series of sequential calls to each web service. Considering the maximum execution duration for Lambda, it is beneficial for I/O bound tasks to run in parallel.

If you develop a Lambda function with Python, parallelism doesn’t come by default. Lambda supports Python 2.7 and Python 3.6, both of which have multiprocessing and threading modules. The multiprocessing module supports multiple cores so it is a better choice, especially for CPU intensive workloads. With the threading module, all threads are going to run on a single core though performance difference is negligible for network-bound tasks.

In this post, I demonstrate how the Python multiprocessing module can be used within a Lambda function to run multiple I/O bound tasks in parallel.

Example use case

In this example, you call Amazon EC2 and Amazon EBS API operations to find the total EBS volume size for all your EC2 instances in a region.

This is a two-step process:

  • The Lambda function calls EC2 to list all EC2 instances
  • The function calls EBS for each instance to find attached EBS volumes

Sequential Execution

If you make these calls sequentially, during the second step, your code has to loop over all the instances and wait for each response before moving to the next request.

The class named VolumesSequential has the following methods:

  • __init__ creates an EC2 resource.
  • total_size returns all EC2 instances and passes these to the instance_volumes method.
  • instance_volumes finds the total size of EBS volumes for the instance.
  • total_size adds all sizes from all instances to find total size for the EBS volumes.

Source Code for Sequential Execution

import time
import boto3

class VolumesSequential(object):
    """Finds total volume size for all EC2 instances"""
    def __init__(self):
        self.ec2 = boto3.resource('ec2')

    def instance_volumes(self, instance):
        """
        Finds total size of the EBS volumes attached
        to an EC2 instance
        """
        instance_total = 0
        for volume in instance.volumes.all():
            instance_total += volume.size
        return instance_total

    def total_size(self):
        """
        Lists all EC2 instances in the default region
        and sums result of instance_volumes
        """
        print "Running sequentially"
        instances = self.ec2.instances.all()
        instances_total = 0
        for instance in instances:
            instances_total += self.instance_volumes(instance)
        return instances_total

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    volumes = VolumesSequential()
    _start = time.time()
    total = volumes.total_size()
    print "Total volume size: %s GB" % total
    print "Sequential execution time: %s seconds" % (time.time() - _start)

Parallel Execution

The multiprocessing module that comes with Python 2.7 lets you run multiple processes in parallel. Due to the Lambda execution environment not having /dev/shm (shared memory for processes) support, you can’t use multiprocessing.Queue or multiprocessing.Pool.

If you try to use multiprocessing.Queue, you get an error similar to the following:

[Errno 38] Function not implemented: OSError
…
    sl = self._semlock = _multiprocessing.SemLock(kind, value, maxvalue)
OSError: [Errno 38] Function not implemented

On the other hand, you can use multiprocessing.Pipe instead of multiprocessing.Queue to accomplish what you need without getting any errors during the execution of the Lambda function.

The class named VolumeParallel has the following methods:

  • __init__ creates an EC2 resource
  • instance_volumes finds the total size of EBS volumes attached to an instance
  • total_size finds all instances and runs instance_volumes for each to find the total size of all EBS volumes attached to all EC2 instances.

Source Code for Parallel Execution

import time
from multiprocessing import Process, Pipe
import boto3

class VolumesParallel(object):
    """Finds total volume size for all EC2 instances"""
    def __init__(self):
        self.ec2 = boto3.resource('ec2')

    def instance_volumes(self, instance, conn):
        """
        Finds total size of the EBS volumes attached
        to an EC2 instance
        """
        instance_total = 0
        for volume in instance.volumes.all():
            instance_total += volume.size
        conn.send([instance_total])
        conn.close()

    def total_size(self):
        """
        Lists all EC2 instances in the default region
        and sums result of instance_volumes
        """
        print "Running in parallel"

        # get all EC2 instances
        instances = self.ec2.instances.all()
        
        # create a list to keep all processes
        processes = []

        # create a list to keep connections
        parent_connections = []
        
        # create a process per instance
        for instance in instances:            
            # create a pipe for communication
            parent_conn, child_conn = Pipe()
            parent_connections.append(parent_conn)

            # create the process, pass instance and connection
            process = Process(target=self.instance_volumes, args=(instance, child_conn,))
            processes.append(process)

        # start all processes
        for process in processes:
            process.start()

        # make sure that all processes have finished
        for process in processes:
            process.join()

        instances_total = 0
        for parent_connection in parent_connections:
            instances_total += parent_connection.recv()[0]

        return instances_total


def lambda_handler(event, context):
    volumes = VolumesParallel()
    _start = time.time()
    total = volumes.total_size()
    print "Total volume size: %s GB" % total
    print "Sequential execution time: %s seconds" % (time.time() - _start)

Performance

There are a few differences between two Lambda functions when it comes to the execution environment. The parallel function requires more memory than the sequential one. You may run the parallel Lambda function with a relatively large memory setting to see how much memory it uses. The amount of memory required by the Lambda function depends on what the function does and how many processes it runs in parallel. To restrict maximum memory usage, you may want to limit the number of parallel executions.

In this case, when you give 1024 MB for both Lambda functions, the parallel function runs about two times faster than the sequential function. I have a handful of EC2 instances and EBS volumes in my account so the test ran way under the maximum execution limit for Lambda. Remember that parallel execution doesn’t guarantee that the runtime for the Lambda function will be under the maximum allowed duration but does speed up the overall execution time.

Sequential Run Time Output

START RequestId: 4c370b12-f9d3-11e6-b46b-b5d41afd648e Version: $LATEST
Running sequentially
Total volume size: 589 GB
Sequential execution time: 3.80066084862 seconds
END RequestId: 4c370b12-f9d3-11e6-b46b-b5d41afd648e
REPORT RequestId: 4c370b12-f9d3-11e6-b46b-b5d41afd648e Duration: 4091.59 ms Billed Duration: 4100 ms  Memory Size: 1024 MB Max Memory Used: 46 MB

Parallel Run Time Output

START RequestId: 4f1328ed-f9d3-11e6-8cd1-c7381c5c078d Version: $LATEST
Running in parallel
Total volume size: 589 GB
Sequential execution time: 1.89170885086 seconds
END RequestId: 4f1328ed-f9d3-11e6-8cd1-c7381c5c078d
REPORT RequestId: 4f1328ed-f9d3-11e6-8cd1-c7381c5c078d Duration: 2069.33 ms Billed Duration: 2100 ms  Memory Size: 1024 MB Max Memory Used: 181 MB 

Summary

In this post, I demonstrated how to run multiple I/O bound tasks in parallel by developing a Lambda function with the Python multiprocessing module. With the help of this module, you freed the CPU from waiting for I/O and fired up several tasks to fit more I/O bound operations into a given time frame. This might be the trick to reduce the overall runtime of a Lambda function especially when you have to run so many and don’t want to split the work into smaller chunks.