Tag Archives: AWS Lambda

Managing AWS Lambda Function Concurrency

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/managing-aws-lambda-function-concurrency/

One of the key benefits of serverless applications is the ease in which they can scale to meet traffic demands or requests, with little to no need for capacity planning. In AWS Lambda, which is the core of the serverless platform at AWS, the unit of scale is a concurrent execution. This refers to the number of executions of your function code that are happening at any given time.

Thinking about concurrent executions as a unit of scale is a fairly unique concept. In this post, I dive deeper into this and talk about how you can make use of per function concurrency limits in Lambda.

Understanding concurrency in Lambda

Instead of diving right into the guts of how Lambda works, here’s an appetizing analogy: a magical pizza.
Yes, a magical pizza!

This magical pizza has some unique properties:

  • It has a fixed maximum number of slices, such as 8.
  • Slices automatically re-appear after they are consumed.
  • When you take a slice from the pizza, it does not re-appear until it has been completely consumed.
  • One person can take multiple slices at a time.
  • You can easily ask to have the number of slices increased, but they remain fixed at any point in time otherwise.

Now that the magical pizza’s properties are defined, here’s a hypothetical situation of some friends sharing this pizza.

Shawn, Kate, Daniela, Chuck, Ian and Avleen get together every Friday to share a pizza and catch up on their week. As there is just six of them, they can easily all enjoy a slice of pizza at a time. As they finish each slice, it re-appears in the pizza pan and they can take another slice again. Given the magical properties of their pizza, they can continue to eat all they want, but with two very important constraints:

  • If any of them take too many slices at once, the others may not get as much as they want.
  • If they take too many slices, they might also eat too much and get sick.

One particular week, some of the friends are hungrier than the rest, taking two slices at a time instead of just one. If more than two of them try to take two pieces at a time, this can cause contention for pizza slices. Some of them would wait hungry for the slices to re-appear. They could ask for a pizza with more slices, but then run the same risk again later if more hungry friends join than planned for.

What can they do?

If the friends agreed to accept a limit for the maximum number of slices they each eat concurrently, both of these issues are avoided. Some could have a maximum of 2 of the 8 slices, or other concurrency limits that were more or less. Just so long as they kept it at or under eight total slices to be eaten at one time. This would keep any from going hungry or eating too much. The six friends can happily enjoy their magical pizza without worry!

Concurrency in Lambda

Concurrency in Lambda actually works similarly to the magical pizza model. Each AWS Account has an overall AccountLimit value that is fixed at any point in time, but can be easily increased as needed, just like the count of slices in the pizza. As of May 2017, the default limit is 1000 “slices” of concurrency per AWS Region.

Also like the magical pizza, each concurrency “slice” can only be consumed individually one at a time. After consumption, it becomes available to be consumed again. Services invoking Lambda functions can consume multiple slices of concurrency at the same time, just like the group of friends can take multiple slices of the pizza.

Let’s take our example of the six friends and bring it back to AWS services that commonly invoke Lambda:

  • Amazon S3
  • Amazon Kinesis
  • Amazon DynamoDB
  • Amazon Cognito

In a single account with the default concurrency limit of 1000 concurrent executions, any of these four services could invoke enough functions to consume the entire limit or some part of it. Just like with the pizza example, there is the possibility for two issues to pop up:

  • One or more of these services could invoke enough functions to consume a majority of the available concurrency capacity. This could cause others to be starved for it, causing failed invocations.
  • A service could consume too much concurrent capacity and cause a downstream service or database to be overwhelmed, which could cause failed executions.

For Lambda functions that are launched in a VPC, you have the potential to consume the available IP addresses in a subnet or the maximum number of elastic network interfaces to which your account has access. For more information, see Configuring a Lambda Function to Access Resources in an Amazon VPC. For information about elastic network interface limits, see Network Interfaces section in the Amazon VPC Limits topic.

One way to solve both of these problems is applying a concurrency limit to the Lambda functions in an account.

Configuring per function concurrency limits

You can now set a concurrency limit on individual Lambda functions in an account. The concurrency limit that you set reserves a portion of your account level concurrency for a given function. All of your functions’ concurrent executions count against this account-level limit by default.

If you set a concurrency limit for a specific function, then that function’s concurrency limit allocation is deducted from the shared pool and assigned to that specific function. AWS also reserves 100 units of concurrency for all functions that don’t have a specified concurrency limit set. This helps to make sure that future functions have capacity to be consumed.

Going back to the example of the consuming services, you could set throttles for the functions as follows:

Amazon S3 function = 350
Amazon Kinesis function = 200
Amazon DynamoDB function = 200
Amazon Cognito function = 150
Total = 900

With the 100 reserved for all non-concurrency reserved functions, this totals the account limit of 1000.

Here’s how this works. To start, create a basic Lambda function that is invoked via Amazon API Gateway. This Lambda function returns a single “Hello World” statement with an added sleep time between 2 and 5 seconds. The sleep time simulates an API providing some sort of capability that can take a varied amount of time. The goal here is to show how an API that is underloaded can reach its concurrency limit, and what happens when it does.
To create the example function

  1. Open the Lambda console.
  2. Choose Create Function.
  3. For Author from scratch, enter the following values:
    1. For Name, enter a value (such as concurrencyBlog01).
    2. For Runtime, choose Python 3.6.
    3. For Role, choose Create new role from template and enter a name aligned with this function, such as concurrencyBlogRole.
  4. Choose Create function.
  5. The function is created with some basic example code. Replace that code with the following:

import time
from random import randint
seconds = randint(2, 5)

def lambda_handler(event, context):
time.sleep(seconds)
return {"statusCode": 200,
"body": ("Hello world, slept " + str(seconds) + " seconds"),
"headers":
{
"Access-Control-Allow-Headers": "Content-Type,X-Amz-Date,Authorization,X-Api-Key,X-Amz-Security-Token",
"Access-Control-Allow-Methods": "GET,OPTIONS",
}}

  1. Under Basic settings, set Timeout to 10 seconds. While this function should only ever take up to 5-6 seconds (with the 5-second max sleep), this gives you a little bit of room if it takes longer.

  1. Choose Save at the top right.

At this point, your function is configured for this example. Test it and confirm this in the console:

  1. Choose Test.
  2. Enter a name (it doesn’t matter for this example).
  3. Choose Create.
  4. In the console, choose Test again.
  5. You should see output similar to the following:

Now configure API Gateway so that you have an HTTPS endpoint to test against.

  1. In the Lambda console, choose Configuration.
  2. Under Triggers, choose API Gateway.
  3. Open the API Gateway icon now shown as attached to your Lambda function:

  1. Under Configure triggers, leave the default values for API Name and Deployment stage. For Security, choose Open.
  2. Choose Add, Save.

API Gateway is now configured to invoke Lambda at the Invoke URL shown under its configuration. You can take this URL and test it in any browser or command line, using tools such as “curl”:


$ curl https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01
Hello world, slept 2 seconds

Throwing load at the function

Now start throwing some load against your API Gateway + Lambda function combo. Right now, your function is only limited by the total amount of concurrency available in an account. For this example account, you might have 850 unreserved concurrency out of a full account limit of 1000 due to having configured a few concurrency limits already (also the 100 concurrency saved for all functions without configured limits). You can find all of this information on the main Dashboard page of the Lambda console:

For generating load in this example, use an open source tool called “hey” (https://github.com/rakyll/hey), which works similarly to ApacheBench (ab). You test from an Amazon EC2 instance running the default Amazon Linux AMI from the EC2 console. For more help with configuring an EC2 instance, follow the steps in the Launch Instance Wizard.

After the EC2 instance is running, SSH into the host and run the following:


sudo yum install go
go get -u github.com/rakyll/hey

“hey” is easy to use. For these tests, specify a total number of tests (5,000) and a concurrency of 50 against the API Gateway URL as follows(replace the URL here with your own):


$ ./go/bin/hey -n 5000 -c 50 https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01

The output from “hey” tells you interesting bits of information:


$ ./go/bin/hey -n 5000 -c 50 https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01

Summary:
Total: 381.9978 secs
Slowest: 9.4765 secs
Fastest: 0.0438 secs
Average: 3.2153 secs
Requests/sec: 13.0891
Total data: 140024 bytes
Size/request: 28 bytes

Response time histogram:
0.044 [1] |
0.987 [2] |
1.930 [0] |
2.874 [1803] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
3.817 [1518] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
4.760 [719] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
5.703 [917] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
6.647 [13] |
7.590 [14] |
8.533 [9] |
9.477 [4] |

Latency distribution:
10% in 2.0224 secs
25% in 2.0267 secs
50% in 3.0251 secs
75% in 4.0269 secs
90% in 5.0279 secs
95% in 5.0414 secs
99% in 5.1871 secs

Details (average, fastest, slowest):
DNS+dialup: 0.0003 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0332 secs
DNS-lookup: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0046 secs
req write: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0005 secs
resp wait: 3.2149 secs, 0.0438 secs, 9.4472 secs
resp read: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0004 secs

Status code distribution:
[200] 4997 responses
[502] 3 responses

You can see a helpful histogram and latency distribution. Remember that this Lambda function has a random sleep period in it and so isn’t entirely representational of a real-life workload. Those three 502s warrant digging deeper, but could be due to Lambda cold-start timing and the “second” variable being the maximum of 5, causing the Lambda functions to time out. AWS X-Ray and the Amazon CloudWatch logs generated by both API Gateway and Lambda could help you troubleshoot this.

Configuring a concurrency reservation

Now that you’ve established that you can generate this load against the function, I show you how to limit it and protect a backend resource from being overloaded by all of these requests.

  1. In the console, choose Configure.
  2. Under Concurrency, for Reserve concurrency, enter 25.

  1. Click on Save in the top right corner.

You could also set this with the AWS CLI using the Lambda put-function-concurrency command or see your current concurrency configuration via Lambda get-function. Here’s an example command:


$ aws lambda get-function --function-name concurrencyBlog01 --output json --query Concurrency
{
"ReservedConcurrentExecutions": 25
}

Either way, you’ve set the Concurrency Reservation to 25 for this function. This acts as both a limit and a reservation in terms of making sure that you can execute 25 concurrent functions at all times. Going above this results in the throttling of the Lambda function. Depending on the invoking service, throttling can result in a number of different outcomes, as shown in the documentation on Throttling Behavior. This change has also reduced your unreserved account concurrency for other functions by 25.

Rerun the same load generation as before and see what happens. Previously, you tested at 50 concurrency, which worked just fine. By limiting the Lambda functions to 25 concurrency, you should see rate limiting kick in. Run the same test again:


$ ./go/bin/hey -n 5000 -c 50 https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01

While this test runs, refresh the Monitoring tab on your function detail page. You see the following warning message:

This is great! It means that your throttle is working as configured and you are now protecting your downstream resources from too much load from your Lambda function.

Here is the output from a new “hey” command:


$ ./go/bin/hey -n 5000 -c 50 https://ofixul557l.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/prod/concurrencyBlog01
Summary:
Total: 379.9922 secs
Slowest: 7.1486 secs
Fastest: 0.0102 secs
Average: 1.1897 secs
Requests/sec: 13.1582
Total data: 164608 bytes
Size/request: 32 bytes

Response time histogram:
0.010 [1] |
0.724 [3075] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
1.438 [0] |
2.152 [811] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
2.866 [11] |
3.579 [566] |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
4.293 [214] |∎∎∎
5.007 [1] |
5.721 [315] |∎∎∎∎
6.435 [4] |
7.149 [2] |

Latency distribution:
10% in 0.0130 secs
25% in 0.0147 secs
50% in 0.0205 secs
75% in 2.0344 secs
90% in 4.0229 secs
95% in 5.0248 secs
99% in 5.0629 secs

Details (average, fastest, slowest):
DNS+dialup: 0.0004 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0537 secs
DNS-lookup: 0.0002 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0184 secs
req write: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0016 secs
resp wait: 1.1892 secs, 0.0101 secs, 7.1038 secs
resp read: 0.0000 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0005 secs

Status code distribution:
[502] 3076 responses
[200] 1924 responses

This looks fairly different from the last load test run. A large percentage of these requests failed fast due to the concurrency throttle failing them (those with the 0.724 seconds line). The timing shown here in the histogram represents the entire time it took to get a response between the EC2 instance and API Gateway calling Lambda and being rejected. It’s also important to note that this example was configured with an edge-optimized endpoint in API Gateway. You see under Status code distribution that 3076 of the 5000 requests failed with a 502, showing that the backend service from API Gateway and Lambda failed the request.

Other uses

Managing function concurrency can be useful in a few other ways beyond just limiting the impact on downstream services and providing a reservation of concurrency capacity. Here are two other uses:

  • Emergency kill switch
  • Cost controls

Emergency kill switch

On occasion, due to issues with applications I’ve managed in the past, I’ve had a need to disable a certain function or capability of an application. By setting the concurrency reservation and limit of a Lambda function to zero, you can do just that.

With the reservation set to zero every invocation of a Lambda function results in being throttled. You could then work on the related parts of the infrastructure or application that aren’t working, and then reconfigure the concurrency limit to allow invocations again.

Cost controls

While I mentioned how you might want to use concurrency limits to control the downstream impact to services or databases that your Lambda function might call, another resource that you might be cautious about is money. Setting the concurrency throttle is another way to help control costs during development and testing of your application.

You might want to prevent against a function performing a recursive action too quickly or a development workload generating too high of a concurrency. You might also want to protect development resources connected to this function from generating too much cost, such as APIs that your Lambda function calls.

Conclusion

Concurrent executions as a unit of scale are a fairly unique characteristic about Lambda functions. Placing limits on how many concurrency “slices” that your function can consume can prevent a single function from consuming all of the available concurrency in an account. Limits can also prevent a function from overwhelming a backend resource that isn’t as scalable.

Unlike monolithic applications or even microservices where there are mixed capabilities in a single service, Lambda functions encourage a sort of “nano-service” of small business logic directly related to the integration model connected to the function. I hope you’ve enjoyed this post and configure your concurrency limits today!

Implementing Dynamic ETL Pipelines Using AWS Step Functions

Post Syndicated from Tara Van Unen original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/implementing-dynamic-etl-pipelines-using-aws-step-functions/

This post contributed by:
Wangechi Dole, AWS Solutions Architect
Milan Krasnansky, ING, Digital Solutions Developer, SGK
Rian Mookencherry, Director – Product Innovation, SGK

Data processing and transformation is a common use case you see in our customer case studies and success stories. Often, customers deal with complex data from a variety of sources that needs to be transformed and customized through a series of steps to make it useful to different systems and stakeholders. This can be difficult due to the ever-increasing volume, velocity, and variety of data. Today, data management challenges cannot be solved with traditional databases.

Workflow automation helps you build solutions that are repeatable, scalable, and reliable. You can use AWS Step Functions for this. A great example is how SGK used Step Functions to automate the ETL processes for their client. With Step Functions, SGK has been able to automate changes within the data management system, substantially reducing the time required for data processing.

In this post, SGK shares the details of how they used Step Functions to build a robust data processing system based on highly configurable business transformation rules for ETL processes.

SGK: Building dynamic ETL pipelines

SGK is a subsidiary of Matthews International Corporation, a diversified organization focusing on brand solutions and industrial technologies. SGK’s Global Content Creation Studio network creates compelling content and solutions that connect brands and products to consumers through multiple assets including photography, video, and copywriting.

We were recently contracted to build a sophisticated and scalable data management system for one of our clients. We chose to build the solution on AWS to leverage advanced, managed services that help to improve the speed and agility of development.

The data management system served two main functions:

  1. Ingesting a large amount of complex data to facilitate both reporting and product funding decisions for the client’s global marketing and supply chain organizations.
  2. Processing the data through normalization and applying complex algorithms and data transformations. The system goal was to provide information in the relevant context—such as strategic marketing, supply chain, product planning, etc. —to the end consumer through automated data feeds or updates to existing ETL systems.

We were faced with several challenges:

  • Output data that needed to be refreshed at least twice a day to provide fresh datasets to both local and global markets. That constant data refresh posed several challenges, especially around data management and replication across multiple databases.
  • The complexity of reporting business rules that needed to be updated on a constant basis.
  • Data that could not be processed as contiguous blocks of typical time-series data. The measurement of the data was done across seasons (that is, combination of dates), which often resulted with up to three overlapping seasons at any given time.
  • Input data that came from 10+ different data sources. Each data source ranged from 1–20K rows with as many as 85 columns per input source.

These challenges meant that our small Dev team heavily invested time in frequent configuration changes to the system and data integrity verification to make sure that everything was operating properly. Maintaining this system proved to be a daunting task and that’s when we turned to Step Functions—along with other AWS services—to automate our ETL processes.

Solution overview

Our solution included the following AWS services:

  • AWS Step Functions: Before Step Functions was available, we were using multiple Lambda functions for this use case and running into memory limit issues. With Step Functions, we can execute steps in parallel simultaneously, in a cost-efficient manner, without running into memory limitations.
  • AWS Lambda: The Step Functions state machine uses Lambda functions to implement the Task states. Our Lambda functions are implemented in Java 8.
  • Amazon DynamoDB provides us with an easy and flexible way to manage business rules. We specify our rules as Keys. These are key-value pairs stored in a DynamoDB table.
  • Amazon RDS: Our ETL pipelines consume source data from our RDS MySQL database.
  • Amazon Redshift: We use Amazon Redshift for reporting purposes because it integrates with our BI tools. Currently we are using Tableau for reporting which integrates well with Amazon Redshift.
  • Amazon S3: We store our raw input files and intermediate results in S3 buckets.
  • Amazon CloudWatch Events: Our users expect results at a specific time. We use CloudWatch Events to trigger Step Functions on an automated schedule.

Solution architecture

This solution uses a declarative approach to defining business transformation rules that are applied by the underlying Step Functions state machine as data moves from RDS to Amazon Redshift. An S3 bucket is used to store intermediate results. A CloudWatch Event rule triggers the Step Functions state machine on a schedule. The following diagram illustrates our architecture:

Here are more details for the above diagram:

  1. A rule in CloudWatch Events triggers the state machine execution on an automated schedule.
  2. The state machine invokes the first Lambda function.
  3. The Lambda function deletes all existing records in Amazon Redshift. Depending on the dataset, the Lambda function can create a new table in Amazon Redshift to hold the data.
  4. The same Lambda function then retrieves Keys from a DynamoDB table. Keys represent specific marketing campaigns or seasons and map to specific records in RDS.
  5. The state machine executes the second Lambda function using the Keys from DynamoDB.
  6. The second Lambda function retrieves the referenced dataset from RDS. The records retrieved represent the entire dataset needed for a specific marketing campaign.
  7. The second Lambda function executes in parallel for each Key retrieved from DynamoDB and stores the output in CSV format temporarily in S3.
  8. Finally, the Lambda function uploads the data into Amazon Redshift.

To understand the above data processing workflow, take a closer look at the Step Functions state machine for this example.

We walk you through the state machine in more detail in the following sections.

Walkthrough

To get started, you need to:

  • Create a schedule in CloudWatch Events
  • Specify conditions for RDS data extracts
  • Create Amazon Redshift input files
  • Load data into Amazon Redshift

Step 1: Create a schedule in CloudWatch Events
Create rules in CloudWatch Events to trigger the Step Functions state machine on an automated schedule. The following is an example cron expression to automate your schedule:

In this example, the cron expression invokes the Step Functions state machine at 3:00am and 2:00pm (UTC) every day.

Step 2: Specify conditions for RDS data extracts
We use DynamoDB to store Keys that determine which rows of data to extract from our RDS MySQL database. An example Key is MCS2017, which stands for, Marketing Campaign Spring 2017. Each campaign has a specific start and end date and the corresponding dataset is stored in RDS MySQL. A record in RDS contains about 600 columns, and each Key can represent up to 20K records.

A given day can have multiple campaigns with different start and end dates running simultaneously. In the following example DynamoDB item, three campaigns are specified for the given date.

The state machine example shown above uses Keys 31, 32, and 33 in the first ChoiceState and Keys 21 and 22 in the second ChoiceState. These keys represent marketing campaigns for a given day. For example, on Monday, there are only two campaigns requested. The ChoiceState with Keys 21 and 22 is executed. If three campaigns are requested on Tuesday, for example, then ChoiceState with Keys 31, 32, and 33 is executed. MCS2017 can be represented by Key 21 and Key 33 on Monday and Tuesday, respectively. This approach gives us the flexibility to add or remove campaigns dynamically.

Step 3: Create Amazon Redshift input files
When the state machine begins execution, the first Lambda function is invoked as the resource for FirstState, represented in the Step Functions state machine as follows:

"Comment": ” AWS Amazon States Language.", 
  "StartAt": "FirstState",
 
"States": { 
  "FirstState": {
   
"Type": "Task",
   
"Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:xx-xxxx-x:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:Start",
    "Next": "ChoiceState" 
  } 

As described in the solution architecture, the purpose of this Lambda function is to delete existing data in Amazon Redshift and retrieve keys from DynamoDB. In our use case, we found that deleting existing records was more efficient and less time-consuming than finding the delta and updating existing records. On average, an Amazon Redshift table can contain about 36 million cells, which translates to roughly 65K records. The following is the code snippet for the first Lambda function in Java 8:

public class LambdaFunctionHandler implements RequestHandler<Map<String,Object>,Map<String,String>> {
    Map<String,String> keys= new HashMap<>();
    public Map<String, String> handleRequest(Map<String, Object> input, Context context){
       Properties config = getConfig(); 
       // 1. Cleaning Redshift Database
       new RedshiftDataService(config).cleaningTable(); 
       // 2. Reading data from Dynamodb
       List<String> keyList = new DynamoDBDataService(config).getCurrentKeys();
       for(int i = 0; i < keyList.size(); i++) {
           keys.put(”key" + (i+1), keyList.get(i)); 
       }
       keys.put(”key" + T,String.valueOf(keyList.size()));
       // 3. Returning the key values and the key count from the “for” loop
       return (keys);
}

The following JSON represents ChoiceState.

"ChoiceState": {
   "Type" : "Choice",
   "Choices": [ 
   {

      "Variable": "$.keyT",
     "StringEquals": "3",
     "Next": "CurrentThreeKeys" 
   }, 
   {

     "Variable": "$.keyT",
    "StringEquals": "2",
    "Next": "CurrentTwooKeys" 
   } 
 ], 
 "Default": "DefaultState"
}

The variable $.keyT represents the number of keys retrieved from DynamoDB. This variable determines which of the parallel branches should be executed. At the time of publication, Step Functions does not support dynamic parallel state. Therefore, choices under ChoiceState are manually created and assigned hardcoded StringEquals values. These values represent the number of parallel executions for the second Lambda function.

For example, if $.keyT equals 3, the second Lambda function is executed three times in parallel with keys, $key1, $key2 and $key3 retrieved from DynamoDB. Similarly, if $.keyT equals two, the second Lambda function is executed twice in parallel.  The following JSON represents this parallel execution:

"CurrentThreeKeys": { 
  "Type": "Parallel",
  "Next": "NextState",
  "Branches": [ 
  {

     "StartAt": “key31",
    "States": { 
       “key31": {

          "Type": "Task",
        "InputPath": "$.key1",
        "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:xx-xxxx-x:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:Execution",
        "End": true 
       } 
    } 
  }, 
  {

     "StartAt": “key32",
    "States": { 
     “key32": {

        "Type": "Task",
       "InputPath": "$.key2",
         "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:xx-xxxx-x:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:Execution",
       "End": true 
      } 
     } 
   }, 
   {

      "StartAt": “key33",
       "States": { 
          “key33": {

                "Type": "Task",
             "InputPath": "$.key3",
             "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:xx-xxxx-x:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:Execution",
           "End": true 
       } 
     } 
    } 
  ] 
} 

Step 4: Load data into Amazon Redshift
The second Lambda function in the state machine extracts records from RDS associated with keys retrieved for DynamoDB. It processes the data then loads into an Amazon Redshift table. The following is code snippet for the second Lambda function in Java 8.

public class LambdaFunctionHandler implements RequestHandler<String, String> {
 public static String key = null;

public String handleRequest(String input, Context context) { 
   key=input; 
   //1. Getting basic configurations for the next classes + s3 client Properties
   config = getConfig();

   AmazonS3 s3 = AmazonS3ClientBuilder.defaultClient(); 
   // 2. Export query results from RDS into S3 bucket 
   new RdsDataService(config).exportDataToS3(s3,key); 
   // 3. Import query results from S3 bucket into Redshift 
    new RedshiftDataService(config).importDataFromS3(s3,key); 
   System.out.println(input); 
   return "SUCCESS"; 
 } 
}

After the data is loaded into Amazon Redshift, end users can visualize it using their preferred business intelligence tools.

Lessons learned

  • At the time of publication, the 1.5–GB memory hard limit for Lambda functions was inadequate for processing our complex workload. Step Functions gave us the flexibility to chunk our large datasets and process them in parallel, saving on costs and time.
  • In our previous implementation, we assigned each key a dedicated Lambda function along with CloudWatch rules for schedule automation. This approach proved to be inefficient and quickly became an operational burden. Previously, we processed each key sequentially, with each key adding about five minutes to the overall processing time. For example, processing three keys meant that the total processing time was three times longer. With Step Functions, the entire state machine executes in about five minutes.
  • Using DynamoDB with Step Functions gave us the flexibility to manage keys efficiently. In our previous implementations, keys were hardcoded in Lambda functions, which became difficult to manage due to frequent updates. DynamoDB is a great way to store dynamic data that changes frequently, and it works perfectly with our serverless architectures.

Conclusion

With Step Functions, we were able to fully automate the frequent configuration updates to our dataset resulting in significant cost savings, reduced risk to data errors due to system downtime, and more time for us to focus on new product development rather than support related issues. We hope that you have found the information useful and that it can serve as a jump-start to building your own ETL processes on AWS with managed AWS services.

For more information about how Step Functions makes it easy to coordinate the components of distributed applications and microservices in any workflow, see the use case examples and then build your first state machine in under five minutes in the Step Functions console.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

Glenn’s Take on re:Invent 2017 – Part 3

Post Syndicated from Glenn Gore original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/glenns-take-on-reinvent-2017-part-3/

Glenn Gore here, Chief Architect for AWS. I was in Las Vegas last week — with 43K others — for re:Invent 2017. I checked in to the Architecture blog here and here with my take on what was interesting about some of the bigger announcements from a cloud-architecture perspective.

In the excitement of so many new services being launched, we sometimes overlook feature updates that, while perhaps not as exciting as Amazon DeepLens, have significant impact on how you architect and develop solutions on AWS.

Amazon DynamoDB is used by more than 100,000 customers around the world, handling over a trillion requests every day. From the start, DynamoDB has offered high availability by natively spanning multiple Availability Zones within an AWS Region. As more customers started building and deploying truly-global applications, there was a need to replicate a DynamoDB table to multiple AWS Regions, allowing for read/write operations to occur in any region where the table was replicated. This update is important for providing a globally-consistent view of information — as users may transition from one region to another — or for providing additional levels of availability, allowing for failover between AWS Regions without loss of information.

There are some interesting concurrency-design aspects you need to be aware of and ensure you can handle correctly. For example, we support the “last writer wins” reconciliation where eventual consistency is being used and an application updates the same item in different AWS Regions at the same time. If you require strongly-consistent read/writes then you must perform all of your read/writes in the same AWS Region. The details behind this can be found in the DynamoDB documentation. Providing a globally-distributed, replicated DynamoDB table simplifies many different use cases and allows for the logic of replication, which may have been pushed up into the application layers to be simplified back down into the data layer.

The other big update for DynamoDB is that you can now back up your DynamoDB table on demand with no impact to performance. One of the features I really like is that when you trigger a backup, it is available instantly, regardless of the size of the table. Behind the scenes, we use snapshots and change logs to ensure a consistent backup. While backup is instant, restoring the table could take some time depending on its size and ranges — from minutes to hours for very large tables.

This feature is super important for those of you who work in regulated industries that often have strict requirements around data retention and backups of data, which sometimes limited the use of DynamoDB or required complex workarounds to implement some sort of backup feature in the past. This often incurred significant, additional costs due to increased read transactions on their DynamoDB tables.

Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) was our first-released AWS service over 11 years ago, and it proved the simplicity and scalability of true API-driven architectures in the cloud. Today, Amazon S3 stores trillions of objects, with transactional requests per second reaching into the millions! Dealing with data as objects opened up an incredibly diverse array of use cases ranging from libraries of static images, game binary downloads, and application log data, to massive data lakes used for big data analytics and business intelligence. With Amazon S3, when you accessed your data in an object, you effectively had to write/read the object as a whole or use the range feature to retrieve a part of the object — if possible — in your individual use case.

Now, with Amazon S3 Select, an SQL-like query language is used that can work with delimited text and JSON files, as well as work with GZIP compressed files. We don’t support encryption during the preview of Amazon S3 Select.

Amazon S3 Select provides two major benefits:

  • Faster access
  • Lower running costs

Serverless Lambda functions, where every millisecond matters when you are being charged, will benefit greatly from Amazon S3 Select as data retrieval and processing of your Lambda function will experience significant speedups and cost reductions. For example, we have seen 2x speed improvement and 80% cost reduction with the Serverless MapReduce code.

Other AWS services such as Amazon Athena, Amazon Redshift, and Amazon EMR will support Amazon S3 Select as well as partner offerings including Cloudera and Hortonworks. If you are using Amazon Glacier for longer-term data archival, you will be able to use Amazon Glacier Select to retrieve a subset of your content from within Amazon Glacier.

As the volume of data that can be stored within Amazon S3 and Amazon Glacier continues to scale on a daily basis, we will continue to innovate and develop improved and optimized services that will allow you to work with these magnificently-large data sets while reducing your costs (retrieval and processing). I believe this will also allow you to simplify the transformation and storage of incoming data into Amazon S3 in basic, semi-structured formats as a single copy vs. some of the duplication and reformatting of data sometimes required to do upfront optimizations for downstream processing. Amazon S3 Select largely removes the need for this upfront optimization and instead allows you to store data once and process it based on your individual Amazon S3 Select query per application or transaction need.

Thanks for reading!

Glenn contemplating why CSV format is still relevant in 2017 (Italy).

Implementing Canary Deployments of AWS Lambda Functions with Alias Traffic Shifting

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/implementing-canary-deployments-of-aws-lambda-functions-with-alias-traffic-shifting/

This post courtesy of Ryan Green, Software Development Engineer, AWS Serverless

The concepts of blue/green and canary deployments have been around for a while now and have been well-established as best-practices for reducing the risk of software deployments.

In a traditional, horizontally scaled application, copies of the application code are deployed to multiple nodes (instances, containers, on-premises servers, etc.), typically behind a load balancer. In these applications, deploying new versions of software to too many nodes at the same time can impact application availability as there may not be enough healthy nodes to service requests during the deployment. This aggressive approach to deployments also drastically increases the blast radius of software bugs introduced in the new version and does not typically give adequate time to safely assess the quality of the new version against production traffic.

In such applications, one commonly accepted solution to these problems is to slowly and incrementally roll out application software across the nodes in the fleet while simultaneously verifying application health (canary deployments). Another solution is to stand up an entirely different fleet and weight (or flip) traffic over to the new fleet after verification, ideally with some production traffic (blue/green). Some teams deploy to a single host (“one box environment”), where the new release can bake for some time before promotion to the rest of the fleet. Techniques like this enable the maintainers of complex systems to safely test in production while minimizing customer impact.

Enter Serverless

There is somewhat of an impedance mismatch when mapping these concepts to a serverless world. You can’t incrementally deploy your software across a fleet of servers when there are no servers!* In fact, even the term “deployment” takes on a different meaning with functions as a service (FaaS). In AWS Lambda, a “deployment” can be roughly modeled as a call to CreateFunction, UpdateFunctionCode, or UpdateAlias (I won’t get into the semantics of whether updating configuration counts as a deployment), all of which may affect the version of code that is invoked by clients.

The abstractions provided by Lambda remove the need for developers to be concerned about servers and Availability Zones, and this provides a powerful opportunity to greatly simplify the process of deploying software.
*Of course there are servers, but they are abstracted away from the developer.

Traffic shifting with Lambda aliases

Before the release of traffic shifting for Lambda aliases, deployments of a Lambda function could only be performed in a single “flip” by updating function code for version $LATEST, or by updating an alias to target a different function version. After the update propagates, typically within a few seconds, 100% of function invocations execute the new version. Implementing canary deployments with this model required the development of an additional routing layer, further adding development time, complexity, and invocation latency.
While rolling back a bad deployment of a Lambda function is a trivial operation and takes effect near instantaneously, deployments of new versions for critical functions can still be a potentially nerve-racking experience.

With the introduction of alias traffic shifting, it is now possible to trivially implement canary deployments of Lambda functions. By updating additional version weights on an alias, invocation traffic is routed to the new function versions based on the weight specified. Detailed CloudWatch metrics for the alias and version can be analyzed during the deployment, or other health checks performed, to ensure that the new version is healthy before proceeding.

Note: Sometimes the term “canary deployments” refers to the release of software to a subset of users. In the case of alias traffic shifting, the new version is released to some percentage of all users. It’s not possible to shard based on identity without adding an additional routing layer.

Examples

The simplest possible use of a canary deployment looks like the following:

# Update $LATEST version of function
aws lambda update-function-code --function-name myfunction ….

# Publish new version of function
aws lambda publish-version --function-name myfunction

# Point alias to new version, weighted at 5% (original version at 95% of traffic)
aws lambda update-alias --function-name myfunction --name myalias --routing-config '{"AdditionalVersionWeights" : {"2" : 0.05} }'

# Verify that the new version is healthy
…
# Set the primary version on the alias to the new version and reset the additional versions (100% weighted)
aws lambda update-alias --function-name myfunction --name myalias --function-version 2 --routing-config '{}'

This is begging to be automated! Here are a few options.

Simple deployment automation

This simple Python script runs as a Lambda function and deploys another function (how meta!) by incrementally increasing the weight of the new function version over a prescribed number of steps, while checking the health of the new version. If the health check fails, the alias is rolled back to its initial version. The health check is implemented as a simple check against the existence of Errors metrics in CloudWatch for the alias and new version.

GitHub aws-lambda-deploy repo

Install:

git clone https://github.com/awslabs/aws-lambda-deploy
cd aws-lambda-deploy
export BUCKET_NAME=[YOUR_S3_BUCKET_NAME_FOR_BUILD_ARTIFACTS]
./install.sh

Run:

# Rollout version 2 incrementally over 10 steps, with 120s between each step
aws lambda invoke --function-name SimpleDeployFunction --log-type Tail --payload \
  '{"function-name": "MyFunction",
  "alias-name": "MyAlias",
  "new-version": "2",
  "steps": 10,
  "interval" : 120,
  "type": "linear"
  }' output

Description of input parameters

  • function-name: The name of the Lambda function to deploy
  • alias-name: The name of the alias used to invoke the Lambda function
  • new-version: The version identifier for the new version to deploy
  • steps: The number of times the new version weight is increased
  • interval: The amount of time (in seconds) to wait between weight updates
  • type: The function to use to generate the weights. Supported values: “linear”

Because this runs as a Lambda function, it is subject to the maximum timeout of 5 minutes. This may be acceptable for many use cases, but to achieve a slower rollout of the new version, a different solution is required.

Step Functions workflow

This state machine performs essentially the same task as the simple deployment function, but it runs as an asynchronous workflow in AWS Step Functions. A nice property of Step Functions is that the maximum deployment timeout has now increased from 5 minutes to 1 year!

The step function incrementally updates the new version weight based on the steps parameter, waiting for some time based on the interval parameter, and performing health checks between updates. If the health check fails, the alias is rolled back to the original version and the workflow fails.

For example, to execute the workflow:

export STATE_MACHINE_ARN=`aws cloudformation describe-stack-resources --stack-name aws-lambda-deploy-stack --logical-resource-id DeployStateMachine --output text | cut  -d$'\t' -f3`

aws stepfunctions start-execution --state-machine-arn $STATE_MACHINE_ARN --input '{
  "function-name": "MyFunction",
  "alias-name": "MyAlias",
  "new-version": "2",
  "steps": 10,
  "interval": 120,
  "type": "linear"}'

Getting feedback on the deployment

Because the state machine runs asynchronously, retrieving feedback on the deployment requires polling for the execution status using DescribeExecution or implementing an asynchronous notification (using SNS or email, for example) from the Rollback or Finalize functions. A CloudWatch alarm could also be created to alarm based on the “ExecutionsFailed” metric for the state machine.

A note on health checks and observability

Weighted rollouts like this are considerably more successful if the code is being exercised and monitored continuously. In this example, it would help to have some automation continuously invoking the alias and reporting metrics on these invocations, such as client-side success rates and latencies.

The absence of Lambda Errors metrics used in these examples can be misleading if the function is not getting invoked. It’s also recommended to instrument your Lambda functions with custom metrics, in addition to Lambda’s built-in metrics, that can be used to monitor health during deployments.

Extensibility

These examples could be easily extended in various ways to support different use cases. For example:

  • Health check implementations: CloudWatch alarms, automatic invocations with payload assertions, querying external systems, etc.
  • Weight increase functions: Exponential, geometric progression, single canary step, etc.
  • Custom success/failure notifications: SNS, email, CI/CD systems, service discovery systems, etc.

Traffic shifting with SAM and CodeDeploy

Using the Lambda UpdateAlias operation with additional version weights provides a powerful primitive for you to implement custom traffic shifting solutions for Lambda functions.

For those not interested in building custom deployment solutions, AWS CodeDeploy provides an intuitive turn-key implementation of this functionality integrated directly into the Serverless Application Model. Traffic-shifted deployments can be declared in a SAM template, and CodeDeploy manages the function rollout as part of the CloudFormation stack update. CloudWatch alarms can also be configured to trigger a stack rollback if something goes wrong.

i.e.

MyFunction:
  Type: AWS::Serverless::Function
  Properties:
    FunctionName: MyFunction
    AutoPublishAlias: MyFunctionInvokeAlias
    DeploymentPreference:
      Type: Linear10PercentEvery1Minute
      Role:
        Fn::GetAtt: [ DeploymentRole, Arn ]
      Alarms:
       - { Ref: MyFunctionErrorsAlarm }
...

For more information about using CodeDeploy with SAM, see Automating Updates to Serverless Apps.

Conclusion

It is often the simple features that provide the most value. As I demonstrated in this post, serverless architectures allow the complex deployment orchestration used in traditional applications to be replaced with a simple Lambda function or Step Functions workflow. By allowing invocation traffic to be easily weighted to multiple function versions, Lambda alias traffic shifting provides a simple but powerful feature that I hope empowers you to easily implement safe deployment workflows for your Lambda functions.

Amazon GuardDuty – Continuous Security Monitoring & Threat Detection

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-guardduty-continuous-security-monitoring-threat-detection/

Threats to your IT infrastructure (AWS accounts & credentials, AWS resources, guest operating systems, and applications) come in all shapes and sizes! The online world can be a treacherous place and we want to make sure that you have the tools, knowledge, and perspective to keep your IT infrastructure safe & sound.

Amazon GuardDuty is designed to give you just that. Informed by a multitude of public and AWS-generated data feeds and powered by machine learning, GuardDuty analyzes billions of events in pursuit of trends, patterns, and anomalies that are recognizable signs that something is amiss. You can enable it with a click and see the first findings within minutes.

How it Works
GuardDuty voraciously consumes multiple data streams, including several threat intelligence feeds, staying aware of malicious IP addresses, devious domains, and more importantly, learning to accurately identify malicious or unauthorized behavior in your AWS accounts. In combination with information gleaned from your VPC Flow Logs, AWS CloudTrail Event Logs, and DNS logs, this allows GuardDuty to detect many different types of dangerous and mischievous behavior including probes for known vulnerabilities, port scans and probes, and access from unusual locations. On the AWS side, it looks for suspicious AWS account activity such as unauthorized deployments, unusual CloudTrail activity, patterns of access to AWS API functions, and attempts to exceed multiple service limits. GuardDuty will also look for compromised EC2 instances talking to malicious entities or services, data exfiltration attempts, and instances that are mining cryptocurrency.

GuardDuty operates completely on AWS infrastructure and does not affect the performance or reliability of your workloads. You do not need to install or manage any agents, sensors, or network appliances. This clean, zero-footprint model should appeal to your security team and allow them to green-light the use of GuardDuty across all of your AWS accounts.

Findings are presented to you at one of three levels (low, medium, or high), accompanied by detailed evidence and recommendations for remediation. The findings are also available as Amazon CloudWatch Events; this allows you to use your own AWS Lambda functions to automatically remediate specific types of issues. This mechanism also allows you to easily push GuardDuty findings into event management systems such as Splunk, Sumo Logic, and PagerDuty and to workflow systems like JIRA, ServiceNow, and Slack.

A Quick Tour
Let’s take a quick tour. I open up the GuardDuty Console and click on Get started:

Then I confirm that I want to enable GuardDuty. This gives it permission to set up the appropriate service-linked roles and to analyze my logs by clicking on Enable GuardDuty:

My own AWS environment isn’t all that exciting, so I visit the General Settings and click on Generate sample findings to move ahead. Now I’ve got some intriguing findings:

I can click on a finding to learn more:

The magnifying glass icons allow me to create inclusion or exclusion filters for the associated resource, action, or other value. I can filter for all of the findings related to this instance:

I can customize GuardDuty by adding lists of trusted IP addresses and lists of malicious IP addresses that are peculiar to my environment:

After I enable GuardDuty in my administrator account, I can invite my other accounts to participate:

Once the accounts decide to participate, GuardDuty will arrange for their findings to be shared with the administrator account.

I’ve barely scratched the surface of GuardDuty in the limited space and time that I have. You can try it out at no charge for 30 days; after that you pay based on the number of entries it processes from your VPC Flow, CloudTrail, and DNS logs.

Available Now
Amazon GuardDuty is available in production form in the US East (Northern Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), US West (Northern California), EU (Ireland), EU (Frankfurt), EU (London), South America (São Paulo), Canada (Central), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), Asia Pacific (Seoul), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Sydney), and Asia Pacific (Mumbai) Regions and you can start using it today!

Jeff;

Introducing AWS AppSync – Build data-driven apps with real-time and off-line capabilities

Post Syndicated from Tara Walker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/introducing-amazon-appsync/

In this day and age, it is almost impossible to do without our mobile devices and the applications that help make our lives easier. As our dependency on our mobile phone grows, the mobile application market has exploded with millions of apps vying for our attention. For mobile developers, this means that we must ensure that we build applications that provide the quality, real-time experiences that app users desire.  Therefore, it has become essential that mobile applications are developed to include features such as multi-user data synchronization, offline network support, and data discovery, just to name a few.  According to several articles, I read recently about mobile development trends on publications like InfoQ, DZone, and the mobile development blog AlleviateTech, one of the key elements in of delivering the aforementioned capabilities is with cloud-driven mobile applications.  It seems that this is especially true, as it related to mobile data synchronization and data storage.

That being the case, it is a perfect time for me to announce a new service for building innovative mobile applications that are driven by data-intensive services in the cloud; AWS AppSync. AWS AppSync is a fully managed serverless GraphQL service for real-time data queries, synchronization, communications and offline programming features. For those not familiar, let me briefly share some information about the open GraphQL specification. GraphQL is a responsive data query language and server-side runtime for querying data sources that allow for real-time data retrieval and dynamic query execution. You can use GraphQL to build a responsive API for use in when building client applications. GraphQL works at the application layer and provides a type system for defining schemas. These schemas serve as specifications to define how operations should be performed on the data and how the data should be structured when retrieved. Additionally, GraphQL has a declarative coding model which is supported by many client libraries and frameworks including React, React Native, iOS, and Android.

Now the power of the GraphQL open standard query language is being brought to you in a rich managed service with AWS AppSync.  With AppSync developers can simplify the retrieval and manipulation of data across multiple data sources with ease, allowing them to quickly prototype, build and create robust, collaborative, multi-user applications. AppSync keeps data updated when devices are connected, but enables developers to build solutions that work offline by caching data locally and synchronizing local data when connections become available.

Let’s discuss some key concepts of AWS AppSync and how the service works.

AppSync Concepts

  • AWS AppSync Client: service client that defines operations, wraps authorization details of requests, and manage offline logic.
  • Data Source: the data storage system or a trigger housing data
  • Identity: a set of credentials with permissions and identification context provided with requests to GraphQL proxy
  • GraphQL Proxy: the GraphQL engine component for processing and mapping requests, handling conflict resolution, and managing Fine Grained Access Control
  • Operation: one of three GraphQL operations supported in AppSync
    • Query: a read-only fetch call to the data
    • Mutation: a write of the data followed by a fetch,
    • Subscription: long-lived connections that receive data in response to events.
  • Action: a notification to connected subscribers from a GraphQL subscription.
  • Resolver: function using request and response mapping templates that converts and executes payload against data source

How It Works

A schema is created to define types and capabilities of the desired GraphQL API and tied to a Resolver function.  The schema can be created to mirror existing data sources or AWS AppSync can create tables automatically based the schema definition. Developers can also use GraphQL features for data discovery without having knowledge of the backend data sources. After a schema definition is established, an AWS AppSync client can be configured with an operation request, like a Query operation. The client submits the operation request to GraphQL Proxy along with an identity context and credentials. The GraphQL Proxy passes this request to the Resolver which maps and executes the request payload against pre-configured AWS data services like an Amazon DynamoDB table, an AWS Lambda function, or a search capability using Amazon Elasticsearch. The Resolver executes calls to one or all of these services within a single network call minimizing CPU cycles and bandwidth needs and returns the response to the client. Additionally, the client application can change data requirements in code on demand and the AppSync GraphQL API will dynamically map requests for data accordingly, allowing prototyping and faster development.

In order to take a quick peek at the service, I’ll go to the AWS AppSync console. I’ll click the Create API button to get started.

 

When the Create new API screen opens, I’ll give my new API a name, TarasTestApp, and since I am just exploring the new service I will select the Sample schema option.  You may notice from the informational dialog box on the screen that in using the sample schema, AWS AppSync will automatically create the DynamoDB tables and the IAM roles for me.It will also deploy the TarasTestApp API on my behalf.  After review of the sample schema provided by the console, I’ll click the Create button to create my test API.

After the TaraTestApp API has been created and the associated AWS resources provisioned on my behalf, I can make updates to the schema, data source, or connect my data source(s) to a resolver. I also can integrate my GraphQL API into an iOS, Android, Web, or React Native application by cloning the sample repo from GitHub and downloading the accompanying GraphQL schema.  These application samples are great to help get you started and they are pre-configured to function in offline scenarios.

If I select the Schema menu option on the console, I can update and view the TarasTestApp GraphQL API schema.


Additionally, if I select the Data Sources menu option in the console, I can see the existing data sources.  Within this screen, I can update, delete, or add data sources if I so desire.

Next, I will select the Query menu option which takes me to the console tool for writing and testing queries. Since I chose the sample schema and the AWS AppSync service did most of the heavy lifting for me, I’ll try a query against my new GraphQL API.

I’ll use a mutation to add data for the event type in my schema. Since this is a mutation and it first writes data and then does a read of the data, I want the query to return values for name and where.

If I go to the DynamoDB table created for the event type in the schema, I will see that the values from my query have been successfully written into the table. Now that was a pretty simple task to write and retrieve data based on a GraphQL API schema from a data source, don’t you think.


 Summary

AWS AppSync is currently in AWS AppSync is in Public Preview and you can sign up today. It supports development for iOS, Android, and JavaScript applications. You can take advantage of this managed GraphQL service by going to the AWS AppSync console or learn more by reviewing more details about the service by reading a tutorial in the AWS documentation for the service or checking out our AWS AppSync Developer Guide.

Tara

 

Using Amazon Redshift Spectrum, Amazon Athena, and AWS Glue with Node.js in Production

Post Syndicated from Rafi Ton original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/using-amazon-redshift-spectrum-amazon-athena-and-aws-glue-with-node-js-in-production/

This is a guest post by Rafi Ton, founder and CEO of NUVIAD. NUVIAD is, in their own words, “a mobile marketing platform providing professional marketers, agencies and local businesses state of the art tools to promote their products and services through hyper targeting, big data analytics and advanced machine learning tools.”

At NUVIAD, we’ve been using Amazon Redshift as our main data warehouse solution for more than 3 years.

We store massive amounts of ad transaction data that our users and partners analyze to determine ad campaign strategies. When running real-time bidding (RTB) campaigns in large scale, data freshness is critical so that our users can respond rapidly to changes in campaign performance. We chose Amazon Redshift because of its simplicity, scalability, performance, and ability to load new data in near real time.

Over the past three years, our customer base grew significantly and so did our data. We saw our Amazon Redshift cluster grow from three nodes to 65 nodes. To balance cost and analytics performance, we looked for a way to store large amounts of less-frequently analyzed data at a lower cost. Yet, we still wanted to have the data immediately available for user queries and to meet their expectations for fast performance. We turned to Amazon Redshift Spectrum.

In this post, I explain the reasons why we extended Amazon Redshift with Redshift Spectrum as our modern data warehouse. I cover how our data growth and the need to balance cost and performance led us to adopt Redshift Spectrum. I also share key performance metrics in our environment, and discuss the additional AWS services that provide a scalable and fast environment, with data available for immediate querying by our growing user base.

Amazon Redshift as our foundation

The ability to provide fresh, up-to-the-minute data to our customers and partners was always a main goal with our platform. We saw other solutions provide data that was a few hours old, but this was not good enough for us. We insisted on providing the freshest data possible. For us, that meant loading Amazon Redshift in frequent micro batches and allowing our customers to query Amazon Redshift directly to get results in near real time.

The benefits were immediately evident. Our customers could see how their campaigns performed faster than with other solutions, and react sooner to the ever-changing media supply pricing and availability. They were very happy.

However, this approach required Amazon Redshift to store a lot of data for long periods, and our data grew substantially. In our peak, we maintained a cluster running 65 DC1.large nodes. The impact on our Amazon Redshift cluster was evident, and we saw our CPU utilization grow to 90%.

Why we extended Amazon Redshift to Redshift Spectrum

Redshift Spectrum gives us the ability to run SQL queries using the powerful Amazon Redshift query engine against data stored in Amazon S3, without needing to load the data. With Redshift Spectrum, we store data where we want, at the cost that we want. We have the data available for analytics when our users need it with the performance they expect.

Seamless scalability, high performance, and unlimited concurrency

Scaling Redshift Spectrum is a simple process. First, it allows us to leverage Amazon S3 as the storage engine and get practically unlimited data capacity.

Second, if we need more compute power, we can leverage Redshift Spectrum’s distributed compute engine over thousands of nodes to provide superior performance – perfect for complex queries running against massive amounts of data.

Third, all Redshift Spectrum clusters access the same data catalog so that we don’t have to worry about data migration at all, making scaling effortless and seamless.

Lastly, since Redshift Spectrum distributes queries across potentially thousands of nodes, they are not affected by other queries, providing much more stable performance and unlimited concurrency.

Keeping it SQL

Redshift Spectrum uses the same query engine as Amazon Redshift. This means that we did not need to change our BI tools or query syntax, whether we used complex queries across a single table or joins across multiple tables.

An interesting capability introduced recently is the ability to create a view that spans both Amazon Redshift and Redshift Spectrum external tables. With this feature, you can query frequently accessed data in your Amazon Redshift cluster and less-frequently accessed data in Amazon S3, using a single view.

Leveraging Parquet for higher performance

Parquet is a columnar data format that provides superior performance and allows Redshift Spectrum (or Amazon Athena) to scan significantly less data. With less I/O, queries run faster and we pay less per query. You can read all about Parquet at https://parquet.apache.org/ or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apache_Parquet.

Lower cost

From a cost perspective, we pay standard rates for our data in Amazon S3, and only small amounts per query to analyze data with Redshift Spectrum. Using the Parquet format, we can significantly reduce the amount of data scanned. Our costs are now lower, and our users get fast results even for large complex queries.

What we learned about Amazon Redshift vs. Redshift Spectrum performance

When we first started looking at Redshift Spectrum, we wanted to put it to the test. We wanted to know how it would compare to Amazon Redshift, so we looked at two key questions:

  1. What is the performance difference between Amazon Redshift and Redshift Spectrum on simple and complex queries?
  2. Does the data format impact performance?

During the migration phase, we had our dataset stored in Amazon Redshift and S3 as CSV/GZIP and as Parquet file formats. We tested three configurations:

  • Amazon Redshift cluster with 28 DC1.large nodes
  • Redshift Spectrum using CSV/GZIP
  • Redshift Spectrum using Parquet

We performed benchmarks for simple and complex queries on one month’s worth of data. We tested how much time it took to perform the query, and how consistent the results were when running the same query multiple times. The data we used for the tests was already partitioned by date and hour. Properly partitioning the data improves performance significantly and reduces query times.

Simple query

First, we tested a simple query aggregating billing data across a month:

SELECT 
  user_id, 
  count(*) AS impressions, 
  SUM(billing)::decimal /1000000 AS billing 
FROM <table_name> 
WHERE 
  date >= '2017-08-01' AND 
  date <= '2017-08-31'  
GROUP BY 
  user_id;

We ran the same query seven times and measured the response times (red marking the longest time and green the shortest time):

Execution Time (seconds)
  Amazon Redshift Redshift Spectrum
CSV
Redshift Spectrum Parquet
Run #1 39.65 45.11 11.92
Run #2 15.26 43.13 12.05
Run #3 15.27 46.47 13.38
Run #4 21.22 51.02 12.74
Run #5 17.27 43.35 11.76
Run #6 16.67 44.23 13.67
Run #7 25.37 40.39 12.75
Average 21.53  44.82 12.61

For simple queries, Amazon Redshift performed better than Redshift Spectrum, as we thought, because the data is local to Amazon Redshift.

What was surprising was that using Parquet data format in Redshift Spectrum significantly beat ‘traditional’ Amazon Redshift performance. For our queries, using Parquet data format with Redshift Spectrum delivered an average 40% performance gain over traditional Amazon Redshift. Furthermore, Redshift Spectrum showed high consistency in execution time with a smaller difference between the slowest run and the fastest run.

Comparing the amount of data scanned when using CSV/GZIP and Parquet, the difference was also significant:

Data Scanned (GB)
CSV (Gzip) 135.49
Parquet 2.83

Because we pay only for the data scanned by Redshift Spectrum, the cost saving of using Parquet is evident and substantial.

Complex query

Next, we compared the same three configurations with a complex query.

Execution Time (seconds)
  Amazon Redshift Redshift Spectrum CSV Redshift Spectrum Parquet
Run #1 329.80 84.20 42.40
Run #2 167.60 65.30 35.10
Run #3 165.20 62.20 23.90
Run #4 273.90 74.90 55.90
Run #5 167.70 69.00 58.40
Average 220.84 71.12 43.14

This time, Redshift Spectrum using Parquet cut the average query time by 80% compared to traditional Amazon Redshift!

Bottom line: For complex queries, Redshift Spectrum provided a 67% performance gain over Amazon Redshift. Using the Parquet data format, Redshift Spectrum delivered an 80% performance improvement over Amazon Redshift. For us, this was substantial.

Optimizing the data structure for different workloads

Because the cost of S3 is relatively inexpensive and we pay only for the data scanned by each query, we believe that it makes sense to keep our data in different formats for different workloads and different analytics engines. It is important to note that we can have any number of tables pointing to the same data on S3. It all depends on how we partition the data and update the table partitions.

Data permutations

For example, we have a process that runs every minute and generates statistics for the last minute of data collected. With Amazon Redshift, this would be done by running the query on the table with something as follows:

SELECT 
  user, 
  COUNT(*) 
FROM 
  events_table 
WHERE 
  ts BETWEEN ‘2017-08-01 14:00:00’ AND ‘2017-08-01 14:00:59’ 
GROUP BY 
  user;

(Assuming ‘ts’ is your column storing the time stamp for each event.)

With Redshift Spectrum, we pay for the data scanned in each query. If the data is partitioned by the minute instead of the hour, a query looking at one minute would be 1/60th the cost. If we use a temporary table that points only to the data of the last minute, we save that unnecessary cost.

Creating Parquet data efficiently

On the average, we have 800 instances that process our traffic. Each instance sends events that are eventually loaded into Amazon Redshift. When we started three years ago, we would offload data from each server to S3 and then perform a periodic copy command from S3 to Amazon Redshift.

Recently, Amazon Kinesis Firehose added the capability to offload data directly to Amazon Redshift. While this is now a viable option, we kept the same collection process that worked flawlessly and efficiently for three years.

This changed, however, when we incorporated Redshift Spectrum. With Redshift Spectrum, we needed to find a way to:

  • Collect the event data from the instances.
  • Save the data in Parquet format.
  • Partition the data effectively.

To accomplish this, we save the data as CSV and then transform it to Parquet. The most effective method to generate the Parquet files is to:

  1. Send the data in one-minute intervals from the instances to Kinesis Firehose with an S3 temporary bucket as the destination.
  2. Aggregate hourly data and convert it to Parquet using AWS Lambda and AWS Glue.
  3. Add the Parquet data to S3 by updating the table partitions.

With this new process, we had to give more attention to validating the data before we sent it to Kinesis Firehose, because a single corrupted record in a partition fails queries on that partition.

Data validation

To store our click data in a table, we considered the following SQL create table command:

create external TABLE spectrum.blog_clicks (
    user_id varchar(50),
    campaign_id varchar(50),
    os varchar(50),
    ua varchar(255),
    ts bigint,
    billing float
)
partitioned by (date date, hour smallint)  
stored as parquet
location 's3://nuviad-temp/blog/clicks/';

The above statement defines a new external table (all Redshift Spectrum tables are external tables) with a few attributes. We stored ‘ts’ as a Unix time stamp and not as Timestamp, and billing data is stored as float and not decimal (more on that later). We also said that the data is partitioned by date and hour, and then stored as Parquet on S3.

First, we need to get the table definitions. This can be achieved by running the following query:

SELECT 
  * 
FROM 
  svv_external_columns 
WHERE 
  tablename = 'blog_clicks';

This query lists all the columns in the table with their respective definitions:

schemaname tablename columnname external_type columnnum part_key
spectrum blog_clicks user_id varchar(50) 1 0
spectrum blog_clicks campaign_id varchar(50) 2 0
spectrum blog_clicks os varchar(50) 3 0
spectrum blog_clicks ua varchar(255) 4 0
spectrum blog_clicks ts bigint 5 0
spectrum blog_clicks billing double 6 0
spectrum blog_clicks date date 7 1
spectrum blog_clicks hour smallint 8 2

Now we can use this data to create a validation schema for our data:

const rtb_request_schema = {
    "name": "clicks",
    "items": {
        "user_id": {
            "type": "string",
            "max_length": 100
        },
        "campaign_id": {
            "type": "string",
            "max_length": 50
        },
        "os": {
            "type": "string",
            "max_length": 50            
        },
        "ua": {
            "type": "string",
            "max_length": 255            
        },
        "ts": {
            "type": "integer",
            "min_value": 0,
            "max_value": 9999999999999
        },
        "billing": {
            "type": "float",
            "min_value": 0,
            "max_value": 9999999999999
        }
    }
};

Next, we create a function that uses this schema to validate data:

function valueIsValid(value, item_schema) {
    if (schema.type == 'string') {
        return (typeof value == 'string' && value.length <= schema.max_length);
    }
    else if (schema.type == 'integer') {
        return (typeof value == 'number' && value >= schema.min_value && value <= schema.max_value);
    }
    else if (schema.type == 'float' || schema.type == 'double') {
        return (typeof value == 'number' && value >= schema.min_value && value <= schema.max_value);
    }
    else if (schema.type == 'boolean') {
        return typeof value == 'boolean';
    }
    else if (schema.type == 'timestamp') {
        return (new Date(value)).getTime() > 0;
    }
    else {
        return true;
    }
}

Near real-time data loading with Kinesis Firehose

On Kinesis Firehose, we created a new delivery stream to handle the events as follows:

Delivery stream name: events
Source: Direct PUT
S3 bucket: nuviad-events
S3 prefix: rtb/
IAM role: firehose_delivery_role_1
Data transformation: Disabled
Source record backup: Disabled
S3 buffer size (MB): 100
S3 buffer interval (sec): 60
S3 Compression: GZIP
S3 Encryption: No Encryption
Status: ACTIVE
Error logging: Enabled

This delivery stream aggregates event data every minute, or up to 100 MB, and writes the data to an S3 bucket as a CSV/GZIP compressed file. Next, after we have the data validated, we can safely send it to our Kinesis Firehose API:

if (validated) {
    let itemString = item.join('|')+'\n'; //Sending csv delimited by pipe and adding new line

    let params = {
        DeliveryStreamName: 'events',
        Record: {
            Data: itemString
        }
    };

    firehose.putRecord(params, function(err, data) {
        if (err) {
            console.error(err, err.stack);        
        }
        else {
            // Continue to your next step 
        }
    });
}

Now, we have a single CSV file representing one minute of event data stored in S3. The files are named automatically by Kinesis Firehose by adding a UTC time prefix in the format YYYY/MM/DD/HH before writing objects to S3. Because we use the date and hour as partitions, we need to change the file naming and location to fit our Redshift Spectrum schema.

Automating data distribution using AWS Lambda

We created a simple Lambda function triggered by an S3 put event that copies the file to a different location (or locations), while renaming it to fit our data structure and processing flow. As mentioned before, the files generated by Kinesis Firehose are structured in a pre-defined hierarchy, such as:

S3://your-bucket/your-prefix/2017/08/01/20/events-4-2017-08-01-20-06-06-536f5c40-6893-4ee4-907d-81e4d3b09455.gz

All we need to do is parse the object name and restructure it as we see fit. In our case, we did the following (the event is an object received in the Lambda function with all the data about the object written to S3):

/*
	object key structure in the event object:
your-prefix/2017/08/01/20/event-4-2017-08-01-20-06-06-536f5c40-6893-4ee4-907d-81e4d3b09455.gz
	*/

let key_parts = event.Records[0].s3.object.key.split('/'); 

let event_type = key_parts[0];
let date = key_parts[1] + '-' + key_parts[2] + '-' + key_parts[3];
let hour = key_parts[4];
if (hour.indexOf('0') == 0) {
 		hour = parseInt(hour, 10) + '';
}
    
let parts1 = key_parts[5].split('-');
let minute = parts1[7];
if (minute.indexOf('0') == 0) {
        minute = parseInt(minute, 10) + '';
}

Now, we can redistribute the file to the two destinations we need—one for the minute processing task and the other for hourly aggregation:

    copyObjectToHourlyFolder(event, date, hour, minute)
        .then(copyObjectToMinuteFolder.bind(null, event, date, hour, minute))
        .then(addPartitionToSpectrum.bind(null, event, date, hour, minute))
        .then(deleteOldMinuteObjects.bind(null, event))
        .then(deleteStreamObject.bind(null, event))        
        .then(result => {
            callback(null, { message: 'done' });            
        })
        .catch(err => {
            console.error(err);
            callback(null, { message: err });            
        }); 

Kinesis Firehose stores the data in a temporary folder. We copy the object to another folder that holds the data for the last processed minute. This folder is connected to a small Redshift Spectrum table where the data is being processed without needing to scan a much larger dataset. We also copy the data to a folder that holds the data for the entire hour, to be later aggregated and converted to Parquet.

Because we partition the data by date and hour, we created a new partition on the Redshift Spectrum table if the processed minute is the first minute in the hour (that is, minute 0). We ran the following:

ALTER TABLE 
  spectrum.events 
ADD partition
  (date='2017-08-01', hour=0) 
  LOCATION 's3://nuviad-temp/events/2017-08-01/0/';

After the data is processed and added to the table, we delete the processed data from the temporary Kinesis Firehose storage and from the minute storage folder.

Migrating CSV to Parquet using AWS Glue and Amazon EMR

The simplest way we found to run an hourly job converting our CSV data to Parquet is using Lambda and AWS Glue (and thanks to the awesome AWS Big Data team for their help with this).

Creating AWS Glue jobs

What this simple AWS Glue script does:

  • Gets parameters for the job, date, and hour to be processed
  • Creates a Spark EMR context allowing us to run Spark code
  • Reads CSV data into a DataFrame
  • Writes the data as Parquet to the destination S3 bucket
  • Adds or modifies the Redshift Spectrum / Amazon Athena table partition for the table
import sys
import sys
from awsglue.transforms import *
from awsglue.utils import getResolvedOptions
from pyspark.context import SparkContext
from awsglue.context import GlueContext
from awsglue.job import Job
import boto3

## @params: [JOB_NAME]
args = getResolvedOptions(sys.argv, ['JOB_NAME','day_partition_key', 'hour_partition_key', 'day_partition_value', 'hour_partition_value' ])

#day_partition_key = "partition_0"
#hour_partition_key = "partition_1"
#day_partition_value = "2017-08-01"
#hour_partition_value = "0"

day_partition_key = args['day_partition_key']
hour_partition_key = args['hour_partition_key']
day_partition_value = args['day_partition_value']
hour_partition_value = args['hour_partition_value']

print("Running for " + day_partition_value + "/" + hour_partition_value)

sc = SparkContext()
glueContext = GlueContext(sc)
spark = glueContext.spark_session
job = Job(glueContext)
job.init(args['JOB_NAME'], args)

df = spark.read.option("delimiter","|").csv("s3://nuviad-temp/events/"+day_partition_value+"/"+hour_partition_value)
df.registerTempTable("data")

df1 = spark.sql("select _c0 as user_id, _c1 as campaign_id, _c2 as os, _c3 as ua, cast(_c4 as bigint) as ts, cast(_c5 as double) as billing from data")

df1.repartition(1).write.mode("overwrite").parquet("s3://nuviad-temp/parquet/"+day_partition_value+"/hour="+hour_partition_value)

client = boto3.client('athena', region_name='us-east-1')

response = client.start_query_execution(
    QueryString='alter table parquet_events add if not exists partition(' + day_partition_key + '=\'' + day_partition_value + '\',' + hour_partition_key + '=' + hour_partition_value + ')  location \'s3://nuviad-temp/parquet/' + day_partition_value + '/hour=' + hour_partition_value + '\'' ,
    QueryExecutionContext={
        'Database': 'spectrumdb'
    },
    ResultConfiguration={
        'OutputLocation': 's3://nuviad-temp/convertresults'
    }
)

response = client.start_query_execution(
    QueryString='alter table parquet_events partition(' + day_partition_key + '=\'' + day_partition_value + '\',' + hour_partition_key + '=' + hour_partition_value + ') set location \'s3://nuviad-temp/parquet/' + day_partition_value + '/hour=' + hour_partition_value + '\'' ,
    QueryExecutionContext={
        'Database': 'spectrumdb'
    },
    ResultConfiguration={
        'OutputLocation': 's3://nuviad-temp/convertresults'
    }
)

job.commit()

Note: Because Redshift Spectrum and Athena both use the AWS Glue Data Catalog, we could use the Athena client to add the partition to the table.

Here are a few words about float, decimal, and double. Using decimal proved to be more challenging than we expected, as it seems that Redshift Spectrum and Spark use them differently. Whenever we used decimal in Redshift Spectrum and in Spark, we kept getting errors, such as:

S3 Query Exception (Fetch). Task failed due to an internal error. File 'https://s3-external-1.amazonaws.com/nuviad-temp/events/2017-08-01/hour=2/part-00017-48ae5b6b-906e-4875-8cde-bc36c0c6d0ca.c000.snappy.parquet has an incompatible Parquet schema for column 's3://nuviad-events/events.lat'. Column type: DECIMAL(18, 8), Parquet schema:\noptional float lat [i:4 d:1 r:0]\n (https://s3-external-1.amazonaws.com/nuviad-temp/events/2017-08-01/hour=2/part-00017-48ae5b6b-906e-4875-8cde-bc36c0c6d0ca.c000.snappy.parq

We had to experiment with a few floating-point formats until we found that the only combination that worked was to define the column as double in the Spark code and float in Spectrum. This is the reason you see billing defined as float in Spectrum and double in the Spark code.

Creating a Lambda function to trigger conversion

Next, we created a simple Lambda function to trigger the AWS Glue script hourly using a simple Python code:

import boto3
import json
from datetime import datetime, timedelta
 
client = boto3.client('glue')
 
def lambda_handler(event, context):
    last_hour_date_time = datetime.now() - timedelta(hours = 1)
    day_partition_value = last_hour_date_time.strftime("%Y-%m-%d") 
    hour_partition_value = last_hour_date_time.strftime("%-H") 
    response = client.start_job_run(
    JobName='convertEventsParquetHourly',
    Arguments={
         '--day_partition_key': 'date',
         '--hour_partition_key': 'hour',
         '--day_partition_value': day_partition_value,
         '--hour_partition_value': hour_partition_value
         }
    )

Using Amazon CloudWatch Events, we trigger this function hourly. This function triggers an AWS Glue job named ‘convertEventsParquetHourly’ and runs it for the previous hour, passing job names and values of the partitions to process to AWS Glue.

Redshift Spectrum and Node.js

Our development stack is based on Node.js, which is well-suited for high-speed, light servers that need to process a huge number of transactions. However, a few limitations of the Node.js environment required us to create workarounds and use other tools to complete the process.

Node.js and Parquet

The lack of Parquet modules for Node.js required us to implement an AWS Glue/Amazon EMR process to effectively migrate data from CSV to Parquet. We would rather save directly to Parquet, but we couldn’t find an effective way to do it.

One interesting project in the works is the development of a Parquet NPM by Marc Vertes called node-parquet (https://www.npmjs.com/package/node-parquet). It is not in a production state yet, but we think it would be well worth following the progress of this package.

Timestamp data type

According to the Parquet documentation, Timestamp data are stored in Parquet as 64-bit integers. However, JavaScript does not support 64-bit integers, because the native number type is a 64-bit double, giving only 53 bits of integer range.

The result is that you cannot store Timestamp correctly in Parquet using Node.js. The solution is to store Timestamp as string and cast the type to Timestamp in the query. Using this method, we did not witness any performance degradation whatsoever.

Lessons learned

You can benefit from our trial-and-error experience.

Lesson #1: Data validation is critical

As mentioned earlier, a single corrupt entry in a partition can fail queries running against this partition, especially when using Parquet, which is harder to edit than a simple CSV file. Make sure that you validate your data before scanning it with Redshift Spectrum.

Lesson #2: Structure and partition data effectively

One of the biggest benefits of using Redshift Spectrum (or Athena for that matter) is that you don’t need to keep nodes up and running all the time. You pay only for the queries you perform and only for the data scanned per query.

Keeping different permutations of your data for different queries makes a lot of sense in this case. For example, you can partition your data by date and hour to run time-based queries, and also have another set partitioned by user_id and date to run user-based queries. This results in faster and more efficient performance of your data warehouse.

Storing data in the right format

Use Parquet whenever you can. The benefits of Parquet are substantial. Faster performance, less data to scan, and much more efficient columnar format. However, it is not supported out-of-the-box by Kinesis Firehose, so you need to implement your own ETL. AWS Glue is a great option.

Creating small tables for frequent tasks

When we started using Redshift Spectrum, we saw our Amazon Redshift costs jump by hundreds of dollars per day. Then we realized that we were unnecessarily scanning a full day’s worth of data every minute. Take advantage of the ability to define multiple tables on the same S3 bucket or folder, and create temporary and small tables for frequent queries.

Lesson #3: Combine Athena and Redshift Spectrum for optimal performance

Moving to Redshift Spectrum also allowed us to take advantage of Athena as both use the AWS Glue Data Catalog. Run fast and simple queries using Athena while taking advantage of the advanced Amazon Redshift query engine for complex queries using Redshift Spectrum.

Redshift Spectrum excels when running complex queries. It can push many compute-intensive tasks, such as predicate filtering and aggregation, down to the Redshift Spectrum layer, so that queries use much less of your cluster’s processing capacity.

Lesson #4: Sort your Parquet data within the partition

We achieved another performance improvement by sorting data within the partition using sortWithinPartitions(sort_field). For example:

df.repartition(1).sortWithinPartitions("campaign_id")…

Conclusion

We were extremely pleased with using Amazon Redshift as our core data warehouse for over three years. But as our client base and volume of data grew substantially, we extended Amazon Redshift to take advantage of scalability, performance, and cost with Redshift Spectrum.

Redshift Spectrum lets us scale to virtually unlimited storage, scale compute transparently, and deliver super-fast results for our users. With Redshift Spectrum, we store data where we want at the cost we want, and have the data available for analytics when our users need it with the performance they expect.


About the Author

With 7 years of experience in the AdTech industry and 15 years in leading technology companies, Rafi Ton is the founder and CEO of NUVIAD. He enjoys exploring new technologies and putting them to use in cutting edge products and services, in the real world generating real money. Being an experienced entrepreneur, Rafi believes in practical-programming and fast adaptation of new technologies to achieve a significant market advantage.

 

 

Presenting Amazon Sumerian: An easy way to create VR, AR, and 3D experiences

Post Syndicated from Tara Walker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/launch-presenting-amazon-sumerian/

If you have had an opportunity to read any of my blog posts or attended any session I’ve conducted at various conferences, you are probably aware that I am definitively a geek girl. I am absolutely enamored with all of the latest advancements that have been made in technology areas like cloud, artificial intelligence, internet of things and the maker space, as well as, with virtual reality and augmented reality. In my opinion, it is a wonderful time to be a geek. All the things that we dreamed about building while we sweated through our algorithms and discrete mathematics classes or the technology we marveled at when watching Star Wars and Star Trek are now coming to fruition.  So hopefully this means it will only be a matter of time before I can hyperdrive to other galaxies in space, but until then I can at least build the 3D virtual reality and augmented reality characters and images like those featured in some of my favorite shows.

Amazon Sumerian provides tools and resources that allows anyone to create and run augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), and 3D applications with ease.  With Sumerian, you can build multi-platform experiences that run on hardware like the Oculus, HTC Vive, and iOS devices using WebVR compatible browsers and with support for ARCore on Android devices coming soon.

This exciting new service, currently in preview, delivers features to allow you to design highly immersive and interactive 3D experiences from your browser. Some of these features are:

  • Editor: A web-based editor for constructing 3D scenes, importing assets, scripting interactions and special effects, with cross-platform publishing.
  • Object Library: a library of pre-built objects and templates.
  • Asset Import: Upload 3D assets to use in your scene. Sumerian supports importing FBX, OBJ, and coming soon Unity projects.
  • Scripting Library: provides a JavaScript scripting library via its 3D engine for advanced scripting capabilities.
  • Hosts: animated, lifelike 3D characters that can be customized for gender, voice, and language.
  • AWS Services Integration: baked in integration with Amazon Polly and Amazon Lex to add speech and natural language to into Sumerian hosts. Additionally, the scripting library can be used with AWS Lambda allowing use of the full range of AWS services.

Since Amazon Sumerian doesn’t require you to have 3D graphics or programming experience to build rich, interactive VR and AR scenes, let’s take a quick run to the Sumerian Dashboard and check it out.

From the Sumerian Dashboard, I can easily create a new scene with a push of a button.

A default view of the new scene opens and is displayed in the Sumerian Editor. With the Tara Blog Scene opened in the editor, I can easily import assets into my scene.

I’ll click the Import Asset button and pick an asset, View Room, to import into the scene. With the desired asset selected, I’ll click the Add button to import it.

Excellent, my asset was successfully imported into the Sumerian Editor and is shown in the Asset panel.  Now, I have the option to add the View Room object into my scene by selecting it in the Asset panel and then dragging it onto the editor’s canvas.

I’ll repeat the import asset process and this time I will add the Mannequin asset to the scene.

Additionally, with Sumerian, I can add scripting to Entity assets to make my scene even more exciting by adding a ScriptComponent to an entity and creating a script.  I can use the provided built-in scripts or create my own custom scripts. If I create a new custom script, I will get a blank script with some base JavaScript code that looks similar to the code below.

'use strict';
/* global sumerian */
//This is Me-- trying out the custom scripts - Tara

var setup = function (args, ctx) {
// Called when play mode starts.
};
var fixedUpdate = function (args, ctx) {
// Called on every physics update, after setup().
};
var update = function (args, ctx) {
// Called on every render frame, after setup().
};
var lateUpdate = function (args, ctx) {
// Called after all script "update" methods in the scene has been called.
};
var cleanup = function (args, ctx) {
// Called when play mode stops.
};
var parameters = [];

Very cool, I just created a 3D scene using Amazon Sumerian in a matter of minutes and I have only scratched the surface.

Summary

The Amazon Sumerian service enables you to create, build, and run virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), and 3D applications with ease.  You don’t need any 3D graphics or specialized programming knowledge to get started building scenes and immersive experiences.  You can import FBX, OBJ, and Unity projects in Sumerian, as well as upload your own 3D assets for use in your scene. In addition, you can create digital characters to narrate your scene and with these digital assets, you have choices for the character’s appearance, speech and behavior.

You can learn more about Amazon Sumerian and sign up for the preview to get started with the new service on the product page.  I can’t wait to see what rich experiences you all will build.

Tara

 

UI Testing at Scale with AWS Lambda

Post Syndicated from Stas Neyman original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/ui-testing-at-scale-with-aws-lambda/

This is a guest blog post by Wes Couch and Kurt Waechter from the Blackboard Internal Product Development team about their experience using AWS Lambda.

One year ago, one of our UI test suites took hours to run. Last month, it took 16 minutes. Today, it takes 39 seconds. Here’s how we did it.

The backstory:

Blackboard is a global leader in delivering robust and innovative education software and services to clients in higher education, government, K12, and corporate training. We have a large product development team working across the globe in at least 10 different time zones, with an internal tools team providing support for quality and workflows. We have been using Selenium Webdriver to perform automated cross-browser UI testing since 2007. Because we are now practicing continuous delivery, the automated UI testing challenge has grown due to the faster release schedule. On top of that, every commit made to each branch triggers an execution of our automated UI test suite. If you have ever implemented an automated UI testing infrastructure, you know that it can be very challenging to scale and maintain. Although there are services that are useful for testing different browser/OS combinations, they don’t meet our scale needs.

It used to take three hours to synchronously run our functional UI suite, which revealed the obvious need for parallel execution. Previously, we used Mesos to orchestrate a Selenium Grid Docker container for each test run. This way, we were able to run eight concurrent threads for test execution, which took an average of 16 minutes. Although this setup is fine for a single workflow, the cracks started to show when we reached the scale required for Blackboard’s mature product lines. Going beyond eight concurrent sessions on a single container introduced performance problems that impact the reliability of tests (for example, issues in Webdriver or the browser popping up frequently). We tried Mesos and considered Kubernetes for Selenium Grid orchestration, but the answer to scaling a Selenium Grid was to think smaller, not larger. This led to our breakthrough with AWS Lambda.

The solution:

We started using AWS Lambda for UI testing because it doesn’t require costly infrastructure or countless man hours to maintain. The steps we outline in this blog post took one work day, from inception to implementation. By simply packaging the UI test suite into a Lambda function, we can execute these tests in parallel on a massive scale. We use a custom JUnit test runner that invokes the Lambda function with a request to run each test from the suite. The runner then aggregates the results returned from each Lambda test execution.

Selenium is the industry standard for testing UI at scale. Although there are other options to achieve the same thing in Lambda, we chose this mature suite of tools. Selenium is backed by Google, Firefox, and others to help the industry drive their browsers with code. This makes Lambda and Selenium a compelling stack for achieving UI testing at scale.

Making Chrome Run in Lambda

Currently, Chrome for Linux will not run in Lambda due to an absent mount point. By rebuilding Chrome with a slight modification, as Marco Lüthy originally demonstrated, you can run it inside Lambda anyway! It took about two hours to build the current master branch of Chromium to build on a c4.4xlarge. Unfortunately, the current version of ChromeDriver, 2.33, does not support any version of Chrome above 62, so we’ll be using Marco’s modified version of version 60 for the near future.

Required System Libraries

The Lambda runtime environment comes with a subset of common shared libraries. This means we need to include some extra libraries to get Chrome and ChromeDriver to work. Anything that exists in the java resources folder during compile time is included in the base directory of the compiled jar file. When this jar file is deployed to Lambda, it is placed in the /var/task/ directory. This allows us to simply place the libraries in the java resources folder under a folder named lib/ so they are right where they need to be when the Lambda function is invoked.

To get these libraries, create an EC2 instance and choose the Amazon Linux AMI.

Next, use ssh to connect to the server. After you connect to the new instance, search for the libraries to find their locations.

sudo find / -name libgconf-2.so.4
sudo find / -name libORBit-2.so.0

Now that you have the locations of the libraries, copy these files from the EC2 instance and place them in the java resources folder under lib/.

Packaging the Tests

To deploy the test suite to Lambda, we used a simple Gradle tool called ShadowJar, which is similar to the Maven Shade Plugin. It packages the libraries and dependencies inside the jar that is built. Usually test dependencies and sources aren’t included in a jar, but for this instance we want to include them. To include the test dependencies, add this section to the build.gradle file.

shadowJar {
   from sourceSets.test.output
   configurations = [project.configurations.testRuntime]
}

Deploying the Test Suite

Now that our tests are packaged with the dependencies in a jar, we need to get them into a running Lambda function. We use  simple SAM  templates to upload the packaged jar into S3, and then deploy it to Lambda with our settings.

{
   "AWSTemplateFormatVersion": "2010-09-09",
   "Transform": "AWS::Serverless-2016-10-31",
   "Resources": {
       "LambdaTestHandler": {
           "Type": "AWS::Serverless::Function",
           "Properties": {
               "CodeUri": "./build/libs/your-test-jar-all.jar",
               "Runtime": "java8",
               "Handler": "com.example.LambdaTestHandler::handleRequest",
               "Role": "<YourLambdaRoleArn>",
               "Timeout": 300,
               "MemorySize": 1536
           }
       }
   }
}

We use the maximum timeout available to ensure our tests have plenty of time to run. We also use the maximum memory size because this ensures our Lambda function can support Chrome and other resources required to run a UI test.

Specifying the handler is important because this class executes the desired test. The test handler should be able to receive a test class and method. With this information it will then execute the test and respond with the results.

public LambdaTestResult handleRequest(TestRequest testRequest, Context context) {
   LoggerContainer.LOGGER = new Logger(context.getLogger());
  
   BlockJUnit4ClassRunner runner = getRunnerForSingleTest(testRequest);
  
   Result result = new JUnitCore().run(runner);

   return new LambdaTestResult(result);
}

Creating a Lambda-Compatible ChromeDriver

We provide developers with an easily accessible ChromeDriver for local test writing and debugging. When we are running tests on AWS, we have configured ChromeDriver to run them in Lambda.

To configure ChromeDriver, we first need to tell ChromeDriver where to find the Chrome binary. Because we know that ChromeDriver is going to be unzipped into the root task directory, we should point the ChromeDriver configuration at that location.

The settings for getting ChromeDriver running are mostly related to Chrome, which must have its working directories pointed at the tmp/ folder.

Start with the default DesiredCapabilities for ChromeDriver, and then add the following settings to enable your ChromeDriver to start in Lambda.

public ChromeDriver createLambdaChromeDriver() {
   ChromeOptions options = new ChromeOptions();

   // Set the location of the chrome binary from the resources folder
   options.setBinary("/var/task/chrome");

   // Include these settings to allow Chrome to run in Lambda
   options.addArguments("--disable-gpu");
   options.addArguments("--headless");
   options.addArguments("--window-size=1366,768");
   options.addArguments("--single-process");
   options.addArguments("--no-sandbox");
   options.addArguments("--user-data-dir=/tmp/user-data");
   options.addArguments("--data-path=/tmp/data-path");
   options.addArguments("--homedir=/tmp");
   options.addArguments("--disk-cache-dir=/tmp/cache-dir");
  
   DesiredCapabilities desiredCapabilities = DesiredCapabilities.chrome();
   desiredCapabilities.setCapability(ChromeOptions.CAPABILITY, options);
  
   return new ChromeDriver(desiredCapabilities);
}

Executing Tests in Parallel

You can approach parallel test execution in Lambda in many different ways. Your approach depends on the structure and design of your test suite. For our solution, we implemented a custom test runner that uses reflection and JUnit libraries to create a list of test cases we want run. When we have the list, we create a TestRequest object to pass into the Lambda function that we have deployed. In this TestRequest, we place the class name, test method, and the test run identifier. When the Lambda function receives this TestRequest, our LambdaTestHandler generates and runs the JUnit test. After the test is complete, the test result is sent to the test runner. The test runner compiles a result after all of the tests are complete. By executing the same Lambda function multiple times with different test requests, we can effectively run the entire test suite in parallel.

To get screenshots and other test data, we pipe those files during test execution to an S3 bucket under the test run identifier prefix. When the tests are complete, we link the files to each test execution in the report generated from the test run. This lets us easily investigate test executions.

Pro Tip: Dynamically Loading Binaries

AWS Lambda has a limit of 250 MB of uncompressed space for packaged Lambda functions. Because we have libraries and other dependencies to our test suite, we hit this limit when we tried to upload a function that contained Chrome and ChromeDriver (~140 MB). This test suite was not originally intended to be used with Lambda. Otherwise, we would have scrutinized some of the included libraries. To get around this limit, we used the Lambda functions temporary directory, which allows up to 500 MB of space at runtime. Downloading these binaries at runtime moves some of that space requirement into the temporary directory. This allows more room for libraries and dependencies. You can do this by grabbing Chrome and ChromeDriver from an S3 bucket and marking them as executable using built-in Java libraries. If you take this route, be sure to point to the new location for these executables in order to create a ChromeDriver.

private static void downloadS3ObjectToExecutableFile(String key) throws IOException {
   File file = new File("/tmp/" + key);

   GetObjectRequest request = new GetObjectRequest("s3-bucket-name", key);

   FileUtils.copyInputStreamToFile(s3client.getObject(request).getObjectContent(), file);
   file.setExecutable(true);
}

Lambda-Selenium Project Source

We have compiled an open source example that you can grab from the Blackboard Github repository. Grab the code and try it out!

https://blackboard.github.io/lambda-selenium/

Conclusion

One year ago, one of our UI test suites took hours to run. Last month, it took 16 minutes. Today, it takes 39 seconds. Thanks to AWS Lambda, we can reduce our build times and perform automated UI testing at scale!

Serverless Automated Cost Controls, Part1

Post Syndicated from Shankar Ramachandran original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/serverless-automated-cost-controls-part1/

This post courtesy of Shankar Ramachandran, Pubali Sen, and George Mao

In line with AWS’s continual efforts to reduce costs for customers, this series focuses on how customers can build serverless automated cost controls. This post provides an architecture blueprint and a sample implementation to prevent budget overruns.

This solution uses the following AWS products:

  • AWS Budgets – An AWS Cost Management tool that helps customers define and track budgets for AWS costs, and forecast for up to three months.
  • Amazon SNS – An AWS service that makes it easy to set up, operate, and send notifications from the cloud.
  • AWS Lambda – An AWS service that lets you run code without provisioning or managing servers.

You can fine-tune a budget for various parameters, for example filtering by service or tag. The Budgets tool lets you post notifications on an SNS topic. A Lambda function that subscribes to the SNS topic can act on the notification. Any programmatically implementable action can be taken.

The diagram below describes the architecture blueprint.

In this post, we describe how to use this blueprint with AWS Step Functions and IAM to effectively revoke the ability of a user to start new Amazon EC2 instances, after a budget amount is exceeded.

Freedom with guardrails

AWS lets you quickly spin up resources as you need them, deploying hundreds or even thousands of servers in minutes. This means you can quickly develop and roll out new applications. Teams can experiment and innovate more quickly and frequently. If an experiment fails, you can always de-provision those servers without risk.

This improved agility also brings in the need for effective cost controls. Your Finance and Accounting department must budget, monitor, and control the AWS spend. For example, this could be a budget per project. Further, Finance and Accounting must take appropriate actions if the budget for the project has been exceeded, for example. Call it “freedom with guardrails” – where Finance wants to give developers freedom, but with financial constraints.

Architecture

This section describes how to use the blueprint introduced earlier to implement a “freedom with guardrails” solution.

  1. The budget for “Project Beta” is set up in Budgets. In this example, we focus on EC2 usage and identify the instances that belong to this project by filtering on the tag Project with the value Beta. For more information, see Creating a Budget.
  2. The budget configuration also includes settings to send a notification on an SNS topic when the usage exceeds 100% of the budgeted amount. For more information, see Creating an Amazon SNS Topic for Budget Notifications.
  3. The master Lambda function receives the SNS notification.
  4. It triggers execution of a Step Functions state machine with the parameters for completing the configured action.
  5. The action Lambda function is triggered as a task in the state machine. The function interacts with IAM to effectively remove the user’s permissions to create an EC2 instance.

This decoupled modular design allows for extensibility.  New actions (serially or in parallel) can be added by simply adding new steps.

Implementing the solution

All the instructions and code needed to implement the architecture have been posted on the Serverless Automated Cost Controls GitHub repo. We recommend that you try this first in a Dev/Test environment.

This implementation description can be broken down into two parts:

  1. Create a solution stack for serverless automated cost controls.
  2. Verify the solution by testing the EC2 fleet.

To tie this back to the “freedom with guardrails” scenario, the Finance department performs a one-time implementation of the solution stack. To simulate resources for Project Beta, the developers spin up the test EC2 fleet.

Prerequisites

There are two prerequisites:

  • Make sure that you have the necessary IAM permissions. For more information, see the section titled “Required IAM permissions” in the README.
  • Define and activate a cost allocation tag with the key Project. For more information, see Using Cost Allocation Tags. It can take up to 12 hours for the tags to propagate to Budgets.

Create resources

The solution stack includes creating the following resources:

  • Three Lambda functions
  • One Step Functions state machine
  • One SNS topic
  • One IAM group
  • One IAM user
  • IAM policies as needed
  • One budget

Two of the Lambda functions were described in the previous section, to a) receive the SNS notification and b) trigger the Step Functions state machine. Another Lambda function is used to create the budget, as a custom AWS CloudFormation resource. The SNS topic connects Budgets with Lambda function A. Lambda function B is configured as a task in Step Functions. A budget for $2 is created which is filtered by Service: EC2 and Tag: Project, Beta. A test IAM group and user is created to enable you to validate this Cost Control Solution.

To create the serverless automated cost control solution stack, choose the button below. It takes few minutes to spin up the stack. You can monitor the progress in the CloudFormation console.

When you see the CREATE_COMPLETE status for the stack you had created, choose Outputs. Copy the following four values that you need later:

  • TemplateURL
  • UserName
  • SignInURL
  • Password

Verify the stack

The next step is to verify the serverless automated cost controls solution stack that you just created. To do this, spin up an EC2 fleet of t2.micro instances, representative of the resources needed for Project Beta, and tag them with Project, Beta.

  1. Browse to the SignInURL, and log in using the UserName and Password values copied on from the stack output.
  2. In the CloudFormation console, choose Create Stack.
  3. For Choose a template, select Choose an Amazon S3 template URL and paste the TemplateURL value from the preceding section. Choose Next.
  4. Give this stack a name, such as “testEc2FleetForProjectBeta”. Choose Next.
  5. On the Specify Details page, enter parameters such as the UserName and Password copied in the previous section. Choose Next.
  6. Ignore any errors related to listing IAM roles. The test user has a minimal set of permissions that is just sufficient to spin up this test stack (in line with security best practices).
  7. On the Options page, choose Next.
  8. On the Review page, choose Create. It takes a few minutes to spin up the stack, and you can monitor the progress in the CloudFormation console. 
  9. When you see the status “CREATE_COMPLETE”, open the EC2 console to verify that four t2.micro instances have been spun up, with the tag of Project, Beta.

The hourly cost for these instances depends on the region in which they are running. On the average (irrespective of the region), you can expect the aggregate cost for this EC2 fleet to exceed the set $2 budget in 48 hours.

Verify the solution

The first step is to identify the test IAM group that was created in the previous section. The group should have “projectBeta” in the name, prepended with the CloudFormation stack name and appended with an alphanumeric string. Verify that the managed policy associated is: “EC2FullAccess”, which indicates that the users in this group have unrestricted access to EC2.

There are two stages of verification for this serverless automated cost controls solution: simulating a notification and waiting for a breach.

Simulated notification

Because it takes at least a few hours for the aggregate cost of the EC2 fleet to breach the set budget, you can verify the solution by simulating the notification from Budgets.

  1. Log in to the SNS console (using your regular AWS credentials).
  2. Publish a message on the SNS topic that has “budgetNotificationTopic” in the name. The complete name is appended by the CloudFormation stack identifier.  
  3. Copy the following text as the body of the notification: “This is a mock notification”.
  4. Choose Publish.
  5. Open the IAM console to verify that the policy for the test group has been switched to “EC2ReadOnly”. This prevents users in this group from creating new instances.
  6. Verify that the test user created in the previous section cannot spin up new EC2 instances.  You can log in as the test user and try creating a new EC2 instance (via the same CloudFormation stack or the EC2 console). You should get an error message indicating that you do not have the necessary permissions.
  7. If you are proceeding to stage 2 of the verification, then you must switch the permissions back to “EC2FullAccess” for the test group, which can be done in the IAM console.

Automatic notification

Within 48 hours, the aggregate cost of the EC2 fleet spun up in the earlier section breaches the budget rule and triggers an automatic notification. This results in the permissions getting switched out, just as in the simulated notification.

Clean up

Use the following steps to delete your resources and stop incurring costs.

  1. Open the CloudFormation console.
  2. Delete the EC2 fleet by deleting the appropriate stack (for example, delete the stack named “testEc2FleetForProjectBeta”).                                               
  3. Next, delete the “costControlStack” stack.                                                                                                                                                    

Conclusion

Using Lambda in tandem with Budgets, you can build Serverless automated cost controls on AWS. Find all the resources (instructions, code) for implementing the solution discussed in this post on the Serverless Automated Cost Controls GitHub repo.

Stay tuned to this series for more tips about building serverless automated cost controls. In the next post, we discuss using smart lighting to influence developer behavior and describe a solution to encourage cost-aware development practices.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

 

How to Patch, Inspect, and Protect Microsoft Windows Workloads on AWS—Part 2

Post Syndicated from Koen van Blijderveen original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-patch-inspect-and-protect-microsoft-windows-workloads-on-aws-part-2/

Yesterday in Part 1 of this blog post, I showed you how to:

  1. Launch an Amazon EC2 instance with an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) role, an Amazon Elastic Block Store (Amazon EBS) volume, and tags that Amazon EC2 Systems Manager (Systems Manager) and Amazon Inspector use.
  2. Configure Systems Manager to install the Amazon Inspector agent and patch your EC2 instances.

Today in Steps 3 and 4, I show you how to:

  1. Take Amazon EBS snapshots using Amazon EBS Snapshot Scheduler to automate snapshots based on instance tags.
  2. Use Amazon Inspector to check if your EC2 instances running Microsoft Windows contain any common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs).

To catch up on Steps 1 and 2, see yesterday’s blog post.

Step 3: Take EBS snapshots using EBS Snapshot Scheduler

In this section, I show you how to use EBS Snapshot Scheduler to take snapshots of your instances at specific intervals. To do this, I will show you how to:

  • Determine the schedule for EBS Snapshot Scheduler by providing you with best practices.
  • Deploy EBS Snapshot Scheduler by using AWS CloudFormation.
  • Tag your EC2 instances so that EBS Snapshot Scheduler backs up your instances when you want them backed up.

In addition to making sure your EC2 instances have all the available operating system patches applied on a regular schedule, you should take snapshots of the EBS storage volumes attached to your EC2 instances. Taking regular snapshots allows you to restore your data to a previous state quickly and cost effectively. With Amazon EBS snapshots, you pay only for the actual data you store, and snapshots save only the data that has changed since the previous snapshot, which minimizes your cost. You will use EBS Snapshot Scheduler to make regular snapshots of your EC2 instance. EBS Snapshot Scheduler takes advantage of other AWS services including CloudFormation, Amazon DynamoDB, and AWS Lambda to make backing up your EBS volumes simple.

Determine the schedule

As a best practice, you should back up your data frequently during the hours when your data changes the most. This reduces the amount of data you lose if you have to restore from a snapshot. For the purposes of this blog post, the data for my instances changes the most between the business hours of 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Pacific Time. During these hours, I will make snapshots hourly to minimize data loss.

In addition to backing up frequently, another best practice is to establish a strategy for retention. This will vary based on how you need to use the snapshots. If you have compliance requirements to be able to restore for auditing, your needs may be different than if you are able to detect data corruption within three hours and simply need to restore to something that limits data loss to five hours. EBS Snapshot Scheduler enables you to specify the retention period for your snapshots. For this post, I only need to keep snapshots for recent business days. To account for weekends, I will set my retention period to three days, which is down from the default of 15 days when deploying EBS Snapshot Scheduler.

Deploy EBS Snapshot Scheduler

In Step 1 of Part 1 of this post, I showed how to configure an EC2 for Windows Server 2012 R2 instance with an EBS volume. You will use EBS Snapshot Scheduler to take eight snapshots each weekday of your EC2 instance’s EBS volumes:

  1. Navigate to the EBS Snapshot Scheduler deployment page and choose Launch Solution. This takes you to the CloudFormation console in your account. The Specify an Amazon S3 template URL option is already selected and prefilled. Choose Next on the Select Template page.
  2. On the Specify Details page, retain all default parameters except for AutoSnapshotDeletion. Set AutoSnapshotDeletion to Yes to ensure that old snapshots are periodically deleted. The default retention period is 15 days (you will specify a shorter value on your instance in the next subsection).
  3. Choose Next twice to move to the Review step, and start deployment by choosing the I acknowledge that AWS CloudFormation might create IAM resources check box and then choosing Create.

Tag your EC2 instances

EBS Snapshot Scheduler takes a few minutes to deploy. While waiting for its deployment, you can start to tag your instance to define its schedule. EBS Snapshot Scheduler reads tag values and looks for four possible custom parameters in the following order:

  • <snapshot time> – Time in 24-hour format with no colon.
  • <retention days> – The number of days (a positive integer) to retain the snapshot before deletion, if set to automatically delete snapshots.
  • <time zone> – The time zone of the times specified in <snapshot time>.
  • <active day(s)>all, weekdays, or mon, tue, wed, thu, fri, sat, and/or sun.

Because you want hourly backups on weekdays between 9:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. Pacific Time, you need to configure eight tags—one for each hour of the day. You will add the eight tags shown in the following table to your EC2 instance.

Tag Value
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:0900 0900;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1000 1000;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1100 1100;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1200 1200;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1300 1300;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1400 1400;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1500 1500;3;utc;weekdays
scheduler:ebs-snapshot:1600 1600;3;utc;weekdays

Next, you will add these tags to your instance. If you want to tag multiple instances at once, you can use Tag Editor instead. To add the tags in the preceding table to your EC2 instance:

  1. Navigate to your EC2 instance in the EC2 console and choose Tags in the navigation pane.
  2. Choose Add/Edit Tags and then choose Create Tag to add all the tags specified in the preceding table.
  3. Confirm you have added the tags by choosing Save. After adding these tags, navigate to your EC2 instance in the EC2 console. Your EC2 instance should look similar to the following screenshot.
    Screenshot of how your EC2 instance should look in the console
  4. After waiting a couple of hours, you can see snapshots beginning to populate on the Snapshots page of the EC2 console.Screenshot of snapshots beginning to populate on the Snapshots page of the EC2 console
  5. To check if EBS Snapshot Scheduler is active, you can check the CloudWatch rule that runs the Lambda function. If the clock icon shown in the following screenshot is green, the scheduler is active. If the clock icon is gray, the rule is disabled and does not run. You can enable or disable the rule by selecting it, choosing Actions, and choosing Enable or Disable. This also allows you to temporarily disable EBS Snapshot Scheduler.Screenshot of checking to see if EBS Snapshot Scheduler is active
  1. You can also monitor when EBS Snapshot Scheduler has run by choosing the name of the CloudWatch rule as shown in the previous screenshot and choosing Show metrics for the rule.Screenshot of monitoring when EBS Snapshot Scheduler has run by choosing the name of the CloudWatch rule

If you want to restore and attach an EBS volume, see Restoring an Amazon EBS Volume from a Snapshot and Attaching an Amazon EBS Volume to an Instance.

Step 4: Use Amazon Inspector

In this section, I show you how to you use Amazon Inspector to scan your EC2 instance for common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs) and set up Amazon SNS notifications. To do this I will show you how to:

  • Install the Amazon Inspector agent by using EC2 Run Command.
  • Set up notifications using Amazon SNS to notify you of any findings.
  • Define an Amazon Inspector target and template to define what assessment to perform on your EC2 instance.
  • Schedule Amazon Inspector assessment runs to assess your EC2 instance on a regular interval.

Amazon Inspector can help you scan your EC2 instance using prebuilt rules packages, which are built and maintained by AWS. These prebuilt rules packages tell Amazon Inspector what to scan for on the EC2 instances you select. Amazon Inspector provides the following prebuilt packages for Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2:

  • Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures
  • Center for Internet Security Benchmarks
  • Runtime Behavior Analysis

In this post, I’m focused on how to make sure you keep your EC2 instances patched, backed up, and inspected for common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs). As a result, I will focus on how to use the CVE rules package and use your instance tags to identify the instances on which to run the CVE rules. If your EC2 instance is fully patched using Systems Manager, as described earlier, you should not have any findings with the CVE rules package. Regardless, as a best practice I recommend that you use Amazon Inspector as an additional layer for identifying any unexpected failures. This involves using Amazon CloudWatch to set up weekly Amazon Inspector scans, and configuring Amazon Inspector to notify you of any findings through SNS topics. By acting on the notifications you receive, you can respond quickly to any CVEs on any of your EC2 instances to help ensure that malware using known CVEs does not affect your EC2 instances. In a previous blog post, Eric Fitzgerald showed how to remediate Amazon Inspector security findings automatically.

Install the Amazon Inspector agent

To install the Amazon Inspector agent, you will use EC2 Run Command, which allows you to run any command on any of your EC2 instances that have the Systems Manager agent with an attached IAM role that allows access to Systems Manager.

  1. Choose Run Command under Systems Manager Services in the navigation pane of the EC2 console. Then choose Run a command.
    Screenshot of choosing "Run a command"
  2. To install the Amazon Inspector agent, you will use an AWS managed and provided command document that downloads and installs the agent for you on the selected EC2 instance. Choose AmazonInspector-ManageAWSAgent. To choose the target EC2 instance where this command will be run, use the tag you previously assigned to your EC2 instance, Patch Group, with a value of Windows Servers. For this example, set the concurrent installations to 1 and tell Systems Manager to stop after 5 errors.
    Screenshot of installing the Amazon Inspector agent
  3. Retain the default values for all other settings on the Run a command page and choose Run. Back on the Run Command page, you can see if the command that installed the Amazon Inspector agent executed successfully on all selected EC2 instances.
    Screenshot showing that the command that installed the Amazon Inspector agent executed successfully on all selected EC2 instances

Set up notifications using Amazon SNS

Now that you have installed the Amazon Inspector agent, you will set up an SNS topic that will notify you of any findings after an Amazon Inspector run.

To set up an SNS topic:

  1. In the AWS Management Console, choose Simple Notification Service under Messaging in the Services menu.
  2. Choose Create topic, name your topic (only alphanumeric characters, hyphens, and underscores are allowed) and give it a display name to ensure you know what this topic does (I’ve named mine Inspector). Choose Create topic.
    "Create new topic" page
  3. To allow Amazon Inspector to publish messages to your new topic, choose Other topic actions and choose Edit topic policy.
  4. For Allow these users to publish messages to this topic and Allow these users to subscribe to this topic, choose Only these AWS users. Type the following ARN for the US East (N. Virginia) Region in which you are deploying the solution in this post: arn:aws:iam::316112463485:root. This is the ARN of Amazon Inspector itself. For the ARNs of Amazon Inspector in other AWS Regions, see Setting Up an SNS Topic for Amazon Inspector Notifications (Console). Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) uniquely identify AWS resources across all of AWS.
    Screenshot of editing the topic policy
  5. To receive notifications from Amazon Inspector, subscribe to your new topic by choosing Create subscription and adding your email address. After confirming your subscription by clicking the link in the email, the topic should display your email address as a subscriber. Later, you will configure the Amazon Inspector template to publish to this topic.
    Screenshot of subscribing to the new topic

Define an Amazon Inspector target and template

Now that you have set up the notification topic by which Amazon Inspector can notify you of findings, you can create an Amazon Inspector target and template. A target defines which EC2 instances are in scope for Amazon Inspector. A template defines which packages to run, for how long, and on which target.

To create an Amazon Inspector target:

  1. Navigate to the Amazon Inspector console and choose Get started. At the time of writing this blog post, Amazon Inspector is available in the US East (N. Virginia), US West (N. California), US West (Oregon), EU (Ireland), Asia Pacific (Mumbai), Asia Pacific (Seoul), Asia Pacific (Sydney), and Asia Pacific (Tokyo) Regions.
  2. For Amazon Inspector to be able to collect the necessary data from your EC2 instance, you must create an IAM service role for Amazon Inspector. Amazon Inspector can create this role for you if you choose Choose or create role and confirm the role creation by choosing Allow.
    Screenshot of creating an IAM service role for Amazon Inspector
  3. Amazon Inspector also asks you to tag your EC2 instance and install the Amazon Inspector agent. You already performed these steps in Part 1 of this post, so you can proceed by choosing Next. To define the Amazon Inspector target, choose the previously used Patch Group tag with a Value of Windows Servers. This is the same tag that you used to define the targets for patching. Then choose Next.
    Screenshot of defining the Amazon Inspector target
  4. Now, define your Amazon Inspector template, and choose a name and the package you want to run. For this post, use the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures package and choose the default duration of 1 hour. As you can see, the package has a version number, so always select the latest version of the rules package if multiple versions are available.
    Screenshot of defining an assessment template
  5. Configure Amazon Inspector to publish to your SNS topic when findings are reported. You can also choose to receive a notification of a started run, a finished run, or changes in the state of a run. For this blog post, you want to receive notifications if there are any findings. To start, choose Assessment Templates from the Amazon Inspector console and choose your newly created Amazon Inspector assessment template. Choose the icon below SNS topics (see the following screenshot).
    Screenshot of choosing an assessment template
  6. A pop-up appears in which you can choose the previously created topic and the events about which you want SNS to notify you (choose Finding reported).
    Screenshot of choosing the previously created topic and the events about which you want SNS to notify you

Schedule Amazon Inspector assessment runs

The last step in using Amazon Inspector to assess for CVEs is to schedule the Amazon Inspector template to run using Amazon CloudWatch Events. This will make sure that Amazon Inspector assesses your EC2 instance on a regular basis. To do this, you need the Amazon Inspector template ARN, which you can find under Assessment templates in the Amazon Inspector console. CloudWatch Events can run your Amazon Inspector assessment at an interval you define using a Cron-based schedule. Cron is a well-known scheduling agent that is widely used on UNIX-like operating systems and uses the following syntax for CloudWatch Events.

Image of Cron schedule

All scheduled events use a UTC time zone, and the minimum precision for schedules is one minute. For more information about scheduling CloudWatch Events, see Schedule Expressions for Rules.

To create the CloudWatch Events rule:

  1. Navigate to the CloudWatch console, choose Events, and choose Create rule.
    Screenshot of starting to create a rule in the CloudWatch Events console
  2. On the next page, specify if you want to invoke your rule based on an event pattern or a schedule. For this blog post, you will select a schedule based on a Cron expression.
  3. You can schedule the Amazon Inspector assessment any time you want using the Cron expression, or you can use the Cron expression I used in the following screenshot, which will run the Amazon Inspector assessment every Sunday at 10:00 P.M. GMT.
    Screenshot of scheduling an Amazon Inspector assessment with a Cron expression
  4. Choose Add target and choose Inspector assessment template from the drop-down menu. Paste the ARN of the Amazon Inspector template you previously created in the Amazon Inspector console in the Assessment template box and choose Create a new role for this specific resource. This new role is necessary so that CloudWatch Events has the necessary permissions to start the Amazon Inspector assessment. CloudWatch Events will automatically create the new role and grant the minimum set of permissions needed to run the Amazon Inspector assessment. To proceed, choose Configure details.
    Screenshot of adding a target
  5. Next, give your rule a name and a description. I suggest using a name that describes what the rule does, as shown in the following screenshot.
  6. Finish the wizard by choosing Create rule. The rule should appear in the Events – Rules section of the CloudWatch console.
    Screenshot of completing the creation of the rule
  7. To confirm your CloudWatch Events rule works, wait for the next time your CloudWatch Events rule is scheduled to run. For testing purposes, you can choose your CloudWatch Events rule and choose Edit to change the schedule to run it sooner than scheduled.
    Screenshot of confirming the CloudWatch Events rule works
  8. Now navigate to the Amazon Inspector console to confirm the launch of your first assessment run. The Start time column shows you the time each assessment started and the Status column the status of your assessment. In the following screenshot, you can see Amazon Inspector is busy Collecting data from the selected assessment targets.
    Screenshot of confirming the launch of the first assessment run

You have concluded the last step of this blog post by setting up a regular scan of your EC2 instance with Amazon Inspector and a notification that will let you know if your EC2 instance is vulnerable to any known CVEs. In a previous Security Blog post, Eric Fitzgerald explained How to Remediate Amazon Inspector Security Findings Automatically. Although that blog post is for Linux-based EC2 instances, the post shows that you can learn about Amazon Inspector findings in other ways than email alerts.

Conclusion

In this two-part blog post, I showed how to make sure you keep your EC2 instances up to date with patching, how to back up your instances with snapshots, and how to monitor your instances for CVEs. Collectively these measures help to protect your instances against common attack vectors that attempt to exploit known vulnerabilities. In Part 1, I showed how to configure your EC2 instances to make it easy to use Systems Manager, EBS Snapshot Scheduler, and Amazon Inspector. I also showed how to use Systems Manager to schedule automatic patches to keep your instances current in a timely fashion. In Part 2, I showed you how to take regular snapshots of your data by using EBS Snapshot Scheduler and how to use Amazon Inspector to check if your EC2 instances running Microsoft Windows contain any common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs).

If you have comments about today’s or yesterday’s post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing any part of this solution, start a new thread on the Amazon EC2 forum or the Amazon Inspector forum, or contact AWS Support.

– Koen

AWS IoT Update – Better Value with New Pricing Model

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-iot-update-better-value-with-new-pricing-model/

Our customers are using AWS IoT to make their connected devices more intelligent. These devices collect & measure data in the field (below the ground, in the air, in the water, on factory floors and in hospital rooms) and use AWS IoT as their gateway to the AWS Cloud. Once connected to the cloud, customers can write device data to Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) and Amazon DynamoDB, process data using Amazon Kinesis and AWS Lambda functions, initiate Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) push notifications, and much more.

New Pricing Model (20-40% Reduction)
Today we are making a change to the AWS IoT pricing model that will make it an even better value for you. Most customers will see a price reduction of 20-40%, with some receiving a significantly larger discount depending on their workload.

The original model was based on a charge for the number of messages that were sent to or from the service. This all-inclusive model was a good starting point, but also meant that some customers were effectively paying for parts of AWS IoT that they did not actually use. For example, some customers have devices that ping AWS IoT very frequently, with sparse rule sets that fire infrequently. Our new model is more fine-grained, with independent charges for each component (all prices are for devices that connect to the US East (Northern Virginia) Region):

Connectivity – Metered in 1 minute increments and based on the total time your devices are connected to AWS IoT. Priced at $0.08 per million minutes of connection (equivalent to $0.042 per device per year for 24/7 connectivity). Your devices can send keep-alive pings at 30 second to 20 minute intervals at no additional cost.

Messaging – Metered by the number of messages transmitted between your devices and AWS IoT. Pricing starts at $1 per million messages, with volume pricing falling as low as $0.70 per million. You may send and receive messages up to 128 kilobytes in size. Messages are metered in 5 kilobyte increments (up from 512 bytes previously). For example, an 8 kilobyte message is metered as two messages.

Rules Engine – Metered for each time a rule is triggered, and for the number of actions executed within a rule, with a minimum of one action per rule. Priced at $0.15 per million rules-triggered and $0.15 per million actions-executed. Rules that process a message in excess of 5 kilobytes are metered at the next multiple of the 5 kilobyte size. For example, a rule that processes an 8 kilobyte message is metered as two rules.

Device Shadow & Registry Updates – Metered on the number of operations to access or modify Device Shadow or Registry data, priced at $1.25 per million operations. Device Shadow and Registry operations are metered in 1 kilobyte increments of the Device Shadow or Registry record size. For example, an update to a 1.5 kilobyte Shadow record is metered as two operations.

The AWS Free Tier now offers a generous allocation of connection minutes, messages, triggered rules, rules actions, Shadow, and Registry usage, enough to operate a fleet of up to 50 devices. The new prices will take effect on January 1, 2018 with no effort on your part. At that time, the updated prices will be published on the AWS IoT Pricing page.

AWS IoT at re:Invent
We have an entire IoT track at this year’s AWS re:Invent. Here is a sampling:

We also have customer-led sessions from Philips, Panasonic, Enel, and Salesforce.

Jeff;