Tag Archives: AWS

New Power Bundle for Amazon WorkSpaces – More vCPUs, Memory, and Storage

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-power-bundle-for-amazon-workspaces-more-vcpus-memory-and-storage/

Are you tired of hearing me talk about Amazon WorkSpaces yet? I hope not, because we have a lot of customer-driven additions on the roadmap! Our customers in the developer and analyst community have been asking for a workstation-class machine that will allow them to take advantage of the low cost and flexibility of WorkSpaces. Developers want to run Visual Studio, IntelliJ, Eclipse, and other IDEs. Analysts want to run complex simulations and statistical analysis using MatLab, GNU Octave, R, and Stata.

New Power Bundle
Today we are extending the current set of WorkSpaces bundles with a new Power bundle. With four vCPUs, 16 GiB of memory, and 275 GB of storage (175 GB on the system volume and another 100 GB on the user volume), this bundle is designed to make developers, analysts, (and me) smile. You can launch them in all of the usual ways: Console, CLI (create-workspaces), or API (CreateWorkSpaces):

One really interesting benefit to using a cloud-based virtual desktop for simulations and statistical analysis is the ease of access to data that’s already stored in the cloud. Analysts can mine and analyze petabytes of data stored in S3 that is effectively local (with respect to access time) to the WorkSpace. This low-latency access will boost productivity and also simplifies the use of other AWS data analysis tools such as Amazon Redshift, Amazon Redshift Spectrum, Amazon QuickSight, and Amazon Athena.

Like the existing bundles, the new Power bundle can be used in either billing configuration, AlwaysOn or AutoStop (read Amazon WorkSpaces Update – Hourly Usage and Expanded Root Volume to learn more). The bundle is available in all AWS Regions where WorkSpaces is available and you can launch one today! Visit the WorkSpaces Pricing page for pricing in your region.

Jeff;

Now Available – Developer Preview of AWS SDK for Java 2.0

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-available-developer-preview-of-aws-sdk-for-java-2-0/

The AWS Developer Tools Team has been hard at work on the AWS SDK for Java and is launching a Developer Preview of version 2.0 today.

This version is a major rewrite of the older, 1.11.x codebase. Built on top of Java 8 with a focus on consistency, immutability and ease of use, the new SDK includes frequently requested features such as support for non-blocking I/O and the ability to choose the desired HTTP implementation at runtime. The new non-blocking I/O support is more efficient than the existing, thread-based implementation of the Async variants of the service clients. Each non-blocking request returns a CompletableFuture object.

The version 2.0 SDK includes a number of changes to the earlier APIs. For example, it replaces the existing mix of client constructors and mutable methods with a consistent model based on client builders and immutable clients. The SDK also collapses the disparate collection of classes used to configure regions into a single Region class, and provides a new set of APIs for streaming.

The SDK is available on GitHub. You can send public feedback by opening GitHub issues and you can also send pull requests in the usual way.

To learn more about this SDK, read AWS SDK for Java 2.0 – Developer Preview on the AWS Developer Blog.

Jeff;

 

Validating AWS CloudFormation Templates

Post Syndicated from Remek Hetman original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/validating-aws-cloudformation-templates/

For their continuous integration and continuous deployment (CI/CD) pipeline path, many companies use tools like Jenkins, Chef, and AWS CloudFormation. Usually, the process is managed by two or more teams. One team is responsible for designing and developing an application, CloudFormation templates, and so on. The other team is generally responsible for integration and deployment.

One of the challenges that a CI/CD team has is to validate the CloudFormation templates provided by the development team. Validation provides early warning about any incorrect syntax and ensures that the development team follows company policies in terms of security and the resources created by CloudFormation templates.

In this post, I focus on the validation of AWS CloudFormation templates for syntax as well as in the context of business rules.

Scripted validation solution

For CloudFormation syntax validation, one option is to use the AWS CLI to call the validate-template command. For security and resource management, another approach is to run a Jenkins pipeline from an Amazon EC2 instance under an EC2 role that has been granted only the necessary permissions.

What if you need more control over your CloudFormation templates, such as managing parameters or attributes? What if you have many development teams where permissions to the AWS environment required by one team are either too open or not open enough for another team?

To have more control over the contents of your CloudFormation template, you can use the cf-validator Python script, which shows you how to validate different template aspects. With this script, you can validate:

  • JSON syntax
  • IAM capabilities
  • Root tags
  • Parameters
  • CloudFormation resources
  • Attributes
  • Reference resources

You can download this script from the cf-validator GitHub repo. Use the following command to run the script:

python cf-validator.py

The script takes the following parameters:

  • –cf_path [Required]

    The location of the CloudFormation template in JSON format. Supported location types:

    • File system – Path to the CloudFormation template on the file system
    • Web – URL, for example, https://my-file.com/my_cf.json
    • Amazon S3 – Amazon S3 bucket, for example, s3://my_bucket/my_cf.json
  • –cf_rules [Required]

    The location of the JSON file with the validation rules. This parameter supports the same locations as –cf_path. The next section of this post has more information about defining rules.

  • –cf_res [Optional]

    The location of the JSON file with the defined AWS resources, which need to be confirmed before launching the CloudFormation template. A later section of this post has more information about resource validation.

  • –allow_cap [Optional][yes/no]

    Controls whether you allow the creation of IAM resources by the CloudFormation template, such as policies, rules, or IAM users. The default value is no.

  • –region [Optional]

    The AWS region where the existing resources were created. The default value is us-east-1.

Defining rules

All rules are defined in the JSON format file. Rules consist of the following keys:

  • “allow_root_keys”

    Lists allowed root CloudFormation keys. Example of root keys are Parameters, Resources, Output, and so on. An empty list means that any key is allowed.

  • “allow_parameters”

    Lists allowed CloudFormation parameters. For instance, to force each CloudFormation template to use only the set of parameters defined in your pipeline, list them under this key. An empty list means that any parameter is allowed.

  • “allow_resources”

    Lists the AWS resources allowed for creation by a CloudFormation template. The format of the resource is the same as resource types in CloudFormation, but without the “AWS::” prefix. Examples:  EC2::Instance, EC2::Volume, and so on. If you allow the creation of all resources from the given group, you can use a wildcard. For instance, if you allow all resources related to CloudFormation, you can add CloudFormation::* to the list instead of typing CloudFormation::Init, CloudFormation:Stack, and so on. An empty list means that all resources are allowed.

  • “require_ref_attributes”

    Lists attributes (per resource) that have to be defined in CloudFormation. The value must be referenced and cannot be hardcoded. For instance, you can require that each EC2 instance must be created from a specific AMI where Image ID has to be a passed-in parameter. An empty list means that you are not requiring specific attributes to be present for a given resource.

  • “allow_additional_attributes”

    Lists additional attributes (per resource) that can be defined and have any value in the CloudFormation template. An empty list means that any additional attribute is allowed. If you specify additional attributes for this key, then any resource attribute defined in a CloudFormation template that is not listed in this key or in the require_ref_attributes key causes validation to fail.

  • “not_allow_attributes”

    Lists attributes (per resource) that are not allowed in the CloudFormation template. This key takes precedence over the require_ref_attributes and allow_additional_attributes keys.

Rule file example

The following is an example of a rule file:

{
  "allow_root_keys" : ["AWSTemplateFormatVersion", "Description", "Parameters", "Conditions", "Resources", "Outputs"],
  "allow_parameters" : [],
  "allow_resources" : [
    "CloudFormation::*",
    "CloudWatch::Alarm",
    "EC2::Instance",
    "EC2::Volume",
    "EC2::VolumeAttachment",
    "ElasticLoadBalancing::LoadBalancer",
    "IAM::Role",
    "IAM::Policy",
    "IAM::InstanceProfile"
  ],
  "require_ref_attributes" :
    {
      "EC2::Instance" : [ "InstanceType", "ImageId", "SecurityGroupIds", "SubnetId", "KeyName", "IamInstanceProfile" ],
      "ElasticLoadBalancing::LoadBalancer" : ["SecurityGroups", "Subnets"]
    },
  "allow_additional_attributes" : {},
  "not_allow_attributes" : {}
}

Validating resources

You can use the –cf_res parameter to validate that the resources you are planning to reference in the CloudFormation template exist and are available. As a value for this parameter, point to the JSON file with defined resources. The format should be as follows:

[
  { "Type" : "SG",
    "ID" : "sg-37c9b448A"
  },
  { "Type" : "AMI",
    "ID" : "ami-e7e523f1"
  },
  { "Type" : "Subnet",
    "ID" : "subnet-034e262e"
  }
]

Summary

At this moment, this CloudFormation template validation script supports only security groups, AMIs, and subnets. But anyone with some knowledge of Python and the boto3 package can add support for additional resources type, as needed.

For more tips please visit our AWS CloudFormation blog

Continuous Delivery of Nested AWS CloudFormation Stacks Using AWS CodePipeline

Post Syndicated from Prakash Palanisamy original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/continuous-delivery-of-nested-aws-cloudformation-stacks-using-aws-codepipeline/

In CodePipeline Update – Build Continuous Delivery Workflows for CloudFormation Stacks, Jeff Barr discusses infrastructure as code and how to use AWS CodePipeline for continuous delivery. In this blog post, I discuss the continuous delivery of nested CloudFormation stacks using AWS CodePipeline, with AWS CodeCommit as the source repository and AWS CodeBuild as a build and testing tool. I deploy the stacks using CloudFormation change sets following a manual approval process.

Here’s how to do it:

In AWS CodePipeline, create a pipeline with four stages:

  • Source (AWS CodeCommit)
  • Build and Test (AWS CodeBuild and AWS CloudFormation)
  • Staging (AWS CloudFormation and manual approval)
  • Production (AWS CloudFormation and manual approval)

Pipeline stages, the actions in each stage, and transitions between stages are shown in the following diagram.

CloudFormation templates, test scripts, and the build specification are stored in AWS CodeCommit repositories. These files are used in the Source stage of the pipeline in AWS CodePipeline.

The AWS::CloudFormation::Stack resource type is used to create child stacks from a master stack. The CloudFormation stack resource requires the templates of the child stacks to be stored in the S3 bucket. The location of the template file is provided as a URL in the properties section of the resource definition.

The following template creates three child stacks:

  • Security (IAM, security groups).
  • Database (an RDS instance).
  • Web stacks (EC2 instances in an Auto Scaling group, elastic load balancer).
Description: Master stack which creates all required nested stacks

Parameters:
  TemplatePath:
    Type: String
    Description: S3Bucket Path where the templates are stored
  VPCID:
    Type: "AWS::EC2::VPC::Id"
    Description: Enter a valid VPC Id
  PrivateSubnet1:
    Type: "AWS::EC2::Subnet::Id"
    Description: Enter a valid SubnetId of private subnet in AZ1
  PrivateSubnet2:
    Type: "AWS::EC2::Subnet::Id"
    Description: Enter a valid SubnetId of private subnet in AZ2
  PublicSubnet1:
    Type: "AWS::EC2::Subnet::Id"
    Description: Enter a valid SubnetId of public subnet in AZ1
  PublicSubnet2:
    Type: "AWS::EC2::Subnet::Id"
    Description: Enter a valid SubnetId of public subnet in AZ2
  S3BucketName:
    Type: String
    Description: Name of the S3 bucket to allow access to the Web Server IAM Role.
  KeyPair:
    Type: "AWS::EC2::KeyPair::KeyName"
    Description: Enter a valid KeyPair Name
  AMIId:
    Type: "AWS::EC2::Image::Id"
    Description: Enter a valid AMI ID to launch the instance
  WebInstanceType:
    Type: String
    Description: Enter one of the possible instance type for web server
    AllowedValues:
      - t2.large
      - m4.large
      - m4.xlarge
      - c4.large
  WebMinSize:
    Type: String
    Description: Minimum number of instances in auto scaling group
  WebMaxSize:
    Type: String
    Description: Maximum number of instances in auto scaling group
  DBSubnetGroup:
    Type: String
    Description: Enter a valid DB Subnet Group
  DBUsername:
    Type: String
    Description: Enter a valid Database master username
    MinLength: 1
    MaxLength: 16
    AllowedPattern: "[a-zA-Z][a-zA-Z0-9]*"
  DBPassword:
    Type: String
    Description: Enter a valid Database master password
    NoEcho: true
    MinLength: 1
    MaxLength: 41
    AllowedPattern: "[a-zA-Z0-9]*"
  DBInstanceType:
    Type: String
    Description: Enter one of the possible instance type for database
    AllowedValues:
      - db.t2.micro
      - db.t2.small
      - db.t2.medium
      - db.t2.large
  Environment:
    Type: String
    Description: Select the appropriate environment
    AllowedValues:
      - dev
      - test
      - uat
      - prod

Resources:
  SecurityStack:
    Type: "AWS::CloudFormation::Stack"
    Properties:
      TemplateURL:
        Fn::Sub: "https://s3.amazonaws.com/${TemplatePath}/security-stack.yml"
      Parameters:
        S3BucketName:
          Ref: S3BucketName
        VPCID:
          Ref: VPCID
        Environment:
          Ref: Environment
      Tags:
        - Key: Name
          Value: SecurityStack

  DatabaseStack:
    Type: "AWS::CloudFormation::Stack"
    Properties:
      TemplateURL:
        Fn::Sub: "https://s3.amazonaws.com/${TemplatePath}/database-stack.yml"
      Parameters:
        DBSubnetGroup:
          Ref: DBSubnetGroup
        DBUsername:
          Ref: DBUsername
        DBPassword:
          Ref: DBPassword
        DBServerSecurityGroup:
          Fn::GetAtt: SecurityStack.Outputs.DBServerSG
        DBInstanceType:
          Ref: DBInstanceType
        Environment:
          Ref: Environment
      Tags:
        - Key: Name
          Value:   DatabaseStack

  ServerStack:
    Type: "AWS::CloudFormation::Stack"
    Properties:
      TemplateURL:
        Fn::Sub: "https://s3.amazonaws.com/${TemplatePath}/server-stack.yml"
      Parameters:
        VPCID:
          Ref: VPCID
        PrivateSubnet1:
          Ref: PrivateSubnet1
        PrivateSubnet2:
          Ref: PrivateSubnet2
        PublicSubnet1:
          Ref: PublicSubnet1
        PublicSubnet2:
          Ref: PublicSubnet2
        KeyPair:
          Ref: KeyPair
        AMIId:
          Ref: AMIId
        WebSG:
          Fn::GetAtt: SecurityStack.Outputs.WebSG
        ELBSG:
          Fn::GetAtt: SecurityStack.Outputs.ELBSG
        DBClientSG:
          Fn::GetAtt: SecurityStack.Outputs.DBClientSG
        WebIAMProfile:
          Fn::GetAtt: SecurityStack.Outputs.WebIAMProfile
        WebInstanceType:
          Ref: WebInstanceType
        WebMinSize:
          Ref: WebMinSize
        WebMaxSize:
          Ref: WebMaxSize
        Environment:
          Ref: Environment
      Tags:
        - Key: Name
          Value: ServerStack

Outputs:
  WebELBURL:
    Description: "URL endpoint of web ELB"
    Value:
      Fn::GetAtt: ServerStack.Outputs.WebELBURL

During the Validate stage, AWS CodeBuild checks for changes to the AWS CodeCommit source repositories. It uses the ValidateTemplate API to validate the CloudFormation template and copies the child templates and configuration files to the appropriate location in the S3 bucket.

The following AWS CodeBuild build specification validates the CloudFormation templates listed under the TEMPLATE_FILES environment variable and copies them to the S3 bucket specified in the TEMPLATE_BUCKET environment variable in the AWS CodeBuild project. Optionally, you can use the TEMPLATE_PREFIX environment variable to specify a path inside the bucket. This updates the configuration files to use the location of the child template files. The location of the template files is provided as a parameter to the master stack.

version: 0.1

environment_variables:
  plaintext:
    CHILD_TEMPLATES: |
      security-stack.yml
      server-stack.yml
      database-stack.yml
    TEMPLATE_FILES: |
      master-stack.yml
      security-stack.yml
      server-stack.yml
      database-stack.yml
    CONFIG_FILES: |
      config-prod.json
      config-test.json
      config-uat.json

phases:
  install:
    commands:
      npm install jsonlint -g
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - echo "Validating CFN templates"
      - |
        for cfn_template in $TEMPLATE_FILES; do
          echo "Validating CloudFormation template file $cfn_template"
          aws cloudformation validate-template --template-body file://$cfn_template
        done
      - |
        for conf in $CONFIG_FILES; do
          echo "Validating CFN parameters config file $conf"
          jsonlint -q $conf
        done
  build:
    commands:
      - echo "Copying child stack templates to S3"
      - |
        for child_template in $CHILD_TEMPLATES; do
          if [ "X$TEMPLATE_PREFIX" = "X" ]; then
            aws s3 cp "$child_template" "s3://$TEMPLATE_BUCKET/$child_template"
          else
            aws s3 cp "$child_template" "s3://$TEMPLATE_BUCKET/$TEMPLATE_PREFIX/$child_template"
          fi
        done
      - echo "Updating template configurtion files to use the appropriate values"
      - |
        for conf in $CONFIG_FILES; do
          if [ "X$TEMPLATE_PREFIX" = "X" ]; then
            echo "Replacing \"TEMPLATE_PATH_PLACEHOLDER\" for \"$TEMPLATE_BUCKET\" in $conf"
            sed -i -e "s/TEMPLATE_PATH_PLACEHOLDER/$TEMPLATE_BUCKET/" $conf
          else
            echo "Replacing \"TEMPLATE_PATH_PLACEHOLDER\" for \"$TEMPLATE_BUCKET/$TEMPLATE_PREFIX\" in $conf"
            sed -i -e "s/TEMPLATE_PATH_PLACEHOLDER/$TEMPLATE_BUCKET\/$TEMPLATE_PREFIX/" $conf
          fi
        done

artifacts:
  files:
    - master-stack.yml
    - config-*.json

After the template files are copied to S3, CloudFormation creates a test stack and triggers AWS CodeBuild as a test action.

Then the AWS CodeBuild build specification executes validate-env.py, the Python script used to determine whether resources created using the nested CloudFormation stacks conform to the specifications provided in the CONFIG_FILE.

version: 0.1

environment_variables:
  plaintext:
    CONFIG_FILE: env-details.yml

phases:
  install:
    commands:
      - pip install --upgrade pip
      - pip install boto3 --upgrade
      - pip install pyyaml --upgrade
      - pip install yamllint --upgrade
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - echo "Validating config file $CONFIG_FILE"
      - yamllint $CONFIG_FILE
  build:
    commands:
      - echo "Validating resources..."
      - python validate-env.py
      - exit $?

Upon successful completion of the test action, CloudFormation deletes the test stack and proceeds to the UAT stage in the pipeline.

During this stage, CloudFormation creates a change set against the UAT stack and then executes the change set. This updates the UAT environment and makes it available for acceptance testing. The process continues to a manual approval action. After the QA team validates the UAT environment and provides an approval, the process moves to the Production stage in the pipeline.

During this stage, CloudFormation creates a change set for the nested production stack and the process continues to a manual approval step. Upon approval (usually by a designated executive), the change set is executed and the production deployment is completed.
 

Setting up a continuous delivery pipeline

 
I used a CloudFormation template to set up my continuous delivery pipeline. The codepipeline-cfn-codebuild.yml template, available from GitHub, sets up a full-featured pipeline.

When I use the template to create my pipeline, I specify the following:

  • AWS CodeCommit repositories.
  • SNS topics to send approval notifications.
  • S3 bucket name where the artifacts will be stored.

The CFNTemplateRepoName points to the AWS CodeCommit repository where CloudFormation templates, configuration files, and build specification files are stored.

My repo contains following files:

The continuous delivery pipeline is ready just seconds after clicking Create Stack. After it’s created, the pipeline executes each stage. Upon manual approvals for the UAT and Production stages, the pipeline successfully enables continuous delivery.


 

Implementing a change in nested stack

 
To make changes to a child stack in a nested stack (for example, to update a parameter value or add or change resources), update the master stack. The changes must be made in the appropriate template or configuration files and then checked in to the AWS CodeCommit repository. This triggers the following deployment process:

 

Conclusion

 
In this post, I showed how you can use AWS CodePipeline, AWS CloudFormation, AWS CodeBuild, and a manual approval process to create a continuous delivery pipeline for both infrastructure as code and application deployment.

For more information about AWS CodePipeline, see the AWS CodePipeline documentation. You can get started in just a few clicks. All CloudFormation templates, AWS CodeBuild build specification files, and the Python script that performs the validation are available in codepipeline-nested-cfn GitHub repository.


About the author

 
Prakash Palanisamy is a Solutions Architect for Amazon Web Services. When he is not working on Serverless, DevOps or Alexa, he will be solving problems in Project Euler. He also enjoys watching educational documentaries.

Cox: Supreme Court Suggests That Pirates Shouldn’t Lose Internet Access

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/cox-supreme-court-suggests-that-pirates-shouldnt-lose-internet-access-170627/

December 2015 a Virginia federal jury held Internet provider Cox Communications responsible for the copyright infringements of its subscribers.

The ISP refused to disconnect alleged pirates and was found guilty of willful contributory copyright infringement. In addition, it was ordered to pay music publisher BMG Rights Management $25 million in damages.

Cox has since filed an appeal and this week it submitted an additional piece of evidence from the US Supreme Court, stating that this strongly supports its side of the argument.

Last week the Supreme Court issued an important verdict in Packingham v. North Carolina, ruling that it’s unconstitutional to bar convicted sex offenders from social media. The Court described the Internet as an important tool for people to exercise free speech rights.

While nothing in the ruling refers to online piracy, it could turn out to be crucial in the case between Cox and BMG. The Internet provider now argues that if convicted criminals have the right to use the Internet, accused file-sharers should have it too.

“Packingham is directly relevant to what constitute ‘appropriate circumstances’ to terminate Internet access to Cox’s customers. The decision emphatically establishes the centrality of Internet access to protected First Amendment activity..,” Cox writes in its filing at the Court of Appeals.

“As the Court recognized, Internet sources are often ‘the principal sources for knowing current events, checking ads for employment, speaking and listening in the modern public square, and otherwise exploring the vast realms of human thought and knowledge’.”

Citing the Supreme Court ruling, Cox notes that the Government “may not suppress lawful speech as the means to suppress unlawful speech.” This would be the case if entire households lost Internet access because a copyright holder accused someone of repeated copyright infringements.

“The Court’s analysis strongly suggests that at least intermediate scrutiny must apply to any law that purports to restrict the ability of a class of persons to access the Internet,” ISP writes (pdf).

In its case against BMG, Cox was held liable because it failed to take appropriate action against frequent pirates, solely based on allegations of piracy monitoring outfit Rightscorp. Cox doesn’t believe these one-sided complaints should be enough for people to be disconnected from the Internet.

If convicted sex offenders still have the right to use social media, accused pirates should not be barred from the Internet on a whim, the argument goes.

“And if it offends the Constitution to cut off a portion of Internet access to convicted criminals, then the district court’s erroneous interpretation of Section 512(i) of the DMCA — which effectively invokes the state’s coercive power to require ISPs to terminate all Internet access to merely accused infringers — cannot stand,” Cox writes.

Whether the Court of Appeals will agree has yet to be seen, but with the stakes at hand this issue is far from resolved. In addition to the case between BMG and Cox, the MPAA recently filed a lawsuit against Grande Communications, which centers around the same issue.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Scratch 2.0: all-new features for your Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Rik Cross original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/scratch-2-raspberry-pi/

We’re very excited to announce that Scratch 2.0 is now available as an offline app for the Raspberry Pi! This new version of Scratch allows you to control the Pi’s GPIO (General Purpose Input and Output) pins, and offers a host of other exciting new features.

Offline accessibility

The most recent update to Raspbian includes the app, which makes Scratch 2.0 available offline on the Raspberry Pi. This is great news for clubs and classrooms, where children can now use Raspberry Pis instead of connected laptops or desktops to explore block-based programming and physical computing.

Controlling GPIO with Scratch 2.0

As with Scratch 1.4, Scratch 2.0 on the Raspberry Pi allows you to create code to control and respond to components connected to the Pi’s GPIO pins. This means that your Scratch projects can light LEDs, sound buzzers and use input from buttons and a range of sensors to control the behaviour of sprites. Interacting with GPIO pins in Scratch 2.0 is easier than ever before, as text-based broadcast instructions have been replaced with custom blocks for setting pin output and getting current pin state.

Scratch 2.0 GPIO blocks

To add GPIO functionality, first click ‘More Blocks’ and then ‘Add an Extension’. You should then select the ‘Pi GPIO’ extension option and click OK.

Scratch 2.0 GPIO extension

In the ‘More Blocks’ section you should now see the additional blocks for controlling and responding to your Pi GPIO pins. To give an example, the entire code for repeatedly flashing an LED connected to GPIO pin 2.0 is now:

Flashing an LED with Scratch 2.0

To react to a button connected to GPIO pin 2.0, simply set the pin as input, and use the ‘gpio (x) is high?’ block to check the button’s state. In the example below, the Scratch cat will say “Pressed” only when the button is being held down.

Responding to a button press on Scractch 2.0

Cloning sprites

Scratch 2.0 also offers some additional features and improvements over Scratch 1.4. One of the main new features of Scratch 2.0 is the ability to create clones of sprites. Clones are instances of a particular sprite that inherit all of the scripts of the main sprite.

The scripts below show how cloned sprites are used — in this case to allow the Scratch cat to throw a clone of an apple sprite whenever the space key is pressed. Each apple sprite clone then follows its ‘when i start as clone’ script.

Cloning sprites with Scratch 2.0

The cloning functionality avoids the need to create multiple copies of a sprite, for example multiple enemies in a game or multiple snowflakes in an animation.

Custom blocks

Scratch 2.0 also allows the creation of custom blocks, allowing code to be encapsulated and used (possibly multiple times) in a project. The code below shows a simple custom block called ‘jump’, which is used to make a sprite jump whenever it is clicked.

Custom 'jump' block on Scratch 2.0

These custom blocks can also optionally include parameters, allowing further generalisation and reuse of code blocks. Here’s another example of a custom block that draws a shape. This time, however, the custom block includes parameters for specifying the number of sides of the shape, as well as the length of each side.

Custom shape-drawing block with Scratch 2.0

The custom block can now be used with different numbers provided, allowing lots of different shapes to be drawn.

Drawing shapes with Scratch 2.0

Peripheral interaction

Another feature of Scratch 2.0 is the addition of code blocks to allow easy interaction with a webcam or a microphone. This opens up a whole new world of possibilities, and for some examples of projects that make use of this new functionality see Clap-O-Meter which uses the microphone to control a noise level meter, and a Keepie Uppies game that uses video motion to control a football. You can use the Raspberry Pi or USB cameras to detect motion in your Scratch 2.0 projects.

Other new features include a vector image editor and a sound editor, as well as lots of new sprites, costumes and backdrops.

Update your Raspberry Pi for Scratch 2.0

Scratch 2.0 is available in the latest Raspbian release, under the ‘Programming’ menu. We’ve put together a guide for getting started with Scratch 2.0 on the Raspberry Pi online (note that GPIO functionality is only available via the desktop version). You can also try out Scratch 2.0 on the Pi by having a go at a project from the Code Club projects site.

As always, we love to see the projects you create using the Raspberry Pi. Once you’ve upgraded to Scratch 2.0, tell us about your projects via Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, or by leaving us a comment below.

The post Scratch 2.0: all-new features for your Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

AWS GovCloud (US) and Amazon Rekognition – A Powerful Public Safety Tool

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-govcloud-us-and-amazon-rekognition-a-powerful-public-safety-tool/

I’ve already told you about Amazon Rekognition and described how it uses deep neural network models to analyze images by detecting objects, scenes, and faces.

Today I am happy to tell you that Rekognition is now available in the AWS GovCloud (US) Region. To learn more, read the Amazon Rekognition FAQ, and the Amazon Rekognition Product Details, review the Amazon Rekognition Customer Use Cases, and then build your app using the information on the Amazon Rekognition for Developers page.

Motorola Solutions for Public Safety
While I have your attention, I would love to tell you how Motorola Solutions is exploring how Rekognition can enhance real-time intelligence for public safety personnel in the field and at the command center.

Motorola Solutions provides over 100,000 public safety and commercial customers in more than 100 countries with software, services, and tools for mobile intelligence and digital evidence management, many powered by images captured using body, dashboard, and stationary cameras. Due to the exceptionally sensitive nature of these images, they must be stored in an environment that meets stringent CJIS (Criminal Justice Information Systems) security standards defined by the FBI.

For several years, researchers at Motorola Solutions have been exploring the use of artificial intelligence. For example, they have built prototype applications that use Rekognition, Lex, and Polly in conjunction with their own software to scan images from a body-worn camera for missing persons and to raise alerts without requiring continuous human attention or interaction. With approximately 100,000 missing people in the US alone, law enforcement agencies need to bring powerful tools to bear. At re:Invent 2016, Dan Law (Chief Data Scientist for Motorola Solutions) described how they use AWS to aid in this effort. Here’s the video (Dan’s section is titled AI for Public Safety):

AWS and CJIS
The applications that Dan described can run in AWS GovCloud (US). This is an isolated cloud built to protect and preserve sensitive IT data while meeting the FBI’s CJIS requirements (and many others). AWS GovCloud (US) resides on US soil and is managed exclusively by US citizens. AWS routinely signs CJIS security agreements with our customers and can either perform or allow background checks on our employees, as needed.

Here are some resources that you can use to learn more about AWS and CJIS:

Jeff;

 

 

Synchronizing Amazon S3 Buckets Using AWS Step Functions

Post Syndicated from Andy Katz original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/synchronizing-amazon-s3-buckets-using-aws-step-functions/

Constantin Gonzalez is a Principal Solutions Architect at AWS

In my free time, I run a small blog that uses Amazon S3 to host static content and Amazon CloudFront to distribute it world-wide. I use a home-grown, static website generator to create and upload my blog content onto S3.

My blog uses two S3 buckets: one for staging and testing, and one for production. As a website owner, I want to update the production bucket with all changes from the staging bucket in a reliable and efficient way, without having to create and populate a new bucket from scratch. Therefore, to synchronize files between these two buckets, I use AWS Lambda and AWS Step Functions.

In this post, I show how you can use Step Functions to build a scalable synchronization engine for S3 buckets and learn some common patterns for designing Step Functions state machines while you do so.

Step Functions overview

Step Functions makes it easy to coordinate the components of distributed applications and microservices using visual workflows. Building applications from individual components that each perform a discrete function lets you scale and change applications quickly.

While this particular example focuses on synchronizing objects between two S3 buckets, it can be generalized to any other use case that involves coordinated processing of any number of objects in S3 buckets, or other, similar data processing patterns.

Bucket replication options

Before I dive into the details on how this particular example works, take a look at some alternatives for copying or replicating data between two Amazon S3 buckets:

  • The AWS CLI provides customers with a powerful aws s3 sync command that can synchronize the contents of one bucket with another.
  • S3DistCP is a powerful tool for users of Amazon EMR that can efficiently load, save, or copy large amounts of data between S3 buckets and HDFS.
  • The S3 cross-region replication functionality enables automatic, asynchronous copying of objects across buckets in different AWS regions.

In this use case, you are looking for a slightly different bucket synchronization solution that:

  • Works within the same region
  • Is more scalable than a CLI approach running on a single machine
  • Doesn’t require managing any servers
  • Uses a more finely grained cost model than the hourly based Amazon EMR approach

You need a scalable, serverless, and customizable bucket synchronization utility.

Solution architecture

Your solution needs to do three things:

  1. Copy all objects from a source bucket into a destination bucket, but leave out objects that are already present, for efficiency.
  2. Delete all "orphaned" objects from the destination bucket that aren’t present on the source bucket, because you don’t want obsolete objects lying around.
  3. Keep track of all objects for #1 and #2, regardless of how many objects there are.

In the beginning, you read in the source and destination buckets as parameters and perform basic parameter validation. Then, you operate two separate, independent loops, one for copying missing objects and one for deleting obsolete objects. Each loop is a sequence of Step Functions states that read in chunks of S3 object lists and use the continuation token to decide in a choice state whether to continue the loop or not.

This solution is based on the following architecture that uses Step Functions, Lambda, and two S3 buckets:

As you can see, this setup involves no servers, just two main building blocks:

  • Step Functions manages the overall flow of synchronizing the objects from the source bucket with the destination bucket.
  • A set of Lambda functions carry out the individual steps necessary to perform the work, such as validating input, getting lists of objects from source and destination buckets, copying or deleting objects in batches, and so on.

To understand the synchronization flow in more detail, look at the Step Functions state machine diagram for this example.

Walkthrough

Here’s a detailed discussion of how this works.

To follow along, use the code in the sync-buckets-state-machine GitHub repo. The code comes with a ready-to-run deployment script in Python that takes care of all the IAM roles, policies, Lambda functions, and of course the Step Functions state machine deployment using AWS CloudFormation, as well as instructions on how to use it.

Fine print: Use at your own risk

Before I start, here are some disclaimers:

  • Educational purposes only.

    The following example and code are intended for educational purposes only. Make sure that you customize, test, and review it on your own before using any of this in production.

  • S3 object deletion.

    In particular, using the code included below may delete objects on S3 in order to perform synchronization. Make sure that you have backups of your data. In particular, consider using the Amazon S3 Versioning feature to protect yourself against unintended data modification or deletion.

Step Functions execution starts with an initial set of parameters that contain the source and destination bucket names in JSON:

{
    "source":       "my-source-bucket-name",
    "destination":  "my-destination-bucket-name"
}

Armed with this data, Step Functions execution proceeds as follows.

Step 1: Detect the bucket region

First, you need to know the regions where your buckets reside. In this case, take advantage of the Step Functions Parallel state. This allows you to use a Lambda function get_bucket_location.py inside two different, parallel branches of task states:

  • FindRegionForSourceBucket
  • FindRegionForDestinationBucket

Each task state receives one bucket name as an input parameter, then detects the region corresponding to "their" bucket. The output of these functions is collected in a result array containing one element per parallel function.

Step 2: Combine the parallel states

The output of a parallel state is a list with all the individual branches’ outputs. To combine them into a single structure, use a Lambda function called combine_dicts.py in its own CombineRegionOutputs task state. The function combines the two outputs from step 1 into a single JSON dict that provides you with the necessary region information for each bucket.

Step 3: Validate the input

In this walkthrough, you only support buckets that reside in the same region, so you need to decide if the input is valid or if the user has given you two buckets in different regions. To find out, use a Lambda function called validate_input.py in the ValidateInput task state that tests if the two regions from the previous step are equal. The output is a Boolean.

Step 4: Branch the workflow

Use another type of Step Functions state, a Choice state, which branches into a Failure state if the comparison in step 3 yields false, or proceeds with the remaining steps if the comparison was successful.

Step 5: Execute in parallel

The actual work is happening in another Parallel state. Both branches of this state are very similar to each other and they re-use some of the Lambda function code.

Each parallel branch implements a looping pattern across the following steps:

  1. Use a Pass state to inject either the string value "source" (InjectSourceBucket) or "destination" (InjectDestinationBucket) into the listBucket attribute of the state document.

    The next step uses either the source or the destination bucket, depending on the branch, while executing the same, generic Lambda function. You don’t need two Lambda functions that differ only slightly. This step illustrates how to use Pass states as a way of injecting constant parameters into your state machine and as a way of controlling step behavior while re-using common step execution code.

  2. The next step UpdateSourceKeyList/UpdateDestinationKeyList lists objects in the given bucket.

    Remember that the previous step injected either "source" or "destination" into the state document’s listBucket attribute. This step uses the same list_bucket.py Lambda function to list objects in an S3 bucket. The listBucket attribute of its input decides which bucket to list. In the left branch of the main parallel state, use the list of source objects to work through copying missing objects. The right branch uses the list of destination objects, to check if they have a corresponding object in the source bucket and eliminate any orphaned objects. Orphans don’t have a source object of the same S3 key.

  3. This step performs the actual work. In the left branch, the CopySourceKeys step uses the copy_keys.py Lambda function to go through the list of source objects provided by the previous step, then copies any missing object into the destination bucket. Its sister step in the other branch, DeleteOrphanedKeys, uses its destination bucket key list to test whether each object from the destination bucket has a corresponding source object, then deletes any orphaned objects.

  4. The S3 ListObjects API action is designed to be scalable across many objects in a bucket. Therefore, it returns object lists in chunks of configurable size, along with a continuation token. If the API result has a continuation token, it means that there are more objects in this list. You can work from token to token to continue getting object list chunks, until you get no more continuation tokens.

By breaking down large amounts of work into chunks, you can make sure each chunk is completed within the timeframe allocated for the Lambda function, and within the maximum input/output data size for a Step Functions state.

This approach comes with a slight tradeoff: the more objects you process at one time in a given chunk, the faster you are done. There’s less overhead for managing individual chunks. On the other hand, if you process too many objects within the same chunk, you risk going over time and space limits of the processing Lambda function or the Step Functions state so the work cannot be completed.

In this particular case, use a Lambda function that maximizes the number of objects listed from the S3 bucket that can be stored in the input/output state data. This is currently up to 32,768 bytes, assuming (based on some experimentation) that the execution of the COPY/DELETE requests in the processing states can always complete in time.

A more sophisticated approach would use the Step Functions retry/catch state attributes to account for any time limits encountered and adjust the list size accordingly through some list site adjusting.

Step 6: Test for completion

Because the presence of a continuation token in the S3 ListObjects output signals that you are not done processing all objects yet, use a Choice state to test for its presence. If a continuation token exists, it branches into the UpdateSourceKeyList step, which uses the token to get to the next chunk of objects. If there is no token, you’re done. The state machine then branches into the FinishCopyBranch/FinishDeleteBranch state.

By using Choice states like this, you can create loops exactly like the old times, when you didn’t have for statements and used branches in assembly code instead!

Step 7: Success!

Finally, you’re done, and can step into your final Success state.

Lessons learned

When implementing this use case with Step Functions and Lambda, I learned the following things:

  • Sometimes, it is necessary to manipulate the JSON state of a Step Functions state machine with just a few lines of code that hardly seem to warrant their own Lambda function. This is ok, and the cost is actually pretty low given Lambda’s 100 millisecond billing granularity. The upside is that functions like these can be helpful to make the data more palatable for the following steps or for facilitating Choice states. An example here would be the combine_dicts.py function.
  • Pass states can be useful beyond debugging and tracing, they can be used to inject arbitrary values into your state JSON and guide generic Lambda functions into doing specific things.
  • Choice states are your friend because you can build while-loops with them. This allows you to reliably grind through large amounts of data with the patience of an engine that currently supports execution times of up to 1 year.

    Currently, there is an execution history limit of 25,000 events. Each Lambda task state execution takes up 5 events, while each choice state takes 2 events for a total of 7 events per loop. This means you can loop about 3500 times with this state machine. For even more scalability, you can split up work across multiple Step Functions executions through object key sharding or similar approaches.

  • It’s not necessary to spend a lot of time coding exception handling within your Lambda functions. You can delegate all exception handling to Step Functions and instead simplify your functions as much as possible.

  • Step Functions are great replacements for shell scripts. This could have been a shell script, but then I would have had to worry about where to execute it reliably, how to scale it if it went beyond a few thousand objects, etc. Think of Step Functions and Lambda as tools for scripting at a cloud level, beyond the boundaries of servers or containers. "Serverless" here also means "boundary-less".

Summary

This approach gives you scalability by breaking down any number of S3 objects into chunks, then using Step Functions to control logic to work through these objects in a scalable, serverless, and fully managed way.

To take a look at the code or tweak it for your own needs, use the code in the sync-buckets-state-machine GitHub repo.

To see more examples, please visit the Step Functions Getting Started page.

Enjoy!

Kotlin and Groovy JVM Languages with AWS Lambda

Post Syndicated from Juan Villa original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/kotlin-and-groovy-jvm-languages-with-aws-lambda/


Juan Villa – Partner Solutions Architect

 

When most people hear “Java” they think of Java the programming language. Java is a lot more than a programming language, it also implies a larger ecosystem including the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). Java, the programming language, is just one of the many languages that can be compiled to run on the JVM. Some of the most popular JVM languages, other than Java, are Clojure, Groovy, Scala, Kotlin, JRuby, and Jython (see this link for a list of more JVM languages).

Did you know that you can compile and subsequently run all these languages on AWS Lambda?

AWS Lambda supports the Java 8 runtime, but this does not mean you are limited to the Java language. The Java 8 runtime is capable of running JVM languages such as Kotlin and Groovy once they have been compiled and packaged as a “fat” JAR (a JAR file containing all necessary dependencies and classes bundled in).

In this blog post we’ll work through building AWS Lambda functions in both Kotlin and Groovy programming languages. To compile and package our projects we will use Gradle build tool.

To follow along, please clone the Git repository available at GitHub here. Also, I recommend using an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) such as JetBrain’s IntelliJ IDEA, this is the IDE I used while working on these projects.

Kotlin

Kotlin is a statically-typed JVM language designed and developed by JetBrains (one of our Amazon Partner Network Technology partners) and the open source community. Compared to Java the programming language, Kotlin has additional powerful language features such as: Data Classes, Default Arguments, Extensions, Elvis Operator, and Destructuring Declarations. This is a just a short list of Kotlin’s powerful language features. For a more thorough list of features, and how to use them, refer to the full documentation of the Kotlin language.

Let’s jump right into the code and see what an AWS Lambda function looks like in Kotlin.

package com.aws.blog.jvmlangs.kotlin

import java.io.*
import com.fasterxml.jackson.module.kotlin.*

data class HandlerInput(val who: String)
data class HandlerOutput(val message: String)

class Main {
    val mapper = jacksonObjectMapper()

    fun handler(input: InputStream, output: OutputStream): Unit {
        val inputObj = mapper.readValue<HandlerInput>(input)
        mapper.writeValue(output, HandlerOutput("Hello ${inputObj.who}"))
    }
}

The above example is a very simple Hello World application that accepts as an input a JSON object containing a key called “who” and returns a JSON object containing a key called “message” with a value of “Hello {who}”.

AWS Lambda does not support serializing JSON objects into Kotlin data classes, but don’t worry! AWS Lambda supports passing an input object as a Stream, and also supports an output Stream for returning a result (see this link for more information). Combined with the Input/Output Stream form of the handler function, we are using the Jackson library with a Kotlin extension function to support serialization and deserialization of Kotlin data class types.

To get started with this example, let’s first compile and package the Kotlin project.

git clone https://github.com/awslabs/lambda-kotlin-groovy-example
cd lambda-kotlin-groovy-example/kotlin
./gradlew shadowJar

Once packaged, a JAR file containing all necessary dependencies will be available at “build/libs/ jvmlangs-kotlin-1.0-SNAPSHOT-all.jar”. Now let’s deploy this package to AWS Lambda.

To deploy the lambda function, we will be using the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI). You can find information on how to set up the AWS CLI here. This tool allows you to set up and manage AWS services via the command line.

aws lambda create-function --region us-east-1 --function-name kotlin-hello \
--zip-file fileb://build/libs/jvmlangs-kotlin-1.0-SNAPSHOT-all.jar \
--role arn:aws:iam::<account_id>:role/lambda_basic_execution \
--handler com.aws.blog.jvmlangs.kotlin.Main::handler --runtime java8 \
--timeout 15 --memory-size 128

Once deployed, we can test the function by invoking the lambda function from the CLI.

aws lambda invoke --function-name kotlin-hello --payload '{"who": "AWS Fan"}' output.txt
cat output.txt

If successful, you’ll see an output of “{"message":"Hello AWS Fan"}”.

Groovy

Groovy is an optionally typed JVM language with both dynamic and static typing capabilities. Groovy is currently being supported by the Apache Software Foundation. Like Kotlin, Groovy also packs a lot of powerful features such as: Closures, Dynamic Typing, Collection Literals, String Interpolation, and Elvis Operator. This is just a short list, see the full documentation for a list of features and how to use them.

Once again, let’s jump right into the code.

package com.aws.blog.jvmlangs.groovy

class HandlerInput {
    String who
}
class HandlerOutput {
    String message
}

class Main {
    def handler(HandlerInput input) {
        return new HandlerOutput(message: "Hello ${input.who}")
    }
}

Just like the Kotlin example, we have defined a function that takes a simple JSON object containing a “who” key value and build a response containing a “message” key. Note that in this case we are not using the Input/Output Stream form of the handler function, but rather we are letting AWS Lambda serialize the input JSON object into the type HandlerInput. To accomplish this, AWS Lambda uses the Jackson library and handles the serialization for us.

Let’s go ahead and compile and package this Groovy example.

git clone https://github.com/awslabs/lambda-kotlin-groovy-example
cd lambda-kotlin-groovy-example/groovy
./gradlew shadowJar

Once packaged, a JAR file containing all necessary dependencies will be available at “build/libs/ jvmlangs-groovy-1.0-SNAPSHOT-all.jar”. Now let’s deploy this package to AWS Lambda.

aws lambda create-function --region us-east-1 --function-name groovy-hello \
--zip-file fileb://build/libs/jvmlangs-groovy-1.0-SNAPSHOT-all.jar \
--role arn:aws:iam::<account_id>:role/lambda_basic_execution \
--handler com.aws.blog.jvmlangs.groovy.Main::handler --runtime java8 \
--timeout 15 --memory-size 128

Once deployed, we can test the function by invoking the lambda function from the CLI.

aws lambda invoke --function-name groovy-hello --payload '{"who": "AWS Fan"}' output.txt
cat output.txt

If successful, you’ll see an output of “{"message":"Hello AWS Fan"}”.

Gradle Build Tool

Finally, let’s touch up on how we built the JAR package from the Kotlin and Groovy sources above. To build the JARs we used the Gradle build tool. Gradle builds a project by reading instructions from a file called “build.gradle”. This is a file written in Gradle’s Groovy Domain Specific Langauge (DSL). You can find more information on the gradle build file by looking at their documentation. Let’s take a look at the Gradle build files we used for this post.

For the Kotlin example, this is the build file we used.

buildscript {
    repositories {
        mavenCentral()
        jcenter()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath "org.jetbrains.kotlin:kotlin-gradle-plugin:$kotlin_version"
        classpath "com.github.jengelman.gradle.plugins:shadow:1.2.3"
    }
}

group 'com.aws.blog.jvmlangs.kotlin'
version '1.0-SNAPSHOT'

apply plugin: 'kotlin'
apply plugin: 'com.github.johnrengelman.shadow'

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
    compile "org.jetbrains.kotlin:kotlin-stdlib:$kotlin_version"
    compile "com.fasterxml.jackson.module:jackson-module-kotlin:2.8.2"
}

For the Groovy example this is the build file we used.

buildscript {
    repositories {
        jcenter()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath 'com.github.jengelman.gradle.plugins:shadow:1.2.3'
    }
}

group 'com.aws.blog.jvmlangs.groovy'
version '1.0-SNAPSHOT'

apply plugin: 'groovy'
apply plugin: 'com.github.johnrengelman.shadow'

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
    compile 'org.codehaus.groovy:groovy-all:2.3.11'
    testCompile group: 'junit', name: 'junit', version: '4.11'
}

As you can see, the build files for both Kotlin and Groovy files are very similar. For the Kotlin project we define a dependency on the Jackson Kotlin module. Also, for each respective language we include the language supporting libraries (kotlin-stdlib and groovy-all respectively).

In addition, you will notice that we are using a plugin called “shadow”. We use this plugin to package all the project dependencies into one JAR by using the Gradle task “shadowJar”. You can find more information on Shadow in their documentation.

Final Words

Don’t stop here though! Take a look at other JVM languages and get them running on AWS Lambda with the Java 8 runtime. Maybe start with Clojure? or Scala?

Also take a look AWS Lambda Java libraries provided by AWS. They provide interfaces and models to make handling events from event sources easier to handle.

Sci-Hub Ordered to Pay $15 Million in Piracy Damages

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/sci-hub-ordered-to-pay-15-million-in-piracy-damages-170623/

Two years ago, academic publisher Elsevier filed a complaint against Sci-Hub and several related “pirate” sites.

It accused the websites of making academic papers widely available to the public, without permission.

While Sci-Hub is nothing like the average pirate site, it is just as illegal according to Elsevier’s legal team, who obtained a preliminary injunction from a New York District Court last fall.

The injunction ordered Sci-Hub’s founder Alexandra Elbakyan to quit offering access to any Elsevier content. However, this didn’t happen.

Instead of taking Sci-Hub down, the lawsuit achieved the opposite. Sci-Hub grew bigger and bigger up to a point where its users were downloading hundreds of thousands of papers per day.

Although Elbakyan sent a letter to the court earlier, she opted not engage in the US lawsuit any further. The same is true for her fellow defendants, associated with Libgen. As a result, Elsevier asked the court for a default judgment and a permanent injunction which were issued this week.

Following a hearing on Wednesday, the Court awarded Elsevier $15,000,000 in damages, the maximum statutory amount for the 100 copyrighted works that were listed in the complaint. In addition, the injunction, through which Sci-Hub and LibGen lost several domain names, was made permanent.

Sci-Hub founder Alexandra Elbakyan says that even if she wanted to pay the millions of dollars in revenue, she doesn’t have the money to do so.

“The money project received and spent in about six years of its operation do not add up to 15 million,” Elbakyan tells torrentFreak.

“More interesting, Elsevier says: the Sci-Hub activity ’causes irreparable injury to Elsevier, its customers and the public’ and US court agreed. That feels like a perfect crime. If you want to cause an irreparable injury to American public, what do you have to do? Now we know the answer: establish a website where they can read research articles for free,” she adds.

Previously, Elbakyan already confirmed to us that, lawsuit or not, the site is not going anywhere.

“The Sci-Hub will continue as usual. In case of problems with the domain names, users can rely on TOR scihub22266oqcxt.onion,” Elbakyan added.

Sci-Hub is regularly referred to as the “Pirate Bay for science,” and based on the site’s resilience and its response to legal threats, it can certainly live up to this claim.

The Association of American Publishers (AAP) is happy with the outcome of the case.

“As the final judgment shows, the Court has not mistaken illegal activity for a public good,” AAP President and CEO Maria A. Pallante says.

“On the contrary, it has recognized the defendants’ operation for the flagrant and sweeping infringement that it really is and affirmed the critical role of copyright law in furthering scientific research and the public interest.”

Matt McKay, a spokesperson for the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM) in Oxford went even further, telling Nature that the site doesn’t offer any value to the scientific comunity.

“Sci-Hub does not add any value to the scholarly community. It neither fosters scientific advancement nor does it value researchers’ achievements. It is simply a place for someone to go to download stolen content and then leave.”

Hundreds of thousands of academics, who regularly use the site to download papers, might contest this though.

With no real prospect of recouping the damages and an ever-resilient Elbakyan, Elsevier’s legal battle could just be a win on paper. Sci-Hub and Libgen are not going anywhere, it seems, and the lawsuit has made them more popular than ever before.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

AWS Bill Simplification – Consolidated CloudWatch Charges

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-bill-simplification-consolidated-cloudwatch-charges/

The bill that you receive for your use of AWS in July will include a change in the way that Amazon CloudWatch charges are presented. The CloudWatch team made this change in order to make your bill simpler and easier to understand.

Consolidating Charges
In the past, charges for your usage of CloudWatch were split between two sections of your bill. For historical reasons, the charges for CloudWatch Alarms, CloudWatch Metrics, and calls to the CloudWatch API were reported in the Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) detail section, while charges for CloudWatch Logs and CloudWatch Dashboards were reported in the CloudWatch detail section, like this:

We have received feedback that splitting the charges across two sections of the bill made it difficult to locate and understand the entire set of monitoring charges. In order to address this issue, we are moving the charges that were formerly listed in the Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) detail section to the CloudWatch detail section. We are making the same change to the detailed billing report, moving the affected charges from the AmazonEC2 product code to the AmazonCloudWatch product code and changing to the AmazonCloudWatch product name. This change does not affect your overall bill; it simply consolidates all of the charges for the use of CloudWatch in one section.

Billing Metric
The CloudWatch billing metric named Estimated Charges can be viewed as a Total Estimated Charge, or broken down By Service:

The total will not change. However, as noted above, the charges that formerly had AmazonEC2 as the ServiceName dimension will now have it set to AmazonCloudWatch:

You may need to adjust thresholds on your billing alarms as a result:

Once again, your total AWS bill will not change. You will begin to see the consolidated charges for CloudWatch in your AWS bill for July 2017.

Jeff;

 

How to Create an AMI Builder with AWS CodeBuild and HashiCorp Packer – Part 2

Post Syndicated from Heitor Lessa original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/how-to-create-an-ami-builder-with-aws-codebuild-and-hashicorp-packer-part-2/

Written by AWS Solutions Architects Jason Barto and Heitor Lessa

 
In Part 1 of this post, we described how AWS CodeBuild, AWS CodeCommit, and HashiCorp Packer can be used to build an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) from the latest version of Amazon Linux. In this post, we show how to use AWS CodePipeline, AWS CloudFormation, and Amazon CloudWatch Events to continuously ship new AMIs. We use Ansible by Red Hat to harden the OS on the AMIs through a well-known set of security controls outlined by the Center for Internet Security in its CIS Amazon Linux Benchmark.

You’ll find the source code for this post in our GitHub repo.

At the end of this post, we will have the following architecture:

Requirements

 
To follow along, you will need Git and a text editor. Make sure Git is configured to work with AWS CodeCommit, as described in Part 1.

Technologies

 
In addition to the services and products used in Part 1 of this post, we also use these AWS services and third-party software:

AWS CloudFormation gives developers and systems administrators an easy way to create and manage a collection of related AWS resources, provisioning and updating them in an orderly and predictable fashion.

Amazon CloudWatch Events enables you to react selectively to events in the cloud and in your applications. Specifically, you can create CloudWatch Events rules that match event patterns, and take actions in response to those patterns.

AWS CodePipeline is a continuous integration and continuous delivery service for fast and reliable application and infrastructure updates. AWS CodePipeline builds, tests, and deploys your code every time there is a code change, based on release process models you define.

Amazon SNS is a fast, flexible, fully managed push notification service that lets you send individual messages or to fan out messages to large numbers of recipients. Amazon SNS makes it simple and cost-effective to send push notifications to mobile device users or email recipients. The service can even send messages to other distributed services.

Ansible is a simple IT automation system that handles configuration management, application deployment, cloud provisioning, ad-hoc task-execution, and multinode orchestration.

Getting Started

 
We use CloudFormation to bootstrap the following infrastructure:

Component Purpose
AWS CodeCommit repository Git repository where the AMI builder code is stored.
S3 bucket Build artifact repository used by AWS CodePipeline and AWS CodeBuild.
AWS CodeBuild project Executes the AWS CodeBuild instructions contained in the build specification file.
AWS CodePipeline pipeline Orchestrates the AMI build process, triggered by new changes in the AWS CodeCommit repository.
SNS topic Notifies subscribed email addresses when an AMI build is complete.
CloudWatch Events rule Defines how the AMI builder should send a custom event to notify an SNS topic.
Region AMI Builder Launch Template
N. Virginia (us-east-1)
Ireland (eu-west-1)

After launching the CloudFormation template linked here, we will have a pipeline in the AWS CodePipeline console. (Failed at this stage simply means we don’t have any data in our newly created AWS CodeCommit Git repository.)

Next, we will clone the newly created AWS CodeCommit repository.

If this is your first time connecting to a AWS CodeCommit repository, please see instructions in our documentation on Setup steps for HTTPS Connections to AWS CodeCommit Repositories.

To clone the AWS CodeCommit repository (console)

  1. From the AWS Management Console, open the AWS CloudFormation console.
  2. Choose the AMI-Builder-Blogpost stack, and then choose Output.
  3. Make a note of the Git repository URL.
  4. Use git to clone the repository.

For example: git clone https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/AMI-Builder_repo

To clone the AWS CodeCommit repository (CLI)

# Retrieve CodeCommit repo URL
git_repo=$(aws cloudformation describe-stacks --query 'Stacks[0].Outputs[?OutputKey==`GitRepository`].OutputValue' --output text --stack-name "AMI-Builder-Blogpost")

# Clone repository locally
git clone ${git_repo}

Bootstrap the Repo with the AMI Builder Structure

 
Now that our infrastructure is ready, download all the files and templates required to build the AMI.

Your local Git repo should have the following structure:

.
├── ami_builder_event.json
├── ansible
├── buildspec.yml
├── cloudformation
├── packer_cis.json

Next, push these changes to AWS CodeCommit, and then let AWS CodePipeline orchestrate the creation of the AMI:

git add .
git commit -m "My first AMI"
git push origin master

AWS CodeBuild Implementation Details

 
While we wait for the AMI to be created, let’s see what’s changed in our AWS CodeBuild buildspec.yml file:

...
phases:
  ...
  build:
    commands:
      ...
      - ./packer build -color=false packer_cis.json | tee build.log
  post_build:
    commands:
      - egrep "${AWS_REGION}\:\sami\-" build.log | cut -d' ' -f2 > ami_id.txt
      # Packer doesn't return non-zero status; we must do that if Packer build failed
      - test -s ami_id.txt || exit 1
      - sed -i.bak "s/<<AMI-ID>>/$(cat ami_id.txt)/g" ami_builder_event.json
      - aws events put-events --entries file://ami_builder_event.json
      ...
artifacts:
  files:
    - ami_builder_event.json
    - build.log
  discard-paths: yes

In the build phase, we capture Packer output into a file named build.log. In the post_build phase, we take the following actions:

  1. Look up the AMI ID created by Packer and save its findings to a temporary file (ami_id.txt).
  2. Forcefully make AWS CodeBuild to fail if the AMI ID (ami_id.txt) is not found. This is required because Packer doesn’t fail if something goes wrong during the AMI creation process. We have to tell AWS CodeBuild to stop by informing it that an error occurred.
  3. If an AMI ID is found, we update the ami_builder_event.json file and then notify CloudWatch Events that the AMI creation process is complete.
  4. CloudWatch Events publishes a message to an SNS topic. Anyone subscribed to the topic will be notified in email that an AMI has been created.

Lastly, the new artifacts phase instructs AWS CodeBuild to upload files built during the build process (ami_builder_event.json and build.log) to the S3 bucket specified in the Outputs section of the CloudFormation template. These artifacts can then be used as an input artifact in any later stage in AWS CodePipeline.

For information about customizing the artifacts sequence of the buildspec.yml, see the Build Specification Reference for AWS CodeBuild.

CloudWatch Events Implementation Details

 
CloudWatch Events allow you to extend the AMI builder to not only send email after the AMI has been created, but to hook up any of the supported targets to react to the AMI builder event. This event publication means you can decouple from Packer actions you might take after AMI completion and plug in other actions, as you see fit.

For more information about targets in CloudWatch Events, see the CloudWatch Events API Reference.

In this case, CloudWatch Events should receive the following event, match it with a rule we created through CloudFormation, and publish a message to SNS so that you can receive an email.

Example CloudWatch custom event

[
        {
            "Source": "com.ami.builder",
            "DetailType": "AmiBuilder",
            "Detail": "{ \"AmiStatus\": \"Created\"}",
            "Resources": [ "ami-12cd5guf" ]
        }
]

Cloudwatch Events rule

{
  "detail-type": [
    "AmiBuilder"
  ],
  "source": [
    "com.ami.builder"
  ],
  "detail": {
    "AmiStatus": [
      "Created"
    ]
  }
}

Example SNS message sent in email

{
    "version": "0",
    "id": "f8bdede0-b9d7...",
    "detail-type": "AmiBuilder",
    "source": "com.ami.builder",
    "account": "<<aws_account_number>>",
    "time": "2017-04-28T17:56:40Z",
    "region": "eu-west-1",
    "resources": ["ami-112cd5guf "],
    "detail": {
        "AmiStatus": "Created"
    }
}

Packer Implementation Details

 
In addition to the build specification file, there are differences between the current version of the HashiCorp Packer template (packer_cis.json) and the one used in Part 1.

Variables

  "variables": {
    "vpc": "{{env `BUILD_VPC_ID`}}",
    "subnet": "{{env `BUILD_SUBNET_ID`}}",
         “ami_name”: “Prod-CIS-Latest-AMZN-{{isotime \”02-Jan-06 03_04_05\”}}”
  },
  • ami_name: Prefixes a name used by Packer to tag resources during the Builders sequence.
  • vpc and subnet: Environment variables defined by the CloudFormation stack parameters.

We no longer assume a default VPC is present and instead use the VPC and subnet specified in the CloudFormation parameters. CloudFormation configures the AWS CodeBuild project to use these values as environment variables. They are made available throughout the build process.

That allows for more flexibility should you need to change which VPC and subnet will be used by Packer to launch temporary resources.

Builders

  "builders": [{
    ...
    "ami_name": “{{user `ami_name`| clean_ami_name}}”,
    "tags": {
      "Name": “{{user `ami_name`}}”,
    },
    "run_tags": {
      "Name": “{{user `ami_name`}}",
    },
    "run_volume_tags": {
      "Name": “{{user `ami_name`}}",
    },
    "snapshot_tags": {
      "Name": “{{user `ami_name`}}",
    },
    ...
    "vpc_id": "{{user `vpc` }}",
    "subnet_id": "{{user `subnet` }}"
  }],

We now have new properties (*_tag) and a new function (clean_ami_name) and launch temporary resources in a VPC and subnet specified in the environment variables. AMI names can only contain a certain set of ASCII characters. If the input in project deviates from the expected characters (for example, includes whitespace or slashes), Packer’s clean_ami_name function will fix it.

For more information, see functions on the HashiCorp Packer website.

Provisioners

  "provisioners": [
    {
        "type": "shell",
        "inline": [
            "sudo pip install ansible"
        ]
    }, 
    {
        "type": "ansible-local",
        "playbook_file": "ansible/playbook.yaml",
        "role_paths": [
            "ansible/roles/common"
        ],
        "playbook_dir": "ansible",
        "galaxy_file": "ansible/requirements.yaml"
    },
    {
      "type": "shell",
      "inline": [
        "rm .ssh/authorized_keys ; sudo rm /root/.ssh/authorized_keys"
      ]
    }

We used shell provisioner to apply OS patches in Part 1. Now, we use shell to install Ansible on the target machine and ansible-local to import, install, and execute Ansible roles to make our target machine conform to our standards.

Packer uses shell to remove temporary keys before it creates an AMI from the target and temporary EC2 instance.

Ansible Implementation Details

 
Ansible provides OS patching through a custom Common role that can be easily customized for other tasks.

CIS Benchmark and Cloudwatch Logs are implemented through two Ansible third-party roles that are defined in ansible/requirements.yaml as seen in the Packer template.

The Ansible provisioner uses Ansible Galaxy to download these roles onto the target machine and execute them as instructed by ansible/playbook.yaml.

For information about how these components are organized, see the Playbook Roles and Include Statements in the Ansible documentation.

The following Ansible playbook (ansible</playbook.yaml) controls the execution order and custom properties:

---
- hosts: localhost
  connection: local
  gather_facts: true    # gather OS info that is made available for tasks/roles
  become: yes           # majority of CIS tasks require root
  vars:
    # CIS Controls whitepaper:  http://bit.ly/2mGAmUc
    # AWS CIS Whitepaper:       http://bit.ly/2m2Ovrh
    cis_level_1_exclusions:
    # 3.4.2 and 3.4.3 effectively blocks access to all ports to the machine
    ## This can break automation; ignoring it as there are stronger mechanisms than that
      - 3.4.2 
      - 3.4.3
    # CloudWatch Logs will be used instead of Rsyslog/Syslog-ng
    ## Same would be true if any other software doesn't support Rsyslog/Syslog-ng mechanisms
      - 4.2.1.4
      - 4.2.2.4
      - 4.2.2.5
    # Autofs is not installed in newer versions, let's ignore
      - 1.1.19
    # Cloudwatch Logs role configuration
    logs:
      - file: /var/log/messages
        group_name: "system_logs"
  roles:
    - common
    - anthcourtney.cis-amazon-linux
    - dharrisio.aws-cloudwatch-logs-agent

Both third-party Ansible roles can be easily configured through variables (vars). We use Ansible playbook variables to exclude CIS controls that don’t apply to our case and to instruct the CloudWatch Logs agent to stream the /var/log/messages log file to CloudWatch Logs.

If you need to add more OS or application logs, you can easily duplicate the playbook and make changes. The CloudWatch Logs agent will ship configured log messages to CloudWatch Logs.

For more information about parameters you can use to further customize third-party roles, download Ansible roles for the Cloudwatch Logs Agent and CIS Amazon Linux from the Galaxy website.

Committing Changes

 
Now that Ansible and CloudWatch Events are configured as a part of the build process, commiting any changes to the AWS CodeComit Git Repository will triger a new AMI build process that can be followed through the AWS CodePipeline console.

When the build is complete, an email will be sent to the email address you provided as a part of the CloudFormation stack deployment. The email serves as notification that an AMI has been built and is ready for use.

Summary

 
We used AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeBuild, Packer, and Ansible to build a pipeline that continuously builds new, hardened CIS AMIs. We used Amazon SNS so that email addresses subscribed to a SNS topic are notified upon completion of the AMI build.

By treating our AMI creation process as code, we can iterate and track changes over time. In this way, it’s no different from a software development workflow. With that in mind, software patches, OS configuration, and logs that need to be shipped to a central location are only a git commit away.

Next Steps

 
Here are some ideas to extend this AMI builder:

  • Hook up a Lambda function in Cloudwatch Events to update EC2 Auto Scaling configuration upon completion of the AMI build.
  • Use AWS CodePipeline parallel steps to build multiple Packer images.
  • Add a commit ID as a tag for the AMI you created.
  • Create a scheduled Lambda function through Cloudwatch Events to clean up old AMIs based on timestamp (name or additional tag).
  • Implement Windows support for the AMI builder.
  • Create a cross-account or cross-region AMI build.

Cloudwatch Events allow the AMI builder to decouple AMI configuration and creation so that you can easily add your own logic using targets (AWS Lambda, Amazon SQS, Amazon SNS) to add events or recycle EC2 instances with the new AMI.

If you have questions or other feedback, feel free to leave it in the comments or contribute to the AMI Builder repo on GitHub.

DynamoDB Accelerator (DAX) Now Generally Available

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/dynamodb-accelerator-dax-now-generally-available/

Earlier this year I told you about Amazon DynamoDB Accelerator (DAX), a fully-managed caching service that sits in front of (logically speaking) your Amazon DynamoDB tables. DAX returns cached responses in microseconds, making it a great fit for eventually-consistent read-intensive workloads. DAX supports the DynamoDB API, and is seamless and easy to use. As a managed service, you simply create your DAX cluster and use it as the target for your existing reads and writes. You don’t have to worry about patching, cluster maintenance, replication, or fault management.

Now Generally Available
Today I am pleased to announce that DAX is now generally available. We have expanded DAX into additional AWS Regions and used the preview time to fine-tune performance and availability:

Now in Five Regions – DAX is now available in the US East (Northern Virginia), EU (Ireland), US West (Oregon), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), and US West (Northern California) Regions.

In Production – Our preview customers are reporting that they are using DAX in production, that they loved how easy it was to add DAX to their application, and have told us that their apps are now running 10x faster.

Getting Started with DAX
As I outlined in my earlier post, it is easy to use DAX to accelerate your existing DynamoDB applications. You simply create a DAX cluster in the desired region, update your application to reference the DAX SDK for Java (the calls are the same; this is a drop-in replacement), and configure the SDK to use the endpoint to your cluster. As a read-through/write-through cache, DAX seamlessly handles all of the DynamoDB read/write APIs.

We are working on SDK support for other languages, and I will share additional information as it becomes available.

DAX Pricing
You pay for each node in the cluster (see the DynamoDB Pricing page for more information) on a per-hour basis, with prices starting at $0.269 per hour in the US East (Northern Virginia) and US West (Oregon) regions. With DAX, each of the nodes in your cluster serves as a read target and as a failover target for high availability. The DAX SDK is cluster aware and will issue round-robin requests to all nodes in the cluster so that you get to make full use of the cluster’s cache resources.

Because DAX can easily handle sudden spikes in read traffic, you may be able to reduce the amount of provisioned throughput for your tables, resulting in an overall cost savings while still returning results in microseconds.

Jeff;

 

Protect Web Sites & Services Using Rate-Based Rules for AWS WAF

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/protect-web-sites-services-using-rate-based-rules-for-aws-waf/

AWS WAF (Web Application Firewall) helps to protect your application from many different types of application-layer attacks that involve requests that are malicious or malformed. As I showed you when I first wrote about this service (New – AWS WAF), you can define rules that match cross-site scripting, IP address, SQL injection, size, or content constraints:

When incoming requests match rules, actions are invoked. Actions can either allow, block, or simply count matches.

The existing rule model is powerful and gives you the ability to detect and respond to many different types of attacks. It does not, however, allow you to respond to attacks that simply consist of a large number of otherwise valid requests from a particular IP address. These requests might be a web-layer DDoS attack, a brute-force login attempt, or even a partner integration gone awry.

New Rate-Based Rules
Today we are adding Rate-based Rules to WAF, giving you control of when IP addresses are added to and removed from a blacklist, along with the flexibility to handle exceptions and special cases:

Blacklisting IP Addresses – You can blacklist IP addresses that make requests at a rate that exceeds a configured threshold rate.

IP Address Tracking– You can see which IP addresses are currently blacklisted.

IP Address Removal – IP addresses that have been blacklisted are automatically removed when they no longer make requests at a rate above the configured threshold.

IP Address Exemption – You can exempt certain IP addresses from blacklisting by using an IP address whitelist inside of the a rate-based rule. For example, you might want to allow trusted partners to access your site at a higher rate.

Monitoring & Alarming – You can watch and alarm on CloudWatch metrics that are published for each rule.

You can combine new Rate-based Rules with WAF Conditions to implement sophisticated rate-limiting strategies. For example, you could use a Rate-based Rule and a WAF Condition that matches your login pages. This would allow you to impose a modest threshold on your login pages (to avoid brute-force password attacks) and allow a more generous one on your marketing or system status pages.

Thresholds are defined in terms of the number of incoming requests from a single IP address within a 5 minute period. Once this threshold is breached, additional requests from the IP address are blocked until the request rate falls below the threshold.

Using Rate-Based Rules
Here’s how you would define a Rate-based Rule that protects the /login portion of your site. Start by defining a WAF condition that matches the desired string in the URI of the page:

Then use this condition to define a Rate-based Rule (the rate limit is expressed in terms of requests within a 5 minute interval, but the blacklisting goes in to effect as soon as the limit is breached):

With the condition and the rule in place, create a Web ACL (ProtectLoginACL) to bring it all together and to attach it to the AWS resource (a CloudFront distribution in this case):

Then attach the rule (ProtectLogin) to the Web ACL:

The resource is now protected in accord with the rule and the web ACL. You can monitor the associated CloudWatch metrics (ProtectLogin and ProtectLoginACL in this case). You could even create CloudWatch Alarms and use them to fire Lambda functions when a protection threshold is breached. The code could examine the offending IP address and make a complex, business-driven decision, perhaps adding a whitelisting rule that gives an extra-generous allowance to a trusted partner or to a user with a special payment plan.

Available Now
The new, Rate-based Rules are available now and you can start using them today! Rate-based rules are priced the same as Regular rules; see the WAF Pricing page for more info.

Jeff;

MPAA & RIAA Demand Tough Copyright Standards in NAFTA Negotiations

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/mpaa-riaa-demand-tough-copyright-standards-in-nafta-negotiations-170621/

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between the United States, Canada, and Mexico was negotiated more than 25 years ago. With a quarter of a decade of developments to contend with, the United States wants to modernize.

“While our economy and U.S. businesses have changed considerably over that period, NAFTA has not,” the government says.

With this in mind, the US requested comments from interested parties seeking direction for negotiation points. With those comments now in, groups like the MPAA and RIAA have been making their positions known. It’s no surprise that intellectual property enforcement is high on the agenda.

“Copyright is the lifeblood of the U.S. motion picture and television industry. As such, MPAA places high priority on securing strong protection and enforcement disciplines in the intellectual property chapters of trade agreements,” the MPAA writes in its submission.

“Strong IPR protection and enforcement are critical trade priorities for the music industry. With IPR, we can create good jobs, make significant contributions to U.S. economic growth and security, invest in artists and their creativity, and drive technological innovation,” the RIAA notes.

While both groups have numerous demands, it’s clear that each seeks an environment where not only infringers can be held liable, but also Internet platforms and services.

For the RIAA, there is a big focus on the so-called ‘Value Gap’, a phenomenon found on user-uploaded content sites like YouTube that are able to offer infringing content while avoiding liability due to Section 512 of the DMCA.

“Today, user-uploaded content services, which have developed sophisticated on-demand music platforms, use this as a shield to avoid licensing music on fair terms like other digital services, claiming they are not legally responsible for the music they distribute on their site,” the RIAA writes.

“Services such as Apple Music, TIDAL, Amazon, and Spotify are forced to compete with services that claim they are not liable for the music they distribute.”

But if sites like YouTube are exercising their rights while acting legally under current US law, how can partners Canada and Mexico do any better? For the RIAA, that can be achieved by holding them to standards envisioned by the group when the DMCA was passed, not how things have panned out since.

Demanding that negotiators “protect the original intent” of safe harbor, the RIAA asks that a “high-level and high-standard service provider liability provision” is pursued. This, the music group says, should only be available to “passive intermediaries without requisite knowledge of the infringement on their platforms, and inapplicable to services actively engaged in communicating to the public.”

In other words, make sure that YouTube and similar sites won’t enjoy the same level of safe harbor protection as they do today.

The RIAA also requires any negotiated safe harbor provisions in NAFTA to be flexible in the event that the DMCA is tightened up in response to the ongoing safe harbor rules study.

In any event, NAFTA should not “support interpretations that no longer reflect today’s digital economy and threaten the future of legitimate and sustainable digital trade,” the RIAA states.

For the MPAA, Section 512 is also perceived as a problem. While noting that the original intent was to foster a system of shared responsibility between copyright owners and service providers, the MPAA says courts have subsequently let copyright holders down. Like the RIAA, the MPAA also suggests that Canada and Mexico can be held to higher standards.

“We recommend a new approach to this important trade policy provision by moving to high-level language that establishes intermediary liability and appropriate limitations on liability. This would be fully consistent with U.S. law and avoid the same misinterpretations by policymakers and courts overseas,” the MPAA writes.

“In so doing, a modernized NAFTA would be consistent with Trade Promotion Authority’s negotiating objective of ‘ensuring that standards of protection and enforcement keep pace with technological developments’.”

The MPAA also has some specific problems with Mexico, including unauthorized camcording. The Hollywood group says that 85 illicit audio and video recordings of films were linked to Mexican theaters in 2016. However, recording is not currently a criminal offense in Mexico.

Another issue for the MPAA is that criminal sanctions for commercial scale infringement are only available if the infringement is for profit.

“This has hampered enforcement against the above-discussed camcording problem but also against online infringement, such as peer-to-peer piracy, that may be on a scale that is immensely harmful to U.S. rightsholders but nonetheless occur without profit by the infringer,” the MPAA writes.

“The modernized NAFTA like other U.S. bilateral free trade agreements must provide for criminal sanctions against commercial scale infringements without proof of profit motive.”

Also of interest are the MPAA’s complaints against Mexico’s telecoms laws. Unlike in the US and many countries in Europe, Mexico’s ISPs are forbidden to hand out their customers’ personal details to rights holders looking to sue. This, the MPAA says, needs to change.

The submissions from the RIAA and MPAA can be found here and here (pdf)

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

The Dangers of Secret Law

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/06/the_dangers_of_.html

Last week, the Department of Justice released 18 new FISC opinions related to Section 702 as part of an EFF FOIA lawsuit. (Of course, they don’t mention EFF or the lawsuit. They make it sound as if it was their idea.)

There’s probably a lot in these opinions. In one Kafkaesque ruling, a defendant was denied access to the previous court rulings that were used by the court to decide against it:

…in 2014, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) rejected a service provider’s request to obtain other FISC opinions that government attorneys had cited and relied on in court filings seeking to compel the provider’s cooperation.

[…]

The provider’s request came up amid legal briefing by both it and the DOJ concerning its challenge to a 702 order. After the DOJ cited two earlier FISC opinions that were not public at the time — one from 2014 and another from 2008­ — the provider asked the court for access to those rulings.

The provider argued that without being able to review the previous FISC rulings, it could not fully understand the court’s earlier decisions, much less effectively respond to DOJ’s argument. The provider also argued that because attorneys with Top Secret security clearances represented it, they could review the rulings without posing a risk to national security.

The court disagreed in several respects. It found that the court’s rules and Section 702 prohibited the documents release. It also rejected the provider’s claim that the Constitution’s Due Process Clause entitled it to the documents.

This kind of government secrecy is toxic to democracy. National security is important, but we will not survive if we become a country of secret court orders based on secret interpretations of secret law.

Court Grants Subpoenas to Unmask ‘TVAddons’ and ‘ZemTV’ Operators

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/court-grants-subpoenas-to-unmask-tvaddons-and-zemtv-operators-170621/

Earlier this month we broke the news that third-party Kodi add-on ZemTV and the TVAddons library were being sued in a federal court in Texas.

In a complaint filed by American satellite and broadcast provider Dish Network, both stand accused of copyright infringement, facing up to $150,000 for each offense.

While the allegations are serious, Dish doesn’t know the full identities of the defendants.

To find out more, the company requested a broad range of subpoenas from the court, targeting Amazon, Github, Google, Twitter, Facebook, PayPal, and several hosting providers.

From Dish’s request

This week the court granted the subpoenas, which means that they can be forwarded to the companies in question. Whether that will be enough to identify the people behind ‘TVAddons’ and ‘ZemTV’ remains to be seen, but Dish has cast its net wide.

For example, the subpoena directed at Google covers any type of information that can be used to identify the account holder of [email protected], which is believed to be tied to ZemTV.

The information requested from Google includes IP address logs with session date and timestamps, but also covers “all communications,” including GChat messages from 2014 onwards.

Similarly, Twitter is required to hand over information tied to the accounts of the users “TV Addons” and “shani_08_kodi” as well as other accounts linked to tvaddons.ag and streamingboxes.com. This also applies the various tweets that were sent through the account.

The subpoena specifically mentions “all communications, including ‘tweets’, Twitter sent to or received from each Twitter Account during the time period of February 1, 2014 to present.”

From the Twitter subpoena

Similar subpoenas were granted for the other services, tailored towards the information Dish hopes to find there. For example, the broadcast provider also requests details of each transaction from PayPal, as well as all debits and credits to the accounts.

In some parts, the subpoenas appear to be quite broad. PayPal is asked to reveal information on any account with the credit card statement “Shani,” for example. Similarly, Github is required to hand over information on accounts that are ‘associated’ with the tvaddons.ag domain, which is referenced by many people who are not directly connected to the site.

The service providers in question still have the option to challenge the subpoenas or ask the court for further clarification. A full overview of all the subpoena requests is available here (Exhibit 2 and onwards), including all the relevant details. This also includes several letters to foreign hosting providers.

While Dish still appears to be keen to find out who is behind ‘TVAddons’ and ‘ZemTV,’ not much has been heard from the defendants in question.

ZemTV developer “Shani” shut down his addon soon after the lawsuit was announced, without mentioning it specifically. TVAddons, meanwhile, has been offline for well over a week, without any notice in public about the reason for the prolonged downtime.

The court’s order granting the subpoenas and letters of request is available here (pdf).

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

In the Works – AWS Region in Hong Kong

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/in-the-works-aws-region-in-hong-kong/

Last year we launched new AWS Regions in Canada, India, Korea, the UK (London), and the United States (Ohio), and announced that new regions are coming to France (Paris), China (Ningxia), and Sweden (Stockholm).

Coming to Hong Kong in 2018
Today, I am happy to be able to tell you that we are planning to open up an AWS Region in Hong Kong, in 2018. Hong Kong is a leading international financial center, well known for its service oriented economy. It is rated highly on innovation and for ease of doing business. As an evangelist, I get to visit many great cities in the world, and was lucky to have spent some time in Hong Kong back in 2014 and met a number of awesome customers there. Many of these customers have given us feedback that they wanted a local AWS Region.

This will be the eighth AWS Region in Asia Pacific joining six other Regions there — Singapore, Tokyo, Sydney, Beijing, Seoul, and Mumbai, and an additional Region in China (Ningxia) expected to launch in the coming months. Together, these Regions will provide our customers with a total of 19 Availability Zones (AZs) and allow them to architect highly fault tolerant applications.

Today, our infrastructure comprises 43 Availability Zones across 16 geographic regions worldwide, with another three AWS Regions (and eight Availability Zones) in France, China, and Sweden coming online throughout 2017 and 2018, (see the AWS Global Infrastructure page for more info).

We are looking forward to serving new and existing customers in Hong Kong and working with partners across Asia-Pacific. Of course, the new region will also be open to existing AWS customers who would like to process and store data in Hong Kong. Public sector organizations such as government agencies, educational institutions, and nonprofits in Hong Kong will be able to use this region to store sensitive data locally (the AWS in the Public Sector page has plenty of success stories drawn from our worldwide customer base).

If you are a customer or a partner and have specific questions about this Region, you can contact our Hong Kong team.

Help Wanted
If you are interested in learning more about AWS positions in Hong Kong, please visit the Amazon Jobs site and set the location to Hong Kong.

Jeff;