All posts by corbet

Krita 3.1 released

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/709171/rss

Version 3.1 of the
Krita image editor
is available. “Krita 3.1 is the result of
half a year of intense work and contains many new features, performance
improvements and bug fixes. It’s now possible to use render animations
(using ffmpeg) to gif or various video formats. You can use a curve editor
to animate properties. Soft-proofing was added for seeing how your artwork
will look in print. A new color picker that allows selecting wide-gamut
colors. There is also a new brush engine that paints fast on large
canvases, a stop-based gradient editor.
” See the release
notes
for more information.

[$] AMD’s Display Core difficulties

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/708891/rss

Back in 2007, the announcement that AMD
intended to reverse its longstanding position and create an upstream driver
for its graphics processors was joyfully received by Linux users
worldwide. As 2017 approaches, an attempt by AMD to merge a driver for an
upcoming graphics chip has been rejected by the kernel’s graphics subsystem
maintainer — a decision that engendered rather less joy. A look at this
discussion reveals a pattern seen many times before; the
positions and decisions taken can seem arbitrary to the wider world but they
are not without their reasons and will, hopefully, lead to a better kernel
in the long run.

The 4.9 kernel has been released

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/708765/rss

Linus has released the 4.9 kernel, as
expected. Some of the headline features in 4.9 include
improved security with virtually mapped kernel
stacks
,
the memory-protection keys system calls,
the BBR congestion-control algorithm,
support for the Greybus bus architecture,
shared extents in the XFS filesystem (which will be used to support
lightweight copy operations among other things),
and much more.
The code name has also been changed to “Roaring Lionus”.
In the end, 16,216 non-merge changesets were pulled for the 4.9 release,
making this development cycle the busiest ever by far.

[$] Maintainerless Debian?

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/708163/rss

The maintainer model is deeply ingrained into the culture of the
free-software community; for any bit of code, there is usually a developer
(or a small group of developers) charged with that code’s maintenance.
Good maintainers can help a project run smoothly, while poor maintainers
can run things into the ground. What is to be done to save a project with
the latter type of maintainer? Forking can be an option in some cases
but, in many others, it’s not a practical alternative. The Debian project
is currently
discussing its approach to bad maintainers — a discussion which has taken a
surprising turn.

Bottomley: Using Your TPM as a Secure Key Store

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/708162/rss

James Bottomley has posted a
tutorial
on using the trusted platform module to store cryptographic
keys. “The main thing that came out of this discussion was that a
lot of this stack complexity can be hidden from users and we should
concentrate on making the TPM ‘just work’ for all cryptographic functions
where we have parallels in the existing security layers (like the
keystore). One of the great advantages of the TPM, instead of messing
about with USB pkcs11 tokens, is that it has a file format for TPM keys
(I’ll explain this later) which can be used directly in place of standard
private key files.

Google’s OSS-Fuzz project

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/707869/rss

The Google security blog announces
the OSS-Fuzz project, which performs continuous fuzz testing of
free-software project repositories. “OSS-Fuzz has already found 150
bugs in several widely used open source projects (and churns ~4 trillion
test cases a week). With your help, we can make fuzzing a standard part of
open source development, and work with the broader community of developers
and security testers to ensure that bugs in critical open source
applications, libraries, and APIs are discovered and fixed.

Ardour 5.5 released

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/707868/rss

Version 5.5 of the Ardour
audio editor
has been released. “Among the notable new features
are support for VST 2.4 plugins on OS X, the ability to have MIDI input
follow MIDI track selection, support for Steinberg CC121, Avid Artist &
Artist Mix Control surfaces, ‘fanning out’ of instrument outputs to new
tracks/busses and the often requested ability to do horizontal zoom via
vertical dragging on the rulers.

[$] The Emacs dumper dispute

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/707615/rss

As covered here in January, changes to the
GNU C Library’s memory-allocation routines have broken the “unexec” method
used to build the Emacs editor. Fixing this problem has proved to be more
challenging than originally thought; that issue has now come to a head in a
disagreement that could cost the Emacs community one of its maintainers.

Welte: Ten years anniversary of Openmoko

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/707457/rss

Harald Welte looks
back at the Openmoko phone
with a ten-year perspective (and an almost
unreadable low-contrast web page). “So yes, the smartphone world is
much more restricted, locked-down and proprietary than it was back in the
Openmoko days. If we had been more successful then, that world might be
quite different today. It was a lost opportunity to make the world embrace
more freedom in terms of software and hardware.

What’s new in Fedora 25 Workstation (Fedora Magazine)

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/707056/rss

Fedora Magazine has a brief
overview
of the changes to be found in the workstation version of the
Fedora 25 release. “Wayland now replaces the old X11 display
server by default. Its goal is to provide a smoother, richer experience
when navigating Fedora Workstation. Like all software, there may still be
some bugs. You can still choose the old X11 server if required.

Kernel prepatch 4.6-rc6

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/706923/rss

Linus has released the 4.9-rc6 kernel
prepatch for testing. “We’re getting further in the rc series, and
while things have stayed pretty calm, I’m not sure if we’re quite there
yet. There’s a few outstanding issues that just shouldn’t be issues at rc6
time, so we’ll just have to see. This may be one of those releases that
have an rc8, which considering the size of 4.9 is perhaps not that
unusual.

Kernel prepatch 4.9-rc6

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/706923/rss

Linus has released the 4.9-rc6 kernel
prepatch for testing. “We’re getting further in the rc series, and
while things have stayed pretty calm, I’m not sure if we’re quite there
yet. There’s a few outstanding issues that just shouldn’t be issues at rc6
time, so we’ll just have to see. This may be one of those releases that
have an rc8, which considering the size of 4.9 is perhaps not that
unusual.