All posts by jake

[$] Mentoring and diversity for Python

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/757715/rss

A two-part session at the 2018 Python Language Summit tackled the core
developer diversity problem from two different angles. Victor Stinner
outlined some work he has been doing to mentor new developers on their path
toward joining the core development ranks; he has also been trying to
document that path. Mariatta Wijaya gave a very personal talk that
described the diversity problem while also providing some concrete action
items that the project and individuals could take to help make Python more
welcoming to minorities.

[$] Getting along in the Python community

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/757714/rss

In a session with a title that used a common misquote of Rodney
King (“can’t we all just get along?”), several
Python developers wanted to discuss an incident that had recently occurred
on the
python-dev mailing list. A rude posting to the list led to a thread that
got somewhat out of control. Some short tempers among the members of the
Python developer community likely escalated things unnecessarily. The
incident in question was brought up as something of an object lesson;
people should take some time to simmer down before firing off that quick,
but perhaps needlessly confrontational, reply.

[$] PEP 572 and decision-making in Python

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/757713/rss

The “PEP 572 mess” was the topic of a 2018 Python Language Summit session
led by benevolent dictator for life (BDFL) Guido van Rossum. PEP 572 seeks to add
assignment expressions (or “inline assignments”) to the language, but it
has seen a prolonged
discussion over multiple huge threads on the python-dev mailing list—even
after multiple rounds on python-ideas.
Those threads were often contentious and were clearly voluminous to the
point where many probably just tuned them out.
At the summit, Van Rossum gave an overview of the
feature proposal, which he seems inclined toward accepting, but he also
wanted to
discuss how to avoid this kind of thread explosion in the future.

[$] Python virtual environments

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/757354/rss

In a short session at the 2018 Python Language Summit, Steve Dower brought
up the shortcomings of Python virtual environments,
which are meant to create isolated installations of the language and its
modules. He said his presentation was “co-written with Twitter” and,
indeed, most of his slides were of tweets. At the end, he also slipped in an
announcement of his plans for hosting a core development sprint in September.

[$] XArray and the mainline

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/757342/rss

The XArray data structure was the topic of
the final filesystem track session at the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem,
and Memory-Management Summit (LSFMM). XArray is a new API for the kernel’s
radix-tree data structure; the session was
led by Matthew Wilcox, who created XArray. When asked by Dave Chinner if
the session was intended to be a live review of the patches, Wilcox
admitted with a grin that it might be “the only way to get a review on this
damn patch set”.

[$] Filesystem test suites

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/757239/rss

While the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit
(LSFMM) filesystem track session was advertised as being a
filesystem test suite
“bakeoff”, it actually focused on how to make the existing test suites more
accessible. Kent Overstreet said that he has learned over the
years that various filesystem developers have their own scripts for testing
using QEMU and other tools. He and Ted Ts’o put the session together to
try to share some of that information (and code) more widely.

[$] Messiness in removing directories

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/757122/rss

In the filesystem track at the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and
Memory-Management Summit (LSFMM), Al Viro discussed some problems he has
recently spotted in the implementation of rmdir().
He covered some of the history of that implementation and how things got to
where they are now. He also described areas that needed to be checked
because the problem may be present in different places in multiple filesystems.

[$] Handling I/O errors in the kernel

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/757123/rss

The kernel’s handling of I/O errors was the topic of a discussion led by
Matthew Wilcox at the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management
Summit (LSFMM) in a combined storage and filesystem track session. At the start, he asked: “how is our error handling and
what do we plan to do about it?” That led to a discussion between the
developers present on the kinds of errors that can occur and on
ways to handle them.

[$] Linux distributions and Python 2

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/756628/rss

Python 2.7 will reach its
end of life in less than two years—at least for the core development
team.
Linux distributions need to figure out
how to handle the transition given that many of their users are still using
that version of the language—and may still be well beyond the end-of-life
date. Petr Viktorin and Matthias Klose led a session at the 2018 Python
Language Summit to discuss distributions’ approaches to deprecating
Python 2.

Security updates for Friday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/756950/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (radare2), Debian (jruby), Fedora (elfutils and wireless-tools), openSUSE (glibc, mariadb, and xdg-utils), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (chromium-browser and java-1.7.1-ibm), SUSE (ceph, icu, kernel-firmware, memcached, and xen), and Ubuntu (unbound).

[$] Flash storage topics

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/756627/rss

At the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit
(LSFMM), Jaegeuk Kim described some current issues for flash storage,
especially with regard to Android. Kim is the F2FS developer and
maintainer, and the filesystem-track session was ostensibly about that
filesystem. In the end, though, the talk did not focus on F2FS and instead
ranged over a number of problem
areas for Android flash storage.

[$] ZUFS

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/756625/rss

At the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit
(LSFMM), Boaz Harrosh presented his zero-copy user-mode filesystem (ZUFS).
It is both a filesystem in its own right and a framework similar to FUSE for
implementing filesystems in user space. It is geared toward extremely low latency and
high performance, particularly for systems using persistent memory.

[$] The ZUFS zero-copy filesystem

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/756625/rss

At the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit
(LSFMM), Boaz Harrosh presented his zero-copy user-mode filesystem (ZUFS).
It is both a filesystem in its own right and a framework similar to FUSE for
implementing filesystems in user space. It is geared toward extremely low latency and
high performance, particularly for systems using persistent memory.

[$] Unplugging old batteries

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/755229/rss

Python is famous for being a “batteries included” language—its standard
library provides a versatile set of modules with the language—but
there may be times when some of those batteries have reached their end of life. At
the 2018 Python Language Summit, Christian Heimes wanted to suggest a few
batteries that may have outlived their usefulness and to discuss how the
process of retiring standard library modules should work.

[$] A filesystem “change journal” and other topics

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/755277/rss

At the 2017 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit
(LSFMM), Amir Goldstein presented his work
on adding a superblock watch mechanism to provide a scalable way to notify
applications
of changes in a filesystem. At the 2018 edition of LSFMM, he was back to
discuss adding NTFS-like change
journals
to the kernel in support of backup solutions of various
sorts. As a second topic for the session, he also wanted to discuss doing
more performance-regression testing
for filesystems.

[$] Advanced computing with IPython

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/756192/rss

If you use Python, there’s a good chance you have heard of IPython, which provides an enhanced read-eval-print
loop (REPL) for Python. But there is more to IPython than just a more
convenient REPL. Today’s IPython comes with integrated libraries that turn
it into an assistant for several advanced computing tasks. We will look at
two of those tasks, using multiple languages and distributed computing, in
this article.