All posts by jake

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/899158/

Security updates have been issued by Debian (openssl), Fedora (dotnet6.0, mediawiki, and python2.7), Mageia (389-ds-base, chromium-browser-stable, exo, and libtiff), Oracle (httpd:2.4 and microcode_ctl), SUSE (dbus-broker, drbd, kernel, liblouis, mariadb, openssl, openssl-1_1, openSUSE kernel modules, oracleasm, php7, php72, python39, salt, and wdiff), and Ubuntu (linux, linux-hwe, mozjs91, and vim).

Security updates for Thursday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/898720/

Security updates have been issued by Debian (chromium, firejail, and request-tracker4), Fedora (ghex, golang-github-emicklei-restful, and openssl1.1), Oracle (postgresql), Scientific Linux (postgresql), Slackware (openssl), SUSE (salt and tor), and Ubuntu (apache2 and squid, squid3).

[$] Introducing PyScript

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/898452/

In a keynote at PyCon 2022 in Salt
Lake City, Utah, Peter Wang introduced another entrant in the field of
in-browser Python interpreters. The Python community has long sought a way
to be able to write Python—instead of JavaScript—to run in web browsers, and there
have been various efforts to do so over the years. Wang announced PyScript as a new framework, built atop
one of those earlier projects, to allow
Python scripting directly within the browser; those programs have access to
much of the existing Python ecosystem as well as being able to interact
with the browser document object model (DOM) directly.
In addition, he gave some rather eye-opening demonstrations as part of the talk.

[$] Disabling an extent optimization

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/898029/

In the final filesystem session at the
2022 Linux Storage,
Filesystem, Memory-management and BPF Summit
(LSFMM), David Howells led
a discussion on a filesystem optimization that is causing various kinds of
problems. Extent-based filesystems have data structures that sometimes do
not reflect the holes
that exist in files. Reads from holes in sparse files (i.e. files with
holes) must return zeroes, but filesystems are not obligated to maintain knowledge of
the holes beyond that, which leads to the problems.

This concludes our coverage of LSFMM 2022.

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/898413/

Security updates have been issued by Debian (cyrus-imapd, exo, sleuthkit, slurm-wlm, vim, and vlc), Fedora (golang-github-docker-libnetwork, kernel, moby-engine, ntfs-3g-system-compression, python-cookiecutter, python2.7, python3.6, python3.7, python3.8, python3.9, rubygem-mechanize, and webkit2gtk3), Mageia (bluez, dnsmasq, exempi, halibut, and php), Oracle (.NET 6.0, .NET Core 3.1, and xz), SUSE (chafa, firejail, kernel, python-Twisted, and tensorflow2), and Ubuntu (intel-microcode).

Security updates for Friday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/898234/

Security updates have been issued by Fedora (kernel, liblouis, ntfs-3g, php, shim, shim-unsigned-aarch64, shim-unsigned-x64, thunderbird, and vim), Mageia (chromium-browser-stable and golang), Red Hat (grub2, mokutil, and shim and grub2, mokutil, shim, and shim-unsigned-x64), SUSE (389-ds, apache2, kernel, mariadb, openssl, openssl-1_0_0, rubygem-actionpack-5_1, rubygem-activesupport-5_1, and vim), and Ubuntu (exempi, kernel, linux, linux-aws, linux-aws-hwe, linux-aws-5.13, linux-aws-5.4, linux-azure, linux-azure-4.15, linux-azure-5.13, linux-azure-5.4, linux-azure-fde, linux-dell300x, linux-gcp, linux-gcp-4.15, linux-gcp-5.13, linux-gcp-5.4, linux-gke, linux-gke-5.4, linux-gkeop, linux-gkeop-5.4, linux-hwe, linux-hwe-5.13, linux-hwe-5.4, linux-ibm, linux-ibm-5.4, linux-intel-5.13, linux-intel-iotg, linux-kvm, linux-lowlatency, linux-oracle, linux-oracle-5.13, linux-oracle-5.4, and spip).

Security updates for Thursday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/898121/

Security updates have been issued by Fedora (containerd, golang-github-containerd-cni, golang-github-containernetworking-cni, golang-x-sys, kernel, and qt5-qtbase), Oracle (kernel, kernel-container, microcode_ctl, subversion:1.14, and xz), Red Hat (.NET 6.0, .NET Core 3.1, cups, and xz), Scientific Linux (xz), SUSE (caddy, chromium, librecad, libredwg, varnish, and webkit2gtk3), and Ubuntu (bluez).

[$] Remote participation at LSFMM

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/897915/

As with many conferences these days, the
2022 Linux Storage,
Filesystem, Memory-management and BPF Summit
(LSFMM) had a virtual
component. The main rooms were equipped with a camera trained on the
podium, thus the session leader, so that
remote participants could watch; this camera connected into a Zoom
conference that allowed participation from afar. In a session near the
end of the conference, led by conference organizer Josef Bacik, remote
participants were invited to share their
experiences—on camera—with those who were there in person. It was an
opportunity to discuss what went right—and wrong—with an eye toward
improving the experience for future events.

[$] A discussion on readahead

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/897786/

Readahead is an I/O
optimization that causes the system to read more data than
has been requested by an application—in the belief that the extra data will
be requested soon thereafter. At the
2022 Linux Storage,
Filesystem, Memory-management and BPF Summit
(LSFMM), Matthew Wilcox
led a session to discuss readahead, especially as it relates to network
filesystems, with assistance from Steve French and
David Howells. The latency of the underlying storage needs to factor into
the calculation of how much data to read in advance, but it is not entirely
clear how to do so.

[$] Zoned storage

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/897263/

Zoned storage is a
form of storage that offers higher capacities by making tradeoffs in the kinds
of writes that are allowed to the device. It was the topic of a storage and
filesystem session led by Luis
Chamberlain at the
2022 Linux Storage,
Filesystem, Memory-management and BPF Summit
(LSFMM). Over the years,
zoned storage has been a frequent topic at LSFMM, going back to LSFMM 2013, where
support for
shingled magnetic recording (SMR) devices, which were the starting point for
zoned storage, was discussed.

[$] Retrieving kernel attributes

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/897420/

At the
2022 Linux Storage,
Filesystem, Memory-management and BPF Summit
(LSFMM), Amir Goldstein
and Miklos Szeredi led a discussion on a new interface for extracting
information from kernel objects using the filesystem extended-attributes
(xattr) interface. Since Szeredi was not present in Palm Springs, he co-led
the session virtually over Zoom audio, which was the only
filesystem session with a virtual leader at LSFMM this year. Szeredi’s proposal
for an interface of that sort had been posted just the day before the session.

[$] ioctl() forever?

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/897202/

In a combined storage and filesystem session at the
2022 Linux Storage,
Filesystem, Memory-management and BPF Summit
(LSFMM), Luis Chamberlain
and James Bottomley led a discussion about the use of ioctl()
as a mechanism for configuration. There are plenty of downsides to the use
of ioctl() commands, and alternatives exist, but in general kernel
developers have chosen to continue using this multiplexing system
call. While there is interest in changing things, at least in some
quarters, the discussion did not seem to indicate major changes on the horizon.

[$] Best practices for fstests

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/897061/

As a followup to a session on testing
challenges
earlier in the day, Josef Bacik led a discussion on best
practices for testing in a combined storage and filesystem session at the
2022 Linux Storage,
Filesystem, Memory-management and BPF Summit
(LSFMM). There are a
number of ways that developers can collaborate on improving the testing
landscape using fstests and blktests, starting with gathering and sharing
information about which tests are expected to pass and fail. That
information depends on a lot of different factors, including kernel version
and configuration, fstest options, and more.