Tag Archives: Articles

Hacking a Gene Sequencer by Encoding Malware in a DNA Strand

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/08/hacking_a_gene_.html

One of the common ways to hack a computer is to mess with its input data. That is, if you can feed the computer data that it interprets — or misinterprets — in a particular way, you can trick the computer into doing things that it wasn’t intended to do. This is basically what a buffer overflow attack is: the data input overflows a buffer and ends up being executed by the computer process.

Well, some researchers did this with a computer that processes DNA, and they encoded their malware in the DNA strands themselves:

To make the malware, the team translated a simple computer command into a short stretch of 176 DNA letters, denoted as A, G, C, and T. After ordering copies of the DNA from a vendor for $89, they fed the strands to a sequencing machine, which read off the gene letters, storing them as binary digits, 0s and 1s.

Erlich says the attack took advantage of a spill-over effect, when data that exceeds a storage buffer can be interpreted as a computer command. In this case, the command contacted a server controlled by Kohno’s team, from which they took control of a computer in their lab they were using to analyze the DNA file.

News articles. Research paper.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 8

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/08/11/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-8/

Many people decide to take time off in August to enjoy the nice weather before Fall, but I’ve been surprised at the number of Grafana related articles that I’ve come across this week. This issue of timeShift, contains articles covering weather tracking, home automation and a couple of updates to native Plugins from the core Grafana team. GrafanaCon EU Announced! GrafanaCon is a two-day event with talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding ecosystem.

Vulnerabilities in Car Washes

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/08/vulnerabilities_6.html

Articles about serious vulnerabilities in IoT devices and embedded systems are now dime-a-dozen. This one concerns Internet-connected car washes:

A group of security researchers have found vulnerabilities in internet-connected drive-through car washes that would let hackers remotely hijack the systems to physically attack vehicles and their occupants. The vulnerabilities would let an attacker open and close the bay doors on a car wash to trap vehicles inside the chamber, or strike them with the doors, damaging them and possibly injuring occupants.

China Says It Will “Severely Strike” Websites Involved in Piracy

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/china-says-it-will-severely-strike-websites-involved-in-piracy-170729/

When it comes to the protection of intellectual property, China is often viewed as one of the world’s leading scofflaws. Everything is copied in the country, from designer watches to cars. Not even major landmarks can escape the replica treatment.

In more recent times, however, there have been signs that China might be at least warming to the idea that IP protection should be given more priority.

For example, every few months authorities announce a new crackdown on Internet piracy, such as the “Jian Wang 2016” program which shuttered 290 piracy websites in the final six months of last year.

Maintaining the same naming convention, this week China’s National Copyright Administration revealed the new “Jian Wang 2017” anti-piracy program. During a meeting in Beijing attended by other state bodies, copyright groups, rights organizations, and representatives from the news media, the administration detailed its latest plans.

The anti-piracy program will focus on protecting the copyrights of the film, television, and news industries in China. Infringing websites, e-commerce and cloud storage services, social networks, plus mobile Internet applications will all be put under the spotlight, with authorities investigating and prosecuting major cases.

The program, which will run for the next four months, has a mission to improve compliance in three key areas.

The first aims to assist the film and TV industries by cracking down on ‘pirate’ websites, the unlawful use of file-sharing software, plus “forum communities and other channels that supply infringing film and television works.”

Also on the cards is a blitz against users of the hugely popular social media and instant messaging app, WeChat.

Released in 2011, WeChat now has more than 930 million users, some of which use the platform to republish news articles without permission from creators. Chinese authorities want to reduce this activity, noting that too many articles are stripped from their sources and reproduced on personal blogs and similar platforms.

The second area for attention is the booming market for pirate apps. Chinese authorities say that cracked app stores and the software they provide are contributing to a huge rise in the unlawful spread of films, TV shows, music, news and other literature. Set-top boxes that utilize such apps will also be targeted in the crackdown.

Finally, there will be a “strengthening of copyright supervision” on large-scale e-commerce platforms that supply audio and video products, eBooks, and other publications. Cloud storage platforms will also be subjected to additional scrutiny, as these are often used to share copyright works without permission.

What kind of effect the program will have on overall copyrighted content availability will remain to be seen, but if previous patterns are maintained, the National Copyright Administration should reveal the results of its blitz in December.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 6

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/07/28/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-6/

Welcome to another edition of timeShift! This week, in addition to the great articles we’ve found scouring the Internet, we have two new plugins to announce and updates to three data source plugins to add to our list of 80 plugins. Without any further ado, let’s dive in! From the Blogosphere Hawkular Data Source: A New Query Interface for Grafana: Our friends over at Hawkular have been busy making big updates to their Hawkular Data Source Plugin.

Google Pi Intercom with the AIY Projects kit

Post Syndicated from Janina Ander original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/google-pi-intercom-aiy-projects/

When we released the Google AIY Projects kit with Issue 57 of The MagPi in May, we could hardly wait to see what you in the community would build with it. Being able to add voice interaction to your Raspberry Pi projects opens up a world of possibilities for exciting digital making.

One such project is maker Martin Mander‘s Google Pi Intercom. We love this build for its retro feel and modern functionality, a combination of characteristics shared by many of Martin’s creations.

1986 Google Pi Intercom

This is a 1986 Radio Shack Intercom that I’ve converted into a Google Home style device using a Raspberry Pi and the Google AIY (Artificial Intelligence Yourself) kit that came free with the MagPi magazine (issue 57). It uses the Google Assistant to answer questions and perform actions, using IFTTT to integrate with smart home accessories and other web services.

Inter-com again?

If you’ve paid any attention at all to the world of Raspberry Pi in the last few months, you’ve probably seen the Google AIY Projects kit that came free with The MagPi #57. It includes a practical cardboard housing, but of course makers everywhere have been upgrading their kits, for example by creating a laser-cut wooden box. Martin, however, has taken things to the next level: he’s installed his AIY kit in a wall-mounted intercom from 1986.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

The components of the Google Pi Intercom

It’s all (inter)coming together

Martin already had not one, but three vintage intercoms at home. So when he snatched up an AIY Projects kit, there was no doubt in his mind about how he was going to use it:

The moment I scooped the Google AIY kit, I knew that one of these old units would be a perfect match for it – after all, both were essentially based on a button, microphone, and loudspeaker, just with different technology in between.

Preparing the intercom housing

First, Martin gutted the intercom and ground away some of the excess plastic inside. This was necessary because integrating all the components was going to be a tight fit. To overhaul its look, he then gave the housing a good scrub and a new paint job. For a splash of colour, Martin affixed a strip of paper in the palette of the Google logo.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

BUBBLES!

Building the Google Pi Intercom

The intercom’s speaker wasn’t going to provide good enough sound quality. Moreover, Martin quickly realised that the one included in the AIY kit was too big for this make. He hunted down a small speaker online, and set about wiring everything up.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

Assembling the electronics

Martin wanted the build to resemble the original intercom as closely as possible. Consequently, he was keen to use its tilting bar to activate the device’s voice command function. Luckily, it was easy to mount the AIY kit’s button behind the bar.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

Using the intercom’s tilting bar switch

Finally it was only a matter of using some hot glue and a few screws and bolts to secure all the components inside the housing. Once he’d done that, Martin just had to set up the software of the Google Assistant, and presto! He had a voice-controlled smart device for home automation.

A pretty snazzy-looking build, isn’t it? If you’d like to learn more about Martin’s Google Pi Intercom, head over to the Instructables page for a complete rundown.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

Awaiting your command

The AIY Projects Kit

Didn’t manage to snap up an AIY Projects kit? Find out how to get your hands on one over at The MagPi.

Or do you have an AIY kit at home? Lucky you! You can follow our shiny new learning resource to get started with using it. There are also lots of handy articles about the kit in The MagPi #57 – download the PDF version here. If you’re stuck, or looking for inspiration, check out our AIY Projects subforum. Ask your questions, and help others by answering theirs.

What have you built with your AIY Projects kit? Be sure to share your voice-controlled project with us in the comments.

 

The post Google Pi Intercom with the AIY Projects kit appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 5

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/07/21/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-5/

We cover a lot of ground in this week’s timeShift. From diving into building your own plugin, finding the right dashboard, configuration options in the alerting feature, to monitoring your local weather, there’s something for everyone. Are you writing an article about Grafana, or have you come across an article you found interesting? Please get in touch, we’ll add it to our roundup.


From the Blogosphere

  • Going open-source in monitoring, part III: 10 most useful Grafana dashboards to monitor Kubernetes and services: We have hundreds of pre-made dashboards ready for you to install into your on-prem or hosted Grafana, but not every one will fit your specific monitoring needs. In part three of the series, Sergey discusses is experiences with finding useful dashboards and shows off ten of the best dashboards you can install for monitoring Kubernetes clusters and the services deployed on them.

  • Using AWS Lambda and API gateway for server-less Grafana adapters: Sometimes you’ll want to visualize metrics from a data source that may not yet be supported in Grafana natively. With the plugin functionality introduced in Grafana 3.0, anyone can create their own data sources. Using the SimpleJson data source, Jonas describes how he used AWS Lambda and AWS API gateway to write data source adapters for Grafana.

  • How to Use Grafana to Monitor JMeter Non-GUI Results – Part 2: A few issues ago we listed an article for using Grafana to monitor JMeter Non-GUI results, which required a number of non-trivial steps to complete. This article shows of an easier way to accomplish this that doesn’t require any additional configuration of InfluxDB.

  • Programming your Personal Weather Chart: It’s always great to see Grafana used outside of the typical dev-ops usecase. This article runs you through the steps to create your own weather chart and show off your local weather stats in Grafana. BONUS: Rob shows off a magic mirror he created, which can display this data.

  • vSphere Performance data – Part 6 – The Dashboard(s): This 6-part series goes into a ton of detail and walks you through the various methods of retrieving vSphere performance data, storing the data in a TSDB, and creating dashboards for the metrics. Part 6 deals specifically with Grafana, but I highly recommend reading all of the articles, as it chronicles the journey of metrics exploration, storage, and visualization from someone who had no prior experience with time series data.

  • Alerting in Grafana: Alerting in Grafana is a fairly new feature and one that we’re continuing to iterate on. We’re soon adding additional data source support, new notification channels, clustering, silencing rules, and more. This article steps you through all the configuration options to get you to your first alert.


Plugins and Dashboards

It can seem like work slows during July and August, but we’re still seeing a lot of activity in the community. This week we have a new graph panel to show off that gives you some unique looking dashboards, and an update to the Zabbix data source, which adds some really great features. You can install both of the plugins now on your on-prem Grafana via our cli, or with one-click on GrafanaCloud.

NEW PLUGIN

Bubble Chart Panel This super-cool looking panel groups your tag values into clusters of circles. The size of the circle represents the aggregated value of the time series data. There are also multiple color schemes to make those bubbles POP (pun intended)! Currently it works against OpenTSDB and Bosun, so give it a try!

Install Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

Zabbix Alex has been hard at work, making improvements on the Zabbix App for Grafana. This update adds annotations, template variables, alerting and more. Thanks Alex! If you’d like to try out the app, head over to http://play.grafana-zabbix.org/dashboard/db/zabbix-db-mysql?orgId=2

Install 3.5.1 Now


This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

Open source software can’t thrive without the contributions from the community. Each week we’ll recognize a Grafana contributor and thank them for all of their PRs, bug reports and feedback.

mk-dhia (Dhia)
Thank you so much for your improvements to the Elasticsearch data source!


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

This week’s tweet comes from @geek_dave

Great looking dashboard Dave! And thank you for adding new features and keeping it updated. It’s creators like you who make the dashboard repository so awesome!


Upcoming Events

We love when people talk about Grafana at meetups and conferences.

Monday, July 24, 2017 – 7:30pm | Google Campus Warsaw


Ząbkowska 27/31, Warsaw, Poland

Iot & HOME AUTOMATION #3 openHAB, InfluxDB, Grafana:
If you are interested in topics of the internet of things and home automation, this might be a good occasion to meet people similar to you. If you are into it, we will also show you how we can all work together on our common projects.

RSVP


Tell us how we’re Doing.

We’d love your feedback on what kind of content you like, length, format, etc – so please keep the comments coming! You can submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Help us make this better.

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

How To Get Your First 1,000 Customers

Post Syndicated from Gleb Budman original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/how-to-get-your-first-1000-customers/

PR for getting your first 1000 customers

If you launch your startup and no one knows, did you actually launch? As mentioned in my last post, our initial launch target was to get a 1,000 people to use our service. But how do you get even 1,000 people to sign up for your service when no one knows who you are?

There are a variety of methods to attract your first 1,000 customers, but launching with the press is my favorite. I’ll explain why and how to do it below.

Paths to Attract Your First 1,000 Customers

Social following: If you have a massive social following, those people are a reasonable target for what you’re offering. In particular if your relationship with them is one where they would buy something you recommend, this can be one of the easiest ways to get your initial customers. However, building this type of following is non-trivial and often is done over several years.

Press not only provides awareness and customers, but credibility and SEO benefits as well

Paid advertising: The advantage of paid ads is you have control over when they are presented and what they say. The primary disadvantage is they tend to be expensive, especially before you have your positioning, messaging, and funnel nailed.

Viral: There are certainly examples of companies that launched with a hugely viral video, blog post, or promotion. While fantastic if it happens, even if you do everything right, the likelihood of massive virality is miniscule and the conversion rate is often low.

Press: As I said, this is my favorite. You don’t need to pay a PR agency and can go from nothing to launched in a couple weeks. Press not only provides awareness and customers, but credibility and SEO benefits as well.

How to Pitch the Press

It’s easy: Have a compelling story, find the right journalists, make their life easy, pitch and follow-up. Of course, each one of those has some nuance, so let’s dig in.

Have a compelling story

How to Get Attention When you’ve been working for months on your startup, it’s easy to get lost in the minutiae when talking to others. Stories that a journalist will write about need to be something their readers will care about. Knowing what story to tell and how to tell it is part science and part art. Here’s how you can get there:

The basics of your story

Ask yourself the following questions, and write down the answers:

  • What are we doing? What product service are we offering?
  • Why? What problem are we solving?
  • What is interesting or unique? Either about what we’re doing, how we’re doing it, or for who we’re doing it.

“But my story isn’t that exciting”

Neither was announcing a data backup company, believe me. Look for angles that make it compelling. Here are some:

  • Did someone on your team do something major before? (build a successful company/product, create some innovation, market something we all know, etc.)
  • Do you have an interesting investor or board member?
  • Is there a personal story that drove you to start this company?
  • Are you starting it in a unique place?
  • Did you come upon the idea in a unique way?
  • Can you share something people want to know that’s not usually shared?
  • Are you partnered with a well-known company?
  • …is there something interesting/entertaining/odd/shocking/touching/etc.?

It doesn’t get much less exciting than, “We’re launching a company that will backup your data.” But there were still a lot of compelling stories:

  • Founded by serial entrepreneurs, bootstrapped a capital-intensive company, committed to each other for a year without salary.
  • Challenging the way that every backup company before was set up by not asking customers to pick and choose files to backup.
  • Designing our own storage system.
  • Etc. etc.

For the initial launch, we focused on “unlimited for $5/month” and statistics from a survey we ran with Harris Interactive that said that 94% of people did not regularly backup their data.

It’s an old adage that “Everyone has a story.” Regardless of what you’re doing, there is always something interesting to share. Dig for that.

The headline

Once you’ve captured what you think the interesting story is, you’ve got to boil it down. Yes, you need the elevator pitch, but this is shorter…it’s the headline pitch. Write the headline that you would love to see a journalist write.

Regardless of what you’re doing, there is always something interesting to share. Dig for that.

Now comes the part where you have to be really honest with yourself: if you weren’t involved, would you care?

The “Techmeme Test”

One way I try to ground myself is what I call the “Techmeme Test”. Techmeme lists the top tech articles. Read the headlines. Imagine the headline you wrote in the middle of the page. If you weren’t involved, would you click on it? Is it more or less compelling than the others. Much of tech news is dominated by the largest companies. If you want to get written about, your story should be more compelling. If not, go back above and explore your story some more.

Embargoes, exclusives and calls-to-action

Journalists write about news. Thus, if you’ve already announced something and are then pitching a journalist to cover it, unless you’re giving her something significant that hasn’t been said, it’s no longer news. As a result, there are ‘embargoes’ and ‘exclusives’.

Embargoes

    • : An embargo simply means that you are sharing news with a journalist that they need to keep private until a certain date and time.

If you’re Apple, this may be a formal and legal document. In our case, it’s as simple as saying, “Please keep embargoed until 4/13/17 at 8am California time.” in the pitch. Some sites explicitly will not keep embargoes; for example The Information will only break news. If you want to launch something later, do not share information with journalists at these sites. If you are only working with a single journalist for a story, and your announcement time is flexible, you can jointly work out a date and time to announce. However, if you have a fixed launch time or are working with a few journalists, embargoes are key.

Exclusives: An exclusive means you’re giving something specifically to that journalist. Most journalists love an exclusive as it means readers have to come to them for the story. One option is to give a journalist an exclusive on the entire story. If it is your dream journalist, this may make sense. Another option, however, is to give exclusivity on certain pieces. For example, for your launch you could give an exclusive on funding detail & a VC interview to a more finance-focused journalist and insight into the tech & a CTO interview to a more tech-focused journalist.

Call-to-Action: With our launch we gave TechCrunch, Ars Technica, and SimplyHelp URLs that gave the first few hundred of their readers access to the private beta. Once those first few hundred users from each site downloaded, the beta would be turned off.

Thus, we used a combination of embargoes, exclusives, and a call-to-action during our initial launch to be able to brief journalists on the news before it went live, give them something they could announce as exclusive, and provide a time-sensitive call-to-action to the readers so that they would actually sign up and not just read and go away.

How to Find the Most Authoritative Sites / Authors

“If a press release is published and no one sees it, was it published?” Perhaps the time existed when sending a press release out over the wire meant journalists would read it and write about it. That time has long been forgotten. Over 1,000 unread press releases are published every day. If you want your compelling story to be covered, you need to find the handful of journalists that will care.

Determine the publications

Find the publications that cover the type of story you want to share. If you’re in tech, Techmeme has a leaderboard of publications ranked by leadership and presence. This list will tell you which publications are likely to have influence. Visit the sites and see if your type of story appears on their site. But, once you’ve determined the publication do NOT send a pitch their [email protected] or [email protected] email addresses. In all the times I’ve done that, I have never had a single response. Those email addresses are likely on every PR, press release, and spam list and unlikely to get read. Instead…

Determine the journalists

Once you’ve determined which publications cover your area, check which journalists are doing the writing. Skim the articles and search for keywords and competitor names.

Over 1,000 unread press releases are published every day.

Identify one primary journalist at the publication that you would love to have cover you, and secondary ones if there are a few good options. If you’re not sure which one should be the primary, consider a few tests:

  • Do they truly seem to care about the space?
  • Do they write interesting/compelling stories that ‘get it’?
  • Do they appear on the Techmeme leaderboard?
  • Do their articles get liked/tweeted/shared and commented on?
  • Do they have a significant social presence?

Leveraging Google

Google author search by date

In addition to Techmeme or if you aren’t in the tech space Google will become a must have tool for finding the right journalists to pitch. Below the search box you will find a number of tabs. Click on Tools and change the Any time setting to Custom range. I like to use the past six months to ensure I find authors that are actively writing about my market. I start with the All results. This will return a combination of product sites and articles depending upon your search term.

Scan for articles and click on the link to see if the article is on topic. If it is find the author’s name. Often if you click on the author name it will take you to a bio page that includes their Twitter, LinkedIn, and/or Facebook profile. Many times you will find their email address in the bio. You should collect all the information and add it to your outreach spreadsheet. Click here to get a copy. It’s always a good idea to comment on the article to start building awareness of your name. Another good idea is to Tweet or Like the article.

Next click on the News tab and set the same search parameters. You will get a different set of results. Repeat the same steps. Between the two searches you will have a list of authors that actively write for the websites that Google considers the most authoritative on your market.

How to find the most socially shared authors

Buzzsumo search for most shared by date

Your next step is to find the writers whose articles get shared the most socially. Go to Buzzsumo and click on the Most Shared tab. Enter search terms for your market as well as competitor names. Again I like to use the past 6 months as the time range. You will get a list of articles that have been shared the most across Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest, and Google+. In addition to finding the most shared articles and their authors you can also see some of the Twitter users that shared the article. Many of those Twitter users are big influencers in your market so it’s smart to start following and interacting with them as well as the authors.

How to Find Author Email Addresses

Some journalists publish their contact info right on the stories. For those that don’t, a bit of googling will often get you the email. For example, TechCrunch wrote a story a few years ago where they published all of their email addresses, which was in response to this new service that charges a small fee to provide journalist email addresses. Sometimes visiting their twitter pages will link to a personal site, upon which they will share an email address.

Of course all is not lost if you don’t find an email in the bio. There are two good services for finding emails, https://app.voilanorbert.com/ and https://hunter.io/. For Voila Norbert enter the author name and the website you found their article on. The majority of the time you search for an author on a major publication Norbert will return an accurate email address. If it doesn’t try Hunter.io.

On Hunter.io enter the domain name and click on Personal Only. Then scroll through the results to find the author’s email. I’ve found Norbert to be more accurate overall but between the two you will find most major author’s email addresses.

Email, by the way, is not necessarily the best way to engage a journalist. Many are avid Twitter users. Follow them and engage – that means read/retweet/favorite their tweets; reply to their questions, and generally be helpful BEFORE you pitch them. Later when you email them, you won’t be just a random email address.

Don’t spam

Now that you have all these email addresses (possibly thousands if you purchased a list) – do NOT spam. It is incredibly tempting to think “I could try to figure out which of these folks would be interested, but if I just email all of them, I’ll save myself time and be more likely to get some of them to respond.” Don’t do it.

Follow them and engage – that means read/retweet/favorite their tweets; reply to their questions, and generally be helpful BEFORE you pitch them.

First, you’ll want to tailor your pitch to the individual. Second, it’s a small world and you’ll be known as someone who spams – reputation is golden. Also, don’t call journalists. Unless you know them or they’ve said they’re open to calls, you’re most likely to just annoy them.

Build a relationship

Build Trust with reporters Play the long game. You may be focusing just on the launch and hoping to get this one story covered, but if you don’t quickly flame-out, you will have many more opportunities to tell interesting stories that you’ll want the press to cover. Be honest and don’t exaggerate.
When you have 500 users it’s tempting to say, “We’ve got thousands!” Don’t. The good journalists will see through it and it’ll likely come back to bite you later. If you don’t know something, say “I don’t know but let me find out for you.” Most journalists want to write interesting stories that their readers will appreciate. Help them do that. Build deeper relationships with 5 – 10 journalists, rather than spamming thousands.

Stay organized

It doesn’t need to be complicated, but keep a spreadsheet that includes the name, publication, and contact info of the journalists you care about. Then, use it to keep track of who you’ve pitched, who’s responded, whether you’ve sent them the materials they need, and whether they intend to write/have written.

Make their life easy

Journalists have a million PR people emailing them, are actively engaging with readers on Twitter and in the comments, are tracking their metrics, are working their sources…and all the while needing to publish new articles. They’re busy. Make their life easy and they’re more likely to engage with yours.

Get to know them

Before sending them a pitch, know what they’ve written in the space. If you tell them how your story relates to ones they’ve written, it’ll help them put the story in context, and enable them to possibly link back to a story they wrote before.

Prepare your materials

Journalists will need somewhere to get more info (prepare a fact sheet), a URL to link to, and at least one image (ideally a few to choose from.) A fact sheet gives bite-sized snippets of information they may need about your startup or product: what it is, how big the market is, what’s the pricing, who’s on the team, etc. The URL is where their reader will get the product or more information from you. It doesn’t have to be live when you’re pitching, but you should be able to tell what the URL will be. The images are ones that they could embed in the article: a product screenshot, a CEO or team photo, an infographic. Scan the types of images included in their articles. Don’t send any of these in your pitch, but have them ready. Studies, stats, customer/partner/investor quotes are also good to have.

Pitch

A pitch has to be short and compelling.

Subject Line

Think back to the headline you want. Is it really compelling? Can you shorten it to a subject line? Include what’s happening and when. For Mike Arrington at Techcrunch, our first subject line was “Startup doing an ‘online time machine’”. Later I would include, “launching June 6th”.

For John Timmer at ArsTechnica, it was “Demographics data re: your 4/17 article”. Why? Because he wrote an article titled “WiFi popular with the young people; backups, not so much”. Since we had run a demographics survey on backups, I figured as a science editor he’d be interested in this additional data.

Body

A few key things about the body of the email. It should be short and to the point, no more than a few sentences. Here was my actual, original pitch email to John:

Hey John,

We’re launching Backblaze next week which provides a Time Machine-online type of service. As part of doing some research I read your article about backups not being popular with young people and that you had wished Accenture would have given you demographics. In prep for our invite-only launch I sponsored Harris Interactive to get demographic data on who’s doing backups and if all goes well, I should have that data on Friday.

Next week starts Backup Awareness Month (and yes, probably Clean Your House Month and Brush Your Teeth Month)…but nonetheless…good time to remind readers to backup with a bit of data?

Would you be interested in seeing/talking about the data when I get it?

Would you be interested in getting a sneak peak at Backblaze? (I could give you some invite codes for your readers as well.)

Gleb Budman        

CEO and Co-Founder

Backblaze, Inc.

Automatic, Secure, High-Performance Online Backup

Cell: XXX-XXX-XXXX

The Good: It said what we’re doing, why this relates to him and his readers, provides him information he had asked for in an article, ties to something timely, is clearly tailored for him, is pitched by the CEO and Co-Founder, and provides my cell.

The Bad: It’s too long.

I got better later. Here’s an example:

Subject: Does temperature affect hard drive life?

Hi Peter, there has been much debate about whether temperature affects how long a hard drive lasts. Following up on the Backblaze analyses of how long do drives last & which drives last the longest (that you wrote about) we’ve now analyzed the impact of heat on the nearly 40,000 hard drives we have and found that…

We’re going to publish the results this Monday, 5/12 at 5am California-time. Want a sneak peak of the analysis?

Timing

A common question is “When should I launch?” What day, what time? I prefer to launch on Tuesday at 8am California-time. Launching earlier in the week gives breathing room for the news to live longer. While your launch may be a single article posted and that’s that, if it ends up a larger success, earlier in the week allows other journalists (including ones who are in other countries) to build on the story. Monday announcements can be tough because the journalists generally need to have their stories finished by Friday, and while ideally everything is buttoned up beforehand, startups sometimes use the weekend as overflow before a launch.

The 8am California-time is because it allows articles to be published at the beginning of the day West Coast and around lunch-time East Coast. Later and you risk it being past publishing time for the day. We used to launch at 5am in order to be morning for the East Coast, but it did not seem to have a significant benefit in coverage or impact, but did mean that the entire internal team needed to be up at 3am or 4am. Sometimes that’s critical, but I prefer to not burn the team out when it’s not.

Finally, try to stay clear of holidays, major announcements and large conferences. If Apple is coming out with their next iPhone, many of the tech journalists will be busy at least a couple days prior and possibly a week after. Not always obvious, but if you can, find times that are otherwise going to be slow for news.

Follow-up

There is a fine line between persistence and annoyance. I once had a journalist write me after we had an announcement that was covered by the press, “Why didn’t you let me know?! I would have written about that!” I had sent him three emails about the upcoming announcement to which he never responded.

My general rule is 3 emails.

Ugh. However, my takeaway from this isn’t that I should send 10 emails to every journalist. It’s that sometimes these things happen.

My general rule is 3 emails. If I’ve identified a specific journalist that I think would be interested and have a pitch crafted for her, I’ll send her the email ideally 2 weeks prior to the announcement. I’ll follow-up a week later, and one more time 2 days prior. If she ever says, “I’m not interested in this topic,” I note it and don’t email her on that topic again.

If a journalist wrote, I read the article and engage in the comments (or someone on our team, such as our social guy, @YevP does). We’ll often promote the story through our social channels and email our employees who may choose to share the story as well. This helps us, but also helps the journalist get their story broader reach. Again, the goal is to build a relationship with the journalists your space. If there’s something relevant to your customers that the journalist wrote, you’re providing a service to your customers AND helping the journalist get the word out about the article.

At times the stories also end up shared on sites such as Hacker News, Reddit, Slashdot, or become active conversations on Twitter. Again, we try to engage there and respond to questions (when we do, we are always clear that we’re from Backblaze.)

And finally, I’ll often send a short thank you to the journalist.

Getting Your First 1,000 Customers With Press

As I mentioned at the beginning, there is more than one way to get your first 1,000 customers. My favorite is working with the press to share your story. If you figure out your compelling story, find the right journalists, make their life easy, pitch and follow-up, you stand a high likelyhood of getting coverage and customers. Better yet, that coverage will provide credibility for your company, and if done right, will establish you as a resource for the press for the future.

Like any muscle, this process takes working out. The first time may feel a bit daunting, but just take the steps one at a time. As you do this a few times, the process will be easier and you’ll know who to reach out and quickly determine what stories will be compelling.

The post How To Get Your First 1,000 Customers appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 4

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/07/14/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-4/

The summer seems to be flying by! This week’s timeShift has a lot of great articles to share, including a Grafana presentation from one of our software engineers, Kubernetes monitoring, dashboard exports and backups via grafcli, scaling Graphite on AWS and a lot more. If you’ve come across a recent article about Grafana, or are writing one yourself, please get in touch, we’d be happy to feature it here. From the Blogosphere Democratizing Metrics with Grafana: Grafana Labs software developer Alexander Zobnin, recently gave a great talk at the Big Monitoring Meetup in St.

Could Pirate TV Box Users Be Prosecuted For Fraud?

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/could-pirate-tv-box-users-be-prosecuted-for-fraud-170709/

With the issue of piracy-enabled set-top boxes still making the headlines, the English Premier League (EPL) has emerged as the most likely organization to prosecute sellers of infringing boxes in the UK.

However, last month the Federation Against Copyright Theft, who provide anti-piracy services for the EPL, revealed that mere users of boxes (such as those containing augmented Kodi setups) could be targeted for prosecution sometime in the future.

As noted in our earlier coverage, people who merely stream pirated content into their own homes are difficult to track online. They pose much greater challenges than BitTorrent users, for example, who can lead investigators straight to their door. But for FACT chief executive Kieron Sharp, there are opportunities to find people via non-technical means.

“When we’re working with the police against a company that’s selling IPTV boxes or illicit streaming devices on a large scale, they have records of who they’ve sold them to,” Sharp said.

The suggestion here is that box sellers’ customer lists contain the personal details of people who obtain Premier League and other content for free so, once identified, could be open to prosecution.

With conventional thinking under copyright law, prosecuting a set-top box/Kodi user for streaming content to his own home is a bit of a daunting prospect, not to mention an expensive one. Copyright cases are notoriously complicated and an individual putting up a spirited defense could cause problems for the prosecution. The inevitable light sentence wouldn’t provide much of a deterrent either.

With all that in mind, it appears that FACT is more interested in prosecuting under other legislation.

During an interview with BBC Radio 5 Live’s Chris Warburton this week, Sharp said that people streaming into their own homes are committing a criminal offense, i.e., something that could interest the police and attract a fine or custodial sentence.

“The law has always been the case that people who are doing something illegal, streaming in their own homes, through these devices, are committing a crime. What’s happened recently is that’s been clarified by an EU judge in one case and by a civil judge in another,” Sharp said.

The EU case was BREIN v Filmspeler, which in part determined that people who stream content from an illegal source do so in breach of copyright law. The judge in the civil case was Justice Arnold, who in a UK Premier League blocking case reached the same conclusion.

While it’s now fairly clear that streaming pirate content in the EU is indeed illegal, is a civil wrong, and can be dealt with by suing someone, it’s not immediately clear how that turns into a criminal offense. It wasn’t clear in the interview either, so Warburton pressed Sharp again.

“What is the bit of the law that you are breaking when you’re streaming, how are you committing a criminal act?” he asked Sharp.

“There are various pieces of legislation,” the FACT chief said. “The one we’ve been looking at is under the Fraud Act which would say you are committing a fraud by streaming these football matches through to your television, watching them at home, and not paying for the license to do so.”

At this point, everything begins to slot into place.

For the past several years through several high-profile Internet piracy cases, FACT has shied away from prosecutions under copyright law. Each time it has opted for offenses under the Fraud Act 2006, partly because longer sentences were available at the time, i.e., up to 10 years in prison.

However, earlier this year FACT’s lawyer revealed that prosecutions under the Fraud Act can be easier for a jury to understand than those actioned under copyright law.

With this wealth of experience in mind, it’s easy to see why FACT would take this route in set-top box cases, especially when fraud legislation is relatively easy to digest.

Possession etc. of articles for use in frauds

“A person is guilty of an offense if he has in his possession or under his control any article for use in the course of or in connection with any fraud,” the Fraud Act reads.

To clarify, an ‘article’ includes “any program or data held in electronic form,” which is perfect for infringing Kodi addons etc.

Given the above, it seems that if the Court can be convinced that the person knowingly possessed a pirate set-top box programmed for fraudulent purposes, there could, in theory, be a successful prosecution resulting in a prison sentence and/or a fine.

Obtaining services dishonestly

“A person is guilty of an offense under this section if he obtains services for himself or another….by a dishonest act, and….he [knowingly] obtains them without any payment having been made for or in respect of them or without payment having been made in full,” the relevant section of the Act reads.

There are probably other angles to this under the Fraud Act but these seem to fit so well that others might not be needed. But how likely is it that someone could be prosecuted in this manner?

Sharp reiterated to the BBC that FACT could get the identities of box buyers as part of investigations into sellers, and as part of that “would see what the situation is” with their customers.

“It may well be that in the future, somebody who is an end-user may well get prosecuted,” he said.

But while the possibilities are there, Sharp really didn’t seem that keen to commit to the hounding of stream consumers in the future, and certainly not now. FACT’s strategy appears to be grounded in getting the word out that people are breaking the law.

“[People] think they can get away with it and that’s an important message from our perspective, that they must understand that they are committing offenses, apart from all the other issues of why they should be paying for the legal product. This is something that should be of concern to them, that they are committing offenses,” Sharp said.

The big question that remains is whether FACT and the English Premier League would ever take a case against a regular end-user to court. History tells us that this is fairly unlikely, but if any case did end up in court, it would definitely be hand-picked for best results.

For example, someone who bought a box from eBay would probably be of no real interest, but someone who had extended email exchanges with a seller, during which they discussed in detail how to pirate English Premier League games specifically, would provide a more useful test subject.

And then, when there are two people involved (the knowingly infringing buyer and the seller, who would also be prosecuted) that also raises the question of whether there had been an element of conspiracy.

Overall though, what people probably want to know is whether lots of people are going to get prosecuted for fraud and the answer to that is almost certainly ‘no.’ Prosecutions against the little guy are resource hungry, expensive, offer little return, and tend to generate negative publicity if they’re perceived as vindictive.

A single highly publicized case is a possible outcome if FACT and the EPL got really desperate, but there’s no guarantee that the Crown Prosecution Service would allow the case to go ahead.

“Prosecutors should guard against the criminal law being used as a debt collection agency or to protect the commercial interests of companies and organizations,” recent CPS advice reads.

“However, prosecutors should also remain alert to the fact that such organizations can become the focus of serious and organized criminal offending.”

FACT could, of course, conduct a private prosecution, which they have done several times in the past. But that is a risk too, so it seems likely that education efforts will come first, to try and slow things down.

“Our desire has always been that sports fans, football fans, would pay for the commercial package, they would pay a fee to watch and that is still our position,” Sharp told the BBC.

“But working with our clients and members such as the Premier League and Sky and BT Sports, we have to consider all the options available to us, to put a bit of a brake on this problem because it’s growing all the time.”

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 3

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/07/07/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-3/

Many in the US were on holiday for Independence Day earlier this week, but that didn’t slow us down: team Stockholm even shipped a new Grafana release. This issue of timeShift has plenty of great articles to highlight. If you know of a recent article about Grafana, or are writing one yourself, please get in touch, we’d be happy to feature it here.


Grafana 4.4 Released

Grafana v4.4 is now Available for download

Dashboard history and version control is here! A big thanks to Walmart Labs for their massive code contribution.

Check out what’s new in Grafana 4.4 in the release announcement.


From the Blogosphere

Plugins and Dashboards

We are excited that there have been over 100,000 plugin installations since we launched the new plugable architecture in Grafana v3. You can discover and install plugins in your own on-premises or Hosted Grafana instance from our website. Below are some recent additions and updates.

Zabbix Updated to v3.5.0 CHANGELOG.md

  • rate() function, which calculates per-second rate for growing counters.
  • Template query format. New format is {group}{host}{app}{item}. It allows to use names with dot.
  • Improved performance of groupBy() functions (at 6-10x faster than old).
  • lots of bug fixes and more

In addition to the plugins available for download, there are hundreds of pre-made dashboards ready for you to import into Grafana to get up and running quickly. Check out some of the popular dashboards.

Server Metrics (Collectd) Collectd/Graphite Server metrics dashboard (Load,CPU, Memory, Temp etc).

Data Source: Graphite | Collector: Collectd

Apache Overview System stats for uptime, cpu count, RAM, free memory %, and panels for load, I/O and network traffic. Apache workers and scoreboard panels and uptime and CPU load single stats.

Data Source: InfluxDB | Collector: Telegraf

Node Exporter Server Metrics A simple dashboard configured to be able to view multiple servers side by side.

Data Source: Prometheus | Collector: Nodeexporter

This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

Each week we’ll recognize a Grafana contributor and thank them for all of their PRs, bug reports and feedback. Many of the fixes and improvements come from our fantastic community!

ryantxu (Ryan McKinley)

Ryan has contributed PR’s to Grafana as well as being the author of 4 well-maintained plugins (Ajax Panel, Discrete Panel, Plotly Panel and Influx Admin plugins). Thank you for all your hard work!

What do you think?

Anything in particular you’d like to see in this series of posts? Too long? Too short? Boring? Let us know. Comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. With your help, we can make this a worthwhile resource.

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

Get social: connecting with Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/connecting-raspberry-pi-social/

Fancy connecting with Raspberry Pi beyond the four imaginary walls of this blog post? Want to find ways into the conversation among our community of makers, learners, and educators? Here’s how:

Twitter

Connecting with us on Twitter is your sure-fire way of receiving the latest news and articles from and about the Raspberry Pi Foundation, Code Club, and CoderDojo. Here you’ll experience the fun, often GIF-fuelled banter of the busy Raspberry Pi community, along with tips, project support, and event updates. This is the best place to follow hashtags such as #Picademy, #MakeYourIdeas, and #RJam in real time.

Raspberry Pi on Twitter

News! Raspberry Pi and @CoderDojo join forces in a merger that will help more young people get creative with tech: https://t.co/37y45ht7li

YouTube

We create a variety of video content, from Pi Towers fun, to resource videos, to interviews and program updates. We’re constantly adding content to our channel to bring you more interesting, enjoyable videos to watch and share within the community. Want to see what happens when you drill a hole through a Raspberry Pi Zero to make a fidget spinner? Or what Code Club International volunteers got up to when we brought them together in London for a catch-up? Maybe you’d like to try a new skill and need guidance? Our YouTube channel is the place to go!

Getting started with soldering

Learn the basics of how to solder components together, and the safety precautions you need to take. Find a transcript of this video in our accompanying learning resource: raspberrypi.org/learning/getting-started-with-soldering/

Instagram

Instagram is known as the home of gorgeous projects and even better-looking project photographs. Our Instagram, however, is mainly a collection of random office shenanigans, short video clips, and the occasional behind-the-scenes snap of projects, events, or the mess on my desk. Come join the party!

When one #AstroPi unit is simply not enough… . Would you like to #3DPrint your own Astro Pi unit? Head to rpf.io/astroprint for the free files and assembly guide . . . . . . #RaspberryPi #Space #ESA @astro_timpeake @thom_astro

1,379 Likes, 9 Comments – Raspberry Pi (@raspberrypifoundation) on Instagram: “When one #AstroPi unit is simply not enough… . Would you like to #3DPrint your own Astro Pi unit?…”

Facebook

Looking to share information on Raspberry Pi with your social community? Maybe catch a live stream or read back through comments on some of our community projects? Then you’ll want to check out Raspberry Pi Facebook page. It brings the world together via a vast collection of interesting articles, images, videos, and discussions. Here you’ll find information on upcoming events we’re visiting, links to our other social media accounts, and projects our community shares via visitor posts. If you have a moment to spare, you may even find you can answer a community question.

Raspberry Pi at the Scottish Learning Festival

No Description

Raspberry Pi forum

The Raspberry Pi forum is the go-to site for posting questions, getting support, and just having a good old chin wag. Whether you have problems setting up your Pi, need advice on how to build a media centre, or can’t figure out how to utilise Scratch for the classroom, the forum has you covered. Head there for absolutely anything Pi-related, and you’re sure to find help with your query – or better yet, the answer may already be waiting for you!

G+

Our G+ community is an ever-growing mix of makers, educators, industry professionals, and those completely new to Pi and eager to learn more about the Foundation and the product. Here you’ll find project shares, tech questions, and conversation. It’s worth stopping by if you use the platform.

Code Club and CoderDojo

You should also check out the social media accounts of our BFFs Code Club and CoderDojo!


On the CoderDojo website, along with their active forum, you’ll find links to all their accounts at the bottom of the page. For UK-focused Code Club information, head to the Code Club UK Twitter account, and for links to accounts of Code Clubs based in your country, use the search option on the Code Club International website.

Connect with us

However you want to connect with us, make sure to say hi. We love how active and welcoming our online community is and we always enjoy engaging in conversation, seeing your builds and events, and sharing Pi Towers mischief as well as useful Pi-related information and links with you!

If you use any other social platform and miss our presence there, let us know in the comments. And if you run your own Raspberry Pi-related forum, online group, or discussion board, share that as well!

The post Get social: connecting with Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Pi-powered hands-on statistical model at the Royal Society

Post Syndicated from Janina Ander original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/royal-society-galton-board/

Physics! Particles! Statistical modelling! Quantum theory! How can non-scientists understand any of it? Well, students from Durham University are here to help you wrap your head around it all – and to our delight, they’re using the power of the Raspberry Pi to do it!

At the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition, taking place in London from 4-9 July, the students are presenting a Pi-based experiment demonstrating the importance of statistics in their field of research.

Modelling the invisible – Summer Science Exhibition 2017

The Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 2017 features 22 exhibits of cutting-edge, hands-on UK science , along with special events and talks. You can meet the scientists behind the research. Find out more about the exhibition at our website: https://royalsociety.org/science-events-and-lectures/2017/summer-science-exhibition/

Ramona, Matthew, and their colleagues are particle physicists keen to bring their science to those of us whose heads start to hurt as soon as we hear the word ‘subatomic’. In their work, they create computer models of subatomic particles to make predictions about real-world particles. Their models help scientists to design better experiments and to improve sensor calibrations. If this doesn’t sound straightforward to you, never fear – this group of scientists has set out to show exactly how statistical models are useful.

The Galton board model

They’ve built a Pi-powered Galton board, also called a bean machine (much less intimidating, I think). This is an upright board, shaped like an upside-down funnel, with nails hammered into it. Drop a ball in at the top, and it will randomly bounce off the nails on its way down. How the nails are spread out determines where a ball is most likely to land at the bottom of the board.

If you’re having trouble picturing this, you can try out an online Galton board. Go ahead, I’ll wait.

You’re back? All clear? Great!

Now, if you drop 100 balls down the board and collect them at the bottom, the result might look something like this:

Galton board

By Antoine Taveneaux CC BY-SA 3.0

The distribution of the balls is determined by the locations of the nails in the board. This means that, if you don’t know where the nails are, you can look at the distribution of balls to figure out where they are most likely to be located. And you’ll be able to do all this using … statistics!!!

Statistical models

Similarly, how particles behave is determined by the laws of physics – think of the particles as balls, and laws of physics as nails. Physicists can observe the behaviour of particles to learn about laws of physics, and create statistical models simulating the laws of physics to predict the behaviour of particles.

I can hear you say, “Alright, thanks for the info, but how does the Raspberry Pi come into this?” Don’t worry – I’m getting to that.

Modelling the invisible – the interactive exhibit

As I said, Ramona and the other physicists have not created a regular old Galton board. Instead, this one records where the balls land using a Raspberry Pi, and other portable Pis around the exhibition space can access the records of the experimental results. These Pis in turn run Galton board simulators, and visitors can use them to recreate a virtual Galton board that produces the same results as the physical one. Then, they can check whether their model board does, in fact, look like the one the physicists built. In this way, people directly experience the relationship between statistical models and experimental results.

Hurrah for science!

The other exhibit the Durham students will be showing is a demo dark matter detector! So if you decide to visit the Summer Science Exhibition, you will also have the chance to learn about the very boundaries of human understanding of the cosmos.

The Pi in museums

At the Raspberry Pi Foundation, education is our mission, and of course we love museums. It is always a pleasure to see our computers incorporated into exhibits: the Pi-powered visual theremin teaches visitors about music; the Museum in a Box uses Pis to engage people in hands-on encounters with exhibits; and this Pi is itself a museum piece! If you want to learn more about Raspberry Pis and museums, you can listen to this interview with Pi Towers’ social media maestro Alex Bate.

It’s amazing that our tech is used to educate people in areas beyond computer science. If you’ve created a pi-powered educational project, please share it with us in the comments.

The post Pi-powered hands-on statistical model at the Royal Society appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 2

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/06/30/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-2/

A big thank you to everyone for the likes, retweets, comments and questions from last week’s timeShift debut. We were delighted to learn that people found this new resource useful, and are excited to continue to publish weekly issues. If you know of a recent article about Grafana, or are writing one yourself, please get in touch, we’d be happy to feature it here.

From the Blogosphere

Plugins and Dashboards

We are excited that there have been over 100,000 plugin installations since we launched the new plugable architecture in Grafana v3. You can discover and install plugins in your own on-premises or Hosted Grafana instance from our website. Below are some recent additions and updates.

SimpleJson SimpleJson is a generic backend datasource that has been the foundation of a number of Grafana data source plugins. It’s also a mechanism by which any application can expose metrics over http directly to Grafana. The newest version adds basic auth.

NetXMS Grafana datasource for NetXMS open source monitoring system.

GoogleCalendar This plugin shows the event description as an annotation on your graphs.

Discrete Panel Show discrete values in a horizontal graph. This panel now supports results from the table format.

Alarm Box This panel shows the total count of values across all series. This update adds a new option to customize how the display and color values are calculated.

Status Dot This panel shows a colored dot for each series; useful to monitor latest values at a glance.

This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

Each week we’ll recognize a Grafana contributor and thank them for all of their PRs, bug reports and feedback. A majority of fixes and improvements come from our fantastic community!

mtanda (Mitsuhiro Tanda)

159 PR’s during the last 2 years and still going strong. Thank you for your contributions mtanda!

What do you think?

Anything in particular you’d like to see in this series of posts? Too long? Too short? Boring? Let us know. Comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. With your help, we can make this a worthwhile resource.

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

New Lawsuit Demands ISP Blockades Against ‘Pirate’ Site Sci-Hub

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/new-lawsuit-demands-isp-blockades-against-pirate-site-sci-hub-170629/

Founded more than 140 years ago, the American Chemical Society (ACS) is a leading source of academic publications in the field of chemistry.

The non-profit organization has around 157,000 members and researchers publish tens of thousands of articles a year in its peer-reviewed journals.

ACS derives a significant portion of its revenue from its publishing work, which is in large part behind a paywall. As such, it is not happy with websites that offer their copyrighted articles for free, such as Sci-Hub.

The deviant ‘pirate site’ believes that all scientific articles should be open to the public, as that’s in the best interest of science. While some academics are sympathetic to the goal, publishers share a different view.

Just last week Sci-Hub lost its copyright infringement case against Elsevier, and now ACS is following suit with a separate case. In a complaint filed in a Virginia District Court, the scientific society demands damages for Sci-Hub’s copyright and trademark infringements.

According to the filing, Sci-Hub has “stolen Plaintiff’s copyright-protected scientific articles and reproduced and distributed them on the Internet without permission.”

ACS points out that Sci-Hub is operating two websites that are nearly identical to the organization’s official site, located at pubs.acs.org.sci-hub.cc and acs.org.secure.sci-hub.cc. These are confusing to the public, they claim, and also an infringement of its copyrights and trademarks.

“The Pirated/Spoofed Site appears to almost completely replicate the content of Plaintiff’s website. For example, the Pirated/Spoofed Site replicates webpages on ACS’s history, purpose, news, scholarship opportunities, and budget,” the complaint (pdf) reads.

“Each of these pages on the Pirated/Spoofed Site contains ACS’s Copyrighted Works and the ACS Marks, creating the impression that the Pirated/Spoofed Site is associated with ACS.”

From the ACS complaint

By offering its articles for free and mimicking the ACS website, Sci-Hub is in direct competition with the scientific society. As a result, ACS claims to lose revenue.

“Defendants are attempting to divert users and revenues away from ACS by replicating and distributing ACS’s Copyrighted Works without authorization,” the complaint reads.

With the lawsuit, ACS hopes to recoup the money it claims to have lost. It’s likely that the total damages amount will run in the millions. However, if the defendants stay out of reach, this might be hard to collect.

Perhaps this is why the current lawsuit has included a request for a broader injunction against Sci-Hub. Not only does it ask for domain name seizures, but the scientific society also wants search engines, web hosting companies and general Internet providers to block access to the site.

“That those in privity with Defendants and those with notice of the injunction, including any Internet search engines, web hosting and Internet service providers, domain name registrars, and domain name registries cease facilitating access to any or all domain names and websites through which Defendants engage in unlawful access to, use, reproduction, and distribution of the ACS Marks or ACS’s Copyrighted Works,” it reads.

If granted, it would mean that Internet providers such as Comcast would have to block users from accessing Sci-Hub. That’s a big deal since pirate site blockades are not common in the United States.

It might very well be that ACS is not expecting any compensation for the alleged copyright and trademark infringements, but that the broad injunction is their main goal. If that is the case, this case could turn out to be more crucial than it looks at first sight.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

FACT Threatens Users of ‘Pirate’ Kodi Add-Ons

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/fact-threatens-users-of-pirate-kodi-add-ons-170628/

In the UK there’s a war going on against streaming pirates. At least, that’s what the local anti-piracy body FACT would like the public to know.

The popular media streaming platform Kodi is at the center of the controversy. While Kodi is perfectly legal, many people use it in conjunction with third party add-ons that offer pirated content.

FACT hopes to curb this trend. The group has already taken action against sellers of Kodi devices pre-loaded with these add-ons and they’re keeping a keen eye on developers of illicit add-ons too.

However, according to FACT, the ‘crackdown’ doesn’t stop there. Users of pirate add-ons are also at risk, they claim.

“And then we’ll also be looking at, at some point, the end user. The reason for end users to come into this is that they are committing criminal offences,” FACT’s chief executive Kieron Sharp told the Independent.

While people who stream pirated content are generally hard to track, since they don’t broadcast their IP-address to the public, FACT says that customer data could be obtained directly from sellers of fully-loaded Kodi boxes.

“When we’re working with the police against a company that’s selling IPTV boxes or illicit streaming devices on a large scale, they have records of who they’ve sold them to,” Sharp noted.

While the current legal efforts are focused on the supply side, including these sellers, the end users may also be targeted in the future.

“We have a number of cases coming before the courts in terms of those people who have been providing, selling and distributing illicit streaming devices. It’s something for the very near future, when we’ll consider whether we go any further than that, in terms of customers.”

The comments above make it clear that FACT wants users of these pirate devices to feel vulnerable and exposed. But threatening talk is much easier than action.

It will be very hard to get someone convicted, simply because they bought a device that can access both legal and illegal content. A receipt doesn’t prove intent, and even if it did, it’s pretty much impossible to prove that a person streamed specific pirated content.

But let’s say FACT was able to prove that someone bought a fully-loaded Kodi box and streamed content without permission. How would that result in a conviction? Contrary to claims in the mainstream press, watching a pirated stream isn’t an offense covered by the new Digital Economy Act.

In theory, there could be other ways, but given the complexity of the situation, one would think that FACT would be better off spending its efforts elsewhere.

If FACT was indeed interested in going after individuals then they could easily target people who use torrents. These people broadcast their IP-addresses to the public, which makes them easy to identify. In addition, you can see what they are uploading, and they would also be liable under the Digital Economy Act.

However, after FACT’s decades-long association with the MPAA ended, its main partner in the demonization of Kodi-enabled devices is now the Premier League, who are far more concerned about piracy of live broadcasts (streaming) than content made available after the fact via torrents.

So, given the challenges of having a meaningful criminal prosecution of an end-user as suggested, that leaves us with the probability of FACT sowing fear, uncertainty, and doubt. In other words, scaring the public to deter them from buying or using a fully-loaded Kodi box.

This would also fit in with FACT’s recent claims that some pirate devices are a fire hazard. While it’s kind of FACT to be concerned about the well-being of pirates, as an anti-piracy organization their warnings also serve as a deterrent.

This strategy could pay off to a degree but there’s also some risk involved. Every day new “Kodi” related articles appear in the UK tabloid press, many of them with comments from FACT. Some of these may scare prospective users, but the same headlines also make these boxes known to a much wider public.

In fact, in what is quite a serious backfire, some recent pieces published by the popular Trinity Mirror group (which include FACT comments) actually provide a nice list of pirate addons that are still operational following recent crackdowns.

So are we just sowing fear now or educating a whole new audience?

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Sci-Hub Ordered to Pay $15 Million in Piracy Damages

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/sci-hub-ordered-to-pay-15-million-in-piracy-damages-170623/

Two years ago, academic publisher Elsevier filed a complaint against Sci-Hub and several related “pirate” sites.

It accused the websites of making academic papers widely available to the public, without permission.

While Sci-Hub is nothing like the average pirate site, it is just as illegal according to Elsevier’s legal team, who obtained a preliminary injunction from a New York District Court last fall.

The injunction ordered Sci-Hub’s founder Alexandra Elbakyan to quit offering access to any Elsevier content. However, this didn’t happen.

Instead of taking Sci-Hub down, the lawsuit achieved the opposite. Sci-Hub grew bigger and bigger up to a point where its users were downloading hundreds of thousands of papers per day.

Although Elbakyan sent a letter to the court earlier, she opted not engage in the US lawsuit any further. The same is true for her fellow defendants, associated with Libgen. As a result, Elsevier asked the court for a default judgment and a permanent injunction which were issued this week.

Following a hearing on Wednesday, the Court awarded Elsevier $15,000,000 in damages, the maximum statutory amount for the 100 copyrighted works that were listed in the complaint. In addition, the injunction, through which Sci-Hub and LibGen lost several domain names, was made permanent.

Sci-Hub founder Alexandra Elbakyan says that even if she wanted to pay the millions of dollars in revenue, she doesn’t have the money to do so.

“The money project received and spent in about six years of its operation do not add up to 15 million,” Elbakyan tells torrentFreak.

“More interesting, Elsevier says: the Sci-Hub activity ’causes irreparable injury to Elsevier, its customers and the public’ and US court agreed. That feels like a perfect crime. If you want to cause an irreparable injury to American public, what do you have to do? Now we know the answer: establish a website where they can read research articles for free,” she adds.

Previously, Elbakyan already confirmed to us that, lawsuit or not, the site is not going anywhere.

“The Sci-Hub will continue as usual. In case of problems with the domain names, users can rely on TOR scihub22266oqcxt.onion,” Elbakyan added.

Sci-Hub is regularly referred to as the “Pirate Bay for science,” and based on the site’s resilience and its response to legal threats, it can certainly live up to this claim.

The Association of American Publishers (AAP) is happy with the outcome of the case.

“As the final judgment shows, the Court has not mistaken illegal activity for a public good,” AAP President and CEO Maria A. Pallante says.

“On the contrary, it has recognized the defendants’ operation for the flagrant and sweeping infringement that it really is and affirmed the critical role of copyright law in furthering scientific research and the public interest.”

Matt McKay, a spokesperson for the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM) in Oxford went even further, telling Nature that the site doesn’t offer any value to the scientific comunity.

“Sci-Hub does not add any value to the scholarly community. It neither fosters scientific advancement nor does it value researchers’ achievements. It is simply a place for someone to go to download stolen content and then leave.”

Hundreds of thousands of academics, who regularly use the site to download papers, might contest this though.

With no real prospect of recouping the damages and an ever-resilient Elbakyan, Elsevier’s legal battle could just be a win on paper. Sci-Hub and Libgen are not going anywhere, it seems, and the lawsuit has made them more popular than ever before.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 1

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/06/23/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-1/

Introducing timeShift

TimeShift is a new blog series we’ve created to provide a weekly curated list of links and articles centered around Grafana and the growing Grafana community. Each week we come across great articles from people who have written about how they are using Grafana, how to build effective dashboards, and a lot of discussion about the state of open source monitoring. We want to collect this information in one place and post an article every Friday afternoon highlighting some of this great content.

From the Blogosphere

We see a lot of articles covering the devops side of monitoring, but it’s interesting to see how people are using Grafana for different use cases.

Plugins and Dashboards

We are excited that there have been over 100,000 plugin installations since we launched the new plugable architecture in Grafana v3. You can discover and install plugins in your own on-premises or Hosted Grafana instance from our website. Below are some recent additions and updates.

Carpet plot A varient of the heatmap graph panel with additional display options.

DalmatinerDB No-fluff, purpose-built metric database.

Gnocchi This plugin was renamed. Users should uninstall the old version and install this new version.

This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

Each week we’ll recognize a Grafana contributor and thank them for all of their PRs, bug reports and feedback. A majority of fixes and improvements come from our fantastic community!

thuck (Denis Doria)

Thank you for all of your PRs!

What do you think?

Anything in particular you’d like to see in this series of posts? Too long? Too short? Boring as shit? Let us know. Comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. With your help, we can make this a worthwhile resource.

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.