Tag Archives: AWS Loft

Join Us for AWS IAM Day on Monday, October 9, in San Francisco

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/join-us-for-aws-iam-day-on-monday-october-9-in-san-francisco/

Join us in San Francisco at the AWS Pop-up Loft for AWS IAM Day on Monday, October 9, from 9:30 A.M.–4:15 P.M. Pacific Time. At this free technical event, you will learn AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) concepts from IAM product managers, as well as tools and strategies you can use for controlling access to your AWS environment, such as the IAM policy language and IAM best practices. You also will take an IAM policy ninja dive deep into permissions and how to use IAM roles to delegate access to your AWS resources. Last, you will learn how to integrate Active Directory with AWS workloads.

You can attend one session or stay for the full day.

Learn more about the available sessions and register!

– Craig

Amazon ECS Events in February

Post Syndicated from Chris Barclay original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/amazon-ecs-events-in-february/

Here are some upcoming events for Amazon ECS this month:

Container World: Abby Fuller, senior AWS technical evangelist, will be speaking about Amazon ECS at Container World on Feb 21-23. Check out her schedule.

Microservices Day @ AWS NY Loft: Microservices Day is on Feb 24 as part of the DevOps | AWS Loft Architecture Week. Learn more about how to build and deploy microservices architectures on AWS. We will cover how to use Amazon ECS and AWS Lambda to build microservices. Signup here.

Seattle AWS Architects & Engineers Meetup: Join us Feb 28 at SURF Incubator to learn more about AWS Batch and Amazon ECS. Food and drinks provided. RSVP here.

AWS Week in Review – October 31, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-october-31-2016/

Over 25 internal and external contributors helped out with pull requests and fresh content this week! Thank you all for your help and your support.

Monday

October 31

Tuesday

November 1

Wednesday

November 2

Thursday

November 3

Friday

November 4

Saturday

November 5

Sunday

November 6

New & Notable Open Source

New Customer Success Stories

  • Apposphere – Using AWS and bitfusion.io from the AWS Marketplace, Apposphere can scale 50 to 60 percent month-over-month while keeping customer satisfaction high. Based in Austin, Texas, the Apposphere mobile app delivers real-time leads from social media channels.
  • CADFEM – CADFEM uses AWS to make complex simulation software more accessible to smaller engineering firms, helping them compete with much larger ones. The firm specializes in simulation software and services for the engineering industry.
  • Mambu – Using AWS, Mambu helped one of its customers launch the United Kingdom’s first cloud-based bank, and the company is now on track for tenfold growth, giving it a competitive edge in the fast-growing fintech sector. Mambu is an all-in-one SaaS banking platform for managing credit and deposit products quickly, simply, and affordably.
  • Okta – Okta uses AWS to get new services into production in days instead of weeks. Okta creates products that use identity information to grant people access to applications on multiple devices at any time, while still enforcing strong security protections.
  • PayPlug – PayPlug is a startup created in 2013 that developed an online payment solution. It differentiates itself by the simplicity of its services and its ease of integration on e-commerce websites. PayPlug is a startup created in 2013 that developed an online payment solution. It differentiates itself by the simplicity of its services and its ease of integration on e-commerce websites
  • Rent-a-Center – Rent-a-Center is a leading renter of furniture, appliances, and electronics to customers in the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, and Mexico. Rent-A-Center uses AWS to manage its new e-commerce website, scale to support a 1,000 percent spike in site traffic, and enable a DevOps approach.
  • UK Ministry of Justice – By going all in on the AWS Cloud, the UK Ministry of Justice (MoJ) can use technology to enhance the effectiveness and fairness of the services it provides to British citizens. The MoJ is a ministerial department of the UK government. MoJ had its own on-premises data center, but lacked the ability to change and adapt rapidly to the needs of its citizens. As it created more digital services, MoJ turned to AWS to automate, consolidate, and deliver constituent services.

New SlideShare Presentations

New YouTube Videos

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

AWS Week in Review – October 24, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-october-24-2016/

Another busy week in AWS-land! Today’s post included submissions from 21 internal and external contributors, along with material from my RSS feeds, my inbox, and other things that come my way. To join in the fun, create (or find) some awesome AWS-related content and submit a pull request!

Monday

October 24

Tuesday

October 25

Wednesday

October 26

Thursday

October 27

Friday

October 28

Saturday

October 29

Sunday

October 30

New & Notable Open Source

  • aws-git-backed-static-website is a Git-backed static website generator powered entirely by AWS.
  • rds-pgbadger fetches log files from an Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL instance and generates a beautiful pgBadger report.
  • aws-lambda-redshift-copy is an AWS Lambda function that automates the copy command in Redshift.
  • VarnishAutoScalingCluster contains code and instructions for setting up a shared, horizontally scalable Varnish cluster that scales up and down using Auto Scaling groups.
  • aws-base-setup contains starter templates for developing AWS CloudFormation-based AWS stacks.
  • terraform_f5 contains Terraform scripts to instantiate a Big IP in AWS.
  • claudia-bot-builder creates chat bots for Facebook, Slack, Skype, Telegram, GroupMe, Kik, and Twilio and deploys them to AWS Lambda in minutes.
  • aws-iam-ssh-auth is a set of scripts used to authenticate users connecting to EC2 via SSH with IAM.
  • go-serverless sets up a go.cd server for serverless application deployment in AWS.
  • awsq is a helper script to run batch jobs on AWS using SQS.
  • respawn generates CloudFormation templates from YAML specifications.

New SlideShare Presentations

New Customer Success Stories

  • AlbemaTV – AbemaTV is an Internet media-services company that operates one of Japan’s leading streaming platforms, FRESH! by AbemaTV. The company built its microservices platform on Amazon EC2 Container Service and uses an Amazon Aurora data store for its write-intensive microservices—such as timelines and chat—and a MySQL database on Amazon RDS for the remaining microservices APIs. By using AWS, AbemaTV has been able to quickly deploy its new platform at scale with minimal engineering effort.
  • Celgene – Celgene uses AWS to enable secure collaboration between internal and external researchers, allow individual scientists to launch hundreds of compute nodes, and reduce the time it takes to do computational jobs from weeks or months to less than a day. Celgene is a global biopharmaceutical company that creates drugs that fight cancer and other diseases and disorders. Celgene runs its high-performance computing research clusters, as well as its research collaboration environment, on AWS.
  • Under Armour – Under Armour can scale its Connected Fitness apps to meet the demands of more than 180 million global users, innovate and deliver new products and features more quickly, and expand internationally by taking advantage of the reliability and high availability of AWS. The company is a global leader in performance footwear, apparel, and equipment. Under Armour runs its growing Connected Fitness app platform on the AWS Cloud.

New YouTube Videos

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

AWS Pop-up Loft and Innovation Lab in Munich

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-pop-up-loft-and-innovation-lab-in-munich/

I’m happy to be able to announce that an AWS Pop-up Loft is opening in Munich on October 26th, with a full calendar of events and a brand-new AWS Innovation Lab, all created with the help of our friends at Intel and Nordcloud. Developers, entrepreneurs, students come to AWS Lofts around the world to learn, code, collaborate, and to ask questions. The Loft will provide developers and architects in Munich with access to local technical resources and expertise that will help them to build robust and successful cloud-powered applications.

Near Munich Königsplatz Station
This loft is located at Brienner Str 49, 80333 in Munich, close to Königsplatz Station and convenient to Stiglmaierplatz. Hours are 10 AM to 6 PM Monday through Friday, with special events in the evening.

During the day, you will have access to the Ask an Architect Bar, daily education sessions, Wi-Fi, a co-working space, coffee, and snacks, all at no charge. There will also be resources to help you to create, run, and grow your startup including educational sessions from local AWS partners, accelerators, and incubators.

Ask an Architect
Step up to the Ask an Architect Bar with your code, architecture diagrams, and your AWS questions at the ready! Simply walk in. You will have access to deep technical expertise and will be able to get guidance on AWS architecture, usage of specific AWS services and features, cost optimization, and more.

AWS Education Sessions
During the day, AWS Solution Architects, Product Managers, and Evangelists will be leading 60-minute educational sessions designed to help you to learn more about specific AWS services and use cases. You can attend these sessions to learn about Serverless Architectures, Mobile & Gaming, Databases, Big Data, Compute & Networking, Architecture, Operations, Security, Machine Learning, and more, all at no charge.

Startup Education Sessions
AWS startup community representatives, incubators, accelerators, startup scene influencers, and hot startup customers running on AWS will share best-practices, entrepreneurial know-how, and lessons learned. Pop in to learn the art of pitching, customer validation & profiling, PR for startups & corporations, and more.

Innovation Lab
The new AWS Innovation Lab is adjacent to the Munich Loft. With over 350 square meters of space, the Lab is Designed to be a resource for mid-market and enterprise companies that are ready to grow their business. It will feature interactive demos, videos, and other materials designed to explain the benefits of digital transformation and cloud-powered innovation, with a focus on Big Data, mobile applications, and the fourth industrial revolution (Industry 4.0).

Come in and Say Hello
We look forward to using the Loft to meet and to connect with our customers, and expect that it will be a place that they visit on a regular basis. Please feel free to stop in and say hello to my colleagues at the Munich Loft if you happen to find yourself in the city!

Jeff;

Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse with Serverless Microservices

Post Syndicated from Aaron Kao original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/surviving-the-zombie-apocalypse-with-serverless-microservices/

Run Apps without the Bite!

by: Kyle Somers – Associate Solutions Architect

Let’s face it, managing servers is a pain! Capacity management and scaling is even worse. Now imagine dedicating your time to SysOps during a zombie apocalypse — barricading the door from flesh eaters with one arm while patching an OS with the other.

This sounds like something straight out of a nightmare. Lucky for you, this doesn’t have to be the case. Over at AWS, we’re making it easier than ever to build and power apps at scale with powerful managed services, so you can focus on your core business – like surviving – while we handle the infrastructure management that helps you do so.

Join the AWS Lambda Signal Corps!

At AWS re:Invent in 2015, we piloted a workshop where participants worked in groups to build a serverless chat application for zombie apocalypse survivors, using Amazon S3, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon API Gateway, and AWS Lambda. Participants learned about microservices design patterns and best practices. They then extended the functionality of the serverless chat application with various add-on functionalities – such as mobile SMS integration, and zombie motion detection – using additional services like Amazon SNS and Amazon Elasticsearch Service.

Between the widespread interest in serverless architectures and AWS Lambda by our customers, we’ve recognized the excitement around this subject. Therefore, we are happy to announce that we’ll be taking this event on the road in the U.S. and abroad to recruit new developers for the AWS Lambda Signal Corps!

 

Help us save humanity! Learn More and Register Here!

 

Washington, DC | March 10 – Mission Accomplished!

San Francisco, CA @ AWS Loft | March 24 – Mission Accomplished!

New York City, NY @ AWS Loft | April 13 – Mission Accomplished!

London, England @ AWS Loft | April 25

Austin, TX | April 26

Atlanta, GA | May 4

Santa Monica, CA | June 7

Berlin, Germany | July 19

San Francisco, CA @ AWS Loft | August 16

New York City, NY @ AWS Loft | August 18

 

If you’re unable to join us at one of these workshops, that’s OK! In this post, I’ll show you how our survivor chat application incorporates some important microservices design patterns and how you can power your apps in the same way using a serverless architecture.


 

What Are Serverless Architectures?

At AWS, we know that infrastructure management can be challenging. We also understand that customers prefer to focus on delivering value to their business and customers. There’s a lot of undifferentiated heavy lifting to be building and running applications, such as installing software, managing servers, coordinating patch schedules, and scaling to meet demand. Serverless architectures allow you to build and run applications and services without having to manage infrastructure. Your application still runs on servers, but all the server management is done for you by AWS. Serverless architectures can make it easier to build, manage, and scale applications in the cloud by eliminating much of the heavy lifting involved with server management.

Key Benefits of Serverless Architectures

  • No Servers to Manage: There are no servers for you to provision and manage. All the server management is done for you by AWS.
  • Increased Productivity: You can now fully focus your attention on building new features and apps because you are freed from the complexities of server management, allowing you to iterate faster and reduce your development time.
  • Continuous Scaling: Your applications and services automatically scale up and down based on size of the workload.

What Should I Expect to Learn at a Zombie Microservices Workshop?

The workshop content we developed is designed to demonstrate best practices for serverless architectures using AWS. In this post we’ll discuss the following topics:

  • Which services are useful when designing a serverless application on AWS (see below!)
  • Design considerations for messaging, data transformation, and business or app-tier logic when building serverless microservices.
  • Best practices demonstrated in the design of our zombie survivor chat application.
  • Next steps for you to get started building your own serverless microservices!

Several AWS services were used to design our zombie survivor chat application. Each of these services are managed and highly scalable. Let’s take a quick at look at which ones we incorporated in the architecture:

  • AWS Lambda allows you to run your code without provisioning or managing servers. Just upload your code (currently Node.js, Python, or Java) and Lambda takes care of everything required to run and scale your code with high availability. You can set up your code to automatically trigger from other AWS services or call it directly from any web or mobile app. Lambda is used to power many use cases, such as application back ends, scheduled administrative tasks, and even big data workloads via integration with other AWS services such as Amazon S3, DynamoDB, Redshift, and Kinesis.
  • Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) is our object storage service, which provides developers and IT teams with secure, durable, and scalable storage in the cloud. S3 is used to support a wide variety of use cases and is easy to use with a simple interface for storing and retrieving any amount of data. In the case of our survivor chat application, it can even be used to host static websites with CORS and DNS support.
  • Amazon API Gateway makes it easy to build RESTful APIs for your applications. API Gateway is scalable and simple to set up, allowing you to build integrations with back-end applications, including code running on AWS Lambda, while the service handles the scaling of your API requests.
  • Amazon DynamoDB is a fast and flexible NoSQL database service for all applications that need consistent, single-digit millisecond latency at any scale. It is a fully managed cloud database and supports both document and key-value store models. Its flexible data model and reliable performance make it a great fit for mobile, web, gaming, ad tech, IoT, and many other applications.

Overview of the Zombie Survivor Chat App

The survivor chat application represents a completely serverless architecture that delivers a baseline chat application (written using AngularJS) to workshop participants upon which additional functionality can be added. In order to deliver this baseline chat application, an AWS CloudFormation template is provided to participants, which spins up the environment in their account. The following diagram represents a high level architecture of the components that are launched automatically:

High-Level Architecture of Survivor Serverless Chat App

  • Amazon S3 bucket is created to store the static web app contents of the chat application.
  • AWS Lambda functions are created to serve as the back-end business logic tier for processing reads/writes of chat messages.
  • API endpoints are created using API Gateway and mapped to Lambda functions. The API Gateway POST method points to a WriteMessages Lambda function. The GET method points to a GetMessages Lambda function.
  • A DynamoDB messages table is provisioned to act as our data store for the messages from the chat application.

Serverless Survivor Chat App Hosted on Amazon S3

With the CloudFormation stack launched and the components built out, the end result is a fully functioning chat app hosted in S3, using API Gateway and Lambda to process requests, and DynamoDB as the persistence for our chat messages.

With this baseline app, participants join in teams to build out additional functionality, including the following:

  • Integration of SMS/MMS via Twilio. Send messages to chat from SMS.
  • Motion sensor detection of nearby zombies with Amazon SNS and Intel® Edison and Grove IoT Starter Kit. AWS provides a shared motion sensor for the workshop, and you consume its messages from SNS.
  • Help-me panic button with IoT.
  • Integration with Slack for messaging from another platform.
  • Typing indicator to see which survivors are typing.
  • Serverless analytics of chat messages using Amazon Elasticsearch Service (Amazon ES).
  • Any other functionality participants can think of!

As a part of the workshop, AWS provides guidance for most of these tasks. With these add-ons completed, the architecture of the chat system begins to look quite a bit more sophisticated, as shown below:

Architecture of Survivor Chat with Additional Add-on Functionality

Architectural Tenants of the Serverless Survivor Chat

For the most part, the design patterns you’d see in a traditional server-yes environment you will also find in a serverless environment. No surprises there. With that said, it never hurts to revisit best practices while learning new ones. So let’s review some key patterns we incorporated in our serverless application.

Decoupling Is Paramount

In the survivor chat application, Lambda functions are serving as our tier for business logic. Since users interact with Lambda at the function level, it serves you well to split up logic into separate functions as much as possible so you can scale the logic tier independently from the source and destinations upon which it serves.

As you’ll see in the architecture diagram in the above section, the application has separate Lambda functions for the chat service, the search service, the indicator service, etc. Decoupling is also incorporated through the use of API Gateway, which exposes our back-end logic via a unified RESTful interface. This model allows us to design our back-end logic with potentially different programming languages, systems, or communications channels, while keeping the requesting endpoints unaware of the implementation. Use this pattern and you won’t cry for help when you need to scale, update, add, or remove pieces of your environment.

Separate Your Data Stores

Treat each data store as an isolated application component of the service it supports. One common pitfall when following microservices architectures is to forget about the data layer. By keeping the data stores specific to the service they support, you can better manage the resources needed at the data layer specifically for that service. This is the true value in microservices.

In the survivor chat application, this practice is illustrated with the Activity and Messages DynamoDB tables. The activity indicator service has its own data store (Activity table) while the chat service has its own (Messages). These tables can scale independently along with their respective services. This scenario also represents a good example of statefuless. The implementation of the talking indicator add-on uses DynamoDB via the Activity table to track state information about which users are talking. Remember, many of the benefits of microservices are lost if the components are still all glued together at the data layer in the end, creating a messy common denominator for scaling.

Leverage Data Transformations up the Stack

When designing a service, data transformation and compatibility are big components. How will you handle inputs from many different clients, users, systems for your service? Will you run different flavors of your environment to correspond with different incoming request standards?  Absolutely not!

With API Gateway, data transformation becomes significantly easier through built-in models and mapping templates. With these features you can build data transformation and mapping logic into the API layer for requests and responses. This results in less work for you since API Gateway is a managed service. In the case of our survivor chat app, AWS Lambda and our survivor chat app require JSON while Twilio likes XML for the SMS integration. This type of transformation can be offloaded to API Gateway, leaving you with a cleaner business tier and one less thing to design around!

Use API Gateway as your interface and Lambda as your common backend implementation. API Gateway uses Apache Velocity Template Language (VTL) and JSONPath for transformation logic. Of course, there is a trade-off to be considered, as a lot of transformation logic could be handled in your business-logic tier (Lambda). But, why manage that yourself in application code when you can transparently handle it in a fully managed service through API Gateway? Here are a few things to keep in mind when handling transformations using API Gateway and Lambda:

  • Transform first; then call your common back-end logic.
  • Use API Gateway VTL transformations first when possible.
  • Use Lambda to preprocess data in ways that VTL can’t.

Using API Gateway VTL for Input/Output Data Transformations

 

Security Through Service Isolation and Least Privilege

As a general recommendation when designing your services, always utilize least privilege and isolate components of your application to provide control over access. In the survivor chat application, a permissions-based model is used via AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM). IAM is integrated in every service on the AWS platform and provides the capability for services and applications to assume roles with strict permission sets to perform their least-privileged access needs. Along with access controls, you should implement audit and access logging to provide the best visibility into your microservices. This is made easy with Amazon CloudWatch Logs and AWS CloudTrail. CloudTrail enables audit capability of API calls made on the platform while CloudWatch Logs enables you to ship custom log data to AWS. Although our implementation of Amazon Elasticsearch in the survivor chat is used for analyzing chat messages, you can easily ship your log data to it and perform analytics on your application. You can incorporate security best practices in the following ways with the survivor chat application:

  • Each Lambda function should have an IAM role to access only the resources it needs. For example, the GetMessages function can read from the Messages table while the WriteMessages function can write to it. But they cannot access the Activities table that is used to track who is typing for the indicator service.
  • Each API Gateway endpoint must have IAM permissions to execute the Lambda function(s) it is tied to. This model ensures that Lambda is only executed from the principle that is allowed to execute it, in this case the API Gateway method that triggers the back end function.
  • DynamoDB requires read/write permissions via IAM, which limits anonymous database activity.
  • Use AWS CloudTrail to audit API activity on the platform and among the various services. This provides traceability, especially to see who is invoking your Lambda functions.
  • Design Lambda functions to publish meaningful outputs, as these are logged to CloudWatch Logs on your behalf.

FYI, in our application, we allow anonymous access to the chat API Gateway endpoints. We want to encourage all survivors to plug into the service without prior registration and start communicating. We’ve assumed zombies aren’t intelligent enough to hack into our communication channels. Until the apocalypse, though, stay true to API keys and authorization with signatures, which API Gateway supports!

Don’t Abandon Dev/Test

When developing with microservices, you can still leverage separate development and test environments as a part of the deployment lifecycle. AWS provides several features to help you continue building apps along the same trajectory as before, including these:

  • Lambda function versioning and aliases: Use these features to version your functions based on the stages of deployment such as development, testing, staging, pre-production, etc. Or perhaps make changes to an existing Lambda function in production without downtime.
  • Lambda service blueprints: Lambda comes with dozens of blueprints to get you started with prewritten code that you can use as a skeleton, or a fully functioning solution, to complete your serverless back end. These include blueprints with hooks into Slack, S3, DynamoDB, and more.
  • API Gateway deployment stages: Similar to Lambda versioning, this feature lets you configure separate API stages, along with unique stage variables and deployment versions within each stage. This allows you to test your API with the same or different back ends while it progresses through changes that you make at the API layer.
  • Mock Integrations with API Gateway: Configure dummy responses that developers can use to test their code while the true implementation of your API is being developed. Mock integrations make it faster to iterate through the API portion of a development lifecycle by streamlining pieces that used to be very sequential/waterfall.

Using Mock Integrations with API Gateway

Stay Tuned for Updates!

Now that you’ve got the necessary best practices to design your microservices, do you have what it takes to fight against the zombie hoard? The serverless options we explored are ready for you to get started with and the survivors are counting on you!

Be sure to keep an eye on the AWS GitHub repo. Although I didn’t cover each component of the survivor chat app in this post, we’ll be deploying this workshop and code soon for you to launch on your own! Keep an eye out for Zombie Workshops coming to your city, or nominate your city for a workshop here.

For more information on how you can get started with serverless architectures on AWS, refer to the following resources:

Whitepaper – AWS Serverless Multi-Tier Architectures

Reference Architectures and Sample Code

*Special thanks to my colleagues Ben Snively, Curtis Bray, Dean Bryen, Warren Santner, and Aaron Kao at AWS. They were instrumental to our team developing the content referenced in this post.

AWS Week in Review – March 14, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-march-14-2016/

Let’s take a quick look at what happened in AWS-land last week:

Monday
March 14

We announced that the Developer Preview of AWS SDK for C++ is Now Available.
We celebrated Ten Years in the AWS Cloud.
We launched Amazon EMR 4.4.0 with Sqoop, HCatalog, Java 8, and More.
The AWS Compute Blog announced the Launch of AWS Lambda and Amazon API Gateway in the EU (Frankfurt) Region.
The Amazon Simple Email Service Blog annouced that Amazon SES Now Supports Custom Email From Domains.
The AWS Java Blog talked about Using Amazon SQS with Spring Boot and Spring JMS.
The AWS Partner Network Blog urged you to Take Advantage of AWS Self-Paced Labs.
The AWS Windows and .NET Developer Blog showed you how to Retrieve Request Metrics from the AWS SDK for .NET.
The AWS Government, Education, & Nonprofits Blog announced the New Amazon-Busan Cloud Innovation and Technology Center.
We announced Lumberyard Beta 1.1 is Now Available.
Bometric shared AWS Security Best Practices: Network Security.
CloudCheckr listed 5 AWS Security Traps You Might be Missing.
Serverless Code announced that ServerlessConf is Here!
Cloud Academy launched 2 New AWS Courses – (Advanced Techniques for AWS Monitoring, Metrics and Logging and Advanced Deployment Techniques on AWS).
Cloudonaut reminded you to Avoid Sharing Key Pairs for EC2.
8KMiles talked about How Cloud Computing Can Address Healthcare Industry Challenges.
Evident discussed the CIS Foundations Benchmark for AWS Security.
Talkin’ Cloud shared 10 Facts About AWS as it Celebrates 10 Years.
The Next Platform reviewed Ten Years of AWS And a Status Check for HPC Clouds.
ZephyCloud is AWS-powered Wind Farm Design Software.

Tuesday
March 15

We announced the AWS Database Migration Service.
We announced that AWS CloudFormation Now Supports Amazon GameLift.
The AWS Partner Network Blog reminded everyone that Friends Don’t Let Friends Build Data Centers.
The Amazon GameDev Blog talked about Using Autoscaling to Control Costs While Delivering Great Player Experiences.
We updated the AWS SDK for JavaScript, the AWS SDK for Ruby, and the AWS SDK for Go.
Calorious talked about Uploading Images into Amazon S3.
Serverless Code showed you How to Use LXML in Lambda.
The Acquia Developer Center talked about Open-Sourcing Moonshot.
Concurrency Labs encouraged you to Hatch a Swarm of AWS IoT Things Using Locust, EC2 and Get Your IoT Application Ready for Prime Time.

Wednesday
March 16

We announced an S3 Lifecycle Management Update with Support for Multipart Upload and Delete Markers.
We announced that the EC2 Container Service is Now Available in the US West (Oregon) Region.
We announced that Amazon ElastiCache now supports the R3 node family in AWS China (Beijing) and AWS South America (Sao Paulo) Regions.
We announced that AWS IoT Now Integrates with Amazon Elasticsearch Service and CloudWatch.
We published the Puppet on the AWS Cloud: Quick Start Reference Deployment.
We announced that Amazon RDS Enhanced Monitoring is now available in the Asia Pacific (Seoul) Region.
I wrote about Additional Failover Control for Amazon Aurora (this feature was launched earlier in the year).
The AWS Security Blog showed you How to Set Up Uninterrupted, Federated User Access to AWS Using AD FS.
The AWS Java Blog talked about Migrating Your Databases Using AWS Database Migration Service.
We updated the AWS SDK for Java and the AWS CLI.
CloudWedge asked Cloud Computing: Cost Saver or Additional Expense?
Gathering Clouds reviewed New 2016 AWS Services: Certificate Manager, Lambda, Dev SecOps.

Thursday
March 17

We announced the new Marketplace Metering Service for 3rd Party Sellers.
We announced Amazon VPC Endpoints for Amazon S3 in South America (Sao Paulo) and Asia Pacific (Seoul).
We announced AWS CloudTrail Support for Kinesis Firehose.
The AWS Big Data Blog showed you How to Analyze a Time Series in Real Time with AWS Lambda, Amazon Kinesis and Amazon DynamoDB Streams.
The AWS Enterprise Blog showed you How to Create a Cloud Center of Excellence in your Enterprise, and then talked about Staffing Your Enterprise’s Cloud Center of Excellence.
The AWS Mobile Development Blog showed you How to Analyze Device-Generated Data with AWS IoT and Amazon Elasticsearch Service.
Stelligent initiated a series on Serverless Delivery.
CloudHealth Academy talked about Modeling RDS Reservations.
N2W Software talked about How to Pre-Warm Your EBS Volumes on AWS.
ParkMyCloud explained How to Save Money on AWS With ParkMyCloud.

Friday
March 18

The AWS Government, Education, & Nonprofits Blog told you how AWS GovCloud (US) Helps ASD Cut Costs by 50% While Dramatically Improving Security.
The Amazon GameDev Blog discussed Code Archeology: Crafting Lumberyard.
Calorious talked about Importing JSON into DynamoDB.
DZone Cloud Zone talked about Graceful Shutdown Using AWS AutoScaling Groups and Terraform.

Saturday
March 19

DZone Cloud Zone wants to honor some Trailblazing Women in the Cloud.

Sunday
March 20

 Cloudability talked about How Atlassian Nailed the Reserved Instance Buying Process.
DZone Cloud Zone talked about Serverless Delivery Architectures.
Gorillastack explained Why the Cloud is THE Key Technology Enabler for Digital Transformation.

New & Notable Open Source

Tumbless is a blogging platform based only on S3 and your browser.
aws-amicleaner cleans up old, unused AMIs and related snapshots.
alexa-aws-administration helps you to do various administration tasks in your AWS account using an Amazon Echo.
aws-s3-zipper takes an S3 bucket folder and zips it for streaming.
aws-lambda-helper is a collection of helper methods for Lambda.
CloudSeed lets you describe a list of AWS stack components, then configure and build a custom stack.
aws-ses-sns-dashboard is a Go-based dashboard with SES and SNS notifications.
snowplow-scala-analytics-sdk is a Scala SDK for working with Snowplow-enriched events in Spark using Lambda.
StackFormation is a lightweight CloudFormation stack manager.
aws-keychain-util is a command-line utility to manage AWS credentials in the OS X keychain.

New SlideShare Presentations

Account Separation and Mandatory Access Control on AWS.
Crypto Options in AWS.
Security Day IAM Recommended Practices.
What’s Nearly New.

New Customer Success Stories

AdiMap measures online advertising spend, app financials, and salary data. Using AWS, AdiMap builds predictive financial models without spending millions on compute resources and hardware, providing scalable financial intelligence and reducing time to market for new products.
Change.org is the world’s largest and fastest growing social change platform, with more than 125 million users in 196 countries starting campaigns and mobilizing support for local causes and global issues. The organization runs its website and business intelligence cluster on AWS, and runs its continuous integration and testing on Solano CI from APN member Solano Labs.
Flatiron Health has been able to reach 230 cancer clinics and 2,200 clinicians across the United States with a solution that captures and organizes oncology data, helping to support cancer treatments. Flatiron moved its solution to AWS to improve speed to market and to minimize the time and expense that the startup company needs to devote to its IT infrastructure.
Global Red specializes in lifecycle marketing, including strategy, data, analytics, and execution across all digital channels. By re-architecting and migrating its data platform and related applications to AWS, Global Red reduced the time to onboard new customers for its advertising trading desk and marketing automation platforms by 50 percent.
GMobi primarily sells its products and services to Original Design Manufacturers and Original Equipment Manufacturers in emerging markets. By running its “over the air” firmware updates, mobile billing, and advertising software development kits in an AWS infrastructure, GMobi has grown to support 120 million users while maintaining more than 99.9 percent availability
Time Inc.’s new chief technology officer joined the renowned media organization in early 2014, and promised big changes. With AWS, Time Inc. can leverage security features and functionality that mirror the benefits of cloud computing, including rich tools, best-in-class industry standards and protocols and lower costs.
Seaco Global is one of the world’s largest shipping companies. By using AWS to run SAP applications, it also reduced the time needed to complete monthly business processes to just one day, down from four days in the past.

New YouTube Videos

AWS Database Migration Service.
Introduction to Amazon WorkSpaces.
AWS Pop-up Loft.
Save the Date – AWS re:Invent 2016.

Upcoming Events

March 22nd – Live Event (Seattle, Washington) – AWS Big Data Meetup – Intro to SparkR.
March 22nd – Live Broadcast – VoiceOps: Commanding and Controlling Your AWS environments using Amazon Echo and Lambda.
March 23rd – Live Event (Atlanta, Georgia) – AWS Key Management Service & AWS Storage Services for a Hybrid Cloud (Atlanta AWS Community).
April 6th – Live Event (Boston, Massachusetts) AWS at Bio-IT World.
April 18th & 19th – Live Event (Chicago, Illinois) – AWS Summit – Chicago.
April 20th – Live Event (Melbourne, Australia) – Inaugural Melbourne Serverless Meetup.
April 26th – Live Event (Sydney, Australia) – AWS Partner Summit.
April 26th – Live Event (Sydney, Australia) – Inaugural Sydney Serverless Meetup.
ParkMyCloud 2016 AWS Cost-Reduction Roadshow.
AWS Loft – San Francisco.
AWS Loft – New York.
AWS Loft – Tel Aviv.
AWS Zombie Microservices Roadshow.
AWS Public Sector Events.
AWS Global Summit Series.

Help Wanted

AWS Careers.

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.
Jeff;

AWS Week in Review – March 14, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-march-14-2016/

Let’s take a quick look at what happened in AWS-land last week:

Monday
March 14

We announced that the Developer Preview of AWS SDK for C++ is Now Available.
We celebrated Ten Years in the AWS Cloud.
We launched Amazon EMR 4.4.0 with Sqoop, HCatalog, Java 8, and More.
The AWS Compute Blog announced the Launch of AWS Lambda and Amazon API Gateway in the EU (Frankfurt) Region.
The Amazon Simple Email Service Blog annouced that Amazon SES Now Supports Custom Email From Domains.
The AWS Java Blog talked about Using Amazon SQS with Spring Boot and Spring JMS.
The AWS Partner Network Blog urged you to Take Advantage of AWS Self-Paced Labs.
The AWS Windows and .NET Developer Blog showed you how to Retrieve Request Metrics from the AWS SDK for .NET.
The AWS Government, Education, & Nonprofits Blog announced the New Amazon-Busan Cloud Innovation and Technology Center.
We announced Lumberyard Beta 1.1 is Now Available.
Bometric shared AWS Security Best Practices: Network Security.
CloudCheckr listed 5 AWS Security Traps You Might be Missing.
Serverless Code announced that ServerlessConf is Here!
Cloud Academy launched 2 New AWS Courses – (Advanced Techniques for AWS Monitoring, Metrics and Logging and Advanced Deployment Techniques on AWS).
Cloudonaut reminded you to Avoid Sharing Key Pairs for EC2.
8KMiles talked about How Cloud Computing Can Address Healthcare Industry Challenges.
Evident discussed the CIS Foundations Benchmark for AWS Security.
Talkin’ Cloud shared 10 Facts About AWS as it Celebrates 10 Years.
The Next Platform reviewed Ten Years of AWS And a Status Check for HPC Clouds.
ZephyCloud is AWS-powered Wind Farm Design Software.

Tuesday
March 15

We announced the AWS Database Migration Service.
We announced that AWS CloudFormation Now Supports Amazon GameLift.
The AWS Partner Network Blog reminded everyone that Friends Don’t Let Friends Build Data Centers.
The Amazon GameDev Blog talked about Using Autoscaling to Control Costs While Delivering Great Player Experiences.
We updated the AWS SDK for JavaScript, the AWS SDK for Ruby, and the AWS SDK for Go.
Calorious talked about Uploading Images into Amazon S3.
Serverless Code showed you How to Use LXML in Lambda.
The Acquia Developer Center talked about Open-Sourcing Moonshot.
Concurrency Labs encouraged you to Hatch a Swarm of AWS IoT Things Using Locust, EC2 and Get Your IoT Application Ready for Prime Time.

Wednesday
March 16

We announced an S3 Lifecycle Management Update with Support for Multipart Upload and Delete Markers.
We announced that the EC2 Container Service is Now Available in the US West (Oregon) Region.
We announced that Amazon ElastiCache now supports the R3 node family in AWS China (Beijing) and AWS South America (Sao Paulo) Regions.
We announced that AWS IoT Now Integrates with Amazon Elasticsearch Service and CloudWatch.
We published the Puppet on the AWS Cloud: Quick Start Reference Deployment.
We announced that Amazon RDS Enhanced Monitoring is now available in the Asia Pacific (Seoul) Region.
I wrote about Additional Failover Control for Amazon Aurora (this feature was launched earlier in the year).
The AWS Security Blog showed you How to Set Up Uninterrupted, Federated User Access to AWS Using AD FS.
The AWS Java Blog talked about Migrating Your Databases Using AWS Database Migration Service.
We updated the AWS SDK for Java and the AWS CLI.
CloudWedge asked Cloud Computing: Cost Saver or Additional Expense?
Gathering Clouds reviewed New 2016 AWS Services: Certificate Manager, Lambda, Dev SecOps.

Thursday
March 17

We announced the new Marketplace Metering Service for 3rd Party Sellers.
We announced Amazon VPC Endpoints for Amazon S3 in South America (Sao Paulo) and Asia Pacific (Seoul).
We announced AWS CloudTrail Support for Kinesis Firehose.
The AWS Big Data Blog showed you How to Analyze a Time Series in Real Time with AWS Lambda, Amazon Kinesis and Amazon DynamoDB Streams.
The AWS Enterprise Blog showed you How to Create a Cloud Center of Excellence in your Enterprise, and then talked about Staffing Your Enterprise’s Cloud Center of Excellence.
The AWS Mobile Development Blog showed you How to Analyze Device-Generated Data with AWS IoT and Amazon Elasticsearch Service.
Stelligent initiated a series on Serverless Delivery.
CloudHealth Academy talked about Modeling RDS Reservations.
N2W Software talked about How to Pre-Warm Your EBS Volumes on AWS.
ParkMyCloud explained How to Save Money on AWS With ParkMyCloud.

Friday
March 18

The AWS Government, Education, & Nonprofits Blog told you how AWS GovCloud (US) Helps ASD Cut Costs by 50% While Dramatically Improving Security.
The Amazon GameDev Blog discussed Code Archeology: Crafting Lumberyard.
Calorious talked about Importing JSON into DynamoDB.
DZone Cloud Zone talked about Graceful Shutdown Using AWS AutoScaling Groups and Terraform.

Saturday
March 19

DZone Cloud Zone wants to honor some Trailblazing Women in the Cloud.

Sunday
March 20

 Cloudability talked about How Atlassian Nailed the Reserved Instance Buying Process.
DZone Cloud Zone talked about Serverless Delivery Architectures.
Gorillastack explained Why the Cloud is THE Key Technology Enabler for Digital Transformation.

New & Notable Open Source

Tumbless is a blogging platform based only on S3 and your browser.
aws-amicleaner cleans up old, unused AMIs and related snapshots.
alexa-aws-administration helps you to do various administration tasks in your AWS account using an Amazon Echo.
aws-s3-zipper takes an S3 bucket folder and zips it for streaming.
aws-lambda-helper is a collection of helper methods for Lambda.
CloudSeed lets you describe a list of AWS stack components, then configure and build a custom stack.
aws-ses-sns-dashboard is a Go-based dashboard with SES and SNS notifications.
snowplow-scala-analytics-sdk is a Scala SDK for working with Snowplow-enriched events in Spark using Lambda.
StackFormation is a lightweight CloudFormation stack manager.
aws-keychain-util is a command-line utility to manage AWS credentials in the OS X keychain.

New SlideShare Presentations

Account Separation and Mandatory Access Control on AWS.
Crypto Options in AWS.
Security Day IAM Recommended Practices.
What’s Nearly New.

New Customer Success Stories

AdiMap measures online advertising spend, app financials, and salary data. Using AWS, AdiMap builds predictive financial models without spending millions on compute resources and hardware, providing scalable financial intelligence and reducing time to market for new products.
Change.org is the world’s largest and fastest growing social change platform, with more than 125 million users in 196 countries starting campaigns and mobilizing support for local causes and global issues. The organization runs its website and business intelligence cluster on AWS, and runs its continuous integration and testing on Solano CI from APN member Solano Labs.
Flatiron Health has been able to reach 230 cancer clinics and 2,200 clinicians across the United States with a solution that captures and organizes oncology data, helping to support cancer treatments. Flatiron moved its solution to AWS to improve speed to market and to minimize the time and expense that the startup company needs to devote to its IT infrastructure.
Global Red specializes in lifecycle marketing, including strategy, data, analytics, and execution across all digital channels. By re-architecting and migrating its data platform and related applications to AWS, Global Red reduced the time to onboard new customers for its advertising trading desk and marketing automation platforms by 50 percent.
GMobi primarily sells its products and services to Original Design Manufacturers and Original Equipment Manufacturers in emerging markets. By running its “over the air” firmware updates, mobile billing, and advertising software development kits in an AWS infrastructure, GMobi has grown to support 120 million users while maintaining more than 99.9 percent availability
Time Inc.’s new chief technology officer joined the renowned media organization in early 2014, and promised big changes. With AWS, Time Inc. can leverage security features and functionality that mirror the benefits of cloud computing, including rich tools, best-in-class industry standards and protocols and lower costs.
Seaco Global is one of the world’s largest shipping companies. By using AWS to run SAP applications, it also reduced the time needed to complete monthly business processes to just one day, down from four days in the past.

New YouTube Videos

AWS Database Migration Service.
Introduction to Amazon WorkSpaces.
AWS Pop-up Loft.
Save the Date – AWS re:Invent 2016.

Upcoming Events

March 22nd – Live Event (Seattle, Washington) – AWS Big Data Meetup – Intro to SparkR.
March 22nd – Live Broadcast – VoiceOps: Commanding and Controlling Your AWS environments using Amazon Echo and Lambda.
March 23rd – Live Event (Atlanta, Georgia) – AWS Key Management Service & AWS Storage Services for a Hybrid Cloud (Atlanta AWS Community).
April 6th – Live Event (Boston, Massachusetts) AWS at Bio-IT World.
April 18th & 19th – Live Event (Chicago, Illinois) – AWS Summit – Chicago.
April 20th – Live Event (Melbourne, Australia) – Inaugural Melbourne Serverless Meetup.
April 26th – Live Event (Sydney, Australia) – AWS Partner Summit.
April 26th – Live Event (Sydney, Australia) – Inaugural Sydney Serverless Meetup.
ParkMyCloud 2016 AWS Cost-Reduction Roadshow.
AWS Loft – San Francisco.
AWS Loft – New York.
AWS Loft – Tel Aviv.
AWS Zombie Microservices Roadshow.
AWS Public Sector Events.
AWS Global Summit Series.

Help Wanted

AWS Careers.

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.
Jeff;