Tag Archives: getting started

Start here for a quick overview of everything you need to know

Post Syndicated from Ghost original https://yovko.net/welcome/

Start here for a quick overview of everything you need to know

Hey there, welcome to your new home on the web!

Unlike social networks, this one is all yours. Publish your work on a custom domain, invite your audience to subscribe, send them new content by email newsletter, and offer premium subscriptions to generate sustainable recurring revenue to fund your work.

Ghost is an independent, open source app, which means you can customize absolutely everything. Inside the admin area, you'll find straightforward controls for changing themes, colors, navigation, logos and settings — so you can set your site up just how you like it. No technical knowledge required.

If you're feeling a little more adventurous, there's really no limit to what's possible. With just a little bit of HTML and CSS you can modify or build your very own theme from scratch, or connect to Zapier to explore advanced integrations. Advanced developers can go even further and build entirely custom workflows using the Ghost API.

This level of customization means that Ghost grows with you. It's easy to get started, but there's always another level of what's possible. So, you won't find yourself outgrowing the app in a few months time and wishing you'd chosen something more powerful!


For now, you're probably just wondering what to do first. To help get you going as quickly as possible, we've populated your site with starter content (like this post!) covering all the key concepts and features of the product.

You'll find an outline of all the different topics below, with links to each section so you can explore the parts that interest you most.

Once you're ready to begin publishing and want to clear out these starter posts, you can delete the "Ghost" staff user. Deleting an author will automatically remove all of their posts, leaving you with a clean blank canvas.

Your guide to Ghost

If you get through all those and you're hungry for more, you can find an extensive library of content for creators over on the Ghost blog.


Getting help

If you need help, Ghost(Pro) customers can always reach our full-time support team by clicking on the Ghost(Pro) link inside their admin panel.

If you're a developer working with the codebase in a self-managed install, check out our developer community forum to chat with other users.

Have fun!

Customizing your brand and design settings

Post Syndicated from Ghost original https://yovko.net/design/

Customizing your brand and design settings

As discussed in the introduction post, one of the best things about Ghost is just how much you can customize to turn your site into something unique. Everything about your layout and design can be changed, so you're not stuck with yet another clone of a social network profile.

How far you want to go with customization is completely up to you, there's no right or wrong approach! The majority of people use one of Ghost's built-in themes to get started, and then progress to something more bespoke later on as their site grows.

The best way to get started is with Ghost's branding settings, where you can set up colors, images and logos to fit with your brand.

Customizing your brand and design settings
Ghost Admin → Settings → Branding

Any Ghost theme that's up to date and compatible with Ghost 4.0 and higher will reflect your branding settings in the preview window, so you can see what your site will look like as you experiment with different options.

When selecting an accent color, try to choose something which will contrast well with white text. Many themes will use your accent color as the background for buttons, headers and navigational elements. Vibrant colors with a darker hue tend to work best, as a general rule.

Installing Ghost themes

By default, new sites are created with Ghost's friendly publication theme, called Casper. Everything in Casper is optimized to work for the most common types of blog, newsletter and publication that people create with Ghost — so it's a perfect place to start.

However, there are hundreds of different themes available to install, so you can pick out a look and feel that suits you best.

Customizing your brand and design settings
Ghost Admin → Settings → Theme

Inside Ghost's theme settings you'll find 4 more official themes that can be directly installed and activated. Each theme is suited to slightly different use-cases.

  • Casper (default) — Made for all sorts of blogs and newsletters
  • Edition — A beautiful minimal template for newsletter authors
  • Alto — A slick news/magazine style design for creators
  • London — A light photography theme with a bold grid
  • Ease — A library theme for organizing large content archives

And if none of those feel quite right, head on over to the Ghost Marketplace, where you'll find a huge variety of both free and premium themes.

Building something custom

Finally, if you want something completely bespoke for your site, you can always build a custom theme from scratch and upload it to your site.

Ghost's theming template files are very easy to work with, and can be picked up in the space of a few hours by anyone who has just a little bit of knowledge of HTML and CSS. Templates from other platforms can also be ported to Ghost with relatively little effort.

If you want to take a quick look at the theme syntax to see what it's like, you can browse through the files of the default Casper theme. We've added tons of inline code comments to make it easy to learn, and the structure is very readable.

{{#post}}
<article class="article {{post_class}}">

    <h1>{{title}}</h1>
    
    {{#if feature_image}}
    	<img src="{{feature_image}}" alt="Feature image" />
    {{/if}}
    
    {{content}}

</article>
{{/post}}
A snippet from a post template

See? Not that scary! But still completely optional.

If you're interested in creating your own Ghost theme, check out our extensive theme documentation for a full guide to all the different template variables and helpers which are available.

Writing and managing content in Ghost, an advanced guide

Post Syndicated from Ghost original https://yovko.net/write/

Writing and managing content in Ghost, an advanced guide

Ghost comes with a best-in-class editor which does its very best to get out of the way, and let you focus on your content. Don't let its minimal looks fool you, though, beneath the surface lies a powerful editing toolset designed to accommodate the extensive needs of modern creators.

For many, the base canvas of the Ghost editor will feel familiar. You can start writing as you would expect, highlight content to access the toolbar you would expect, and generally use all of the keyboard shortcuts you would expect.

Our main focus in building the Ghost editor is to try and make as many things that you hope/expect might work: actually work.

  • You can copy and paste raw content from web pages, and Ghost will do its best to correctly preserve the formatting.
  • Pasting an image from your clipboard will upload inline.
  • Pasting a social media URL will automatically create an embed.
  • Highlight a word in the editor and paste a URL from your clipboard on top: Ghost will turn it into a link.
  • You can also paste (or write!) Markdown and Ghost will usually be able to auto-convert it into fully editable, formatted content.
Writing and managing content in Ghost, an advanced guide
The Ghost editor. Also available in dark-mode, for late night writing sessions.

The goal, as much as possible, is for things to work so that you don't have to think so much about the editor. You won't find any disastrous "block builders" here, where you have to open 6 submenus and choose from 18 different but identical alignment options. That's not what Ghost is about.

What you will find though, is dynamic cards which allow you to embed rich media into your posts and create beautifully laid out stories.

Using cards

You can insert dynamic cards inside post content using the + button, which appears on new lines, or by typing / on a new line to trigger the card menu. Many of the choices are simple and intuitive, like bookmark cards, which allow you to create rich links with embedded structured data:

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A shared movement for independent subscription data.
Writing and managing content in Ghost, an advanced guide

or embed cards which make it easy to insert content you want to share with your audience, from external services:

But, dig a little deeper, and you'll also find more advanced cards, like one that only shows up in email newsletters (great for personalized introductions) and a comprehensive set of specialized cards for different types of images and galleries.

Once you  start mixing text and image cards creatively, the whole narrative of the story changes. Suddenly, you're working in a new format.

Writing and managing content in Ghost, an advanced guide

As it turns out, sometimes pictures and a thousand words go together really well. Telling people a great story often has much more impact if they can feel, even for a moment, as though they were right there with you.

Writing and managing content in Ghost, an advanced guide

Galleries and image cards can be combined in so many different ways — the only limit is your imagination.

Build workflows with snippets

One of the most powerful features of the Ghost editor is the ability to create and re-use content snippets. If you've ever used an email client with a concept of saved replies then this will be immediately intuitive.

To create a snippet, select a piece of content in the editor that you'd like to re-use in future, then click on the snippet icon in the toolbar. Give your snippet a name, and you're all done. Now your snippet will be available from within the card menu, or you can search for it directly using the / command.

This works really well for saving images you might want to use often, like a company logo or team photo, links to resources you find yourself often linking to, or introductions and passages that you want to remember.

Writing and managing content in Ghost, an advanced guide

You can even build entire post templates or outlines to create a quick, re-usable workflow for publishing over time. Or build custom design elements for your post with an HTML card, and use a snippet to insert it.

Once you get a few useful snippets set up, it's difficult to go back to the old way of diving through media libraries and trawling for that one thing you know you used somewhere that one time.


Publishing and newsletters the easy way

When you're ready to publish, Ghost makes it as simple as possible to deliver your new post to all your existing members. Just hit the Preview link and you'll get a chance to see what your content looks like on Web, Mobile, Email and Social.

Writing and managing content in Ghost, an advanced guide

You can send yourself a test newsletter to make sure everything looks good in your email client, and then hit the Publish button to decide who to deliver it to.

Ghost comes with a streamlined, optimized email newsletter template that has settings built-in for you to customize the colors and typography. We've spent countless hours refining the template to make sure it works great across all email clients, and performs well for email deliverability.

So, you don't need to fight the awful process of building a custom email template from scratch. It's all done already!


The Ghost editor is powerful enough to do whatever you want it to do. With a little exploration, you'll be up and running in no time.

Building your audience with subscriber signups

Post Syndicated from Ghost original https://yovko.net/portal/

Building your audience with subscriber signups

What sets Ghost apart from other products is that you can publish content and grow your audience using the same platform. Rather than just endlessly posting and hoping someone is listening, you can track real signups against your work and have them subscribe to be notified of future posts. The feature that makes all this possible is called Portal.

Portal is an embedded interface for your audience to sign up to your site. It works on every Ghost site, with every theme, and for any type of publisher.

You can customize the design, content and settings of Portal to suit your site, whether you just want people to sign up to your newsletter — or you're running a full premium publication with user sign-ins and private content.

Building your audience with subscriber signups

Once people sign up to your site, they'll receive an email confirmation with a link to click. The link acts as an automatic sign-in, so subscribers will be automatically signed-in to your site when they click on it. There are a couple of interesting angles to this:

Because subscribers are automatically able to sign in and out of your site as registered members: You can (optionally) restrict access to posts and pages depending on whether people are signed-in or not. So if you want to publish some posts for free, but keep some really great stuff for members-only, this can be a great draw to encourage people to sign up!

Ghost members sign in using email authentication links, so there are no passwords for people to set or forget. You can turn any list of email subscribers into a database of registered members who can sign in to your site. Like magic.

Portal makes all of this possible, and it appears by default as a floating button in the bottom-right corner of your site. When people are logged out, clicking it will open a sign-up/sign-in window. When members are logged in, clicking the Portal button will open the account menu where they can edit their name, email, and subscription settings.

The floating Portal button is completely optional. If you prefer, you can add manual links to your content, navigation, or theme to trigger it instead.

Like this! Sign up here


As you start to grow your registered audience, you'll be able to get a sense of who you're publishing for and where those people are coming from. Best of all: You'll have a straightforward, reliable way to connect with people who enjoy your work.

Social networks go in and out of fashion all the time. Email addresses are timeless.

Growing your audience is valuable no matter what type of site you run, but if your content is your business, then you might also be interested in setting up premium subscriptions.

Selling premium memberships with recurring revenue

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Selling premium memberships with recurring revenue

For creators and aspiring entrepreneurs looking to generate a sustainable recurring revenue stream from their creative work, Ghost has built-in payments allowing you to create a subscription commerce business.

Connect your Stripe account to Ghost, and you'll be able to quickly and easily create monthly and yearly premium plans for members to subscribe to, as well as complimentary plans for friends and family.

Ghost takes 0% payment fees, so everything you make is yours to keep!

Using subscriptions, you can build an independent media business like Stratechery, The Information, or The Browser.

The creator economy is just getting started, and Ghost allows you to build something based on technology that you own and control.

Selling premium memberships with recurring revenue
The Browser has over 10,000 paying subscribers

Most successful subscription businesses publish a mix of free and paid posts to attract a new audience, and upsell the most loyal members to a premium offering. You can also mix different access levels within the same post, showing a free preview to logged out members and then, right when you're ready for a cliffhanger, that's a good time to…

How to grow your business around an audience

Post Syndicated from Ghost original https://yovko.net/grow/

How to grow your business around an audience

As you grow, you'll probably want to start inviting team members and collaborators to your site. Ghost has a number of different user roles for your team:

Contributors
This is the base user level in Ghost. Contributors can create and edit their own draft posts, but they are unable to edit drafts of others or publish posts. Contributors are untrusted users with the most basic access to your publication.

Authors
Authors are the 2nd user level in Ghost. Authors can write, edit and publish their own posts. Authors are trusted users. If you don't trust users to be allowed to publish their own posts, they should be set as Contributors.

Editors
Editors are the 3rd user level in Ghost. Editors can do everything that an Author can do, but they can also edit and publish the posts of others – as well as their own. Editors can also invite new Contributors & Authors to the site.

Administrators
The top user level in Ghost is Administrator. Again, administrators can do everything that Authors and Editors can do, but they can also edit all site settings and data, not just content. Additionally, administrators have full access to invite, manage or remove any other user of the site.

The Owner
There is only ever one owner of a Ghost site. The owner is a special user which has all the same permissions as an Administrator, but with two exceptions: The Owner can never be deleted. And in some circumstances the owner will have access to additional special settings if applicable. For example: billing details, if using Ghost(Pro).

Ask all of your users to fill out their user profiles, including bio and social links. These will populate rich structured data for posts and generally create more opportunities for themes to fully populate their design.


If you're looking for insights, tips and reference materials to expand your content business, here's 5 top resources to get you started:

Setting up apps and custom integrations

Post Syndicated from Ghost original https://yovko.net/integrations/

Setting up apps and custom integrations

It's possible to extend your Ghost site and connect it with hundreds of the most popular apps and tools using integrations.

Whether you need to automatically publish new posts on social media, connect your favorite analytics tool, sync your community or embed forms into your content — our integrations library has got it all covered with hundreds of integration tutorials.

Many integrations are as simple as inserting an embed by pasting a link, or copying a snippet of code directly from an app and pasting it into Ghost. Our integration tutorials are used by creators of all kinds to get apps and integrations up and running in no time — no technical knowledge required.

Setting up apps and custom integrations

Zapier

Zapier is a no-code tool that allows you to build powerful automations, and our official integration allows you to connect your Ghost site to more than 1,000 external services.

Example: When someone new subscribes to a newsletter on a Ghost site (Trigger) then the contact information is automatically pushed into MailChimp (Action).

Here's a few of the most popular automation templates:


Custom integrations

For more advanced automation, it's possible to create custom Ghost integrations with dedicated API keys from the Integrations page within Ghost Admin.

Setting up apps and custom integrations

These custom integrations allow you to use the Ghost API without needing to write code, and create powerful workflows such as sending content from your favorite desktop editor into Ghost as a new draft.

Welcome to Ghost

Post Syndicated from Ghost original https://yovko.net/welcome/

A few things you should know

  1. Ghost is designed for ambitious, professional publishers who want to actively build a business around their content. That’s who it works best for.
  2. The entire platform can be modified and customised to suit your needs. It’s very powerful, but does require some knowledge of code. Ghost is not necessarily a good platform for beginners or people who just want a simple personal blog.
  3. It’s possible to work with all your favourite tools and apps with hundreds of integrations to speed up your workflows, connect email lists, build communities and much more.

Behind the scenes

Welcome to Ghost

Ghost is made by an independent non-profit organisation called the Ghost Foundation. We are 100% self funded by revenue from our Ghost(Pro) service, and every penny we make is re-invested into funding further development of free, open source technology for modern publishing.

The version of Ghost you are looking at right now would not have been made possible without generous contributions from the open source community.

Next up, the editor

The main thing you’ll want to read about next is probably: the Ghost editor. This is where the good stuff happens.

By the way, once you’re done reading, you can simply delete the default Ghost user from your team to remove all of these introductory posts!

Writing posts with Ghost ✍️

Post Syndicated from Ghost original https://yovko.net/the-editor/

Just start writing

Writing posts with Ghost ✍️

Ghost has a powerful visual editor with familiar formatting options, as well as the ability to add dynamic content.

Select your text to add formatting such as headers or to create links. Or use Markdown shortcuts to do the work for you – if that’s your thing.

Writing posts with Ghost ✍️

Rich editing at your fingertips

The editor can also handle rich media objects, called cards, which can be organised and re-ordered using drag and drop.

You can insert a card either by clicking the  +  button, or typing  /  on a new line to search for a particular card. This allows you to efficiently insert images, markdown, html, embeds and more.

For example:

  • Insert a video from YouTube directly by pasting the URL
  • Create unique content like buttons or forms using the HTML card
  • Need to share some code? Embed code blocks directly
<header class="site-header outer">
    <div class="inner">
        {{> "site-nav"}}
    </div>
</header>

It’s also possible to share links from across the web in a visual way using bookmark cards that automatically render information from a websites meta data. Paste any URL to try it out:

Ghost: The #1 open source headless Node.js CMS
The world’s most popular modern open source publishing platform. A headless Node.js CMS used by Apple, Sky News, Tinder and thousands more. MIT licensed, with 30k+ stars on Github.
Writing posts with Ghost ✍️

Working with images in posts

You can add images to your posts in many ways:

  • Upload from your computer
  • Click and drag an image into the browser
  • Paste directly into the editor from your clipboard
  • Insert using a URL

Image sizes

Once inserted you can blend images beautifully into your content at different sizes and add captions and alt tags wherever needed.

Writing posts with Ghost ✍️

Image galleries

Tell visual stories using the gallery card to add up to 9 images that will display as a responsive image gallery:

Image optimisation

Ghost will automatically resize and optimise your images with lossless compression. Your posts will be fully optimised for the web without any extra effort on your part.

Next: Publishing Options

Once your post is looking good, you’ll want to use the publishing options to ensure it gets distributed in the right places, with custom meta data, feature images and more.

Publishing options

Post Syndicated from Ghost original https://yovko.net/publishing-options/

Distribute your content

Publishing options

Access the post settings menu by clicking the settings icon in the top right hand corner of the editor and discover everything you need to get your content ready for publishing. This is where you can edit things like tags, post URL, publish date and custom meta data.

Feature images, URL & excerpts

Insert your post feature image from the very top of the post settings menu. Consider resizing or optimising your image first to ensure it’s an appropriate size. Below this, you can set your post URL, publish date and add a custom excerpt.

Tags & authors

You can easily add multiple tags and authors to any post to filter and organise the relationships between your content in Ghost.

Structured data & SEO

There’s no need to hard code your meta data. In fact, Ghost will generate default meta data automatically using the content in your post.

Alternatively, you can override this by adding a custom meta title and description, as well as unique information for social media sharing cards on Facebook and Twitter.

It’s also possible to set custom canonicals, which is useful for guest posts or curated lists of external links.

Ghost will automatically implement structured data for your publication using JSON-LD to further optimise your content.

{
    "@context": "https://schema.org",
    "@type": "Article",
    "publisher": {
        "@type": "Organization",
        "name": "Publishing options",
        "logo": "https://static.ghost.org/ghost-logo.svg"
    },
    "author": {
        "@type": "Person",
        "name": "Ghost",
        "url": "http://demo.ghost.io/author/ghost/",
        "sameAs": []
    },
    "headline": "Publishing options",
    "url": "http://demo.ghost.io/publishing-options",
    "datePublished": "2018-08-08T11:44:00.000Z",
    "dateModified": "2018-08-09T12:06:21.000Z",
    "keywords": "Getting Started",
    "description": "The Ghost editor has everything you need to fully optimise your content. This is where you can add tags and authors, feature a post, or turn a post into a page.",
    }
}
    

You can test that the structured data schema on your site is working as it should using Google’s structured data tool.

Code injection

This tool allows you to inject code on a per post or page basis, or across your entire site. This means you can modify CSS, add unique tracking codes, or add other scripts to the head or foot of your publication without making edits to your theme files.

To add code site-wide, use the code injection tool in the main admin menu. This is useful for adding a Google Analytics tracking code, or to start tracking with any other analytics tool.

To add code to a post or page, use the code injection tool within the post settings menu. This is useful if you want to add art direction, scripts or styles that are only applicable to one post or page.

Next: Admin settings

Now you understand how to create and optimise content, let’s explore some admin settings so you can invite your team and start collaborating.

Managing admin settings

Post Syndicated from Ghost original https://yovko.net/admin-settings/

Make your site private

Managing admin settings

If you’ve got a publication that you don’t want the world to see yet because it’s not ready to launch, you can hide your Ghost site behind a basic shared pass-phrase.

You can toggle this preference on at the bottom of Ghost’s General Settings:

Managing admin settings

Ghost will give you a short, randomly generated pass-phrase which you can share with anyone who needs access to the site while you’re working on it. While this setting is enabled, all search engine optimisation features will be switched off to help keep your site under the radar.

Do remember though, this is not secure authentication. You shouldn’t rely on this feature for protecting important private data. It’s just a simple, shared pass-phrase for some very basic privacy.

Invite your team

Ghost has a number of different user roles for your team:

Contributors
This is the base user level in Ghost. Contributors can create and edit their own draft posts, but they are unable to edit drafts of others or publish posts. Contributors are untrusted users with the most basic access to your publication.

Authors
Authors are the 2nd user level in Ghost. Authors can write, edit  and publish their own posts. Authors are trusted users. If you don’t trust users to be allowed to publish their own posts, they should be set as Contributors.

Editors
Editors are the 3rd user level in Ghost. Editors can do everything that an Author can do, but they can also edit and publish the posts of others – as well as their own. Editors can also invite new Contributors & Authors to the site.

Administrators
The top user level in Ghost is Administrator. Again, administrators can do everything that Authors and Editors can do, but they can also edit all site settings and data, not just content. Additionally, administrators have full access to invite, manage or remove any other user of the site.

The Owner
There is only ever one owner of a Ghost site. The owner is a special user which has all the same permissions as an Administrator, but with two exceptions: The Owner can never be deleted. And in some circumstances the owner will have access to additional special settings if applicable. For example: billing details, if using Ghost(Pro).

It’s a good idea to ask all of your users to fill out their user profiles, including bio and social links. These will populate rich structured data for posts and generally create more opportunities for themes to fully populate their design.

Next: Organising content

Find out how to organise your content with sensible tags and authors, or for more advanced configurations, how to create custom content structures using dynamic routing.

Organising your content

Post Syndicated from Ghost original https://yovko.net/organising-content/

Sensible tagging

Organising your content

You can think of tags like Gmail labels. By tagging posts with one or more keyword, you can organise articles into buckets of related content.

When you create content for your publication you can assign tags to help differentiate between categories of content.

For example you may tag some content with News and other content with Podcast, which would create two distinct categories of content listed on /tag/news/ and /tag/podcast/, respectively.

If you tag a post with both News and Podcast – then it appears in both sections. Tag archives are like dedicated home-pages for each category of content that you have. They have their own pages, their own RSS feeds, and can support their own cover images and meta data.

The primary tag

Inside the Ghost editor, you can drag and drop tags into a specific order. The first tag in the list is always given the most importance, and some themes will only display the primary tag (the first tag in the list) by default.

News, Technology, Startup

So you can add the most important tag which you want to show up in your theme, but also add related tags which are less important.

Private tags

Sometimes you may want to assign a post a specific tag, but you don’t necessarily want that tag appearing in the theme or creating an archive page. In Ghost, hashtags are private and can be used for special styling.

For example, if you sometimes publish posts with video content – you might want your theme to adapt and get rid of the sidebar for these posts, to give more space for an embedded video to fill the screen. In this case, you could use private tags to tell your theme what to do.

News, #video

Here, the theme would assign the post publicly displayed tags of News – but it would also keep a private record of the post being tagged with #video. In your theme, you could then look for private tags conditionally and give them special formatting.

You can find documentation for theme development techniques like this and many more over on Ghost’s extensive theme docs.

Dynamic routing

Dynamic routing gives you the ultimate freedom to build a custom publication to suit your needs. Routes are rules that map URL patterns to your content and templates.

You may not want content tagged with News to exist on: example.com/tag/news. Instead, you want it to exist on example.com/news .

In this case you can use dynamic routes to create customised collections of content on your site. It’s also possible to use multiple templates in your theme to render each content type differently.

There are lots of use cases for dynamic routing with Ghost, here are a few common examples:

  • Setting a custom home page with its own template
  • Having separate content hubs for blog and podcast, that render differently, and have custom RSS feeds to support two types of content
  • Creating a founders column as a unique view, by filtering content created by specific authors
  • Including dates in permalinks for your posts
  • Setting posts to have a URL relative to their primary tag like example.com/europe/story-title/

Dynamic routing can be configured in Ghost using YAML files. Read our dynamic routing documentation for further details.

Next: Apps & Integrations

Work with all your favourite apps and tools using our integrations, or create your own custom integrations with webhooks.

Apps & integrations

Post Syndicated from Ghost original https://yovko.net/apps-integrations/

Work with your existing tools

Apps & integrations

It’s possible to connect your Ghost site to hundreds of the most popular apps and tools using integrations that take no more than a few minutes to setup.

Whether you need to automate workflows, connect your email list, build a community or embed products from your ecommerce store, our integrations library has got it all covered with hundreds of tutorials.

Apps & integrations

Zapier

On top of this, you can connect your Ghost site to more than 1,000 external services using the official integration with Zapier.

Zapier sets up automations with Triggers and Actions, which allows you to create and customise a wide range of connected applications.

Example: When someone new subscribes to a newsletter on a Ghost site (Trigger) then the contact information is automatically pushed into MailChimp (Action).

Here are the most popular Ghost<>Zapier automation templates:


Custom integrations

At the heart of Ghost sits a robust JSON API – designed to create, manage and retrieve content with ease.

It’s possible to create custom Ghost integrations with dedicated API keys and webhooks from the Integrations page within Ghost Admin.

Apps & integrations

Beyond that, the API allows you to build entirely custom publishing apps. You can send content from your favourite desktop editor, build a custom interface for handling editorial workflow or use Ghost as a full headless CMS with a custom front-end.

The Ghost API is thoroughly documented and straightforward to work with for developers of almost any level.

Final step: Themes

Alright, on to the last post in our welcome-series! If you’re curious about creating your own Ghost theme from scratch, find out how that works.

Creating a custom theme

Post Syndicated from Ghost original https://yovko.net/themes/

Ghost themes

Creating a custom theme

Ghost comes with a default theme called Casper, which is designed to be a clean, readable publication layout and can be easily adapted for most purposes.

If you need something a little more customised, it’s entirely possible to build on top of existing open source themes, or to build your own from scratch. Rather than giving you a few basic settings which act as a poor proxy for code, we just let you write code.

Marketplace

There are a huge range of both free and premium pre-built themes which you can download from the Ghost Theme Marketplace:

Creating a custom theme
Anyone can write a completely custom Ghost theme with some solid knowledge of HTML and CSS

Theme development

Ghost themes are written with a templating language called handlebars, which has a set of dynamic helpers to insert your data into template files. For example: {{author.name}} outputs the name of the current author.

The best way to learn how to write your own Ghost theme is to have a look at the source code for Casper, which is heavily commented and should give you a sense of how everything fits together.

  • default.hbs is the main template file, all contexts will load inside this file unless specifically told to use a different template.
  • post.hbs is the file used in the context of viewing a post.
  • index.hbs is the file u
  • cused in the context of viewing the home page.
  • and so on

We’ve got full and extensive theme documentation which outlines every template file, context and helper that you can use. You can also get started with our useful starter theme, which includes the most common foundations and components required to build your own theme.

If you want to chat with other people making Ghost themes to get any advice or help, there’s also a themes section on our public Ghost forum.

How to set up and use your brand-new Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/how-to-set-up-and-use-your-brand-new-raspberry-pi/

If you’re reading this, it’s probably because you bagged yourself a brand-new Raspberry Pi for Christmas, and you’re wondering what you should do next.

Well, look no further, for we’re here to show you the ropes. So, sit back, pull on a pair of those nice, warm socks that you found in your stocking, top up your eggnog, and let’s get started.

Do I need an operating system?

Unless your Raspberry Pi came in a kit with a preloaded SD card, you’ll need to download an operating system. Find a microSD card (you may have one lurking in an old phone) and click here to download the latest version of Raspbian, our dedicated Raspberry Pi operating system.

To get Raspbian onto the microSD card, use free online software such as Etcher. Here’s a video from The MagPi magazine to show you how to do it.

Use Etcher to install operating systems onto an SD card

Lucy Hattersley shows you how to install Raspberry Pi operating systems such as Raspbian onto an SD card, using the excellent Etcher. For more tutorials, check out The MagPi at http://magpi.cc ! Don’t want to miss an issue? Subscribe, and get every issue delivered straight to your door.

Turn it on!

Here, this video should help:

How to set up your Raspberry Pi || Getting started with #RaspberryPi

Learn #howto set up your Raspberry Pi for the first time, from plugging in peripherals to setting up #Raspbian.

Insert your microSD card into your Raspberry Pi. The microSD card slot should be fairly easy to find, and you need to make sure that you insert it with the contact side facing the board. If you feel like you’re having to force it in, you have it the wrong way round.

Next, plug your HDMI cable into the Raspberry Pi and your chosen HDMI display. This could be a computer monitor or your home television.

If you’re using a Raspberry Pi Zero or Raspberry Pi Zero W, you’ll need a mini HDMI to HDMI cable or adapter.

If you’re using a Raspberry Pi 4, you’ll need a micro HDMI to HDMI cable or adapter.

Raspberry Pi official keyboard

Next, plug in any peripherals that you want to use, such as a mouse or keyboard.

Lastly, plug your power cable into your Raspberry Pi. This is any standard micro USB cable (if you have an Android phone, check your phone charger!), or a USB-C power cable if you’re using the Raspberry Pi 4.

Most kits will come with all of the cables and adapters that you need, so look in the box first before you start rummaging around your home for spare cables.

Once the power cable is connected, your Raspberry Pi will turn on. If it doesn’t, check that your SD card is inserted correctly and your cables are pushed in fully.

Still in doubt? Here’s Sally Le Page with more:

How to use a Raspberry Pi ft. Dr Sally Le Page

What is a Raspberry Pi and what do you need to get started? Our ‘How to use a Raspberry Pi’ explainer will take you through the basics of your #RaspberryPi, and how you can get hands-on with Raspbian and #coding language tools such as Scratch and Mu, with our host, Dr Sally Le Page.

Once on, the Raspberry Pi will direct you through a setup process that allows you to change your password and connect to your local wireless network.

And then, you’re good to go!

Now what?

Now what? Well, that depends on what you want to do with your Raspberry Pi.

Many people use their Raspberry Pi to learn how to code. If you’re new to coding, we suggest trying out a few of our easy online projects to help you understand the basics of Scratch — the drag-and-drop coding platform from MIT — and Python — a popular general-purpose programming language and the reason for the “Pi” in Raspberry Pi’s name.

The components of a virtual analogue Raspberry Pu synthesiser


Maybe you want to use your Raspberry Pi to set up control of smart devices in your home, or build a media centre for all your favourite photos and home movies. Perhaps you want to play games on your Raspberry Pi, or try out various HATs and add-ons to create fun digital making projects.

Sally Le Page

Whatever you want to do with your Raspberry Pi, the internet is full of brilliant tutorials from the Raspberry Pi Foundation and online creators.

Some places to start

Get involved with the Raspberry Pi Foundation

From community events and magazines to online learning and space exploration – there are so many ways to get involved with the Raspberry Pi Foundation.

The Raspberry Pi community is huge, and spreads across the entire globe, bringing people together to share their love of coding, digital making, and computer education. However you use your Raspberry Pi, know that, by owning it, you’ve helped the non-profit Raspberry Pi Foundation to grow, bringing more opportunities to kids and teachers all over the world. So, from the bottom of our hearts this festive season, thank you.

We can’t wait to see what 2020 brings!

 

The post How to set up and use your brand-new Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Improving the Getting Started experience with AWS Lambda

Post Syndicated from Eric Johnson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/improving-the-getting-started-experience-with-aws-lambda/

A common question from developers is, “How do I get started with creating serverless applications?” Frequently, I point developers to the AWS Lambda console where they can create a new Lambda function and immediately see it working.

While you can learn the basics of a Lambda function this way, it does not encompass the full serverless experience. It does not allow you to take advantage of best practices like infrastructure as code (IaC) or continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD). A full-on serverless application could include a combination of services like Amazon API Gateway, Amazon S3, and Amazon DynamoDB.

To help you start right with serverless, AWS has added a Create application experience to the Lambda console. This enables you to create serverless applications from ready-to-use sample applications, which follow these best practices:

  • Use infrastructure as code (IaC) for defining application resources
  • Provide a continuous integration and continuous deployment (CI/CD) pipeline for deployment
  • Exemplify best practices in serverless application structure and methods

IaC

Using IaC allows you to automate deployment and management of your resources. When you define and deploy your IaC architecture, you can standardize infrastructure components across your organization. You can rebuild your applications quickly and consistently without having to perform manual actions. You can also enforce best practices such as code reviews.

When you’re building serverless applications on AWS, you can use AWS CloudFormation directly, or choose the AWS Serverless Application Model, also known as AWS SAM. AWS SAM is an open source framework for building serverless applications that makes it easier to build applications quickly. AWS SAM provides a shorthand syntax to express APIs, functions, databases, and event source mappings. Because AWS SAM is built on CloudFormation, you can specify any other AWS resources using CloudFormation syntax in the same template.

Through this new experience, AWS provides an AWS SAM template that describes the entire application. You have instant access to modify the resources and security as needed.

CI/CD

When editing a Lambda function in the console, it’s live the moment that the function is saved. This works when developing against test environments, but risks introducing untested, faulty code in production environments. That’s a stressful atmosphere for developers with the unneeded overhead of manually testing code on each change.

Developers say that they are looking for an automated process for consistently testing and deploying reliable code. What they need is a CI/CD pipeline.

CI/CD pipelines are more than just convenience, they can be critical in helping development teams to be successful. CI/CDs provide code integration, testing, multiple environment deployments, notifications, rollbacks, and more. The functionality depends on how you choose to configure it.

When you create a new application through Lambda console, you create a CI/CD pipeline to provide a framework for automated testing and deployment. The pipeline includes the following resources:

Best practices

Like any other development pattern, there are best practices for serverless applications. These include testing strategies, local development, IaC, and CI/CD. When you create a Lambda function using the console, most of this is abstracted away. A common request from developers learning about serverless is for opinionated examples of best practices.

When you choose Create application, the application uses many best practices, including:

  • Managing IaC architectures
  • Managing deployment with a CI/CD pipeline
  • Runtime-specific test examples
  • Runtime-specific dependency management
  • A Lambda execution role with permissions boundaries
  • Application security with managed policies

Create an application

Now, lets walk through creating your first application.

  1. Open the Lambda console, and choose Applications, Create application.
  2. Choose Serverless API backend. The next page shows the architecture, services used, and development workflow of the chosen application.
  3. Choose Create and then configure your application settings.
    • For Application name and Application description, enter values.
    • For Runtime, the preview supports Node.js 10.x. Stay tuned for more runtimes.
    • For Source Control Service, I chose CodeCommit for this example, but you can choose either. If you choose GitHub, you are asked to connect to your GitHub account for authorization.
    • For Repository Name, feel free to use whatever you want.
    • Under Permissions, check Create roles and permissions boundary.
  4. Choose Create.

Exploring the application

That’s it! You have just created a new serverless application from the Lambda console. It takes a few moments for all the resources to be created. Take a moment to review what you have done so far.

Across the top of the application, you can see four tabs, as shown in the following screenshot:

  • Overview—Shows the current page, including a Getting started section, and application and toolchain resources of the application
  • Code—Shows the code repository and instructions on how to connect
  • Deployments—Links to the deployment pipeline and a deployment history.
  • Monitoring—Reports on the application health and performance

getting started dialog

The Resources section lists all the resources specific to the application. This application includes three Lambda functions, a DynamoDB table, and the API. The following screenshot shows the resources for this sample application.resources view

Finally, the Infrastructure section lists all the resources for the CI/CD pipeline including the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) roles, the permissions boundary policy, the S3 bucket, and more. The following screenshot shows the resources for this sample application.application view

About Permissions Boundaries

This new Create application experience utilizes an IAM permissions boundary to help further secure the function that gets created and prevent an overly permissive function policy from being created later on. The boundary is a separate policy that acts as a maximum bound on what an IAM policy for your function can be created to have permissions for. This model allows developers to build out the security model of their application while still meeting certain requirements that are often put in place to prevent overly permissive policies and is considered a best practice. By default, the permissions boundary that is created limits the application access to just the resources that are included in the example template. In order to expand the permissions of the application, you’ll first need to extend what is defined in the permissions boundary to allow it.

A quick test

Now that you have an application up and running, try a quick test to see if it works.

  1. In the Lambda console, in the left navigation pane, choose Applications.
  2. For Applications, choose Start Right application.
  3. On the Endpoint details card, copy your endpoint.
  4. From a terminal, run the following command:
    curl -d '{"id":"id1", "name":"name1"}' -H "Content-Type: application/json" -X POST <YOUR-ENDPOINT>

You can find tips like this, and other getting started hints in the README.md file of your new serverless application.

Outside of the console

With the introduction of the Create application function, there is now a closer tie between the Lambda console and local development. Before this feature, you would get started in the Lambda console or with a framework like AWS SAM. Now, you can start the project in the console and then move to local development.

You have already walked through the steps of creating an application, now pull it local and make some changes.

  1. In the Lambda console, in the left navigation pane, choose Applications.
  2. Select your application from the list and choose the Code tab.
  3. If you used CodeCommit, choose Connect instructions to configure your local git client. To copy the URL, choose the SSH squares icon.
  4. If you used GitHub, click on the SSH squares icon.
  5. In a terminal window, run the following command:
    git clone <your repo>
  6. Update one of the Lambda function files and save it.
  7. In the terminal window, commit and push the changes:
    git commit -am "simple change"
    git push
  8. In the Lambda console, under Deployments, choose View in CodePipeline.codepipeline pipeline

The build has started and the application is being deployed .

Caveats

submit feedback

This feature is currently available in US East (Ohio), US East (N. Virginia), US West (N. California), US West (Oregon), EU (Ireland), and Asia Pacific (Tokyo). This is a feature beta and as such, it is not a full representation of the final experience. We know this is limited in scope and request your feedback. Let us know your thoughts about any future enhancements you would like to see. The best way to give feedback is to use the feedback button in the console.

Conclusion

With the addition of the Create application feature, you can now start right with full serverless applications from within the Lambda console. This delivers the simplicity and ease of the console while still offering the power of an application built on best practices.

Until next time: Happy coding!

Getting started with your Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/getting-started-raspberry-pi/

Here on the Raspberry Pi blog, we often share impressive builds made by community members who have advanced making and coding skills. But what about those of you who are just getting started?

Getting started with Raspberry Pi

For you, we’ve been working hard to update and polish our Getting started resources, including a brand-new video to help you get to grips with your new Pi.

Getting started with Raspberry Pi

Whether you’re new to electronics and the Raspberry Pi, or a seasoned pro looking to share your knowledge and skills with others, sit back and watch us walk you through the basics of setting up our powerful little computer.

How to set up your Raspberry Pi || Getting started with #RaspberryPi

Learn how to set up your Raspberry Pi for the first time, from plugging in peripherals to loading Raspbian.

We’ve tried to make this video as easy to follow as possible, with only the essential explanations and steps.

getting started with raspberry pi

As with everything we produce, we want this video to be accessible to the entire world, so if you can translate its text into another language, please follow this link to submit your translation directly through YouTube. You can also add translations to our other YouTube videos here! As a thank you, we’ll display your username in the video descriptions to acknowledge your contributions.

New setup guides and resources

Alongside our shiny new homepage, we’ve also updated our Help section to reflect our newest tech and demonstrate the easiest way for beginners to start their Raspberry Pi journey. We’re now providing a first-time setup guide, and also a walk-through for using your Raspberry Pi that shows you all sort of things you can do with it. And with guides to our official add-on devices and a troubleshooting section, our updated Help page is your one-stop shop for getting the most out of your Pi.

getting started with raspberry pi

For parents and teachers, we offer guides on introducing Raspberry Pi and digital making to your children and students. And for those of you who are visual learners, we’ve curated a collection of our videos to help you get making.

As with our videos, we’re looking for people whose first language isn’t English to help us translate our resources. If you’re able to donate some of your time to support this cause, please sign up here.

The forums

We’re very proud of our forum community. Since the birth of the Raspberry Pi, our forums have been the place to go for additional support, conversation, and project bragging.

Raspberry Pi forums

If your question isn’t answered on our Help page, there’s no better place to go than the forums. Nine times out of ten, your question will already have been asked and answered there! And if not, then our friendly forum community will be happy to share their wealth of knowledge and help you out.

Events and clubs

Raspberry Pi and digital making enthusiasts come together across the world at various events and clubs, including Raspberry Jams, Code Club and CoderDojo, and Coolest Projects. These events are perfect for learning more about how people use Raspberry Pi and other technologies for digital making — as a hobby and as a tool for education.

getting started with raspberry pi

Keep up to date

To keep track of all the goings-on of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, be sure to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, and sign up to our Raspberry Pi Weekly newsletter and the monthly Raspberry Pi LEARN education newsletter.

The post Getting started with your Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Build your own weather station with our new guide!

Post Syndicated from Richard Hayler original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-your-own-weather-station/

One of the most common enquiries I receive at Pi Towers is “How can I get my hands on a Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station?” Now the answer is: “Why not build your own version using our guide?”

Build Your Own weather station kit assembled

Tadaaaa! The BYO weather station fully assembled.

Our Oracle Weather Station

In 2016 we sent out nearly 1000 Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station kits to schools from around the world who had applied to be part of our weather station programme. In the original kit was a special HAT that allows the Pi to collect weather data with a set of sensors.

The original Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station HAT – Build Your Own Raspberry Pi weather station

The original Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station HAT

We designed the HAT to enable students to create their own weather stations and mount them at their schools. As part of the programme, we also provide an ever-growing range of supporting resources. We’ve seen Oracle Weather Stations in great locations with a huge differences in climate, and they’ve even recorded the effects of a solar eclipse.

Our new BYO weather station guide

We only had a single batch of HATs made, and unfortunately we’ve given nearly* all the Weather Station kits away. Not only are the kits really popular, we also receive lots of questions about how to add extra sensors or how to take more precise measurements of a particular weather phenomenon. So today, to satisfy your demand for a hackable weather station, we’re launching our Build your own weather station guide!

Build Your Own Raspberry Pi weather station

Fun with meteorological experiments!

Our guide suggests the use of many of the sensors from the Oracle Weather Station kit, so can build a station that’s as close as possible to the original. As you know, the Raspberry Pi is incredibly versatile, and we’ve made it easy to hack the design in case you want to use different sensors.

Many other tutorials for Pi-powered weather stations don’t explain how the various sensors work or how to store your data. Ours goes into more detail. It shows you how to put together a breadboard prototype, it describes how to write Python code to take readings in different ways, and it guides you through recording these readings in a database.

Build Your Own Raspberry Pi weather station on a breadboard

There’s also a section on how to make your station weatherproof. And in case you want to move past the breadboard stage, we also help you with that. The guide shows you how to solder together all the components, similar to the original Oracle Weather Station HAT.

Who should try this build

We think this is a great project to tackle at home, at a STEM club, Scout group, or CoderDojo, and we’re sure that many of you will be chomping at the bit to get started. Before you do, please note that we’ve designed the build to be as straight-forward as possible, but it’s still fairly advanced both in terms of electronics and programming. You should read through the whole guide before purchasing any components.

Build Your Own Raspberry Pi weather station – components

The sensors and components we’re suggesting balance cost, accuracy, and easy of use. Depending on what you want to use your station for, you may wish to use different components. Similarly, the final soldered design in the guide may not be the most elegant, but we think it is achievable for someone with modest soldering experience and basic equipment.

You can build a functioning weather station without soldering with our guide, but the build will be more durable if you do solder it. If you’ve never tried soldering before, that’s OK: we have a Getting started with soldering resource plus video tutorial that will walk you through how it works step by step.

Prototyping HAT for Raspberry Pi weather station sensors

For those of you who are more experienced makers, there are plenty of different ways to put the final build together. We always like to hear about alternative builds, so please post your designs in the Weather Station forum.

Our plans for the guide

Our next step is publishing supplementary guides for adding extra functionality to your weather station. We’d love to hear which enhancements you would most like to see! Our current ideas under development include adding a webcam, making a tweeting weather station, adding a light/UV meter, and incorporating a lightning sensor. Let us know which of these is your favourite, or suggest your own amazing ideas in the comments!

*We do have a very small number of kits reserved for interesting projects or locations: a particularly cool experiment, a novel idea for how the Oracle Weather Station could be used, or places with specific weather phenomena. If have such a project in mind, please send a brief outline to [email protected], and we’ll consider how we might be able to help you.

The post Build your own weather station with our new guide! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Measuring the throughput for Amazon MQ using the JMS Benchmark

Post Syndicated from Rachel Richardson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/measuring-the-throughput-for-amazon-mq-using-the-jms-benchmark/

This post is courtesy of Alan Protasio, Software Development Engineer, Amazon Web Services

Just like compute and storage, messaging is a fundamental building block of enterprise applications. Message brokers (aka “message-oriented middleware”) enable different software systems, often written in different languages, on different platforms, running in different locations, to communicate and exchange information. Mission-critical applications, such as CRM and ERP, rely on message brokers to work.

A common performance consideration for customers deploying a message broker in a production environment is the throughput of the system, measured as messages per second. This is important to know so that application environments (hosts, threads, memory, etc.) can be configured correctly.

In this post, we demonstrate how to measure the throughput for Amazon MQ, a new managed message broker service for ActiveMQ, using JMS Benchmark. It should take between 15–20 minutes to set up the environment and an hour to run the benchmark. We also provide some tips on how to configure Amazon MQ for optimal throughput.

Benchmarking throughput for Amazon MQ

ActiveMQ can be used for a number of use cases. These use cases can range from simple fire and forget tasks (that is, asynchronous processing), low-latency request-reply patterns, to buffering requests before they are persisted to a database.

The throughput of Amazon MQ is largely dependent on the use case. For example, if you have non-critical workloads such as gathering click events for a non-business-critical portal, you can use ActiveMQ in a non-persistent mode and get extremely high throughput with Amazon MQ.

On the flip side, if you have a critical workload where durability is extremely important (meaning that you can’t lose a message), then you are bound by the I/O capacity of your underlying persistence store. We recommend using mq.m4.large for the best results. The mq.t2.micro instance type is intended for product evaluation. Performance is limited, due to the lower memory and burstable CPU performance.

Tip: To improve your throughput with Amazon MQ, make sure that you have consumers processing messaging as fast as (or faster than) your producers are pushing messages.

Because it’s impossible to talk about how the broker (ActiveMQ) behaves for each and every use case, we walk through how to set up your own benchmark for Amazon MQ using our favorite open-source benchmarking tool: JMS Benchmark. We are fans of the JMS Benchmark suite because it’s easy to set up and deploy, and comes with a built-in visualizer of the results.

Non-Persistent Scenarios – Queue latency as you scale producer throughput

JMS Benchmark nonpersistent scenarios

Getting started

At the time of publication, you can create an mq.m4.large single-instance broker for testing for $0.30 per hour (US pricing).

This walkthrough covers the following tasks:

  1.  Create and configure the broker.
  2. Create an EC2 instance to run your benchmark
  3. Configure the security groups
  4.  Run the benchmark.

Step 1 – Create and configure the broker
Create and configure the broker using Tutorial: Creating and Configuring an Amazon MQ Broker.

Step 2 – Create an EC2 instance to run your benchmark
Launch the EC2 instance using Step 1: Launch an Instance. We recommend choosing the m5.large instance type.

Step 3 – Configure the security groups
Make sure that all the security groups are correctly configured to let the traffic flow between the EC2 instance and your broker.

  1. Sign in to the Amazon MQ console.
  2. From the broker list, choose the name of your broker (for example, MyBroker)
  3. In the Details section, under Security and network, choose the name of your security group or choose the expand icon ( ).
  4. From the security group list, choose your security group.
  5. At the bottom of the page, choose Inbound, Edit.
  6. In the Edit inbound rules dialog box, add a role to allow traffic between your instance and the broker:
    • Choose Add Rule.
    • For Type, choose Custom TCP.
    • For Port Range, type the ActiveMQ SSL port (61617).
    • For Source, leave Custom selected and then type the security group of your EC2 instance.
    • Choose Save.

Your broker can now accept the connection from your EC2 instance.

Step 4 – Run the benchmark
Connect to your EC2 instance using SSH and run the following commands:

$ cd ~
$ curl -L https://github.com/alanprot/jms-benchmark/archive/master.zip -o master.zip
$ unzip master.zip
$ cd jms-benchmark-master
$ chmod a+x bin/*
$ env \
  SERVER_SETUP=false \
  SERVER_ADDRESS={activemq-endpoint} \
  ACTIVEMQ_TRANSPORT=ssl\
  ACTIVEMQ_PORT=61617 \
  ACTIVEMQ_USERNAME={activemq-user} \
  ACTIVEMQ_PASSWORD={activemq-password} \
  ./bin/benchmark-activemq

After the benchmark finishes, you can find the results in the ~/reports directory. As you may notice, the performance of ActiveMQ varies based on the number of consumers, producers, destinations, and message size.

Amazon MQ architecture

The last bit that’s important to know so that you can better understand the results of the benchmark is how Amazon MQ is architected.

Amazon MQ is architected to be highly available (HA) and durable. For HA, we recommend using the multi-AZ option. After a message is sent to Amazon MQ in persistent mode, the message is written to the highly durable message store that replicates the data across multiple nodes in multiple Availability Zones. Because of this replication, for some use cases you may see a reduction in throughput as you migrate to Amazon MQ. Customers have told us they appreciate the benefits of message replication as it helps protect durability even in the face of the loss of an Availability Zone.

Conclusion

We hope this gives you an idea of how Amazon MQ performs. We encourage you to run tests to simulate your own use cases.

To learn more, see the Amazon MQ website. You can try Amazon MQ for free with the AWS Free Tier, which includes up to 750 hours of a single-instance mq.t2.micro broker and up to 1 GB of storage per month for one year.