Tag Archives: subtitles

Sky Streaming Service Uses ‘Pirate’ Subtitles on Chernobyl Episode

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/sky-streaming-service-uses-pirate-subtitles-on-chernobyl-episode-190614/

Every day, millions of people enjoy fan-made subtitles.

These files help foreigners to better understand English entertainment and provide the hearing impaired with a way to comprehend audio.

The subtitles are often used in combination with pirated files. While helpful to many, they are a thorn in the side for major copyright holders, who see them as yet another threat to their business.

As a result, fansub communities are increasingly portrayed as illegal operations. Several sites are now blocked by ISPs and site operators have been taken to court following copyright infringement allegations. 

Given this backdrop, it’s quite unusual to see one of the largest entertainment industry brands using these ‘pirate’ subtitles on its official streaming service. This is exactly what Comcast-owned Sky Switzerland is doing at the moment. 

Subscribers of the local Sky platform who watch the last episode of the hit series Chernobyl, with English subtitles enabled, see the following message appearing around the five-minute mark.

“- Synced and corrected by VitoSilans – www.Addic7ed.com.”

The message (screenshot by TF)

The message is part of the credits that are typically added to fan-made subtitles. In this case, it clearly indicates that they were sourced from Addic7ed.com, a well-known resource for these type of subtitles and one that is blocked by ISPs in Australia. 

Looking more closely at the official video and the Addic7ed subtitles, we see that the timing doesn’t match. This suggests that the subtitle has been synced separately to fit the Sky video. However, the opening ‘credits’ were not removed. 

Also, these subs generally have a closing credit too. These are not visible during the episode on Sky.ch.  

The Addic7ed team tells us that it doesn’t mind seeing their subs being used by major entertainment conglomerates. It has happened before and as long as it helps people to enjoy a movie or TV-show, everybody benefits.

“When we started the project we wished that content would be available to a larger audience by breaking the language barrier or providing English subtitles for hearing impaired people, which would otherwise not enjoy videos as much. If this means that others take our work, so be it,” Addic7ed informs TF.

“Professionals or not, our main objective was reached: more people enjoyed the show. Kudos to Sky for keeping the credits.”

Sky Switzerland hasn’t responded to our request for comment at the time of publication. Whether the Addic7ed credit was left in intentionally is highly doubtful though. It seems more likely that someone forgot to remove it.

In any case, the mention hasn’t gone unnoticed either. At least one person has alerted Sky via Twitter, but the company didn’t respond there either. 

Interestingly, this is not the first time ‘pirate’ subtitles have been used on a streaming service. In the past, Netflix was caught using “unauthorized” fansubs as well. In addition, American anime distributor Funimation previously used ‘pirate’ subs in their dubbing room.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

Help us translate our YouTube videos

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/youtube-translations/

As we work to create more content for our YouTube channel, making our videos as accessible as possible is key to serving the growing Raspberry Pi community. And as we push to create more videos linked to our collection of free resources, providing translated subtitles will help to bring our content to more people across the globe.

We need your help to make this happen.

YouTube translations Raspberry Pi

Subtitles for our ‘Getting started with soldering‘ video translated into Portuguese.

Translating YouTube

We recently enabled translation submissions for all our YouTube content, allowing viewers, subscribers, and members of the community to contribute translated subtitles, descriptions, and titles for all of our videos.

YouTube Subtitle translations Raspberry Pi

Once approved, these translated subtitles are available for all viewers of our videos via the closed captioning button on the navigation bar of every video, while translated descriptions and titles will automatically be shown, based on your location. Anyone who has contributed to the translations is automatically credited in the video’s description.

YouTube translations Raspberry Pi

Thanks Mário!

Our aim is to collect translations of our videos in as many languages as possible, including the original English. While YouTube does a great job of using speech-to-text to create automatic subtitles, these aren’t always correct – especially when the videos feature loud background noises and music – so we need to create subtitles in English too.

Submit your own YouTube translations

If you’d like to contribute subtitles for our YouTube videos, you can do so by heading to the Community Contributions page for our channel. Simply pick a video you’d like to translate and work your way through. The system is very easy to navigate and allows you to manage the timing of subtitles, which is very handy. Once complete, your translation will be sent to us to double check. When we’ve approved it, it will be published. If we find any issues with the translation, we’ll let you know via the Community Contributions page.

YouTube translations Raspberry Pi

A sneaky peak into what we see on the other side

If you find a video that’s already been translated, but you see faults in the language and/or grammar used, you can also correct and improve existing translations.

Thank you

If you contribute a translation to any of our videos, make sure you post a comment for the world to see in the video’s comments section. If you have a Twitter account, leave your username in the comment and we’ll make sure to thank you on the official Raspberry Pi account when we’ve approved your submission.

Thank you to everyone who has contributed so far, and to everyone who is now logging into YouTube to take part. It’s things like this that make our community the best out there.

Thank you.

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BackMap, the haptic navigation system

Post Syndicated from Janina Ander original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/backmap-haptic/

At this year’s TechCrunch Disrupt NY hackathon, one team presented BackMap, a haptic feedback system which helps visually impaired people to navigate cities and venues. It is assisted by a Raspberry Pi and integrated into a backpack.

Good vibrations with BackMap

The team, including Shashank Sharma, wrote an iOS phone app in Swift, Apple’s open-source programming language. To convert between addresses and geolocations, they used the Esri APIs offered by PubNub. So far, so standard. However, they then configured their BackMap setup so that the user can input their destination via the app, and then follow the route without having to look at a screen or listen to directions. Instead, vibrating motors have been integrated into the straps of a backpack and hooked up to a Raspberry Pi. Whenever the user needs to turn left or right, the Pi makes the respective motor vibrate.

Disrupt NY 2017 Hackathon | Part 1

Disrupt NY 2017 Hackathon presentations filmed live on May 15th, 2017. Preceding the Disrupt Conference is Hackathon weekend on May 13-14, where developers and engineers descend from all over the world to take part in a 24-hour hacking endurance test.

BackMap can also be adapted for indoor navigation by receiving signals from beacons. This could be used to direct users to toilet facilities or exhibition booths at conferences. The team hopes to upgrade the BackMap device to use a wristband format in the future.

Accessible Pi

Here at Pi Towers, we are always glad to see Pi builds for people with disabilities: we’ve seen Sanskriti and Aman’s Braille teacher Mudra, the audio e-reader Valdema by Finnish non-profit Kolibre, and Myrijam and Paul’s award-winning, eye-movement-controlled wheelchair, to name but a few.

Our mission is to bring the power of coding and digital making to everyone, and we are lucky to be part of a diverse community of makers and educators who have often worked proactively to make events and resources accessible to as many people as possible. There is, for example, the autism- and Tourette’s syndrome-friendly South London Raspberry Jam, organised by Femi Owolade-Coombes and his mum Grace. The Raspberry VI website is a portal to all things Pi for visually impaired and blind people. Deaf digital makers may find Jim Roberts’ video tutorials, which are signed in ASL, useful. And anyone can contribute subtitles in any language to our YouTube channel.

If you create or use accessible tutorials, or run a Jam, Code Club, or CoderDojo that is designed to be friendly to people who are neuroatypical or have a disability, let us know how to find your resource or event in the comments!

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Check Point: Hacked in Translation

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/723696/rss

Check Point has issued an
advisory
that a number of video-player applications can be compromised
via specially crafted subtitles. “By crafting malicious subtitle
files, which are then downloaded by a victim’s media player, attackers can
take complete control over any type of device via vulnerabilities found in
many popular streaming platforms, including VLC, Kodi (XBMC), Popcorn-Time
and strem.io. We estimate there are approximately 200 million video players
and streamers that currently run the vulnerable software, making this one
of the most widespread, easily accessed and zero-resistance vulnerability
reported in recent years.