Tag Archives: Validation

New – AWS SAM Local (Beta) – Build and Test Serverless Applications Locally

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-aws-sam-local-beta-build-and-test-serverless-applications-locally/

Today we’re releasing a beta of a new tool, SAM Local, that makes it easy to build and test your serverless applications locally. In this post we’ll use SAM local to build, debug, and deploy a quick application that allows us to vote on tabs or spaces by curling an endpoint. AWS introduced Serverless Application Model (SAM) last year to make it easier for developers to deploy serverless applications. If you’re not already familiar with SAM my colleague Orr wrote a great post on how to use SAM that you can read in about 5 minutes. At it’s core, SAM is a powerful open source specification built on AWS CloudFormation that makes it easy to keep your serverless infrastructure as code – and they have the cutest mascot.

SAM Local takes all the good parts of SAM and brings them to your local machine.

There are a couple of ways to install SAM Local but the easiest is through NPM. A quick npm install -g aws-sam-local should get us going but if you want the latest version you can always install straight from the source: go get github.com/awslabs/aws-sam-local (this will create a binary named aws-sam-local, not sam).

I like to vote on things so let’s write a quick SAM application to vote on Spaces versus Tabs. We’ll use a very simple, but powerful, architecture of API Gateway fronting a Lambda function and we’ll store our results in DynamoDB. In the end a user should be able to curl our API curl https://SOMEURL/ -d '{"vote": "spaces"}' and get back the number of votes.

Let’s start by writing a simple SAM template.yaml:

AWSTemplateFormatVersion : '2010-09-09'
Transform: AWS::Serverless-2016-10-31
Resources:
  VotesTable:
    Type: "AWS::Serverless::SimpleTable"
  VoteSpacesTabs:
    Type: "AWS::Serverless::Function"
    Properties:
      Runtime: python3.6
      Handler: lambda_function.lambda_handler
      Policies: AmazonDynamoDBFullAccess
      Environment:
        Variables:
          TABLE_NAME: !Ref VotesTable
      Events:
        Vote:
          Type: Api
          Properties:
            Path: /
            Method: post

So we create a [dynamo_i] table that we expose to our Lambda function through an environment variable called TABLE_NAME.

To test that this template is valid I’ll go ahead and call sam validate to make sure I haven’t fat-fingered anything. It returns Valid! so let’s go ahead and get to work on our Lambda function.

import os
import os
import json
import boto3
votes_table = boto3.resource('dynamodb').Table(os.getenv('TABLE_NAME'))

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    print(event)
    if event['httpMethod'] == 'GET':
        resp = votes_table.scan()
        return {'body': json.dumps({item['id']: int(item['votes']) for item in resp['Items']})}
    elif event['httpMethod'] == 'POST':
        try:
            body = json.loads(event['body'])
        except:
            return {'statusCode': 400, 'body': 'malformed json input'}
        if 'vote' not in body:
            return {'statusCode': 400, 'body': 'missing vote in request body'}
        if body['vote'] not in ['spaces', 'tabs']:
            return {'statusCode': 400, 'body': 'vote value must be "spaces" or "tabs"'}

        resp = votes_table.update_item(
            Key={'id': body['vote']},
            UpdateExpression='ADD votes :incr',
            ExpressionAttributeValues={':incr': 1},
            ReturnValues='ALL_NEW'
        )
        return {'body': "{} now has {} votes".format(body['vote'], resp['Attributes']['votes'])}

So let’s test this locally. I’ll need to create a real DynamoDB database to talk to and I’ll need to provide the name of that database through the enviornment variable TABLE_NAME. I could do that with an env.json file or I can just pass it on the command line. First, I can call:
$ echo '{"httpMethod": "POST", "body": "{\"vote\": \"spaces\"}"}' |\
TABLE_NAME="vote-spaces-tabs" sam local invoke "VoteSpacesTabs"

to test the Lambda – it returns the number of votes for spaces so theoritically everything is working. Typing all of that out is a pain so I could generate a sample event with sam local generate-event api and pass that in to the local invocation. Far easier than all of that is just running our API locally. Let’s do that: sam local start-api. Now I can curl my local endpoints to test everything out.
I’ll run the command: $ curl -d '{"vote": "tabs"}' http://127.0.0.1:3000/ and it returns: “tabs now has 12 votes”. Now, of course I did not write this function perfectly on my first try. I edited and saved several times. One of the benefits of hot-reloading is that as I change the function I don’t have to do any additional work to test the new function. This makes iterative development vastly easier.

Let’s say we don’t want to deal with accessing a real DynamoDB database over the network though. What are our options? Well we can download DynamoDB Local and launch it with java -Djava.library.path=./DynamoDBLocal_lib -jar DynamoDBLocal.jar -sharedDb. Then we can have our Lambda function use the AWS_SAM_LOCAL environment variable to make some decisions about how to behave. Let’s modify our function a bit:

import os
import json
import boto3
if os.getenv("AWS_SAM_LOCAL"):
    votes_table = boto3.resource(
        'dynamodb',
        endpoint_url="http://docker.for.mac.localhost:8000/"
    ).Table("spaces-tabs-votes")
else:
    votes_table = boto3.resource('dynamodb').Table(os.getenv('TABLE_NAME'))

Now we’re using a local endpoint to connect to our local database which makes working without wifi a little easier.

SAM local even supports interactive debugging! In Java and Node.js I can just pass the -d flag and a port to immediately enable the debugger. For Python I could use a library like import epdb; epdb.serve() and connect that way. Then we can call sam local invoke -d 8080 "VoteSpacesTabs" and our function will pause execution waiting for you to step through with the debugger.

Alright, I think we’ve got everything working so let’s deploy this!

First I’ll call the sam package command which is just an alias for aws cloudformation package and then I’ll use the result of that command to sam deploy.

$ sam package --template-file template.yaml --s3-bucket MYAWESOMEBUCKET --output-template-file package.yaml
Uploading to 144e47a4a08f8338faae894afe7563c3  90570 / 90570.0  (100.00%)
Successfully packaged artifacts and wrote output template to file package.yaml.
Execute the following command to deploy the packaged template
aws cloudformation deploy --template-file package.yaml --stack-name 
$ sam deploy --template-file package.yaml --stack-name VoteForSpaces --capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM
Waiting for changeset to be created..
Waiting for stack create/update to complete
Successfully created/updated stack - VoteForSpaces

Which brings us to our API:
.

I’m going to hop over into the production stage and add some rate limiting in case you guys start voting a lot – but otherwise we’ve taken our local work and deployed it to the cloud without much effort at all. I always enjoy it when things work on the first deploy!

You can vote now and watch the results live! http://spaces-or-tabs.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/

We hope that SAM Local makes it easier for you to test, debug, and deploy your serverless apps. We have a CONTRIBUTING.md guide and we welcome pull requests. Please tweet at us to let us know what cool things you build. You can see our What’s New post here and the documentation is live here.

Randall

[$] User=0day considered harmful in systemd

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/727490/rss

Validating user input is a long-established security best practice, but
there can be differences of opinion about what should be done when that
validation fails. A recently reported bug in systemd has fostered a
discussion on that topic; along the way there has also been discussion
about how much
validation systemd should actually be doing and how much should be left up
to the underlying distribution. The controversy all revolves around
usernames that systemd does not accept, but that some distributions (and
POSIX)
find to
be perfectly acceptable.

Wildcard Certificates Coming January 2018

Post Syndicated from Let's Encrypt - Free SSL/TLS Certificates original https://letsencrypt.org//2017/07/06/wildcard-certificates-coming-jan-2018.html

Let’s Encrypt will begin issuing wildcard certificates in January of 2018. Wildcard certificates are a commonly requested feature and we understand that there are some use cases where they make HTTPS deployment easier. Our hope is that offering wildcards will help to accelerate the Web’s progress towards 100% HTTPS.

Let’s Encrypt is currently securing 47 million domains via our fully automated DV certificate issuance and management API. This has contributed heavily to the Web going from 40% to 58% encrypted page loads since Let’s Encrypt’s service became available in December 2015. If you’re excited about wildcard availability and our mission to get to a 100% encrypted Web, we ask that you contribute to our summer fundraising campaign.

A wildcard certificate can secure any number of subdomains of a base domain (e.g. *.example.com). This allows administrators to use a single certificate and key pair for a domain and all of its subdomains, which can make HTTPS deployment significantly easier.

Wildcard certificates will be offered free of charge via our upcoming ACME v2 API endpoint. We will initially only support base domain validation via DNS for wildcard certificates, but may explore additional validation options over time. We encourage people to ask any questions they might have about wildcard certificate support on our community forums.

We decided to announce this exciting development during our summer fundraising campaign because we are a nonprofit that exists thanks to the generous support of the community that uses our services. If you’d like to support a more secure and privacy-respecting Web, donate today!

We’d like to thank our community and our sponsors for making everything we’ve done possible. If your company or organization is able to sponsor Let’s Encrypt please email us at [email protected].

Validating AWS CloudFormation Templates

Post Syndicated from Remek Hetman original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/validating-aws-cloudformation-templates/

For their continuous integration and continuous deployment (CI/CD) pipeline path, many companies use tools like Jenkins, Chef, and AWS CloudFormation. Usually, the process is managed by two or more teams. One team is responsible for designing and developing an application, CloudFormation templates, and so on. The other team is generally responsible for integration and deployment.

One of the challenges that a CI/CD team has is to validate the CloudFormation templates provided by the development team. Validation provides early warning about any incorrect syntax and ensures that the development team follows company policies in terms of security and the resources created by CloudFormation templates.

In this post, I focus on the validation of AWS CloudFormation templates for syntax as well as in the context of business rules.

Scripted validation solution

For CloudFormation syntax validation, one option is to use the AWS CLI to call the validate-template command. For security and resource management, another approach is to run a Jenkins pipeline from an Amazon EC2 instance under an EC2 role that has been granted only the necessary permissions.

What if you need more control over your CloudFormation templates, such as managing parameters or attributes? What if you have many development teams where permissions to the AWS environment required by one team are either too open or not open enough for another team?

To have more control over the contents of your CloudFormation template, you can use the cf-validator Python script, which shows you how to validate different template aspects. With this script, you can validate:

  • JSON syntax
  • IAM capabilities
  • Root tags
  • Parameters
  • CloudFormation resources
  • Attributes
  • Reference resources

You can download this script from the cf-validator GitHub repo. Use the following command to run the script:

python cf-validator.py

The script takes the following parameters:

  • –cf_path [Required]

    The location of the CloudFormation template in JSON format. Supported location types:

    • File system – Path to the CloudFormation template on the file system
    • Web – URL, for example, https://my-file.com/my_cf.json
    • Amazon S3 – Amazon S3 bucket, for example, s3://my_bucket/my_cf.json
  • –cf_rules [Required]

    The location of the JSON file with the validation rules. This parameter supports the same locations as –cf_path. The next section of this post has more information about defining rules.

  • –cf_res [Optional]

    The location of the JSON file with the defined AWS resources, which need to be confirmed before launching the CloudFormation template. A later section of this post has more information about resource validation.

  • –allow_cap [Optional][yes/no]

    Controls whether you allow the creation of IAM resources by the CloudFormation template, such as policies, rules, or IAM users. The default value is no.

  • –region [Optional]

    The AWS region where the existing resources were created. The default value is us-east-1.

Defining rules

All rules are defined in the JSON format file. Rules consist of the following keys:

  • “allow_root_keys”

    Lists allowed root CloudFormation keys. Example of root keys are Parameters, Resources, Output, and so on. An empty list means that any key is allowed.

  • “allow_parameters”

    Lists allowed CloudFormation parameters. For instance, to force each CloudFormation template to use only the set of parameters defined in your pipeline, list them under this key. An empty list means that any parameter is allowed.

  • “allow_resources”

    Lists the AWS resources allowed for creation by a CloudFormation template. The format of the resource is the same as resource types in CloudFormation, but without the “AWS::” prefix. Examples:  EC2::Instance, EC2::Volume, and so on. If you allow the creation of all resources from the given group, you can use a wildcard. For instance, if you allow all resources related to CloudFormation, you can add CloudFormation::* to the list instead of typing CloudFormation::Init, CloudFormation:Stack, and so on. An empty list means that all resources are allowed.

  • “require_ref_attributes”

    Lists attributes (per resource) that have to be defined in CloudFormation. The value must be referenced and cannot be hardcoded. For instance, you can require that each EC2 instance must be created from a specific AMI where Image ID has to be a passed-in parameter. An empty list means that you are not requiring specific attributes to be present for a given resource.

  • “allow_additional_attributes”

    Lists additional attributes (per resource) that can be defined and have any value in the CloudFormation template. An empty list means that any additional attribute is allowed. If you specify additional attributes for this key, then any resource attribute defined in a CloudFormation template that is not listed in this key or in the require_ref_attributes key causes validation to fail.

  • “not_allow_attributes”

    Lists attributes (per resource) that are not allowed in the CloudFormation template. This key takes precedence over the require_ref_attributes and allow_additional_attributes keys.

Rule file example

The following is an example of a rule file:

{
  "allow_root_keys" : ["AWSTemplateFormatVersion", "Description", "Parameters", "Conditions", "Resources", "Outputs"],
  "allow_parameters" : [],
  "allow_resources" : [
    "CloudFormation::*",
    "CloudWatch::Alarm",
    "EC2::Instance",
    "EC2::Volume",
    "EC2::VolumeAttachment",
    "ElasticLoadBalancing::LoadBalancer",
    "IAM::Role",
    "IAM::Policy",
    "IAM::InstanceProfile"
  ],
  "require_ref_attributes" :
    {
      "EC2::Instance" : [ "InstanceType", "ImageId", "SecurityGroupIds", "SubnetId", "KeyName", "IamInstanceProfile" ],
      "ElasticLoadBalancing::LoadBalancer" : ["SecurityGroups", "Subnets"]
    },
  "allow_additional_attributes" : {},
  "not_allow_attributes" : {}
}

Validating resources

You can use the –cf_res parameter to validate that the resources you are planning to reference in the CloudFormation template exist and are available. As a value for this parameter, point to the JSON file with defined resources. The format should be as follows:

[
  { "Type" : "SG",
    "ID" : "sg-37c9b448A"
  },
  { "Type" : "AMI",
    "ID" : "ami-e7e523f1"
  },
  { "Type" : "Subnet",
    "ID" : "subnet-034e262e"
  }
]

Summary

At this moment, this CloudFormation template validation script supports only security groups, AMIs, and subnets. But anyone with some knowledge of Python and the boto3 package can add support for additional resources type, as needed.

For more tips please visit our AWS CloudFormation blog