Tag Archives: Validation

Maliciously Changing Someone’s Address

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/05/maliciously_cha.html

Someone changed the address of UPS corporate headquarters to his own apartment in Chicago. The company discovered it three months later.

The problem, of course, is that there isn’t any authentication of change-of-address submissions:

According to the Postal Service, nearly 37 million change-of-address requests ­ known as PS Form 3575 ­ were submitted in 2017. The form, which can be filled out in person or online, includes a warning below the signature line that “anyone submitting false or inaccurate information” could be subject to fines and imprisonment.

To cut down on possible fraud, post offices send a validation letter to both an old and new address when a change is filed. The letter includes a toll-free number to call to report anything suspicious.

Each year, only a tiny fraction of the requests are ever referred to postal inspectors for investigation. A spokeswoman for the U.S. Postal Inspection Service could not provide a specific number to the Tribune, but officials have previously said that the number of change-of-address investigations in a given year totals 1,000 or fewer typically.

While fraud involving change-of-address forms has long been linked to identity thieves, the targets are usually unsuspecting individuals, not massive corporations.

Introducing the AWS Machine Learning Competency for Consulting Partners

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/introducing-the-aws-machine-learning-competency-for-consulting-partners/

Today I’m excited to announce a new Machine Learning Competency for Consulting Partners in the Amazon Partner Network (APN). This AWS Competency program allows APN Consulting Partners to demonstrate a deep expertise in machine learning on AWS by providing solutions that enable machine learning and data science workflows for their customers. This new AWS Competency is in addition to the Machine Learning comptency for our APN Technology Partners, that we launched at the re:Invent 2017 partner summit.

These APN Consulting Partners help organizations solve their machine learning and data challenges through:

  • Providing data services that help data scientists and machine learning practitioners prepare their enterprise data for training.
  • Platform solutions that provide data scientists and machine learning practitioners with tools to take their data, train models, and make predictions on new data.
  • SaaS and API solutions to enable predictive capabilities within customer applications.

Why work with an AWS Machine Learning Competency Partner?

The AWS Competency Program helps customers find the most qualified partners with deep expertise. AWS Machine Learning Competency Partners undergo a strict validation of their capabilities to demonstrate technical proficiency and proven customer success with AWS machine learning tools.

If you’re an AWS customer interested in machine learning workloads on AWS, check out our AWS Machine Learning launch partners below:

 

Interested in becoming an AWS Machine Learning Competency Partner?

APN Partners with experience in Machine Learning can learn more about becoming an AWS Machine Learning Competency Partner here. To learn more about the benefits of joining the AWS Partner Network, see our APN Partner website.

Thanks to the AWS Partner Team for their help with this post!
Randall

What’s new in HiveMQ 3.4

Post Syndicated from The HiveMQ Team original https://www.hivemq.com/whats-new-in-hivemq-3-4

We are pleased to announce the release of HiveMQ 3.4. This version of HiveMQ is the most resilient and advanced version of HiveMQ ever. The main focus in this release was directed towards addressing the needs for the most ambitious MQTT deployments in the world for maximum performance and resilience for millions of concurrent MQTT clients. Of course, deployments of all sizes can profit from the improvements in the latest and greatest HiveMQ.

This version is a drop-in replacement for HiveMQ 3.3 and of course supports rolling upgrades with zero-downtime.

HiveMQ 3.4 brings many features that your users, administrators and plugin developers are going to love. These are the highlights:

 

New HiveMQ 3.4 features at a glance

Cluster

HiveMQ 3.4 brings various improvements in terms of scalability, availability, resilience and observability for the cluster mechanism. Many of the new features remain under the hood, but several additions stand out:

Cluster Overload Protection

The new version has a first-of-its-kind Cluster Overload Protection. The whole cluster is able to spot MQTT clients that cause overload on nodes or the cluster as a whole and protects itself from the overload. This mechanism also protects the deployment from cascading failures due to slow or failing underlying hardware (as sometimes seen on cloud providers). This feature is enabled by default and you can learn more about the mechanism in our documentation.

Dynamic Replicates

HiveMQ’s sophisticated cluster mechanism is able to scale in a linear fashion due to extremely efficient and true data distribution mechanics based on a configured replication factor. The most important aspect of every cluster is availability, which is achieved by having eventual consistency functions in place for edge cases. The 3.4 version adds dynamic replicates to the cluster so even the most challenging edge cases involving network splits don’t lead to the sacrifice of consistency for the most important MQTT operations.

Node Stress Level Metrics

All MQTT cluster nodes are now aware of their own stress level and the stress levels of other cluster members. While all stress mitigation is handled internally by HiveMQ, experienced operators may want to monitor the individual node’s stress level (e.g with Grafana) in order to start investigating what caused the increase of load.

WebUI

Operators worldwide love the HiveMQ WebUI introduced with HiveMQ 3.3. We gathered all the fantastic feedback from our users and polished the WebUI, so it’s even more useful for day-to-day broker operations and remote debugging of MQTT clients. The most important changes and additions are:

Trace Recording Download

The unique Trace Recordings functionality is without doubt a lifesaver when the behavior of individual MQTT clients needs further investigation as all interactions with the broker can be traced — at runtime and at scale! Huge production deployments may accumulate multiple gigabytes of trace recordings. HiveMQ now offers a convenient way to collect all trace recordings from all nodes, zips them and allows the download via a simple button on the WebUI. Remote debugging was never easier!

Additional Client Detail Information in WebUI

The mission of the HiveMQ WebUI is to provide easy insights to the whole production MQTT cluster for operators and administrators. Individual MQTT client investigations are a piece of cake, as all available information about clients can be viewed in detail. We further added the ability to view the restrictions a concrete client has:

  • Maximum Inflight Queue Size
  • Client Offline Queue Messages Size
  • Client Offline Message Drop Strategy

Session Invalidation

MQTT persistent sessions are one of the outstanding features of the MQTT protocol specification. Sessions which do not expire but are never reused unnecessarily consume disk space and memory. Administrators can now invalidate individual session directly in the HiveMQ WebUI for client sessions, which can be deleted safely. HiveMQ 3.4 will take care and release the resources on all cluster nodes after a session was invalidated

Web UI Polishing

Most texts on the WebUI were revisited and are now clearer and crisper. The help texts also received a major overhaul and should now be more, well, helpful. In addition, many small improvements were added, which are most of the time invisible but are here to help when you need them most. For example, the WebUI now displays a warning if cluster nodes with old versions are in the cluster (which may happen if a rolling upgrade was not finished properly)

Plugin System

One of the most popular features of HiveMQ is the extensive Plugin System, which virtually enables the integration of HiveMQ to any system and allows hooking into all aspects of the MQTT lifecycle. We listened to the feedback and are pleased to announce many improvements, big and small, for the Plugin System:

Client Session Time-to-live for individual clients

HiveMQ 3.3 offered a global configuration for setting the Time-To-Live for MQTT sessions. With the advent of HiveMQ 3.4, users can now programmatically set Time-To-Live values for individual MQTT clients and can discard a MQTT session immediately.

Individual Inflight Queues

While the Inflight Queue configuration is typically sufficient in the HiveMQ default configuration, there are some use cases that require the adjustment of this configuration. It’s now possible to change the Inflight Queue size for individual clients via the Plugin System.
 
 

Plugin Service Overload Protection

The HiveMQ Plugin System is a power-user tool and it’s possible to do unbelievably useful modifications as well as putting major stress on the system as a whole if the programmer is not careful. In order to protect the HiveMQ instances from accidental overload, a Plugin Service Overload Protection can be configured. This rate limits the Plugin Service usage and gives feedback to the application programmer in case the rate limit is exceeded. This feature is disabled by default but we strongly recommend updating your plugins to profit from this feature.

Session Attribute Store putIfNewer

This is one of the small bits you almost never need but when you do, you’re ecstatic for being able to use it. The Session Attribute Store now offers methods to put values, if the values you want to put are newer or fresher than the values already written. This is extremely useful, if multiple cluster nodes want to write to the Session Attribute Store simultaneously, as this guarantees that outdated values can no longer overwrite newer values.
 
 
 
 

Disconnection Timestamp for OnDisconnectCallback

As the OnDisconnectCallback is executed asynchronously, the client might already be gone when the callback is executed. It’s now easy to obtain the exact timestamp when a MQTT client disconnected, even if the callback is executed later on. This feature might be very interesting for many plugin developers in conjunction with the Session Attribute Store putIfNewer functionality.

Operations

We ❤️ Operators and we strive to provide all the tools needed for operating and administrating a MQTT broker cluster at scale in any environment. A key strategy for successful operations of any system is monitoring. We added some interesting new metrics you might find useful.

System Metrics

In addition to JVM Metrics, HiveMQ now also gathers Operating System Metrics for Linux Systems. So HiveMQ is able to see for itself how the operating system views the process, including native memory, the real CPU usage, and open file usage. These metrics are particularly useful, if you don’t have a monitoring agent for Linux systems setup. All metrics can be found here.

Client Disconnection Metrics

The reality of many MQTT scenarios is that not all clients are able to disconnect gracefully by sending MQTT DISCONNECT messages. HiveMQ now also exposes metrics about clients that disconnected by closing the TCP connection instead of sending a DISCONNECT packet first. This is especially useful for monitoring, if you regularly deal with clients that don’t have a stable connection to the MQTT brokers.

 

JMX enabled by default

JMX, the Java Monitoring Extension, is now enabled by default. Many HiveMQ operators use Application Performance Monitoring tools, which are able to hook into the metrics via JMX or use plain JMX for on-the-fly debugging. While we recommend to use official off-the-shelf plugins for monitoring, it’s now easier than ever to just use JMX if other solutions are not available to you.

Other notable improvements

The 3.4 release of HiveMQ is full of hidden gems and improvements. While it would be too much to highlight all small improvements, these notable changes stand out and contribute to the best HiveMQ release ever.

Topic Level Distribution Configuration

Our recommendation for all huge deployments with millions of devices is: Start with separate topic prefixes by bringing the dynamic topic parts directly to the beginning. The reality is that many customers have topics that are constructed like the following: “devices/{deviceId}/status”. So what happens is that all topics in this example start with a common prefix, “devices”, which is the first topic level. Unfortunately the first topic level doesn’t include a dynamic topic part. In order to guarantee the best scalability of the cluster and the best performance of the topic tree, customers can now configure how many topic levels are used for distribution. In the example outlined here, a topic level distribution of 2 would be perfect and guarantees the best scalability.

Mass disconnect performance improvements

Mass disconnections of MQTT clients can happen. This might be the case when e.g. a load balancer in front of the MQTT broker cluster drops the connections or if a mobile carrier experiences connectivity problems. Prior to HiveMQ 3.4, mass disconnect events caused stress on the cluster. Mass disconnect events are now massively optimized and even tens of millions of connection losses at the same time won’t bring the cluster into stress situations.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Replication Performance Improvements

Due to the distributed nature of a HiveMQ, data needs to be replicated across the cluster in certain events, e.g. when cluster topology changes occur. There are various internal improvements in HiveMQ version 3.4, which increase the replication performance significantly. Our engineers put special love into the replication of Queued Messages, which is now faster than ever, even for multiple millions of Queued Messages that need to be transferred across the cluster.

Updated Native SSL Libraries

The Native SSL Integration of HiveMQ was updated to the newest BoringSSL version. This results in better performance and increased security. In case you’re using SSL and you are not yet using the native SSL integration, we strongly recommend to give it a try, more than 40% performance improvement can be observed for most deployments.

 
 

Improvements for Java 9

While Java 9 was already supported for older HiveMQ versions, HiveMQ 3.4 has full-blown Java 9 support. The minimum Java version still remains Java 7, although we strongly recommend to use Java 8 or newer for the best performance of HiveMQ.

Implement continuous integration and delivery of serverless AWS Glue ETL applications using AWS Developer Tools

Post Syndicated from Prasad Alle original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/implement-continuous-integration-and-delivery-of-serverless-aws-glue-etl-applications-using-aws-developer-tools/

AWS Glue is an increasingly popular way to develop serverless ETL (extract, transform, and load) applications for big data and data lake workloads. Organizations that transform their ETL applications to cloud-based, serverless ETL architectures need a seamless, end-to-end continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) pipeline: from source code, to build, to deployment, to product delivery. Having a good CI/CD pipeline can help your organization discover bugs before they reach production and deliver updates more frequently. It can also help developers write quality code and automate the ETL job release management process, mitigate risk, and more.

AWS Glue is a fully managed data catalog and ETL service. It simplifies and automates the difficult and time-consuming tasks of data discovery, conversion, and job scheduling. AWS Glue crawls your data sources and constructs a data catalog using pre-built classifiers for popular data formats and data types, including CSV, Apache Parquet, JSON, and more.

When you are developing ETL applications using AWS Glue, you might come across some of the following CI/CD challenges:

  • Iterative development with unit tests
  • Continuous integration and build
  • Pushing the ETL pipeline to a test environment
  • Pushing the ETL pipeline to a production environment
  • Testing ETL applications using real data (live test)
  • Exploring and validating data

In this post, I walk you through a solution that implements a CI/CD pipeline for serverless AWS Glue ETL applications supported by AWS Developer Tools (including AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeCommit, and AWS CodeBuild) and AWS CloudFormation.

Solution overview

The following diagram shows the pipeline workflow:

This solution uses AWS CodePipeline, which lets you orchestrate and automate the test and deploy stages for ETL application source code. The solution consists of a pipeline that contains the following stages:

1.) Source Control: In this stage, the AWS Glue ETL job source code and the AWS CloudFormation template file for deploying the ETL jobs are both committed to version control. I chose to use AWS CodeCommit for version control.

To get the ETL job source code and AWS CloudFormation template, download the gluedemoetl.zip file. This solution is developed based on a previous post, Build a Data Lake Foundation with AWS Glue and Amazon S3.

2.) LiveTest: In this stage, all resources—including AWS Glue crawlers, jobs, S3 buckets, roles, and other resources that are required for the solution—are provisioned, deployed, live tested, and cleaned up.

The LiveTest stage includes the following actions:

  • Deploy: In this action, all the resources that are required for this solution (crawlers, jobs, buckets, roles, and so on) are provisioned and deployed using an AWS CloudFormation template.
  • AutomatedLiveTest: In this action, all the AWS Glue crawlers and jobs are executed and data exploration and validation tests are performed. These validation tests include, but are not limited to, record counts in both raw tables and transformed tables in the data lake and any other business validations. I used AWS CodeBuild for this action.
  • LiveTestApproval: This action is included for the cases in which a pipeline administrator approval is required to deploy/promote the ETL applications to the next stage. The pipeline pauses in this action until an administrator manually approves the release.
  • LiveTestCleanup: In this action, all the LiveTest stage resources, including test crawlers, jobs, roles, and so on, are deleted using the AWS CloudFormation template. This action helps minimize cost by ensuring that the test resources exist only for the duration of the AutomatedLiveTest and LiveTestApproval

3.) DeployToProduction: In this stage, all the resources are deployed using the AWS CloudFormation template to the production environment.

Try it out

This code pipeline takes approximately 20 minutes to complete the LiveTest test stage (up to the LiveTest approval stage, in which manual approval is required).

To get started with this solution, choose Launch Stack:

This creates the CI/CD pipeline with all of its stages, as described earlier. It performs an initial commit of the sample AWS Glue ETL job source code to trigger the first release change.

In the AWS CloudFormation console, choose Create. After the template finishes creating resources, you see the pipeline name on the stack Outputs tab.

After that, open the CodePipeline console and select the newly created pipeline. Initially, your pipeline’s CodeCommit stage shows that the source action failed.

Allow a few minutes for your new pipeline to detect the initial commit applied by the CloudFormation stack creation. As soon as the commit is detected, your pipeline starts. You will see the successful stage completion status as soon as the CodeCommit source stage runs.

In the CodeCommit console, choose Code in the navigation pane to view the solution files.

Next, you can watch how the pipeline goes through the LiveTest stage of the deploy and AutomatedLiveTest actions, until it finally reaches the LiveTestApproval action.

At this point, if you check the AWS CloudFormation console, you can see that a new template has been deployed as part of the LiveTest deploy action.

At this point, make sure that the AWS Glue crawlers and the AWS Glue job ran successfully. Also check whether the corresponding databases and external tables have been created in the AWS Glue Data Catalog. Then verify that the data is validated using Amazon Athena, as shown following.

Open the AWS Glue console, and choose Databases in the navigation pane. You will see the following databases in the Data Catalog:

Open the Amazon Athena console, and run the following queries. Verify that the record counts are matching.

SELECT count(*) FROM "nycitytaxi_gluedemocicdtest"."data";
SELECT count(*) FROM "nytaxiparquet_gluedemocicdtest"."datalake";

The following shows the raw data:

The following shows the transformed data:

The pipeline pauses the action until the release is approved. After validating the data, manually approve the revision on the LiveTestApproval action on the CodePipeline console.

Add comments as needed, and choose Approve.

The LiveTestApproval stage now appears as Approved on the console.

After the revision is approved, the pipeline proceeds to use the AWS CloudFormation template to destroy the resources that were deployed in the LiveTest deploy action. This helps reduce cost and ensures a clean test environment on every deployment.

Production deployment is the final stage. In this stage, all the resources—AWS Glue crawlers, AWS Glue jobs, Amazon S3 buckets, roles, and so on—are provisioned and deployed to the production environment using the AWS CloudFormation template.

After successfully running the whole pipeline, feel free to experiment with it by changing the source code stored on AWS CodeCommit. For example, if you modify the AWS Glue ETL job to generate an error, it should make the AutomatedLiveTest action fail. Or if you change the AWS CloudFormation template to make its creation fail, it should affect the LiveTest deploy action. The objective of the pipeline is to guarantee that all changes that are deployed to production are guaranteed to work as expected.

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how easy it is to implement CI/CD for serverless AWS Glue ETL solutions with AWS developer tools like AWS CodePipeline and AWS CodeBuild at scale. Implementing such solutions can help you accelerate ETL development and testing at your organization.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

 


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Implement Continuous Integration and Delivery of Apache Spark Applications using AWS and Build a Data Lake Foundation with AWS Glue and Amazon S3.

 


About the Authors

Prasad Alle is a Senior Big Data Consultant with AWS Professional Services. He spends his time leading and building scalable, reliable Big data, Machine learning, Artificial Intelligence and IoT solutions for AWS Enterprise and Strategic customers. His interests extend to various technologies such as Advanced Edge Computing, Machine learning at Edge. In his spare time, he enjoys spending time with his family.

 
Luis Caro is a Big Data Consultant for AWS Professional Services. He works with our customers to provide guidance and technical assistance on big data projects, helping them improving the value of their solutions when using AWS.

 

 

 

Implementing safe AWS Lambda deployments with AWS CodeDeploy

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/implementing-safe-aws-lambda-deployments-with-aws-codedeploy/

This post courtesy of George Mao, AWS Senior Serverless Specialist – Solutions Architect

AWS Lambda and AWS CodeDeploy recently made it possible to automatically shift incoming traffic between two function versions based on a preconfigured rollout strategy. This new feature allows you to gradually shift traffic to the new function. If there are any issues with the new code, you can quickly rollback and control the impact to your application.

Previously, you had to manually move 100% of traffic from the old version to the new version. Now, you can have CodeDeploy automatically execute pre- or post-deployment tests and automate a gradual rollout strategy. Traffic shifting is built right into the AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM), making it easy to define and deploy your traffic shifting capabilities. SAM is an extension of AWS CloudFormation that provides a simplified way of defining serverless applications.

In this post, I show you how to use SAM, CloudFormation, and CodeDeploy to accomplish an automated rollout strategy for safe Lambda deployments.

Scenario

For this walkthrough, you write a Lambda application that returns a count of the S3 buckets that you own. You deploy it and use it in production. Later on, you receive requirements that tell you that you need to change your Lambda application to count only buckets that begin with the letter “a”.

Before you make the change, you need to be sure that your new Lambda application works as expected. If it does have issues, you want to minimize the number of impacted users and roll back easily. To accomplish this, you create a deployment process that publishes the new Lambda function, but does not send any traffic to it. You use CodeDeploy to execute a PreTraffic test to ensure that your new function works as expected. After the test succeeds, CodeDeploy automatically shifts traffic gradually to the new version of the Lambda function.

Your Lambda function is exposed as a REST service via an Amazon API Gateway deployment. This makes it easy to test and integrate.

Prerequisites

To execute the SAM and CloudFormation deployment, you must have the following IAM permissions:

  • cloudformation:*
  • lambda:*
  • codedeploy:*
  • iam:create*

You may use the AWS SAM Local CLI or the AWS CLI to package and deploy your Lambda application. If you choose to use SAM Local, be sure to install it onto your system. For more information, see AWS SAM Local Installation.

All of the code used in this post can be found in this GitHub repository: https://github.com/aws-samples/aws-safe-lambda-deployments.

Walkthrough

For this post, use SAM to define your resources because it comes with built-in CodeDeploy support for safe Lambda deployments.  The deployment is handled and automated by CloudFormation.

SAM allows you to define your Serverless applications in a simple and concise fashion, because it automatically creates all necessary resources behind the scenes. For example, if you do not define an execution role for a Lambda function, SAM automatically creates one. SAM also creates the CodeDeploy application necessary to drive the traffic shifting, as well as the IAM service role that CodeDeploy uses to execute all actions.

Create a SAM template

To get started, write your SAM template and call it template.yaml.

AWSTemplateFormatVersion : '2010-09-09'
Transform: AWS::Serverless-2016-10-31
Description: An example SAM template for Lambda Safe Deployments.

Resources:

  returnS3Buckets:
    Type: AWS::Serverless::Function
    Properties:
      Handler: returnS3Buckets.handler
      Runtime: nodejs6.10
      AutoPublishAlias: live
      Policies:
        - Version: "2012-10-17"
          Statement: 
          - Effect: "Allow"
            Action: 
              - "s3:ListAllMyBuckets"
            Resource: '*'
      DeploymentPreference:
          Type: Linear10PercentEvery1Minute
          Hooks:
            PreTraffic: !Ref preTrafficHook
      Events:
        Api:
          Type: Api
          Properties:
            Path: /test
            Method: get

  preTrafficHook:
    Type: AWS::Serverless::Function
    Properties:
      Handler: preTrafficHook.handler
      Policies:
        - Version: "2012-10-17"
          Statement: 
          - Effect: "Allow"
            Action: 
              - "codedeploy:PutLifecycleEventHookExecutionStatus"
            Resource:
              !Sub 'arn:aws:codedeploy:${AWS::Region}:${AWS::AccountId}:deploymentgroup:${ServerlessDeploymentApplication}/*'
        - Version: "2012-10-17"
          Statement: 
          - Effect: "Allow"
            Action: 
              - "lambda:InvokeFunction"
            Resource: !Ref returnS3Buckets.Version
      Runtime: nodejs6.10
      FunctionName: 'CodeDeployHook_preTrafficHook'
      DeploymentPreference:
        Enabled: false
      Timeout: 5
      Environment:
        Variables:
          NewVersion: !Ref returnS3Buckets.Version

This template creates two functions:

  • returnS3Buckets
  • preTrafficHook

The returnS3Buckets function is where your application logic lives. It’s a simple piece of code that uses the AWS SDK for JavaScript in Node.JS to call the Amazon S3 listBuckets API action and return the number of buckets.

'use strict';

var AWS = require('aws-sdk');
var s3 = new AWS.S3();

exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
	console.log("I am here! " + context.functionName  +  ":"  +  context.functionVersion);

	s3.listBuckets(function (err, data){
		if(err){
			console.log(err, err.stack);
			callback(null, {
				statusCode: 500,
				body: "Failed!"
			});
		}
		else{
			var allBuckets = data.Buckets;

			console.log("Total buckets: " + allBuckets.length);
			callback(null, {
				statusCode: 200,
				body: allBuckets.length
			});
		}
	});	
}

Review the key parts of the SAM template that defines returnS3Buckets:

  • The AutoPublishAlias attribute instructs SAM to automatically publish a new version of the Lambda function for each new deployment and link it to the live alias.
  • The Policies attribute specifies additional policy statements that SAM adds onto the automatically generated IAM role for this function. The first statement provides the function with permission to call listBuckets.
  • The DeploymentPreference attribute configures the type of rollout pattern to use. In this case, you are shifting traffic in a linear fashion, moving 10% of traffic every minute to the new version. For more information about supported patterns, see Serverless Application Model: Traffic Shifting Configurations.
  • The Hooks attribute specifies that you want to execute the preTrafficHook Lambda function before CodeDeploy automatically begins shifting traffic. This function should perform validation testing on the newly deployed Lambda version. This function invokes the new Lambda function and checks the results. If you’re satisfied with the tests, instruct CodeDeploy to proceed with the rollout via an API call to: codedeploy.putLifecycleEventHookExecutionStatus.
  • The Events attribute defines an API-based event source that can trigger this function. It accepts requests on the /test path using an HTTP GET method.
'use strict';

const AWS = require('aws-sdk');
const codedeploy = new AWS.CodeDeploy({apiVersion: '2014-10-06'});
var lambda = new AWS.Lambda();

exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {

	console.log("Entering PreTraffic Hook!");
	
	// Read the DeploymentId & LifecycleEventHookExecutionId from the event payload
    var deploymentId = event.DeploymentId;
	var lifecycleEventHookExecutionId = event.LifecycleEventHookExecutionId;

	var functionToTest = process.env.NewVersion;
	console.log("Testing new function version: " + functionToTest);

	// Perform validation of the newly deployed Lambda version
	var lambdaParams = {
		FunctionName: functionToTest,
		InvocationType: "RequestResponse"
	};

	var lambdaResult = "Failed";
	lambda.invoke(lambdaParams, function(err, data) {
		if (err){	// an error occurred
			console.log(err, err.stack);
			lambdaResult = "Failed";
		}
		else{	// successful response
			var result = JSON.parse(data.Payload);
			console.log("Result: " +  JSON.stringify(result));

			// Check the response for valid results
			// The response will be a JSON payload with statusCode and body properties. ie:
			// {
			//		"statusCode": 200,
			//		"body": 51
			// }
			if(result.body == 9){	
				lambdaResult = "Succeeded";
				console.log ("Validation testing succeeded!");
			}
			else{
				lambdaResult = "Failed";
				console.log ("Validation testing failed!");
			}

			// Complete the PreTraffic Hook by sending CodeDeploy the validation status
			var params = {
				deploymentId: deploymentId,
				lifecycleEventHookExecutionId: lifecycleEventHookExecutionId,
				status: lambdaResult // status can be 'Succeeded' or 'Failed'
			};
			
			// Pass AWS CodeDeploy the prepared validation test results.
			codedeploy.putLifecycleEventHookExecutionStatus(params, function(err, data) {
				if (err) {
					// Validation failed.
					console.log('CodeDeploy Status update failed');
					console.log(err, err.stack);
					callback("CodeDeploy Status update failed");
				} else {
					// Validation succeeded.
					console.log('Codedeploy status updated successfully');
					callback(null, 'Codedeploy status updated successfully');
				}
			});
		}  
	});
}

The hook is hardcoded to check that the number of S3 buckets returned is 9.

Review the key parts of the SAM template that defines preTrafficHook:

  • The Policies attribute specifies additional policy statements that SAM adds onto the automatically generated IAM role for this function. The first statement provides permissions to call the CodeDeploy PutLifecycleEventHookExecutionStatus API action. The second statement provides permissions to invoke the specific version of the returnS3Buckets function to test
  • This function has traffic shifting features disabled by setting the DeploymentPreference option to false.
  • The FunctionName attribute explicitly tells CloudFormation what to name the function. Otherwise, CloudFormation creates the function with the default naming convention: [stackName]-[FunctionName]-[uniqueID].  Name the function with the “CodeDeployHook_” prefix because the CodeDeployServiceRole role only allows InvokeFunction on functions named with that prefix.
  • Set the Timeout attribute to allow enough time to complete your validation tests.
  • Use an environment variable to inject the ARN of the newest deployed version of the returnS3Buckets function. The ARN allows the function to know the specific version to invoke and perform validation testing on.

Deploy the function

Your SAM template is all set and the code is written—you’re ready to deploy the function for the first time. Here’s how to do it via the SAM CLI. Replace “sam” with “cloudformation” to use CloudFormation instead.

First, package the function. This command returns a CloudFormation importable file, packaged.yaml.

sam package –template-file template.yaml –s3-bucket mybucket –output-template-file packaged.yaml

Now deploy everything:

sam deploy –template-file packaged.yaml –stack-name mySafeDeployStack –capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM

At this point, both Lambda functions have been deployed within the CloudFormation stack mySafeDeployStack. The returnS3Buckets has been deployed as Version 1:

SAM automatically created a few things, including the CodeDeploy application, with the deployment pattern that you specified (Linear10PercentEvery1Minute). There is currently one deployment group, with no action, because no deployments have occurred. SAM also created the IAM service role that this CodeDeploy application uses:

There is a single managed policy attached to this role, which allows CodeDeploy to invoke any Lambda function that begins with “CodeDeployHook_”.

An API has been set up called safeDeployStack. It targets your Lambda function with the /test resource using the GET method. When you test the endpoint, API Gateway executes the returnS3Buckets function and it returns the number of S3 buckets that you own. In this case, it’s 51.

Publish a new Lambda function version

Now implement the requirements change, which is to make returnS3Buckets count only buckets that begin with the letter “a”. The code now looks like the following (see returnS3BucketsNew.js in GitHub):

'use strict';

var AWS = require('aws-sdk');
var s3 = new AWS.S3();

exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
	console.log("I am here! " + context.functionName  +  ":"  +  context.functionVersion);

	s3.listBuckets(function (err, data){
		if(err){
			console.log(err, err.stack);
			callback(null, {
				statusCode: 500,
				body: "Failed!"
			});
		}
		else{
			var allBuckets = data.Buckets;

			console.log("Total buckets: " + allBuckets.length);
			//callback(null, allBuckets.length);

			//  New Code begins here
			var counter=0;
			for(var i  in allBuckets){
				if(allBuckets[i].Name[0] === "a")
					counter++;
			}
			console.log("Total buckets starting with a: " + counter);

			callback(null, {
				statusCode: 200,
				body: counter
			});
			
		}
	});	
}

Repackage and redeploy with the same two commands as earlier:

sam package –template-file template.yaml –s3-bucket mybucket –output-template-file packaged.yaml
	
sam deploy –template-file packaged.yaml –stack-name mySafeDeployStack –capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM

CloudFormation understands that this is a stack update instead of an entirely new stack. You can see that reflected in the CloudFormation console:

During the update, CloudFormation deploys the new Lambda function as version 2 and adds it to the “live” alias. There is no traffic routing there yet. CodeDeploy now takes over to begin the safe deployment process.

The first thing CodeDeploy does is invoke the preTrafficHook function. Verify that this happened by reviewing the Lambda logs and metrics:

The function should progress successfully, invoke Version 2 of returnS3Buckets, and finally invoke the CodeDeploy API with a success code. After this occurs, CodeDeploy begins the predefined rollout strategy. Open the CodeDeploy console to review the deployment progress (Linear10PercentEvery1Minute):

Verify the traffic shift

During the deployment, verify that the traffic shift has started to occur by running the test periodically. As the deployment shifts towards the new version, a larger percentage of the responses return 9 instead of 51. These numbers match the S3 buckets.

A minute later, you see 10% more traffic shifting to the new version. The whole process takes 10 minutes to complete. After completion, open the Lambda console and verify that the “live” alias now points to version 2:

After 10 minutes, the deployment is complete and CodeDeploy signals success to CloudFormation and completes the stack update.

Check the results

If you invoke the function alias manually, you see the results of the new implementation.

aws lambda invoke –function [lambda arn to live alias] out.txt

You can also execute the prod stage of your API and verify the results by issuing an HTTP GET to the invoke URL:

Summary

This post has shown you how you can safely automate your Lambda deployments using the Lambda traffic shifting feature. You used the Serverless Application Model (SAM) to define your Lambda functions and configured CodeDeploy to manage your deployment patterns. Finally, you used CloudFormation to automate the deployment and updates to your function and PreTraffic hook.

Now that you know all about this new feature, you’re ready to begin automating Lambda deployments with confidence that things will work as designed. I look forward to hearing about what you’ve built with the AWS Serverless Platform.

Using AWS Lambda and Amazon Comprehend for sentiment analysis

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/using-aws-lambda-and-amazon-comprehend-for-sentiment-analysis/

This post courtesy of Giedrius Praspaliauskas, AWS Solutions Architect

Even with best IVR systems, customers get frustrated. What if you knew that 10 callers in your Amazon Connect contact flow were likely to say “Agent!” in frustration in the next 30 seconds? Would you like to get to them before that happens? What if your bot was smart enough to admit, “I’m sorry this isn’t helping. Let me find someone for you.”?

In this post, I show you how to use AWS Lambda and Amazon Comprehend for sentiment analysis to make your Amazon Lex bots in Amazon Connect more sympathetic.

Setting up a Lambda function for sentiment analysis

There are multiple natural language and text processing frameworks or services available to use with Lambda, including but not limited to Amazon Comprehend, TextBlob, Pattern, and NLTK. Pick one based on the nature of your system:  the type of interaction, languages supported, and so on. For this post, I picked Amazon Comprehend, which uses natural language processing (NLP) to extract insights and relationships in text.

The walkthrough in this post is just an example. In a full-scale implementation, you would likely implement a more nuanced approach. For example, you could keep the overall sentiment score through the conversation and act only when it reaches a certain threshold. It is worth noting that this Lambda function is not called for missed utterances, so there may be a gap between what is being analyzed and what was actually said.

The Lambda function is straightforward. It analyses the input transcript field of the Amazon Lex event. Based on the overall sentiment value, it generates a response message with next step instructions. When the sentiment is neutral, positive, or mixed, the response leaves it to Amazon Lex to decide what the next steps should be. It adds to the response overall sentiment value as an additional session attribute, along with slots’ values received as an input.

When the overall sentiment is negative, the function returns the dialog action, pointing to an escalation intent (specified in the environment variable ESCALATION_INTENT_NAME) or returns the fulfillment closure action with a failure state when the intent is not specified. In addition to actions or intents, the function returns a message, or prompt, to be provided to the customer before taking the next step. Based on the returned action, Amazon Connect can select the appropriate next step in a contact flow.

For this walkthrough, you create a Lambda function using the AWS Management Console:

  1. Open the Lambda console.
  2. Choose Create Function.
  3. Choose Author from scratch (no blueprint).
  4. For Runtime, choose Python 3.6.
  5. For Role, choose Create a custom role. The custom execution role allows the function to detect sentiments, create a log group, stream log events, and store the log events.
  6. Enter the following values:
    • For Role Description, enter Lambda execution role permissions.
    • For IAM Role, choose Create an IAM role.
    • For Role Name, enter LexSentimentAnalysisLambdaRole.
    • For Policy, use the following policy:
{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "logs:CreateLogGroup",
                "logs:CreateLogStream",
                "logs:PutLogEvents"
            ],
            "Resource": "arn:aws:logs:*:*:*"
        },
        {
            "Action": [
                "comprehend:DetectDominantLanguage",
                "comprehend:DetectSentiment"
            ],
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Resource": "*"
        }
    ]
}
    1. Choose Create function.
    2. Copy/paste the following code to the editor window
import os, boto3

ESCALATION_INTENT_MESSAGE="Seems that you are having troubles with our service. Would you like to be transferred to the associate?"
FULFILMENT_CLOSURE_MESSAGE="Seems that you are having troubles with our service. Let me transfer you to the associate."

escalation_intent_name = os.getenv('ESACALATION_INTENT_NAME', None)

client = boto3.client('comprehend')

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    sentiment=client.detect_sentiment(Text=event['inputTranscript'],LanguageCode='en')['Sentiment']
    if sentiment=='NEGATIVE':
        if escalation_intent_name:
            result = {
                "sessionAttributes": {
                    "sentiment": sentiment
                    },
                    "dialogAction": {
                        "type": "ConfirmIntent", 
                        "message": {
                            "contentType": "PlainText", 
                            "content": ESCALATION_INTENT_MESSAGE
                        }, 
                    "intentName": escalation_intent_name
                    }
            }
        else:
            result = {
                "sessionAttributes": {
                    "sentiment": sentiment
                },
                "dialogAction": {
                    "type": "Close",
                    "fulfillmentState": "Failed",
                    "message": {
                            "contentType": "PlainText",
                            "content": FULFILMENT_CLOSURE_MESSAGE
                    }
                }
            }

    else:
        result ={
            "sessionAttributes": {
                "sentiment": sentiment
            },
            "dialogAction": {
                "type": "Delegate",
                "slots" : event["currentIntent"]["slots"]
            }
        }
    return result
  1. Below the code editor specify the environment variable ESCALATION_INTENT_NAME with a value of Escalate.

  1. Click on Save in the top right of the console.

Now you can test your function.

  1. Click Test at the top of the console.
  2. Configure a new test event using the following test event JSON:
{
  "messageVersion": "1.0",
  "invocationSource": "DialogCodeHook",
  "userId": "1234567890",
  "sessionAttributes": {},
  "bot": {
    "name": "BookSomething",
    "alias": "None",
    "version": "$LATEST"
  },
  "outputDialogMode": "Text",
  "currentIntent": {
    "name": "BookSomething",
    "slots": {
      "slot1": "None",
      "slot2": "None"
    },
    "confirmationStatus": "None"
  },
  "inputTranscript": "I want something"
}
  1. Click Create
  2. Click Test on the console

This message should return a response from Lambda with a sentiment session attribute of NEUTRAL.

However, if you change the input to “This is garbage!”, Lambda changes the dialog action to the escalation intent specified in the environment variable ESCALATION_INTENT_NAME.

Setting up Amazon Lex

Now that you have your Lambda function running, it is time to create the Amazon Lex bot. Use the BookTrip sample bot and call it BookSomething. The IAM role is automatically created on your behalf. Indicate that this bot is not subject to the COPPA, and choose Create. A few minutes later, the bot is ready.

Make the following changes to the default configuration of the bot:

  1. Add an intent with no associated slots. Name it Escalate.
  2. Specify the Lambda function for initialization and validation in the existing two intents (“BookCar” and “BookHotel”), at the same time giving Amazon Lex permission to invoke it.
  3. Leave the other configuration settings as they are and save the intents.

You are ready to build and publish this bot. Set a new alias, BookSomethingWithSentimentAnalysis. When the build finishes, test it.

As you see, sentiment analysis works!

Setting up Amazon Connect

Next, provision an Amazon Connect instance.

After the instance is created, you need to integrate the Amazon Lex bot created in the previous step. For more information, see the Amazon Lex section in the Configuring Your Amazon Connect Instance topic.  You may also want to look at the excellent post by Randall Hunt, New – Amazon Connect and Amazon Lex Integration.

Create a new contact flow, “Sentiment analysis walkthrough”:

  1. Log in into the Amazon Connect instance.
  2. Choose Create contact flow, Create transfer to agent flow.
  3. Add a Get customer input block, open the icon in the top left corner, and specify your Amazon Lex bot and its intents.
  4. Select the Text to speech audio prompt type and enter text for Amazon Connect to play at the beginning of the dialog.
  5. Choose Amazon Lex, enter your Amazon Lex bot name and the alias.
  6. Specify the intents to be used as dialog branches that a customer can choose: BookHotel, BookTrip, or Escalate.
  7. Add two Play prompt blocks and connect them to the customer input block.
    • If booking hotel or car intent is returned from the bot flow, play the corresponding prompt (“OK, will book it for you”) and initiate booking (in this walkthrough, just hang up after the prompt).
    • However, if escalation intent is returned (caused by the sentiment analysis results in the bot), play the prompt (“OK, transferring to an agent”) and initiate the transfer.
  8. Save and publish the contact flow.

As a result, you have a contact flow with a single customer input step and a text-to-speech prompt that uses the Amazon Lex bot. You expect one of the three intents returned:

Edit the phone number to associate the contact flow that you just created. It is now ready for testing. Call the phone number and check how your contact flow works.

Cleanup

Don’t forget to delete all the resources created during this walkthrough to avoid incurring any more costs:

  • Amazon Connect instance
  • Amazon Lex bot
  • Lambda function
  • IAM role LexSentimentAnalysisLambdaRole

Summary

In this walkthrough, you implemented sentiment analysis with a Lambda function. The function can be integrated into Amazon Lex and, as a result, into Amazon Connect. This approach gives you the flexibility to analyze user input and then act. You may find the following potential use cases of this approach to be of interest:

  • Extend the Lambda function to identify “hot” topics in the user input even if the sentiment is not negative and take action proactively. For example, switch to an escalation intent if a user mentioned “where is my order,” which may signal potential frustration.
  • Use Amazon Connect Streams to provide agent sentiment analysis results along with call transfer. Enable service tailored towards particular customer needs and sentiments.
  • Route calls to agents based on both skill set and sentiment.
  • Prioritize calls based on sentiment using multiple Amazon Connect queues instead of transferring directly to an agent.
  • Monitor quality and flag for review contact flows that result in high overall negative sentiment.
  • Implement sentiment and AI/ML based call analysis, such as a real-time recommendation engine. For more details, see Machine Learning on AWS.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

Linux kernel lockdown and UEFI Secure Boot

Post Syndicated from Matthew Garrett original https://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/50577.html

David Howells recently published the latest version of his kernel lockdown patchset. This is intended to strengthen the boundary between root and the kernel by imposing additional restrictions that prevent root from modifying the kernel at runtime. It’s not the first feature of this sort – /dev/mem no longer allows you to overwrite arbitrary kernel memory, and you can configure the kernel so only signed modules can be loaded. But the present state of things is that these security features can be easily circumvented (by using kexec to modify the kernel security policy, for instance).

Why do you want lockdown? If you’ve got a setup where you know that your system is booting a trustworthy kernel (you’re running a system that does cryptographic verification of its boot chain, or you built and installed the kernel yourself, for instance) then you can trust the kernel to keep secrets safe from even root. But if root is able to modify the running kernel, that guarantee goes away. As a result, it makes sense to extend the security policy from the boot environment up to the running kernel – it’s really just an extension of configuring the kernel to require signed modules.

The patchset itself isn’t hugely conceptually controversial, although there’s disagreement over the precise form of certain restrictions. But one patch has, because it associates whether or not lockdown is enabled with whether or not UEFI Secure Boot is enabled. There’s some backstory that’s important here.

Most kernel features get turned on or off by either build-time configuration or by passing arguments to the kernel at boot time. There’s two ways that this patchset allows a bootloader to tell the kernel to enable lockdown mode – it can either pass the lockdown argument on the kernel command line, or it can set the secure_boot flag in the bootparams structure that’s passed to the kernel. If you’re running in an environment where you’re able to verify the kernel before booting it (either through cryptographic validation of the kernel, or knowing that there’s a secret tied to the TPM that will prevent the system booting if the kernel’s been tampered with), you can turn on lockdown.

There’s a catch on UEFI systems, though – you can build the kernel so that it looks like an EFI executable, and then run it directly from the firmware. The firmware doesn’t know about Linux, so can’t populate the bootparam structure, and there’s no mechanism to enforce command lines so we can’t rely on that either. The controversial patch simply adds a kernel configuration option that automatically enables lockdown when UEFI secure boot is enabled and otherwise leaves it up to the user to choose whether or not to turn it on.

Why do we want lockdown enabled when booting via UEFI secure boot? UEFI secure boot is designed to prevent the booting of any bootloaders that the owner of the system doesn’t consider trustworthy[1]. But a bootloader is only software – the only thing that distinguishes it from, say, Firefox is that Firefox is running in user mode and has no direct access to the hardware. The kernel does have direct access to the hardware, and so there’s no meaningful distinction between what grub can do and what the kernel can do. If you can run arbitrary code in the kernel then you can use the kernel to boot anything you want, which defeats the point of UEFI Secure Boot. Linux distributions don’t want their kernels to be used to be used as part of an attack chain against other distributions or operating systems, so they enable lockdown (or equivalent functionality) for kernels booted this way.

So why not enable it everywhere? There’s a couple of reasons. The first is that some of the features may break things people need – for instance, some strange embedded apps communicate with PCI devices by mmap()ing resources directly from sysfs[2]. This is blocked by lockdown, which would break them. Distributions would then have to ship an additional kernel that had lockdown disabled (it’s not possible to just have a command line argument that disables it, because an attacker could simply pass that), and users would have to disable secure boot to boot that anyway. It’s easier to just tie the two together.

The second is that it presents a promise of security that isn’t really there if your system didn’t verify the kernel. If an attacker can replace your bootloader or kernel then the ability to modify your kernel at runtime is less interesting – they can just wait for the next reboot. Appearing to give users safety assurances that are much less strong than they seem to be isn’t good for keeping users safe.

So, what about people whose work is impacted by lockdown? Right now there’s two ways to get stuff blocked by lockdown unblocked: either disable secure boot[3] (which will disable it until you enable secure boot again) or press alt-sysrq-x (which will disable it until the next boot). Discussion has suggested that having an additional secure variable that disables lockdown without disabling secure boot validation might be helpful, and it’s not difficult to implement that so it’ll probably happen.

Overall: the patchset isn’t controversial, just the way it’s integrated with UEFI secure boot. The reason it’s integrated with UEFI secure boot is because that’s the policy most distributions want, since the alternative is to enable it everywhere even when it doesn’t provide real benefits but does provide additional support overhead. You can use it even if you’re not using UEFI secure boot. We should have just called it securelevel.

[1] Of course, if the owner of a system isn’t allowed to make that determination themselves, the same technology is restricting the freedom of the user. This is abhorrent, and sadly it’s the default situation in many devices outside the PC ecosystem – most of them not using UEFI. But almost any security solution that aims to prevent malicious software from running can also be used to prevent any software from running, and the problem here is the people unwilling to provide that policy to users rather than the security features.
[2] This is how X.org used to work until the advent of kernel modesetting
[3] If your vendor doesn’t provide a firmware option for this, run sudo mokutil –disable-validation

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Node.js 8.10 runtime now available in AWS Lambda

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/node-js-8-10-runtime-now-available-in-aws-lambda/

This post courtesy of Ed Lima, AWS Solutions Architect

We are excited to announce that you can now develop your AWS Lambda functions using the Node.js 8.10 runtime, which is the current Long Term Support (LTS) version of Node.js. Start using this new version today by specifying a runtime parameter value of nodejs8.10 when creating or updating functions.

Supporting async/await

The Lambda programming model for Node.js 8.10 now supports defining a function handler using the async/await pattern.

Asynchronous or non-blocking calls are an inherent and important part of applications, as user and human interfaces are asynchronous by nature. If you decide to have a coffee with a friend, you usually order the coffee then start or continue a conversation with your friend while the coffee is getting ready. You don’t wait for the coffee to be ready before you start talking. These activities are asynchronous, because you can start one and then move to the next without waiting for completion. Otherwise, you’d delay (or block) the start of the next activity.

Asynchronous calls used to be handled in Node.js using callbacks. That presented problems when they were nested within other callbacks in multiple levels, making the code difficult to maintain and understand.

Promises were implemented to try to solve issues caused by “callback hell.” They allow asynchronous operations to call their own methods and handle what happens when a call is successful or when it fails. As your requirements become more complicated, even promises become harder to work with and may still end up complicating your code.

Async/await is the new way of handling asynchronous operations in Node.js, and makes for simpler, easier, and cleaner code for non-blocking calls. It still uses promises but a callback is returned directly from the asynchronous function, just as if it were a synchronous blocking function.

Take for instance the following Lambda function to get the current account settings, using the Node.js 6.10 runtime:

let AWS = require('aws-sdk');
let lambda = new AWS.Lambda();

exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
    let getAccountSettingsPromise = lambda.getAccountSettings().promise();
    getAccountSettingsPromise.then(
        (data) => {
            callback(null, data);
        },
        (err) => {
            console.log(err);
            callback(err);
        }
    );
};

With the new Node.js 8.10 runtime, there are new handler types that can be declared with the “async” keyword or can return a promise directly.

This is how the same function looks like using async/await with Node.js 8.10:

let AWS = require('aws-sdk');
let lambda = new AWS.Lambda();

exports.handler = async (event) => {
    return await lambda.getAccountSettings().promise() ;
};

Alternatively, you could have the handler return a promise directly:

let AWS = require('aws-sdk');
let lambda = new AWS.Lambda();

exports.handler = (event) => {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        lambda.getAccountSettings(event)
        .then((data) => {
            resolve data;
        })
        .catch(reject);
     });
};

The new handler types are alternatives to the callback pattern, which is still fully supported.

All three functions return the same results. However, in the new runtime with async/await, all callbacks in the code are gone, which makes it easier to read. This is especially true for those less familiar with promises.

{
    "AccountLimit":{
        "TotalCodeSize":80530636800,
        "CodeSizeUnzipped":262144000,
        "CodeSizeZipped":52428800, 
        "ConcurrentExecutions":1000,
        "UnreservedConcurrentExecutions":1000
    },
    "AccountUsage":{
        "TotalCodeSize":52234461,
        "FunctionCount":53
    }
}

Another great advantage of async/await is better error handling. You can use a try/catch block inside the scope of an async function. Even though the function awaits an asynchronous operation, any errors end up in the catch block.

You can improve your previous Node.js 8.10 function with this trusted try/catch error handling pattern:

let AWS = require('aws-sdk');
let lambda = new AWS.Lambda();
let data;

exports.handler = async (event) => {
    try {
        data = await lambda.getAccountSettings().promise();
    }
    catch (err) {
        console.log(err);
        return err;
    }
    return data;
};

While you now have a similar number of lines in both runtimes, the code is cleaner and more readable with async/await. It makes the asynchronous calls look more synchronous. However, it is important to notice that the code is still executed the same way as if it were using a callback or promise-based API.

Backward compatibility

You may port your existing Node.js 4.3 and 6.10 functions over to Node.js 8.10 by updating the runtime. Node.js 8.10 does include numerous breaking changes from previous Node versions.

Make sure to review the API changes between Node.js 4.3, 6.10, and Node.js 8.10 to see if there are other changes that might affect your code. We recommend testing that your Lambda function passes internal validation for its behavior when upgrading to the new runtime version.

You can use Lambda versions/aliases to safely test that your function runs as expected on Node 8.10, before routing production traffic to it.

New node features

You can now get better performance when compared to the previous LTS version 6.x (up to 20%). The new V8 6.0 engine comes with Turbofan and the Ignition pipeline, which leads to lower memory consumption and faster startup time across Node.js applications.

HTTP/2, which is subject to future changes, allows developers to use the new protocol to speed application development and undo many of HTTP/1.1 workarounds to make applications faster, simpler, and more powerful.

For more information, see the AWS Lambda Developer Guide.

Hope you enjoy and… go build with Node.js 8.10!

AWS Key Management Service now offers FIPS 140-2 validated cryptographic modules enabling easier adoption of the service for regulated workloads

Post Syndicated from Sreekumar Pisharody original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-key-management-service-now-offers-fips-140-2-validated-cryptographic-modules-enabling-easier-adoption-of-the-service-for-regulated-workloads/

AWS Key Management Service (KMS) now uses FIPS 140-2 validated hardware security modules (HSM) and supports FIPS 140-2 validated endpoints, which provide independent assurances about the confidentiality and integrity of your keys. Having additional third-party assurances about the keys you manage in AWS KMS can make it easier to use the service for regulated workloads.

The process of gaining FIPS 140-2 validation is rigorous. First, AWS KMS HSMs were tested by an independent lab; those results were further reviewed by the Cryptographic Module Validation Program run by NIST. You can view the FIPS 140-2 certificate of the AWS Key Management Service HSM to get more details.

AWS KMS HSMs are designed so that no one, not even AWS employees, can retrieve your plaintext keys. The service uses the FIPS 140-2 validated HSMs to protect your keys when you request the service to create keys on your behalf or when you import them. Your plaintext keys are never written to disk and are only used in volatile memory of the HSMs while performing your requested cryptographic operation. Furthermore, AWS KMS keys are never transmitted outside the AWS Regions they were created. And HSM firmware updates are controlled by multi-party access that is audited and reviewed by an independent group within AWS.

AWS KMS HSMs are validated at level 2 overall and at level 3 in the following areas:

  • Cryptographic Module Specification
  • Roles, Services, and Authentication
  • Physical Security
  • Design Assurance

You can also make AWS KMS requests to API endpoints that terminate TLS sessions using a FIPS 140-2 validated cryptographic software module. To do so, connect to the unique FIPS 140-2 validated HTTPS endpoints in the AWS KMS requests made from your applications. AWS KMS FIPS 140-2 validated HTTPS endpoints are powered by the OpenSSL FIPS Object Module. FIPS 140-2 validated API endpoints are available in all commercial regions where AWS KMS is available.

Security Vulnerabilities in Smart Contracts

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/03/security_vulner_13.html

Interesting research: “Finding The Greedy, Prodigal, and Suicidal Contracts at Scale“:

Abstract: Smart contracts — stateful executable objects hosted on blockchains like Ethereum — carry billions of dollars worth of coins and cannot be updated once deployed. We present a new systematic characterization of a class of trace vulnerabilities, which result from analyzing multiple invocations of a contract over its lifetime. We focus attention on three example properties of such trace vulnerabilities: finding contracts that either lock funds indefinitely, leak them carelessly to arbitrary users, or can be killed by anyone. We implemented MAIAN, the first tool for precisely specifying and reasoning about trace properties, which employs inter-procedural symbolic analysis and concrete validator for exhibiting real exploits. Our analysis of nearly one million contracts flags 34,200 (2,365 distinct) contracts vulnerable, in 10 seconds per contract. On a subset of 3,759 contracts which we sampled for concrete validation and manual analysis, we reproduce real exploits at a true positive rate of 89%, yielding exploits for 3,686 contracts. Our tool finds exploits for the infamous Parity bug that indirectly locked 200 million dollars worth in Ether, which previous analyses failed to capture.

Central Logging in Multi-Account Environments

Post Syndicated from matouk original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/central-logging-in-multi-account-environments/

Centralized logging is often required in large enterprise environments for a number of reasons, ranging from compliance and security to analytics and application-specific needs.

I’ve seen that in a multi-account environment, whether the accounts belong to the same line of business or multiple business units, collecting logs in a central, dedicated logging account is an established best practice. It helps security teams detect malicious activities both in real-time and during incident response. It provides protection to log data in case it is accidentally or intentionally deleted. It also helps application teams correlate and analyze log data across multiple application tiers.

This blog post provides a solution and building blocks to stream Amazon CloudWatch log data across accounts. In a multi-account environment this repeatable solution could be deployed multiple times to stream all relevant Amazon CloudWatch log data from all accounts to a centralized logging account.

Solution Summary 

The solution uses Amazon Kinesis Data Streams and a log destination to set up an endpoint in the logging account to receive streamed logs and uses Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose to deliver log data to the Amazon Simple Storage Solution (S3) bucket. Application accounts will subscribe to stream all (or part) of their Amazon CloudWatch logs to a defined destination in the logging account via subscription filters.

Below is a diagram illustrating how the various services work together.


In logging an account, a Kinesis Data Stream is created to receive streamed log data and a log destination is created to facilitate remote streaming, configured to use the Kinesis Data Stream as its target.

The Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose stream is created to deliver log data from the data stream to S3. The delivery stream uses a generic AWS Lambda function for data validation and transformation.

In each application account, a subscription filter is created between each Amazon CloudWatch log group and the destination created for this log group in the logging account.

The following steps are involved in setting up the central-logging solution:

  1. Create an Amazon S3 bucket for your central logging in the logging account
  2. Create an AWS Lambda function for log data transformation and decoding in logging account
  3. Create a central logging stack as a logging-account destination ready to receive streamed logs and deliver them to S3
  4. Create a subscription in application accounts to deliver logs from a specific CloudWatch log group to the logging account destination
  5. Create Amazon Athena tables to query and analyze log data in your logging account

Creating a log destination in your logging account

In this section, we will setup the logging account side of the solution, providing detail on the list above. The example I use is for the us-east-1 region, however any region where required services are available could be used.

It’s important to note that your logging-account destination and application-account subscription must be in the same region. You can deploy the solution multiple times to create destinations in all required regions if application accounts use multiple regions.

Step 1: Create an S3 bucket

Use the CloudFormation template below to create S3 bucket in logging account. This template also configures the bucket to archive log data to Glacier after 60 days.


{
  "AWSTemplateFormatVersion":"2010-09-09",
  "Description": "CF Template to create S3 bucket for central logging",
  "Parameters":{

    "BucketName":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"",
      "Description":"Central logging bucket name"
    }
  },
  "Resources":{
                        
   "CentralLoggingBucket" : {
      "Type" : "AWS::S3::Bucket",
      "Properties" : {
        "BucketName" : {"Ref": "BucketName"},
        "LifecycleConfiguration": {
            "Rules": [
                {
                  "Id": "ArchiveToGlacier",
                  "Prefix": "",
                  "Status": "Enabled",
                  "Transitions":[{
                      "TransitionInDays": "60",
                      "StorageClass": "GLACIER"
                  }]
                }
            ]
        }
      }
    }

  },
  "Outputs":{
    "CentralLogBucket":{
    	"Description" : "Central log bucket",
    	"Value" : {"Ref": "BucketName"} ,
    	"Export" : { "Name" : "CentralLogBucketName"}
    }
  }
} 

To create your central-logging bucket do the following:

  1. Save the template file to your local developer machine as “central-log-bucket.json”
  2. From the CloudFormation console, select “create new stack” and import the file “central-log-bucket.json”
  3. Fill in the parameters and complete stack creation steps (as indicated in the screenshot below)
  4. Verify the bucket has been created successfully and take a note of the bucket name

Step 2: Create data processing Lambda function

Use the template below to create a Lambda function in your logging account that will be used by Amazon Firehose for data transformation during the delivery process to S3. This function is based on the AWS Lambda kinesis-firehose-cloudwatch-logs-processor blueprint.

The function could be created manually from the blueprint or using the cloudformation template below. To find the blueprint navigate to Lambda -> Create -> Function -> Blueprints

This function will unzip the event message, parse it and verify that it is a valid CloudWatch log event. Additional processing can be added if needed. As this function is generic, it could be reused by all log-delivery streams.

{
  "AWSTemplateFormatVersion":"2010-09-09",
  "Description": "Create cloudwatch data processing lambda function",
  "Resources":{
      
    "LambdaRole": {
        "Type": "AWS::IAM::Role",
        "Properties": {
            "AssumeRolePolicyDocument": {
                "Version": "2012-10-17",
                "Statement": [
                    {
                        "Effect": "Allow",
                        "Principal": {
                            "Service": "lambda.amazonaws.com"
                        },
                        "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
                    }
                ]
            },
            "Path": "/",
            "Policies": [
                {
                    "PolicyName": "firehoseCloudWatchDataProcessing",
                    "PolicyDocument": {
                        "Version": "2012-10-17",
                        "Statement": [
                            {
                                "Effect": "Allow",
                                "Action": [
                                    "logs:CreateLogGroup",
                                    "logs:CreateLogStream",
                                    "logs:PutLogEvents"
                                ],
                                "Resource": "arn:aws:logs:*:*:*"
                            }
                        ]
                    }
                }
            ]
        }
    },
      
    "FirehoseDataProcessingFunction": {
        "Type": "AWS::Lambda::Function",
        "Properties": {
            "Handler": "index.handler",
            "Role": {"Fn::GetAtt": ["LambdaRole","Arn"]},
            "Description": "Firehose cloudwatch data processing",
            "Code": {
                "ZipFile" : { "Fn::Join" : ["\n", [
                  "'use strict';",
                  "const zlib = require('zlib');",
                  "function transformLogEvent(logEvent) {",
                  "       return Promise.resolve(`${logEvent.message}\n`);",
                  "}",
                  "exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {",
                  "    Promise.all(event.records.map(r => {",
                  "        const buffer = new Buffer(r.data, 'base64');",
                  "        const decompressed = zlib.gunzipSync(buffer);",
                  "        const data = JSON.parse(decompressed);",
                  "        if (data.messageType !== 'DATA_MESSAGE') {",
                  "            return Promise.resolve({",
                  "                recordId: r.recordId,",
                  "                result: 'ProcessingFailed',",
                  "            });",
                  "         } else {",
                  "            const promises = data.logEvents.map(transformLogEvent);",
                  "            return Promise.all(promises).then(transformed => {",
                  "                const payload = transformed.reduce((a, v) => a + v, '');",
                  "                const encoded = new Buffer(payload).toString('base64');",
                  "                console.log('---------------payloadv2:'+JSON.stringify(payload, null, 2));",
                  "                return {",
                  "                    recordId: r.recordId,",
                  "                    result: 'Ok',",
                  "                    data: encoded,",
                  "                };",
                  "           });",
                  "        }",
                  "    })).then(recs => callback(null, { records: recs }));",
                    "};"

                ]]}
            },
            "Runtime": "nodejs6.10",
            "Timeout": "60"
        }
    }

  },
  "Outputs":{
   "Function" : {
      "Description": "Function ARN",
      "Value": {"Fn::GetAtt": ["FirehoseDataProcessingFunction","Arn"]},
      "Export" : { "Name" : {"Fn::Sub": "${AWS::StackName}-Function" }}
    }
  }
}

To create the function follow the steps below:

  1. Save the template file as “central-logging-lambda.json”
  2. Login to logging account and, from the CloudFormation console, select “create new stack”
  3. Import the file “central-logging-lambda.json” and click next
  4. Follow the steps to create the stack and verify successful creation
  5. Take a note of Lambda function arn from the output section

Step 3: Create log destination in logging account

Log destination is used as the target of a subscription from application accounts, log destination can be shared between multiple subscriptions however according to the architecture suggested in this solution all logs streamed to the same destination will be stored in the same S3 location, if you would like to store log data in different hierarchy or in a completely different bucket you need to create separate destinations.

As noted previously, your destination and subscription have to be in the same region

Use the template below to create destination stack in logging account.

{
  "AWSTemplateFormatVersion":"2010-09-09",
  "Description": "Create log destination and required resources",
  "Parameters":{

    "LogBucketName":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"central-log-do-not-delete",
      "Description":"Destination logging bucket"
    },
    "LogS3Location":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"<BU>/<ENV>/<SOURCE_ACCOUNT>/<LOG_TYPE>/",
      "Description":"S3 location for the logs streamed to this destination; example marketing/prod/999999999999/flow-logs/"
    },
    "ProcessingLambdaARN":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"",
      "Description":"CloudWatch logs data processing function"
    },
    "SourceAccount":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"",
      "Description":"Source application account number"
    }
  },
    
  "Resources":{
    "MyStream": {
      "Type": "AWS::Kinesis::Stream",
      "Properties": {
        "Name": {"Fn::Join" : [ "", [{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-Stream"] ]},
        "RetentionPeriodHours" : 48,
        "ShardCount": 1,
        "Tags": [
          {
            "Key": "Solution",
            "Value": "CentralLogging"
          }
       ]
      }
    },
    "LogRole" : {
      "Type"  : "AWS::IAM::Role",
      "Properties" : {
          "AssumeRolePolicyDocument" : {
              "Statement" : [ {
                  "Effect" : "Allow",
                  "Principal" : {
                      "Service" : [ {"Fn::Join": [ "", [ "logs.", { "Ref": "AWS::Region" }, ".amazonaws.com" ] ]} ]
                  },
                  "Action" : [ "sts:AssumeRole" ]
              } ]
          },         
          "Path" : "/service-role/"
      }
    },
      
    "LogRolePolicy" : {
        "Type" : "AWS::IAM::Policy",
        "Properties" : {
            "PolicyName" : {"Fn::Join" : [ "", [{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-LogPolicy"] ]},
            "PolicyDocument" : {
              "Version": "2012-10-17",
              "Statement": [
                {
                  "Effect": "Allow",
                  "Action": ["kinesis:PutRecord"],
                  "Resource": [{ "Fn::GetAtt" : ["MyStream", "Arn"] }]
                },
                {
                  "Effect": "Allow",
                  "Action": ["iam:PassRole"],
                  "Resource": [{ "Fn::GetAtt" : ["LogRole", "Arn"] }]
                }
              ]
            },
            "Roles" : [ { "Ref" : "LogRole" } ]
        }
    },
      
    "LogDestination" : {
      "Type" : "AWS::Logs::Destination",
      "DependsOn" : ["MyStream","LogRole","LogRolePolicy"],
      "Properties" : {
        "DestinationName": {"Fn::Join" : [ "", [{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-Destination"] ]},
        "RoleArn": { "Fn::GetAtt" : ["LogRole", "Arn"] },
        "TargetArn": { "Fn::GetAtt" : ["MyStream", "Arn"] },
        "DestinationPolicy": { "Fn::Join" : ["",[
		
				"{\"Version\" : \"2012-10-17\",\"Statement\" : [{\"Effect\" : \"Allow\",",
                " \"Principal\" : {\"AWS\" : \"", {"Ref":"SourceAccount"} ,"\"},",
                "\"Action\" : \"logs:PutSubscriptionFilter\",",
                " \"Resource\" : \"", 
                {"Fn::Join": [ "", [ "arn:aws:logs:", { "Ref": "AWS::Region" }, ":" ,{ "Ref": "AWS::AccountId" }, ":destination:",{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-Destination" ] ]}  ,"\"}]}"

			]]}
          
          
      }
    },
      
    "S3deliveryStream": {
      "DependsOn": ["S3deliveryRole", "S3deliveryPolicy"],
      "Type": "AWS::KinesisFirehose::DeliveryStream",
      "Properties": {
        "DeliveryStreamName": {"Fn::Join" : [ "", [{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-DeliveryStream"] ]},
        "DeliveryStreamType": "KinesisStreamAsSource",
        "KinesisStreamSourceConfiguration": {
            "KinesisStreamARN": { "Fn::GetAtt" : ["MyStream", "Arn"] },
            "RoleARN": {"Fn::GetAtt" : ["S3deliveryRole", "Arn"] }
        },
        "ExtendedS3DestinationConfiguration": {
          "BucketARN": {"Fn::Join" : [ "", ["arn:aws:s3:::",{"Ref":"LogBucketName"}] ]},
          "BufferingHints": {
            "IntervalInSeconds": "60",
            "SizeInMBs": "50"
          },
          "CompressionFormat": "UNCOMPRESSED",
          "Prefix": {"Ref": "LogS3Location"},
          "RoleARN": {"Fn::GetAtt" : ["S3deliveryRole", "Arn"] },
          "ProcessingConfiguration" : {
              "Enabled": "true",
              "Processors": [
              {
                "Parameters": [ 
                { 
                    "ParameterName": "LambdaArn",
                    "ParameterValue": {"Ref":"ProcessingLambdaARN"}
                }],
                "Type": "Lambda"
              }]
          }
        }

      }
    },
      
    "S3deliveryRole": {
      "Type": "AWS::IAM::Role",
      "Properties": {
        "AssumeRolePolicyDocument": {
          "Version": "2012-10-17",
          "Statement": [
            {
              "Sid": "",
              "Effect": "Allow",
              "Principal": {
                "Service": "firehose.amazonaws.com"
              },
              "Action": "sts:AssumeRole",
              "Condition": {
                "StringEquals": {
                  "sts:ExternalId": {"Ref":"AWS::AccountId"}
                }
              }
            }
          ]
        }
      }
    },
      
    "S3deliveryPolicy": {
      "Type": "AWS::IAM::Policy",
      "Properties": {
        "PolicyName": {"Fn::Join" : [ "", [{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-FirehosePolicy"] ]},
        "PolicyDocument": {
          "Version": "2012-10-17",
          "Statement": [
            {
              "Effect": "Allow",
              "Action": [
                "s3:AbortMultipartUpload",
                "s3:GetBucketLocation",
                "s3:GetObject",
                "s3:ListBucket",
                "s3:ListBucketMultipartUploads",
                "s3:PutObject"
              ],
              "Resource": [
                {"Fn::Join": ["", [ {"Fn::Join" : [ "", ["arn:aws:s3:::",{"Ref":"LogBucketName"}] ]}]]},
                {"Fn::Join": ["", [ {"Fn::Join" : [ "", ["arn:aws:s3:::",{"Ref":"LogBucketName"}] ]}, "*"]]}
              ]
            },
            {
              "Effect": "Allow",
              "Action": [
                "lambda:InvokeFunction",
                "lambda:GetFunctionConfiguration",
                "logs:PutLogEvents",
                "kinesis:DescribeStream",
                "kinesis:GetShardIterator",
                "kinesis:GetRecords",
                "kms:Decrypt"
              ],
              "Resource": "*"
            }
          ]
        },
        "Roles": [{"Ref": "S3deliveryRole"}]
      }
    }

  },
  "Outputs":{
      
   "Destination" : {
      "Description": "Destination",
      "Value": {"Fn::Join": [ "", [ "arn:aws:logs:", { "Ref": "AWS::Region" }, ":" ,{ "Ref": "AWS::AccountId" }, ":destination:",{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-Destination" ] ]},
      "Export" : { "Name" : {"Fn::Sub": "${AWS::StackName}-Destination" }}
    }

  }
} 

To create log your destination and all required resources, follow these steps:

  1. Save your template as “central-logging-destination.json”
  2. Login to your logging account and, from the CloudFormation console, select “create new stack”
  3. Import the file “central-logging-destination.json” and click next
  4. Fill in the parameters to configure the log destination and click Next
  5. Follow the default steps to create the stack and verify successful creation
    1. Bucket name is the same as in the “create central logging bucket” step
    2. LogS3Location is the directory hierarchy for saving log data that will be delivered to this destination
    3. ProcessingLambdaARN is as created in “create data processing Lambda function” step
    4. SourceAccount is the application account number where the subscription will be created
  6. Take a note of destination ARN as it appears in outputs section as you did above.

Step 4: Create the log subscription in your application account

In this section, we will create the subscription filter in one of the application accounts to stream logs from the CloudWatch log group to the log destination that was created in your logging account.

Create log subscription filter

The subscription filter is created between the CloudWatch log group and a destination endpoint. Asubscription could be filtered to send part (or all) of the logs in the log group. For example,you can create a subscription filter to stream only flow logs with status REJECT.

Use the CloudFormation template below to create subscription filter. Subscription filter and log destination must be in the same region.

{
  "AWSTemplateFormatVersion":"2010-09-09",
  "Description": "Create log subscription filter for a specific Log Group",
  "Parameters":{

    "DestinationARN":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"",
      "Description":"ARN of logs destination"
    },
    "LogGroupName":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"",
      "Description":"Name of LogGroup to forward logs from"
    },
    "FilterPattern":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"",
      "Description":"Filter pattern to filter events to be sent to log destination; Leave empty to send all logs"
    }
  },
    
  "Resources":{
    "SubscriptionFilter" : {
      "Type" : "AWS::Logs::SubscriptionFilter",
      "Properties" : {
        "LogGroupName" : { "Ref" : "LogGroupName" },
        "FilterPattern" : { "Ref" : "FilterPattern" },
        "DestinationArn" : { "Ref" : "DestinationARN" }
      }
    }
  }
}

To create a subscription filter for one of CloudWatch log groups in your application account, follow the steps below:

  1. Save the template as “central-logging-subscription.json”
  2. Login to your application account and, from the CloudFormation console, select “create new stack”
  3. Select the file “central-logging-subscription.json” and click next
  4. Fill in the parameters as appropriate to your environment as you did above
    a.  DestinationARN is the value of obtained in “create log destination in logging account” step
    b.  FilterPatterns is the filter value for log data to be streamed to your logging account (leave empty to stream all logs in the selected log group)
    c.  LogGroupName is the log group as it appears under CloudWatch Logs
  5. Verify successful creation of the subscription

This completes the deployment process in both the logging- and application-account side. After a few minutes, log data will be streamed to the central-logging destination defined in your logging account.

Step 5: Analyzing log data

Once log data is centralized, it opens the door to run analytics on the consolidated data for business or security reasons. One of the powerful services that AWS offers is Amazon Athena.

Amazon Athena allows you to query data in S3 using standard SQL.

Follow the steps below to create a simple table and run queries on the flow logs data that has been collected from your application accounts

  1. Login to your logging account and from the Amazon Athena console, use the DDL below in your query  editor to create a new table

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE IF NOT EXISTS prod_vpc_flow_logs (

Version INT,

Account STRING,

InterfaceId STRING,

SourceAddress STRING,

DestinationAddress STRING,

SourcePort INT,

DestinationPort INT,

Protocol INT,

Packets INT,

Bytes INT,

StartTime INT,

EndTime INT,

Action STRING,

LogStatus STRING

)

ROW FORMAT SERDE ‘org.apache.hadoop.hive.serde2.RegexSerDe’

WITH SERDEPROPERTIES (

“input.regex” = “^([^ ]+)\\s+([0-9]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([0-9]+)\\s+([0-9]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)$”)

LOCATION ‘s3://central-logging-company-do-not-delete/’;

2. Click ”run query” and verify a successful run/ This creates the table “prod_vpc_flow_logs”

3. You can then run queries against the table data as below:

Conclusion

By following the steps I’ve outlined, you will build a central logging solution to stream CloudWatch logs from one application account to a central logging account. This solution is repeatable and could be deployed multiple times for multiple accounts and logging requirements.

 

About the Author

Mahmoud Matouk is a Senior Cloud Infrastructure Architect. He works with our customers to help accelerate migration and cloud adoption at the enterprise level.

 

Migrating Your Amazon ECS Containers to AWS Fargate

Post Syndicated from Tiffany Jernigan original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/migrating-your-amazon-ecs-containers-to-aws-fargate/

AWS Fargate is a new technology that works with Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS) to run containers without having to manage servers or clusters. What does this mean? With Fargate, you no longer need to provision or manage a single virtual machine; you can just create tasks and run them directly!

Fargate uses the same API actions as ECS, so you can use the ECS console, the AWS CLI, or the ECS CLI. I recommend running through the first-run experience for Fargate even if you’re familiar with ECS. It creates all of the one-time setup requirements, such as the necessary IAM roles. If you’re using a CLI, make sure to upgrade to the latest version

In this blog, you will see how to migrate ECS containers from running on Amazon EC2 to Fargate.

Getting started

Note: Anything with code blocks is a change in the task definition file. Screen captures are from the console. Additionally, Fargate is currently available in the us-east-1 (N. Virginia) region.

Launch type

When you create tasks (grouping of containers) and clusters (grouping of tasks), you now have two launch type options: EC2 and Fargate. The default launch type, EC2, is ECS as you knew it before the announcement of Fargate. You need to specify Fargate as the launch type when running a Fargate task.

Even though Fargate abstracts away virtual machines, tasks still must be launched into a cluster. With Fargate, clusters are a logical infrastructure and permissions boundary that allow you to isolate and manage groups of tasks. ECS also supports heterogeneous clusters that are made up of tasks running on both EC2 and Fargate launch types.

The optional, new requiresCompatibilities parameter with FARGATE in the field ensures that your task definition only passes validation if you include Fargate-compatible parameters. Tasks can be flagged as compatible with EC2, Fargate, or both.

"requiresCompatibilities": [
    "FARGATE"
]

Networking

"networkMode": "awsvpc"

In November, we announced the addition of task networking with the network mode awsvpc. By default, ECS uses the bridge network mode. Fargate requires using the awsvpc network mode.

In bridge mode, all of your tasks running on the same instance share the instance’s elastic network interface, which is a virtual network interface, IP address, and security groups.

The awsvpc mode provides this networking support to your tasks natively. You now get the same VPC networking and security controls at the task level that were previously only available with EC2 instances. Each task gets its own elastic networking interface and IP address so that multiple applications or copies of a single application can run on the same port number without any conflicts.

The awsvpc mode also provides a separation of responsibility for tasks. You can get complete control of task placement within your own VPCs, subnets, and the security policies associated with them, even though the underlying infrastructure is managed by Fargate. Also, you can assign different security groups to each task, which gives you more fine-grained security. You can give an application only the permissions it needs.

"portMappings": [
    {
        "containerPort": "3000"
    }
 ]

What else has to change? First, you only specify a containerPort value, not a hostPort value, as there is no host to manage. Your container port is the port that you access on your elastic network interface IP address. Therefore, your container ports in a single task definition file need to be unique.

"environment": [
    {
        "name": "WORDPRESS_DB_HOST",
        "value": "127.0.0.1:3306"
    }
 ]

Additionally, links are not allowed as they are a property of the “bridge” network mode (and are now a legacy feature of Docker). Instead, containers share a network namespace and communicate with each other over the localhost interface. They can be referenced using the following:

localhost/127.0.0.1:<some_port_number>

CPU and memory

"memory": "1024",
 "cpu": "256"

"memory": "1gb",
 "cpu": ".25vcpu"

When launching a task with the EC2 launch type, task performance is influenced by the instance types that you select for your cluster combined with your task definition. If you pick larger instances, your applications make use of the extra resources if there is no contention.

In Fargate, you needed a way to get additional resource information so we created task-level resources. Task-level resources define the maximum amount of memory and cpu that your task can consume.

  • memory can be defined in MB with just the number, or in GB, for example, “1024” or “1gb”.
  • cpu can be defined as the number or in vCPUs, for example, “256” or “.25vcpu”.
    • vCPUs are virtual CPUs. You can look at the memory and vCPUs for instance types to get an idea of what you may have used before.

The memory and CPU options available with Fargate are:

CPU Memory
256 (.25 vCPU) 0.5GB, 1GB, 2GB
512 (.5 vCPU) 1GB, 2GB, 3GB, 4GB
1024 (1 vCPU) 2GB, 3GB, 4GB, 5GB, 6GB, 7GB, 8GB
2048 (2 vCPU) Between 4GB and 16GB in 1GB increments
4096 (4 vCPU) Between 8GB and 30GB in 1GB increments

IAM roles

Because Fargate uses awsvpc mode, you need an Amazon ECS service-linked IAM role named AWSServiceRoleForECS. It provides Fargate with the needed permissions, such as the permission to attach an elastic network interface to your task. After you create your service-linked IAM role, you can delete the remaining roles in your services.

"executionRoleArn": "arn:aws:iam::<your_account_id>:role/ecsTaskExecutionRole"

With the EC2 launch type, an instance role gives the agent the ability to pull, publish, talk to ECS, and so on. With Fargate, the task execution IAM role is only needed if you’re pulling from Amazon ECR or publishing data to Amazon CloudWatch Logs.

The Fargate first-run experience tutorial in the console automatically creates these roles for you.

Volumes

Fargate currently supports non-persistent, empty data volumes for containers. When you define your container, you no longer use the host field and only specify a name.

Load balancers

For awsvpc mode, and therefore for Fargate, use the IP target type instead of the instance target type. You define this in the Amazon EC2 service when creating a load balancer.

If you’re using a Classic Load Balancer, change it to an Application Load Balancer or a Network Load Balancer.

Tip: If you are using an Application Load Balancer, make sure that your tasks are launched in the same VPC and Availability Zones as your load balancer.

Let’s migrate a task definition!

Here is an example NGINX task definition. This type of task definition is what you’re used to if you created one before Fargate was announced. It’s what you would run now with the EC2 launch type.

{
    "containerDefinitions": [
        {
            "name": "nginx",
            "image": "nginx",
            "memory": "512",
            "cpu": "100",
            "essential": true,
            "portMappings": [
                {
                    "hostPort": "80",
                    "containerPort": "80",
                    "protocol": "tcp"
                }
            ],
            "logConfiguration": {
                "logDriver": "awslogs",
                "options": {
                    "awslogs-group": "/ecs/",
                    "awslogs-region": "us-east-1",
                    "awslogs-stream-prefix": "ecs"
                }
            }
        }
    ],
    "family": "nginx-ec2"
}

OK, so now what do you need to do to change it to run with the Fargate launch type?

  • Add FARGATE for requiredCompatibilities (not required, but a good safety check for your task definition).
  • Use awsvpc as the network mode.
  • Just specify the containerPort (the hostPortvalue is the same).
  • Add a task executionRoleARN value to allow logging to CloudWatch.
  • Provide cpu and memory limits for the task.
{
    "requiresCompatibilities": [
        "FARGATE"
    ],
    "containerDefinitions": [
        {
            "name": "nginx",
            "image": "nginx",
            "memory": "512",
            "cpu": "100",
            "essential": true,
            "portMappings": [
                {
                    "containerPort": "80",
                    "protocol": "tcp"
                }
            ],
            "logConfiguration": {
                "logDriver": "awslogs",
                "options": {
                    "awslogs-group": "/ecs/",
                    "awslogs-region": "us-east-1",
                    "awslogs-stream-prefix": "ecs"
                }
            }
        }
    ],
    "networkMode": "awsvpc",
    "executionRoleArn": "arn:aws:iam::<your_account_id>:role/ecsTaskExecutionRole",
    "family": "nginx-fargate",
    "memory": "512",
    "cpu": "256"
}

Are there more examples?

Yep! Head to the AWS Samples GitHub repo. We have several sample task definitions you can try for both the EC2 and Fargate launch types. Contributions are very welcome too :).

 

tiffany jernigan
@tiffanyfayj

Reactive Microservices Architecture on AWS

Post Syndicated from Sascha Moellering original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/reactive-microservices-architecture-on-aws/

Microservice-application requirements have changed dramatically in recent years. These days, applications operate with petabytes of data, need almost 100% uptime, and end users expect sub-second response times. Typical N-tier applications can’t deliver on these requirements.

Reactive Manifesto, published in 2014, describes the essential characteristics of reactive systems including: responsiveness, resiliency, elasticity, and being message driven.

Being message driven is perhaps the most important characteristic of reactive systems. Asynchronous messaging helps in the design of loosely coupled systems, which is a key factor for scalability. In order to build a highly decoupled system, it is important to isolate services from each other. As already described, isolation is an important aspect of the microservices pattern. Indeed, reactive systems and microservices are a natural fit.

Implemented Use Case
This reference architecture illustrates a typical ad-tracking implementation.

Many ad-tracking companies collect massive amounts of data in near-real-time. In many cases, these workloads are very spiky and heavily depend on the success of the ad-tech companies’ customers. Typically, an ad-tracking-data use case can be separated into a real-time part and a non-real-time part. In the real-time part, it is important to collect data as fast as possible and ask several questions including:,  “Is this a valid combination of parameters?,””Does this program exist?,” “Is this program still valid?”

Because response time has a huge impact on conversion rate in advertising, it is important for advertisers to respond as fast as possible. This information should be kept in memory to reduce communication overhead with the caching infrastructure. The tracking application itself should be as lightweight and scalable as possible. For example, the application shouldn’t have any shared mutable state and it should use reactive paradigms. In our implementation, one main application is responsible for this real-time part. It collects and validates data, responds to the client as fast as possible, and asynchronously sends events to backend systems.

The non-real-time part of the application consumes the generated events and persists them in a NoSQL database. In a typical tracking implementation, clicks, cookie information, and transactions are matched asynchronously and persisted in a data store. The matching part is not implemented in this reference architecture. Many ad-tech architectures use frameworks like Hadoop for the matching implementation.

The system can be logically divided into the data collection partand the core data updatepart. The data collection part is responsible for collecting, validating, and persisting the data. In the core data update part, the data that is used for validation gets updated and all subscribers are notified of new data.

Components and Services

Main Application
The main application is implemented using Java 8 and uses Vert.x as the main framework. Vert.x is an event-driven, reactive, non-blocking, polyglot framework to implement microservices. It runs on the Java virtual machine (JVM) by using the low-level IO library Netty. You can write applications in Java, JavaScript, Groovy, Ruby, Kotlin, Scala, and Ceylon. The framework offers a simple and scalable actor-like concurrency model. Vert.x calls handlers by using a thread known as an event loop. To use this model, you have to write code known as “verticles.” Verticles share certain similarities with actors in the actor model. To use them, you have to implement the verticle interface. Verticles communicate with each other by generating messages in  a single event bus. Those messages are sent on the event bus to a specific address, and verticles can register to this address by using handlers.

With only a few exceptions, none of the APIs in Vert.x block the calling thread. Similar to Node.js, Vert.x uses the reactor pattern. However, in contrast to Node.js, Vert.x uses several event loops. Unfortunately, not all APIs in the Java ecosystem are written asynchronously, for example, the JDBC API. Vert.x offers a possibility to run this, blocking APIs without blocking the event loop. These special verticles are called worker verticles. You don’t execute worker verticles by using the standard Vert.x event loops, but by using a dedicated thread from a worker pool. This way, the worker verticles don’t block the event loop.

Our application consists of five different verticles covering different aspects of the business logic. The main entry point for our application is the HttpVerticle, which exposes an HTTP-endpoint to consume HTTP-requests and for proper health checking. Data from HTTP requests such as parameters and user-agent information are collected and transformed into a JSON message. In order to validate the input data (to ensure that the program exists and is still valid), the message is sent to the CacheVerticle.

This verticle implements an LRU-cache with a TTL of 10 minutes and a capacity of 100,000 entries. Instead of adding additional functionality to a standard JDK map implementation, we use Google Guava, which has all the features we need. If the data is not in the L1 cache, the message is sent to the RedisVerticle. This verticle is responsible for data residing in Amazon ElastiCache and uses the Vert.x-redis-client to read data from Redis. In our example, Redis is the central data store. However, in a typical production implementation, Redis would just be the L2 cache with a central data store like Amazon DynamoDB. One of the most important paradigms of a reactive system is to switch from a pull- to a push-based model. To achieve this and reduce network overhead, we’ll use Redis pub/sub to push core data changes to our main application.

Vert.x also supports direct Redis pub/sub-integration, the following code shows our subscriber-implementation:

vertx.eventBus().<JsonObject>consumer(REDIS_PUBSUB_CHANNEL_VERTX, received -> {

JsonObject value = received.body().getJsonObject("value");

String message = value.getString("message");

JsonObject jsonObject = new JsonObject(message);

eb.send(CACHE_REDIS_EVENTBUS_ADDRESS, jsonObject);

});

redis.subscribe(Constants.REDIS_PUBSUB_CHANNEL, res -> {

if (res.succeeded()) {

LOGGER.info("Subscribed to " + Constants.REDIS_PUBSUB_CHANNEL);

} else {

LOGGER.info(res.cause());

}

});

The verticle subscribes to the appropriate Redis pub/sub-channel. If a message is sent over this channel, the payload is extracted and forwarded to the cache-verticle that stores the data in the L1-cache. After storing and enriching data, a response is sent back to the HttpVerticle, which responds to the HTTP request that initially hit this verticle. In addition, the message is converted to ByteBuffer, wrapped in protocol buffers, and send to an Amazon Kinesis Data Stream.

The following example shows a stripped-down version of the KinesisVerticle:

public class KinesisVerticle extends AbstractVerticle {

private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(KinesisVerticle.class);

private AmazonKinesisAsync kinesisAsyncClient;

private String eventStream = "EventStream";

@Override

public void start() throws Exception {

EventBus eb = vertx.eventBus();

kinesisAsyncClient = createClient();

eventStream = System.getenv(STREAM_NAME) == null ? "EventStream" : System.getenv(STREAM_NAME);

eb.consumer(Constants.KINESIS_EVENTBUS_ADDRESS, message -> {

try {

TrackingMessage trackingMessage = Json.decodeValue((String)message.body(), TrackingMessage.class);

String partitionKey = trackingMessage.getMessageId();

byte [] byteMessage = createMessage(trackingMessage);

ByteBuffer buf = ByteBuffer.wrap(byteMessage);

sendMessageToKinesis(buf, partitionKey);

message.reply("OK");

}

catch (KinesisException exc) {

LOGGER.error(exc);

}

});

}

Kinesis Consumer
This AWS Lambda function consumes data from an Amazon Kinesis Data Stream and persists the data in an Amazon DynamoDB table. In order to improve testability, the invocation code is separated from the business logic. The invocation code is implemented in the class KinesisConsumerHandler and iterates over the Kinesis events pulled from the Kinesis stream by AWS Lambda. Each Kinesis event is unwrapped and transformed from ByteBuffer to protocol buffers and converted into a Java object. Those Java objects are passed to the business logic, which persists the data in a DynamoDB table. In order to improve duration of successive Lambda calls, the DynamoDB-client is instantiated lazily and reused if possible.

Redis Updater
From time to time, it is necessary to update core data in Redis. A very efficient implementation for this requirement is using AWS Lambda and Amazon Kinesis. New core data is sent over the AWS Kinesis stream using JSON as data format and consumed by a Lambda function. This function iterates over the Kinesis events pulled from the Kinesis stream by AWS Lambda. Each Kinesis event is unwrapped and transformed from ByteBuffer to String and converted into a Java object. The Java object is passed to the business logic and stored in Redis. In addition, the new core data is also sent to the main application using Redis pub/sub in order to reduce network overhead and converting from a pull- to a push-based model.

The following example shows the source code to store data in Redis and notify all subscribers:

public void updateRedisData(final TrackingMessage trackingMessage, final Jedis jedis, final LambdaLogger logger) {

try {

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();

String jsonString = mapper.writeValueAsString(trackingMessage);

Map<String, String> map = marshal(jsonString);

String statusCode = jedis.hmset(trackingMessage.getProgramId(), map);

}

catch (Exception exc) {

if (null == logger)

exc.printStackTrace();

else

logger.log(exc.getMessage());

}

}

public void notifySubscribers(final TrackingMessage trackingMessage, final Jedis jedis, final LambdaLogger logger) {

try {

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();

String jsonString = mapper.writeValueAsString(trackingMessage);

jedis.publish(Constants.REDIS_PUBSUB_CHANNEL, jsonString);

}

catch (final IOException e) {

log(e.getMessage(), logger);

}

}

Similarly to our Kinesis Consumer, the Redis-client is instantiated somewhat lazily.

Infrastructure as Code
As already outlined, latency and response time are a very critical part of any ad-tracking solution because response time has a huge impact on conversion rate. In order to reduce latency for customers world-wide, it is common practice to roll out the infrastructure in different AWS Regions in the world to be as close to the end customer as possible. AWS CloudFormation can help you model and set up your AWS resources so that you can spend less time managing those resources and more time focusing on your applications that run in AWS.

You create a template that describes all the AWS resources that you want (for example, Amazon EC2 instances or Amazon RDS DB instances), and AWS CloudFormation takes care of provisioning and configuring those resources for you. Our reference architecture can be rolled out in different Regions using an AWS CloudFormation template, which sets up the complete infrastructure (for example, Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC), Amazon Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS) cluster, Lambda functions, DynamoDB table, Amazon ElastiCache cluster, etc.).

Conclusion
In this blog post we described reactive principles and an example architecture with a common use case. We leveraged the capabilities of different frameworks in combination with several AWS services in order to implement reactive principles—not only at the application-level but also at the system-level. I hope I’ve given you ideas for creating your own reactive applications and systems on AWS.

About the Author

Sascha Moellering is a Senior Solution Architect. Sascha is primarily interested in automation, infrastructure as code, distributed computing, containers and JVM. He can be reached at [email protected]

 

 

Using Trusted Timestamping With Java

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/using-trusted-timestamping-java/

Trusted timestamping is the process of having a trusted third party (“Time stamping authority”, TSA) certify the time of a given event in electronic form. The EU regulation eIDAS gives these timestamps legal strength – i.e. nobody can dispute the time or the content of the event if it was timestamped. It is applicable to multiple scenarios, including timestamping audit logs. (Note: timestamping is not sufficient for a good audit trail as it does not prevent a malicious actor from deleting the event altogether)

There are a number of standards for trusted timestamping, the core one being RFC 3161. As most RFCs it is hard to read. Fortunately for Java users, BouncyCastle implements the standard. Unfortunately, as with most security APIs, working with it is hard, even abysmal. I had to implement it, so I’ll share the code needed to timestamp data.

The whole gist can be found here, but I’ll try to explain the main flow. Obviously, there is a lot of code that’s there to simply follow the standard. The BouncyCastle classes are a maze that’s hard to navigate.

The main method is obviously timestamp(hash, tsaURL, username, password):

public TimestampResponseDto timestamp(byte[] hash, String tsaUrl, String tsaUsername, String tsaPassword) throws IOException {
    MessageImprint imprint = new MessageImprint(sha512oid, hash);

    TimeStampReq request = new TimeStampReq(imprint, null, new ASN1Integer(random.nextLong()),
            ASN1Boolean.TRUE, null);

    byte[] body = request.getEncoded();
    try {
        byte[] responseBytes = getTSAResponse(body, tsaUrl, tsaUsername, tsaPassword);

        ASN1StreamParser asn1Sp = new ASN1StreamParser(responseBytes);
        TimeStampResp tspResp = TimeStampResp.getInstance(asn1Sp.readObject());
        TimeStampResponse tsr = new TimeStampResponse(tspResp);

        checkForErrors(tsaUrl, tsr);

        // validate communication level attributes (RFC 3161 PKIStatus)
        tsr.validate(new TimeStampRequest(request));

        TimeStampToken token = tsr.getTimeStampToken();
            
        TimestampResponseDto response = new TimestampResponseDto();
        response.setTime(getSigningTime(token.getSignedAttributes()));
        response.setEncodedToken(Base64.getEncoder().encodeToString(token.getEncoded()));
           
        return response;
    } catch (RestClientException | TSPException | CMSException | OperatorCreationException | GeneralSecurityException e) {
        throw new IOException(e);
    }
}

It prepares the request by creating the message imprint. Note that you are passing the hash itself, but also the hashing algorithm used to make the hash. Why isn’t the API hiding that from you, I don’t know. In my case the hash is obtained in a more complicated way, so it’s useful, but still. Then we get the raw form of the request and send it to the TSA (time stamping authority). It is an HTTP request, sort of simple, but you have to take care of some request and response headers that are not necessarily consistent across TSAs. The username and password are optional, some TSAs offer the service (rate-limited) without authentication.

When you have the raw response back, you parse it to a TimeStampResponse. Again, you have to go through 2 intermediate objects (ASN1StreamParser and TimeStampResp), which may be a proper abstraction, but is not a usable API.

Then you check if the response was successful, and you also have to validate it – the TSA may have returned a bad response. Ideally all of that could’ve been hidden from you. Validation throws an exception, which in this case I just propagate by wrapping in an IOException.

Finally, you get the token and return the response. The most important thing is the content of the token, which in my case was needed as Base64, so I encode it. It could just be the raw bytes as well. If you want to get any additional data from the token (e.g. the signing time), it’s not that simple; you have to parse the low-level attributes (seen in the gist).

Okay, you have the token now, and you can store it in a database. Occasionally you may want to validate whether timestamps have not been tampered with (which is my usecase). The code is here, and I won’t even try to explain it – it’s a ton of boilerplate that is also accounting for variations in the way TSAs respond (I’ve tried a few). The fact that a DummyCertificate class is needed either means I got something very wrong, or confirms my critique for the BouncyCastle APIs. The DummyCertificate may not be needed for some TSAs, but it is for others, and you actually can’t instantiate it that easily. You need a real certificate to construct it (which is not included in the gist; using the init() method in the next gist you can create the dummy with dummyCertificate = new DummyCertificate(certificateHolder.toASN1Structure());). In my code these are all one class, but for presenting them I decided to split it, hence this little duplication.

Okay, now we can timestamp and validate timestamps. That should be enough; but for testing purposes (or limited internal use) you may want to do the timestamping locally instead of asking a TSA. The code can be found here. It uses spring, but you can instead pass the keystore details as arguments to the init method. You need a JKS store with a keypair and a certificate, and I used KeyStore Explorer to create them. If you are running your application in AWS, you may want to encrypt your keystore using KMS (Key Management Service), and then decrypt it on application load, but that’s out of the scope of this article. For the local timestamping validation works as expected, and for timestamping – instead of calling the external service, just call localTSA.timestamp(req);

How did I get to know which classes to instantiate and which parameters to pass – I don’t remember. Looking at tests, examples, answers, sources. It took a while, and so I’m sharing it, to potentially save some trouble of others.

A list of TSAs you can test with: SafeCreative, FreeTSA, time.centum.pl.

I realize this does not seem applicable to many scenarios, but I would recommend timestamping some critical pieces of your application data. And it is generally useful to have it in your “toolbox”, ready to use, rather than trying to read the standard and battling with BouncyCastle classes for days in order to achieve this allegedly simple task.

The post Using Trusted Timestamping With Java appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

How to Easily Apply Amazon Cloud Directory Schema Changes with In-Place Schema Upgrades

Post Syndicated from Mahendra Chheda original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-easily-apply-amazon-cloud-directory-schema-changes-with-in-place-schema-upgrades/

Now, Amazon Cloud Directory makes it easier for you to apply schema changes across your directories with in-place schema upgrades. Your directory now remains available while Cloud Directory applies backward-compatible schema changes such as the addition of new fields. Without migrating data between directories or applying code changes to your applications, you can upgrade your schemas. You also can view the history of your schema changes in Cloud Directory by using version identifiers, which help you track and audit schema versions across directories. If you have multiple instances of a directory with the same schema, you can view the version history of schema changes to manage your directory fleet and ensure that all directories are running with the same schema version.

In this blog post, I demonstrate how to perform an in-place schema upgrade and use schema versions in Cloud Directory. I add additional attributes to an existing facet and add a new facet to a schema. I then publish the new schema and apply it to running directories, upgrading the schema in place. I also show how to view the version history of a directory schema, which helps me to ensure my directory fleet is running the same version of the schema and has the correct history of schema changes applied to it.

Note: I share Java code examples in this post. I assume that you are familiar with the AWS SDK and can use Java-based code to build a Cloud Directory code example. You can apply the concepts I cover in this post to other programming languages such as Python and Ruby.

Cloud Directory fundamentals

I will start by covering a few Cloud Directory fundamentals. If you are already familiar with the concepts behind Cloud Directory facets, schemas, and schema lifecycles, you can skip to the next section.

Facets: Groups of attributes. You use facets to define object types. For example, you can define a device schema by adding facets such as computers, phones, and tablets. A computer facet can track attributes such as serial number, make, and model. You can then use the facets to create computer objects, phone objects, and tablet objects in the directory to which the schema applies.

Schemas: Collections of facets. Schemas define which types of objects can be created in a directory (such as users, devices, and organizations) and enforce validation of data for each object class. All data within a directory must conform to the applied schema. As a result, the schema definition is essentially a blueprint to construct a directory with an applied schema.

Schema lifecycle: The four distinct states of a schema: Development, Published, Applied, and Deleted. Schemas in the Published and Applied states have version identifiers and cannot be changed. Schemas in the Applied state are used by directories for validation as applications insert or update data. You can change schemas in the Development state as many times as you need them to. In-place schema upgrades allow you to apply schema changes to an existing Applied schema in a production directory without the need to export and import the data populated in the directory.

How to add attributes to a computer inventory application schema and perform an in-place schema upgrade

To demonstrate how to set up schema versioning and perform an in-place schema upgrade, I will use an example of a computer inventory application that uses Cloud Directory to store relationship data. Let’s say that at my company, AnyCompany, we use this computer inventory application to track all computers we give to our employees for work use. I previously created a ComputerSchema and assigned its version identifier as 1. This schema contains one facet called ComputerInfo that includes attributes for SerialNumber, Make, and Model, as shown in the following schema details.

Schema: ComputerSchema
Version: 1

Facet: ComputerInfo
Attribute: SerialNumber, type: Integer
Attribute: Make, type: String
Attribute: Model, type: String

AnyCompany has offices in Seattle, Portland, and San Francisco. I have deployed the computer inventory application for each of these three locations. As shown in the lower left part of the following diagram, ComputerSchema is in the Published state with a version of 1. The Published schema is applied to SeattleDirectory, PortlandDirectory, and SanFranciscoDirectory for AnyCompany’s three locations. Implementing separate directories for different geographic locations when you don’t have any queries that cross location boundaries is a good data partitioning strategy and gives your application better response times with lower latency.

Diagram of ComputerSchema in Published state and applied to three directories

Legend for the diagrams in this post

The following code example creates the schema in the Development state by using a JSON file, publishes the schema, and then creates directories for the Seattle, Portland, and San Francisco locations. For this example, I assume the schema has been defined in the JSON file. The createSchema API creates a schema Amazon Resource Name (ARN) with the name defined in the variable, SCHEMA_NAME. I can use the putSchemaFromJson API to add specific schema definitions from the JSON file.

// The utility method to get valid Cloud Directory schema JSON
String validJson = getJsonFile("ComputerSchema_version_1.json")

String SCHEMA_NAME = "ComputerSchema";

String developmentSchemaArn = client.createSchema(new CreateSchemaRequest()
        .withName(SCHEMA_NAME))
        .getSchemaArn();

// Put the schema document in the Development schema
PutSchemaFromJsonResult result = client.putSchemaFromJson(new PutSchemaFromJsonRequest()
        .withSchemaArn(developmentSchemaArn)
        .withDocument(validJson));

The following code example takes the schema that is currently in the Development state and publishes the schema, changing its state to Published.

String SCHEMA_VERSION = "1";
String publishedSchemaArn = client.publishSchema(
        new PublishSchemaRequest()
        .withDevelopmentSchemaArn(developmentSchemaArn)
        .withVersion(SCHEMA_VERSION))
        .getPublishedSchemaArn();

// Our Published schema ARN is as follows
// arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:schema/published/ComputerSchema/1

The following code example creates a directory named SeattleDirectory and applies the published schema. The createDirectory API call creates a directory by using the published schema provided in the API parameters. Note that Cloud Directory stores a version of the schema in the directory in the Applied state. I will use similar code to create directories for PortlandDirectory and SanFranciscoDirectory.

String DIRECTORY_NAME = "SeattleDirectory"; 

CreateDirectoryResult directory = client.createDirectory(
        new CreateDirectoryRequest()
        .withName(DIRECTORY_NAME)
        .withSchemaArn(publishedSchemaArn));

String directoryArn = directory.getDirectoryArn();
String appliedSchemaArn = directory.getAppliedSchemaArn();

// This code section can be reused to create directories for Portland and San Francisco locations with the appropriate directory names

// Our directory ARN is as follows 
// arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:directory/XX_DIRECTORY_GUID_XX

// Our applied schema ARN is as follows 
// arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:directory/XX_DIRECTORY_GUID_XX/schema/ComputerSchema/1

Revising a schema

Now let’s say my company, AnyCompany, wants to add more information for computers and to track which employees have been assigned a computer for work use. I modify the schema to add two attributes to the ComputerInfo facet: Description and OSVersion (operating system version). I make Description optional because it is not important for me to track this attribute for the computer objects I create. I make OSVersion mandatory because it is critical for me to track it for all computer objects so that I can make changes such as applying security patches or making upgrades. Because I make OSVersion mandatory, I must provide a default value that Cloud Directory will apply to objects that were created before the schema revision, in order to handle backward compatibility. Note that you can replace the value in any object with a different value.

I also add a new facet to track computer assignment information, shown in the following updated schema as the ComputerAssignment facet. This facet tracks these additional attributes: Name (the name of the person to whom the computer is assigned), EMail (the email address of the assignee), Department, and department CostCenter. Note that Cloud Directory refers to the previously available version identifier as the Major Version. Because I can now add a minor version to a schema, I also denote the changed schema as Minor Version A.

Schema: ComputerSchema
Major Version: 1
Minor Version: A 

Facet: ComputerInfo
Attribute: SerialNumber, type: Integer 
Attribute: Make, type: String
Attribute: Model, type: Integer
Attribute: Description, type: String, required: NOT_REQUIRED
Attribute: OSVersion, type: String, required: REQUIRED_ALWAYS, default: "Windows 7"

Facet: ComputerAssignment
Attribute: Name, type: String
Attribute: EMail, type: String
Attribute: Department, type: String
Attribute: CostCenter, type: Integer

The following diagram shows the changes that were made when I added another facet to the schema and attributes to the existing facet. The highlighted area of the diagram (bottom left) shows that the schema changes were published.

Diagram showing that schema changes were published

The following code example revises the existing Development schema by adding the new attributes to the ComputerInfo facet and by adding the ComputerAssignment facet. I use a new JSON file for the schema revision, and for the purposes of this example, I am assuming the JSON file has the full schema including planned revisions.

// The utility method to get a valid CloudDirectory schema JSON
String schemaJson = getJsonFile("ComputerSchema_version_1_A.json")

// Put the schema document in the Development schema
PutSchemaFromJsonResult result = client.putSchemaFromJson(
        new PutSchemaFromJsonRequest()
        .withSchemaArn(developmentSchemaArn)
        .withDocument(schemaJson));

Upgrading the Published schema

The following code example performs an in-place schema upgrade of the Published schema with schema revisions (it adds new attributes to the existing facet and another facet to the schema). The upgradePublishedSchema API upgrades the Published schema with backward-compatible changes from the Development schema.

// From an earlier code example, I know the publishedSchemaArn has this value: "arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:schema/published/ComputerSchema/1"

// Upgrade publishedSchemaArn to minorVersion A. The Development schema must be backward compatible with 
// the existing publishedSchemaArn. 

String minorVersion = "A"

UpgradePublishedSchemaResult upgradePublishedSchemaResult = client.upgradePublishedSchema(new UpgradePublishedSchemaRequest()
        .withDevelopmentSchemaArn(developmentSchemaArn)
        .withPublishedSchemaArn(publishedSchemaArn)
        .withMinorVersion(minorVersion));

String upgradedPublishedSchemaArn = upgradePublishedSchemaResult.getUpgradedSchemaArn();

// The Published schema ARN after the upgrade shows a minor version as follows 
// arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:schema/published/ComputerSchema/1/A

Upgrading the Applied schema

The following diagram shows the in-place schema upgrade for the SeattleDirectory directory. I am performing the schema upgrade so that I can reflect the new schemas in all three directories. As a reminder, I added new attributes to the ComputerInfo facet and also added the ComputerAssignment facet. After the schema and directory upgrade, I can create objects for the ComputerInfo and ComputerAssignment facets in the SeattleDirectory. Any objects that were created with the old facet definition for ComputerInfo will now use the default values for any additional attributes defined in the new schema.

Diagram of the in-place schema upgrade for the SeattleDirectory directory

I use the following code example to perform an in-place upgrade of the SeattleDirectory to a Major Version of 1 and a Minor Version of A. Note that you should change a Major Version identifier in a schema to make backward-incompatible changes such as changing the data type of an existing attribute or dropping a mandatory attribute from your schema. Backward-incompatible changes require directory data migration from a previous version to the new version. You should change a Minor Version identifier in a schema to make backward-compatible upgrades such as adding additional attributes or adding facets, which in turn may contain one or more attributes. The upgradeAppliedSchema API lets me upgrade an existing directory with a different version of a schema.

// This upgrades ComputerSchema version 1 of the Applied schema in SeattleDirectory to Major Version 1 and Minor Version A
// The schema must be backward compatible or the API will fail with IncompatibleSchemaException

UpgradeAppliedSchemaResult upgradeAppliedSchemaResult = client.upgradeAppliedSchema(new UpgradeAppliedSchemaRequest()
        .withDirectoryArn(directoryArn)
        .withPublishedSchemaArn(upgradedPublishedSchemaArn));

String upgradedAppliedSchemaArn = upgradeAppliedSchemaResult.getUpgradedSchemaArn();

// The Applied schema ARN after the in-place schema upgrade will appear as follows
// arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:directory/XX_DIRECTORY_GUID_XX/schema/ComputerSchema/1

// This code section can be reused to upgrade directories for the Portland and San Francisco locations with the appropriate directory ARN

Note: Cloud Directory has excluded returning the Minor Version identifier in the Applied schema ARN for backward compatibility and to enable the application to work across older and newer versions of the directory.

The following diagram shows the changes that are made when I perform an in-place schema upgrade in the two remaining directories, PortlandDirectory and SanFranciscoDirectory. I make these calls sequentially, upgrading PortlandDirectory first and then upgrading SanFranciscoDirectory. I use the same code example that I used earlier to upgrade SeattleDirectory. Now, all my directories are running the most current version of the schema. Also, I made these schema changes without having to migrate data and while maintaining my application’s high availability.

Diagram showing the changes that are made with an in-place schema upgrade in the two remaining directories

Schema revision history

I can now view the schema revision history for any of AnyCompany’s directories by using the listAppliedSchemaArns API. Cloud Directory maintains the five most recent versions of applied schema changes. Similarly, to inspect the current Minor Version that was applied to my schema, I use the getAppliedSchemaVersion API. The listAppliedSchemaArns API returns the schema ARNs based on my schema filter as defined in withSchemaArn.

I use the following code example to query an Applied schema for its version history.

// This returns the five most recent Minor Versions associated with a Major Version
ListAppliedSchemaArnsResult listAppliedSchemaArnsResult = client.listAppliedSchemaArns(new ListAppliedSchemaArnsRequest()
        .withDirectoryArn(directoryArn)
        .withSchemaArn(upgradedAppliedSchemaArn));

// Note: The listAppliedSchemaArns API without the SchemaArn filter returns all the Major Versions in a directory

The listAppliedSchemaArns API returns the two ARNs as shown in the following output.

arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:directory/XX_DIRECTORY_GUID_XX/schema/ComputerSchema/1
arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:directory/XX_DIRECTORY_GUID_XX/schema/ComputerSchema/1/A

The following code example queries an Applied schema for current Minor Version by using the getAppliedSchemaVersion API.

// This returns the current Applied schema's Minor Version ARN 

GetAppliedSchemaVersion getAppliedSchemaVersionResult = client.getAppliedSchemaVersion(new GetAppliedSchemaVersionRequest()
	.withSchemaArn(upgradedAppliedSchemaArn));

The getAppliedSchemaVersion API returns the current Applied schema ARN with a Minor Version, as shown in the following output.

arn:aws:clouddirectory:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:directory/XX_DIRECTORY_GUID_XX/schema/ComputerSchema/1/A

If you have a lot of directories, schema revision API calls can help you audit your directory fleet and ensure that all directories are running the same version of a schema. Such auditing can help you ensure high integrity of directories across your fleet.

Summary

You can use in-place schema upgrades to make changes to your directory schema as you evolve your data set to match the needs of your application. An in-place schema upgrade allows you to maintain high availability for your directory and applications while the upgrade takes place. For more information about in-place schema upgrades, see the in-place schema upgrade documentation.

If you have comments about this blog post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about implementing the solution in this post, start a new thread in the Directory Service forum or contact AWS Support.

– Mahendra

 

Using Amazon Redshift Spectrum, Amazon Athena, and AWS Glue with Node.js in Production

Post Syndicated from Rafi Ton original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/using-amazon-redshift-spectrum-amazon-athena-and-aws-glue-with-node-js-in-production/

This is a guest post by Rafi Ton, founder and CEO of NUVIAD. NUVIAD is, in their own words, “a mobile marketing platform providing professional marketers, agencies and local businesses state of the art tools to promote their products and services through hyper targeting, big data analytics and advanced machine learning tools.”

At NUVIAD, we’ve been using Amazon Redshift as our main data warehouse solution for more than 3 years.

We store massive amounts of ad transaction data that our users and partners analyze to determine ad campaign strategies. When running real-time bidding (RTB) campaigns in large scale, data freshness is critical so that our users can respond rapidly to changes in campaign performance. We chose Amazon Redshift because of its simplicity, scalability, performance, and ability to load new data in near real time.

Over the past three years, our customer base grew significantly and so did our data. We saw our Amazon Redshift cluster grow from three nodes to 65 nodes. To balance cost and analytics performance, we looked for a way to store large amounts of less-frequently analyzed data at a lower cost. Yet, we still wanted to have the data immediately available for user queries and to meet their expectations for fast performance. We turned to Amazon Redshift Spectrum.

In this post, I explain the reasons why we extended Amazon Redshift with Redshift Spectrum as our modern data warehouse. I cover how our data growth and the need to balance cost and performance led us to adopt Redshift Spectrum. I also share key performance metrics in our environment, and discuss the additional AWS services that provide a scalable and fast environment, with data available for immediate querying by our growing user base.

Amazon Redshift as our foundation

The ability to provide fresh, up-to-the-minute data to our customers and partners was always a main goal with our platform. We saw other solutions provide data that was a few hours old, but this was not good enough for us. We insisted on providing the freshest data possible. For us, that meant loading Amazon Redshift in frequent micro batches and allowing our customers to query Amazon Redshift directly to get results in near real time.

The benefits were immediately evident. Our customers could see how their campaigns performed faster than with other solutions, and react sooner to the ever-changing media supply pricing and availability. They were very happy.

However, this approach required Amazon Redshift to store a lot of data for long periods, and our data grew substantially. In our peak, we maintained a cluster running 65 DC1.large nodes. The impact on our Amazon Redshift cluster was evident, and we saw our CPU utilization grow to 90%.

Why we extended Amazon Redshift to Redshift Spectrum

Redshift Spectrum gives us the ability to run SQL queries using the powerful Amazon Redshift query engine against data stored in Amazon S3, without needing to load the data. With Redshift Spectrum, we store data where we want, at the cost that we want. We have the data available for analytics when our users need it with the performance they expect.

Seamless scalability, high performance, and unlimited concurrency

Scaling Redshift Spectrum is a simple process. First, it allows us to leverage Amazon S3 as the storage engine and get practically unlimited data capacity.

Second, if we need more compute power, we can leverage Redshift Spectrum’s distributed compute engine over thousands of nodes to provide superior performance – perfect for complex queries running against massive amounts of data.

Third, all Redshift Spectrum clusters access the same data catalog so that we don’t have to worry about data migration at all, making scaling effortless and seamless.

Lastly, since Redshift Spectrum distributes queries across potentially thousands of nodes, they are not affected by other queries, providing much more stable performance and unlimited concurrency.

Keeping it SQL

Redshift Spectrum uses the same query engine as Amazon Redshift. This means that we did not need to change our BI tools or query syntax, whether we used complex queries across a single table or joins across multiple tables.

An interesting capability introduced recently is the ability to create a view that spans both Amazon Redshift and Redshift Spectrum external tables. With this feature, you can query frequently accessed data in your Amazon Redshift cluster and less-frequently accessed data in Amazon S3, using a single view.

Leveraging Parquet for higher performance

Parquet is a columnar data format that provides superior performance and allows Redshift Spectrum (or Amazon Athena) to scan significantly less data. With less I/O, queries run faster and we pay less per query. You can read all about Parquet at https://parquet.apache.org/ or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apache_Parquet.

Lower cost

From a cost perspective, we pay standard rates for our data in Amazon S3, and only small amounts per query to analyze data with Redshift Spectrum. Using the Parquet format, we can significantly reduce the amount of data scanned. Our costs are now lower, and our users get fast results even for large complex queries.

What we learned about Amazon Redshift vs. Redshift Spectrum performance

When we first started looking at Redshift Spectrum, we wanted to put it to the test. We wanted to know how it would compare to Amazon Redshift, so we looked at two key questions:

  1. What is the performance difference between Amazon Redshift and Redshift Spectrum on simple and complex queries?
  2. Does the data format impact performance?

During the migration phase, we had our dataset stored in Amazon Redshift and S3 as CSV/GZIP and as Parquet file formats. We tested three configurations:

  • Amazon Redshift cluster with 28 DC1.large nodes
  • Redshift Spectrum using CSV/GZIP
  • Redshift Spectrum using Parquet

We performed benchmarks for simple and complex queries on one month’s worth of data. We tested how much time it took to perform the query, and how consistent the results were when running the same query multiple times. The data we used for the tests was already partitioned by date and hour. Properly partitioning the data improves performance significantly and reduces query times.

Simple query

First, we tested a simple query aggregating billing data across a month:

SELECT 
  user_id, 
  count(*) AS impressions, 
  SUM(billing)::decimal /1000000 AS billing 
FROM <table_name> 
WHERE 
  date >= '2017-08-01' AND 
  date <= '2017-08-31'  
GROUP BY 
  user_id;

We ran the same query seven times and measured the response times (red marking the longest time and green the shortest time):

Execution Time (seconds)
  Amazon Redshift Redshift Spectrum
CSV
Redshift Spectrum Parquet
Run #1 39.65 45.11 11.92
Run #2 15.26 43.13 12.05
Run #3 15.27 46.47 13.38
Run #4 21.22 51.02 12.74
Run #5 17.27 43.35 11.76
Run #6 16.67 44.23 13.67
Run #7 25.37 40.39 12.75
Average 21.53  44.82 12.61

For simple queries, Amazon Redshift performed better than Redshift Spectrum, as we thought, because the data is local to Amazon Redshift.

What was surprising was that using Parquet data format in Redshift Spectrum significantly beat ‘traditional’ Amazon Redshift performance. For our queries, using Parquet data format with Redshift Spectrum delivered an average 40% performance gain over traditional Amazon Redshift. Furthermore, Redshift Spectrum showed high consistency in execution time with a smaller difference between the slowest run and the fastest run.

Comparing the amount of data scanned when using CSV/GZIP and Parquet, the difference was also significant:

Data Scanned (GB)
CSV (Gzip) 135.49
Parquet 2.83

Because we pay only for the data scanned by Redshift Spectrum, the cost saving of using Parquet is evident and substantial.

Complex query

Next, we compared the same three configurations with a complex query.

Execution Time (seconds)
  Amazon Redshift Redshift Spectrum CSV Redshift Spectrum Parquet
Run #1 329.80 84.20 42.40
Run #2 167.60 65.30 35.10
Run #3 165.20 62.20 23.90
Run #4 273.90 74.90 55.90
Run #5 167.70 69.00 58.40
Average 220.84 71.12 43.14

This time, Redshift Spectrum using Parquet cut the average query time by 80% compared to traditional Amazon Redshift!

Bottom line: For complex queries, Redshift Spectrum provided a 67% performance gain over Amazon Redshift. Using the Parquet data format, Redshift Spectrum delivered an 80% performance improvement over Amazon Redshift. For us, this was substantial.

Optimizing the data structure for different workloads

Because the cost of S3 is relatively inexpensive and we pay only for the data scanned by each query, we believe that it makes sense to keep our data in different formats for different workloads and different analytics engines. It is important to note that we can have any number of tables pointing to the same data on S3. It all depends on how we partition the data and update the table partitions.

Data permutations

For example, we have a process that runs every minute and generates statistics for the last minute of data collected. With Amazon Redshift, this would be done by running the query on the table with something as follows:

SELECT 
  user, 
  COUNT(*) 
FROM 
  events_table 
WHERE 
  ts BETWEEN ‘2017-08-01 14:00:00’ AND ‘2017-08-01 14:00:59’ 
GROUP BY 
  user;

(Assuming ‘ts’ is your column storing the time stamp for each event.)

With Redshift Spectrum, we pay for the data scanned in each query. If the data is partitioned by the minute instead of the hour, a query looking at one minute would be 1/60th the cost. If we use a temporary table that points only to the data of the last minute, we save that unnecessary cost.

Creating Parquet data efficiently

On the average, we have 800 instances that process our traffic. Each instance sends events that are eventually loaded into Amazon Redshift. When we started three years ago, we would offload data from each server to S3 and then perform a periodic copy command from S3 to Amazon Redshift.

Recently, Amazon Kinesis Firehose added the capability to offload data directly to Amazon Redshift. While this is now a viable option, we kept the same collection process that worked flawlessly and efficiently for three years.

This changed, however, when we incorporated Redshift Spectrum. With Redshift Spectrum, we needed to find a way to:

  • Collect the event data from the instances.
  • Save the data in Parquet format.
  • Partition the data effectively.

To accomplish this, we save the data as CSV and then transform it to Parquet. The most effective method to generate the Parquet files is to:

  1. Send the data in one-minute intervals from the instances to Kinesis Firehose with an S3 temporary bucket as the destination.
  2. Aggregate hourly data and convert it to Parquet using AWS Lambda and AWS Glue.
  3. Add the Parquet data to S3 by updating the table partitions.

With this new process, we had to give more attention to validating the data before we sent it to Kinesis Firehose, because a single corrupted record in a partition fails queries on that partition.

Data validation

To store our click data in a table, we considered the following SQL create table command:

create external TABLE spectrum.blog_clicks (
    user_id varchar(50),
    campaign_id varchar(50),
    os varchar(50),
    ua varchar(255),
    ts bigint,
    billing float
)
partitioned by (date date, hour smallint)  
stored as parquet
location 's3://nuviad-temp/blog/clicks/';

The above statement defines a new external table (all Redshift Spectrum tables are external tables) with a few attributes. We stored ‘ts’ as a Unix time stamp and not as Timestamp, and billing data is stored as float and not decimal (more on that later). We also said that the data is partitioned by date and hour, and then stored as Parquet on S3.

First, we need to get the table definitions. This can be achieved by running the following query:

SELECT 
  * 
FROM 
  svv_external_columns 
WHERE 
  tablename = 'blog_clicks';

This query lists all the columns in the table with their respective definitions:

schemaname tablename columnname external_type columnnum part_key
spectrum blog_clicks user_id varchar(50) 1 0
spectrum blog_clicks campaign_id varchar(50) 2 0
spectrum blog_clicks os varchar(50) 3 0
spectrum blog_clicks ua varchar(255) 4 0
spectrum blog_clicks ts bigint 5 0
spectrum blog_clicks billing double 6 0
spectrum blog_clicks date date 7 1
spectrum blog_clicks hour smallint 8 2

Now we can use this data to create a validation schema for our data:

const rtb_request_schema = {
    "name": "clicks",
    "items": {
        "user_id": {
            "type": "string",
            "max_length": 100
        },
        "campaign_id": {
            "type": "string",
            "max_length": 50
        },
        "os": {
            "type": "string",
            "max_length": 50            
        },
        "ua": {
            "type": "string",
            "max_length": 255            
        },
        "ts": {
            "type": "integer",
            "min_value": 0,
            "max_value": 9999999999999
        },
        "billing": {
            "type": "float",
            "min_value": 0,
            "max_value": 9999999999999
        }
    }
};

Next, we create a function that uses this schema to validate data:

function valueIsValid(value, item_schema) {
    if (schema.type == 'string') {
        return (typeof value == 'string' && value.length <= schema.max_length);
    }
    else if (schema.type == 'integer') {
        return (typeof value == 'number' && value >= schema.min_value && value <= schema.max_value);
    }
    else if (schema.type == 'float' || schema.type == 'double') {
        return (typeof value == 'number' && value >= schema.min_value && value <= schema.max_value);
    }
    else if (schema.type == 'boolean') {
        return typeof value == 'boolean';
    }
    else if (schema.type == 'timestamp') {
        return (new Date(value)).getTime() > 0;
    }
    else {
        return true;
    }
}

Near real-time data loading with Kinesis Firehose

On Kinesis Firehose, we created a new delivery stream to handle the events as follows:

Delivery stream name: events
Source: Direct PUT
S3 bucket: nuviad-events
S3 prefix: rtb/
IAM role: firehose_delivery_role_1
Data transformation: Disabled
Source record backup: Disabled
S3 buffer size (MB): 100
S3 buffer interval (sec): 60
S3 Compression: GZIP
S3 Encryption: No Encryption
Status: ACTIVE
Error logging: Enabled

This delivery stream aggregates event data every minute, or up to 100 MB, and writes the data to an S3 bucket as a CSV/GZIP compressed file. Next, after we have the data validated, we can safely send it to our Kinesis Firehose API:

if (validated) {
    let itemString = item.join('|')+'\n'; //Sending csv delimited by pipe and adding new line

    let params = {
        DeliveryStreamName: 'events',
        Record: {
            Data: itemString
        }
    };

    firehose.putRecord(params, function(err, data) {
        if (err) {
            console.error(err, err.stack);        
        }
        else {
            // Continue to your next step 
        }
    });
}

Now, we have a single CSV file representing one minute of event data stored in S3. The files are named automatically by Kinesis Firehose by adding a UTC time prefix in the format YYYY/MM/DD/HH before writing objects to S3. Because we use the date and hour as partitions, we need to change the file naming and location to fit our Redshift Spectrum schema.

Automating data distribution using AWS Lambda

We created a simple Lambda function triggered by an S3 put event that copies the file to a different location (or locations), while renaming it to fit our data structure and processing flow. As mentioned before, the files generated by Kinesis Firehose are structured in a pre-defined hierarchy, such as:

S3://your-bucket/your-prefix/2017/08/01/20/events-4-2017-08-01-20-06-06-536f5c40-6893-4ee4-907d-81e4d3b09455.gz

All we need to do is parse the object name and restructure it as we see fit. In our case, we did the following (the event is an object received in the Lambda function with all the data about the object written to S3):

/*
	object key structure in the event object:
your-prefix/2017/08/01/20/event-4-2017-08-01-20-06-06-536f5c40-6893-4ee4-907d-81e4d3b09455.gz
	*/

let key_parts = event.Records[0].s3.object.key.split('/'); 

let event_type = key_parts[0];
let date = key_parts[1] + '-' + key_parts[2] + '-' + key_parts[3];
let hour = key_parts[4];
if (hour.indexOf('0') == 0) {
 		hour = parseInt(hour, 10) + '';
}
    
let parts1 = key_parts[5].split('-');
let minute = parts1[7];
if (minute.indexOf('0') == 0) {
        minute = parseInt(minute, 10) + '';
}

Now, we can redistribute the file to the two destinations we need—one for the minute processing task and the other for hourly aggregation:

    copyObjectToHourlyFolder(event, date, hour, minute)
        .then(copyObjectToMinuteFolder.bind(null, event, date, hour, minute))
        .then(addPartitionToSpectrum.bind(null, event, date, hour, minute))
        .then(deleteOldMinuteObjects.bind(null, event))
        .then(deleteStreamObject.bind(null, event))        
        .then(result => {
            callback(null, { message: 'done' });            
        })
        .catch(err => {
            console.error(err);
            callback(null, { message: err });            
        }); 

Kinesis Firehose stores the data in a temporary folder. We copy the object to another folder that holds the data for the last processed minute. This folder is connected to a small Redshift Spectrum table where the data is being processed without needing to scan a much larger dataset. We also copy the data to a folder that holds the data for the entire hour, to be later aggregated and converted to Parquet.

Because we partition the data by date and hour, we created a new partition on the Redshift Spectrum table if the processed minute is the first minute in the hour (that is, minute 0). We ran the following:

ALTER TABLE 
  spectrum.events 
ADD partition
  (date='2017-08-01', hour=0) 
  LOCATION 's3://nuviad-temp/events/2017-08-01/0/';

After the data is processed and added to the table, we delete the processed data from the temporary Kinesis Firehose storage and from the minute storage folder.

Migrating CSV to Parquet using AWS Glue and Amazon EMR

The simplest way we found to run an hourly job converting our CSV data to Parquet is using Lambda and AWS Glue (and thanks to the awesome AWS Big Data team for their help with this).

Creating AWS Glue jobs

What this simple AWS Glue script does:

  • Gets parameters for the job, date, and hour to be processed
  • Creates a Spark EMR context allowing us to run Spark code
  • Reads CSV data into a DataFrame
  • Writes the data as Parquet to the destination S3 bucket
  • Adds or modifies the Redshift Spectrum / Amazon Athena table partition for the table
import sys
import sys
from awsglue.transforms import *
from awsglue.utils import getResolvedOptions
from pyspark.context import SparkContext
from awsglue.context import GlueContext
from awsglue.job import Job
import boto3

## @params: [JOB_NAME]
args = getResolvedOptions(sys.argv, ['JOB_NAME','day_partition_key', 'hour_partition_key', 'day_partition_value', 'hour_partition_value' ])

#day_partition_key = "partition_0"
#hour_partition_key = "partition_1"
#day_partition_value = "2017-08-01"
#hour_partition_value = "0"

day_partition_key = args['day_partition_key']
hour_partition_key = args['hour_partition_key']
day_partition_value = args['day_partition_value']
hour_partition_value = args['hour_partition_value']

print("Running for " + day_partition_value + "/" + hour_partition_value)

sc = SparkContext()
glueContext = GlueContext(sc)
spark = glueContext.spark_session
job = Job(glueContext)
job.init(args['JOB_NAME'], args)

df = spark.read.option("delimiter","|").csv("s3://nuviad-temp/events/"+day_partition_value+"/"+hour_partition_value)
df.registerTempTable("data")

df1 = spark.sql("select _c0 as user_id, _c1 as campaign_id, _c2 as os, _c3 as ua, cast(_c4 as bigint) as ts, cast(_c5 as double) as billing from data")

df1.repartition(1).write.mode("overwrite").parquet("s3://nuviad-temp/parquet/"+day_partition_value+"/hour="+hour_partition_value)

client = boto3.client('athena', region_name='us-east-1')

response = client.start_query_execution(
    QueryString='alter table parquet_events add if not exists partition(' + day_partition_key + '=\'' + day_partition_value + '\',' + hour_partition_key + '=' + hour_partition_value + ')  location \'s3://nuviad-temp/parquet/' + day_partition_value + '/hour=' + hour_partition_value + '\'' ,
    QueryExecutionContext={
        'Database': 'spectrumdb'
    },
    ResultConfiguration={
        'OutputLocation': 's3://nuviad-temp/convertresults'
    }
)

response = client.start_query_execution(
    QueryString='alter table parquet_events partition(' + day_partition_key + '=\'' + day_partition_value + '\',' + hour_partition_key + '=' + hour_partition_value + ') set location \'s3://nuviad-temp/parquet/' + day_partition_value + '/hour=' + hour_partition_value + '\'' ,
    QueryExecutionContext={
        'Database': 'spectrumdb'
    },
    ResultConfiguration={
        'OutputLocation': 's3://nuviad-temp/convertresults'
    }
)

job.commit()

Note: Because Redshift Spectrum and Athena both use the AWS Glue Data Catalog, we could use the Athena client to add the partition to the table.

Here are a few words about float, decimal, and double. Using decimal proved to be more challenging than we expected, as it seems that Redshift Spectrum and Spark use them differently. Whenever we used decimal in Redshift Spectrum and in Spark, we kept getting errors, such as:

S3 Query Exception (Fetch). Task failed due to an internal error. File 'https://s3-external-1.amazonaws.com/nuviad-temp/events/2017-08-01/hour=2/part-00017-48ae5b6b-906e-4875-8cde-bc36c0c6d0ca.c000.snappy.parquet has an incompatible Parquet schema for column 's3://nuviad-events/events.lat'. Column type: DECIMAL(18, 8), Parquet schema:\noptional float lat [i:4 d:1 r:0]\n (https://s3-external-1.amazonaws.com/nuviad-temp/events/2017-08-01/hour=2/part-00017-48ae5b6b-906e-4875-8cde-bc36c0c6d0ca.c000.snappy.parq

We had to experiment with a few floating-point formats until we found that the only combination that worked was to define the column as double in the Spark code and float in Spectrum. This is the reason you see billing defined as float in Spectrum and double in the Spark code.

Creating a Lambda function to trigger conversion

Next, we created a simple Lambda function to trigger the AWS Glue script hourly using a simple Python code:

import boto3
import json
from datetime import datetime, timedelta
 
client = boto3.client('glue')
 
def lambda_handler(event, context):
    last_hour_date_time = datetime.now() - timedelta(hours = 1)
    day_partition_value = last_hour_date_time.strftime("%Y-%m-%d") 
    hour_partition_value = last_hour_date_time.strftime("%-H") 
    response = client.start_job_run(
    JobName='convertEventsParquetHourly',
    Arguments={
         '--day_partition_key': 'date',
         '--hour_partition_key': 'hour',
         '--day_partition_value': day_partition_value,
         '--hour_partition_value': hour_partition_value
         }
    )

Using Amazon CloudWatch Events, we trigger this function hourly. This function triggers an AWS Glue job named ‘convertEventsParquetHourly’ and runs it for the previous hour, passing job names and values of the partitions to process to AWS Glue.

Redshift Spectrum and Node.js

Our development stack is based on Node.js, which is well-suited for high-speed, light servers that need to process a huge number of transactions. However, a few limitations of the Node.js environment required us to create workarounds and use other tools to complete the process.

Node.js and Parquet

The lack of Parquet modules for Node.js required us to implement an AWS Glue/Amazon EMR process to effectively migrate data from CSV to Parquet. We would rather save directly to Parquet, but we couldn’t find an effective way to do it.

One interesting project in the works is the development of a Parquet NPM by Marc Vertes called node-parquet (https://www.npmjs.com/package/node-parquet). It is not in a production state yet, but we think it would be well worth following the progress of this package.

Timestamp data type

According to the Parquet documentation, Timestamp data are stored in Parquet as 64-bit integers. However, JavaScript does not support 64-bit integers, because the native number type is a 64-bit double, giving only 53 bits of integer range.

The result is that you cannot store Timestamp correctly in Parquet using Node.js. The solution is to store Timestamp as string and cast the type to Timestamp in the query. Using this method, we did not witness any performance degradation whatsoever.

Lessons learned

You can benefit from our trial-and-error experience.

Lesson #1: Data validation is critical

As mentioned earlier, a single corrupt entry in a partition can fail queries running against this partition, especially when using Parquet, which is harder to edit than a simple CSV file. Make sure that you validate your data before scanning it with Redshift Spectrum.

Lesson #2: Structure and partition data effectively

One of the biggest benefits of using Redshift Spectrum (or Athena for that matter) is that you don’t need to keep nodes up and running all the time. You pay only for the queries you perform and only for the data scanned per query.

Keeping different permutations of your data for different queries makes a lot of sense in this case. For example, you can partition your data by date and hour to run time-based queries, and also have another set partitioned by user_id and date to run user-based queries. This results in faster and more efficient performance of your data warehouse.

Storing data in the right format

Use Parquet whenever you can. The benefits of Parquet are substantial. Faster performance, less data to scan, and much more efficient columnar format. However, it is not supported out-of-the-box by Kinesis Firehose, so you need to implement your own ETL. AWS Glue is a great option.

Creating small tables for frequent tasks

When we started using Redshift Spectrum, we saw our Amazon Redshift costs jump by hundreds of dollars per day. Then we realized that we were unnecessarily scanning a full day’s worth of data every minute. Take advantage of the ability to define multiple tables on the same S3 bucket or folder, and create temporary and small tables for frequent queries.

Lesson #3: Combine Athena and Redshift Spectrum for optimal performance

Moving to Redshift Spectrum also allowed us to take advantage of Athena as both use the AWS Glue Data Catalog. Run fast and simple queries using Athena while taking advantage of the advanced Amazon Redshift query engine for complex queries using Redshift Spectrum.

Redshift Spectrum excels when running complex queries. It can push many compute-intensive tasks, such as predicate filtering and aggregation, down to the Redshift Spectrum layer, so that queries use much less of your cluster’s processing capacity.

Lesson #4: Sort your Parquet data within the partition

We achieved another performance improvement by sorting data within the partition using sortWithinPartitions(sort_field). For example:

df.repartition(1).sortWithinPartitions("campaign_id")…

Conclusion

We were extremely pleased with using Amazon Redshift as our core data warehouse for over three years. But as our client base and volume of data grew substantially, we extended Amazon Redshift to take advantage of scalability, performance, and cost with Redshift Spectrum.

Redshift Spectrum lets us scale to virtually unlimited storage, scale compute transparently, and deliver super-fast results for our users. With Redshift Spectrum, we store data where we want at the cost we want, and have the data available for analytics when our users need it with the performance they expect.


About the Author

With 7 years of experience in the AdTech industry and 15 years in leading technology companies, Rafi Ton is the founder and CEO of NUVIAD. He enjoys exploring new technologies and putting them to use in cutting edge products and services, in the real world generating real money. Being an experienced entrepreneur, Rafi believes in practical-programming and fast adaptation of new technologies to achieve a significant market advantage.