Tag Archives: Security Software

testssl.sh – Test SSL Security Including Ciphers, Protocols & Detect Flaws

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2018/10/testssl-sh-test-ssl-security-including-ciphers-protocols-detect-flaws/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

testssl.sh – Test SSL Security Including Ciphers, Protocols & Detect Flaws

testssl.sh is a free command line tool to test SSL security, it checks a server’s service on any port for the support of TLS/SSL ciphers, protocols as well as recent cryptographic flaws and more.

testssl.sh is pretty much portable/compatible. It is working on every Linux, Mac OS X, FreeBSD distribution, on MSYS2/Cygwin (slow). It is supposed also to work on any other unixoid systems. A newer OpenSSL version (1.0) is recommended though.

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Acunetix v12 – More Comprehensive More Accurate & 2x Faster

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2018/05/acunetix-v12-more-comprehensive-more-accurate-2x-faster/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

Acunetix v12 – More Comprehensive More Accurate & 2x Faster

Acunetix, the pioneer in automated web application security software, has announced the release of Acunetix v12. This new version provides support for JavaScript ES7 to better analyse sites which rely heavily on JavaScript such as SPAs. This coupled with a new AcuSensor for Java web applications, sets Acunetix ahead of the curve in its ability to comprehensively and accurately scan all types of websites.

With v12 also comes a brand new scanning engine, re-engineered and re-written from the ground up, making Acunetix the fastest scanning engine in the industry.

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Ransomware Update: Viruses Targeting Business IT Servers

Post Syndicated from Roderick Bauer original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/ransomware-update-viruses-targeting-business-it-servers/

Ransomware warning message on computer

As ransomware attacks have grown in number in recent months, the tactics and attack vectors also have evolved. While the primary method of attack used to be to target individual computer users within organizations with phishing emails and infected attachments, we’re increasingly seeing attacks that target weaknesses in businesses’ IT infrastructure.

How Ransomware Attacks Typically Work

In our previous posts on ransomware, we described the common vehicles used by hackers to infect organizations with ransomware viruses. Most often, downloaders distribute trojan horses through malicious downloads and spam emails. The emails contain a variety of file attachments, which if opened, will download and run one of the many ransomware variants. Once a user’s computer is infected with a malicious downloader, it will retrieve additional malware, which frequently includes crypto-ransomware. After the files have been encrypted, a ransom payment is demanded of the victim in order to decrypt the files.

What’s Changed With the Latest Ransomware Attacks?

In 2016, a customized ransomware strain called SamSam began attacking the servers in primarily health care institutions. SamSam, unlike more conventional ransomware, is not delivered through downloads or phishing emails. Instead, the attackers behind SamSam use tools to identify unpatched servers running Red Hat’s JBoss enterprise products. Once the attackers have successfully gained entry into one of these servers by exploiting vulnerabilities in JBoss, they use other freely available tools and scripts to collect credentials and gather information on networked computers. Then they deploy their ransomware to encrypt files on these systems before demanding a ransom. Gaining entry to an organization through its IT center rather than its endpoints makes this approach scalable and especially unsettling.

SamSam’s methodology is to scour the Internet searching for accessible and vulnerable JBoss application servers, especially ones used by hospitals. It’s not unlike a burglar rattling doorknobs in a neighborhood to find unlocked homes. When SamSam finds an unlocked home (unpatched server), the software infiltrates the system. It is then free to spread across the company’s network by stealing passwords. As it transverses the network and systems, it encrypts files, preventing access until the victims pay the hackers a ransom, typically between $10,000 and $15,000. The low ransom amount has encouraged some victimized organizations to pay the ransom rather than incur the downtime required to wipe and reinitialize their IT systems.

The success of SamSam is due to its effectiveness rather than its sophistication. SamSam can enter and transverse a network without human intervention. Some organizations are learning too late that securing internet-facing services in their data center from attack is just as important as securing endpoints.

The typical steps in a SamSam ransomware attack are:

1
Attackers gain access to vulnerable server
Attackers exploit vulnerable software or weak/stolen credentials.
2
Attack spreads via remote access tools
Attackers harvest credentials, create SOCKS proxies to tunnel traffic, and abuse RDP to install SamSam on more computers in the network.
3
Ransomware payload deployed
Attackers run batch scripts to execute ransomware on compromised machines.
4
Ransomware demand delivered requiring payment to decrypt files
Demand amounts vary from victim to victim. Relatively low ransom amounts appear to be designed to encourage quick payment decisions.

What all the organizations successfully exploited by SamSam have in common is that they were running unpatched servers that made them vulnerable to SamSam. Some organizations had their endpoints and servers backed up, while others did not. Some of those without backups they could use to recover their systems chose to pay the ransom money.

Timeline of SamSam History and Exploits

Since its appearance in 2016, SamSam has been in the news with many successful incursions into healthcare, business, and government institutions.

March 2016
SamSam appears

SamSam campaign targets vulnerable JBoss servers
Attackers hone in on healthcare organizations specifically, as they’re more likely to have unpatched JBoss machines.

April 2016
SamSam finds new targets

SamSam begins targeting schools and government.
After initial success targeting healthcare, attackers branch out to other sectors.

April 2017
New tactics include RDP

Attackers shift to targeting organizations with exposed RDP connections, and maintain focus on healthcare.
An attack on Erie County Medical Center costs the hospital $10 million over three months of recovery.
Erie County Medical Center attacked by SamSam ransomware virus

January 2018
Municipalities attacked

• Attack on Municipality of Farmington, NM.
• Attack on Hancock Health.
Hancock Regional Hospital notice following SamSam attack
• Attack on Adams Memorial Hospital
• Attack on Allscripts (Electronic Health Records), which includes 180,000 physicians, 2,500 hospitals, and 7.2 million patients’ health records.

February 2018
Attack volume increases

• Attack on Davidson County, NC.
• Attack on Colorado Department of Transportation.
SamSam virus notification

March 2018
SamSam shuts down Atlanta

• Second attack on Colorado Department of Transportation.
• City of Atlanta suffers a devastating attack by SamSam.
The attack has far-reaching impacts — crippling the court system, keeping residents from paying their water bills, limiting vital communications like sewer infrastructure requests, and pushing the Atlanta Police Department to file paper reports.
Atlanta Ransomware outage alert
• SamSam campaign nets $325,000 in 4 weeks.
Infections spike as attackers launch new campaigns. Healthcare and government organizations are once again the primary targets.

How to Defend Against SamSam and Other Ransomware Attacks

The best way to respond to a ransomware attack is to avoid having one in the first place. If you are attacked, making sure your valuable data is backed up and unreachable by ransomware infection will ensure that your downtime and data loss will be minimal or none if you ever suffer an attack.

In our previous post, How to Recover From Ransomware, we listed the ten ways to protect your organization from ransomware.

  1. Use anti-virus and anti-malware software or other security policies to block known payloads from launching.
  2. Make frequent, comprehensive backups of all important files and isolate them from local and open networks. Cybersecurity professionals view data backup and recovery (74% in a recent survey) by far as the most effective solution to respond to a successful ransomware attack.
  3. Keep offline backups of data stored in locations inaccessible from any potentially infected computer, such as disconnected external storage drives or the cloud, which prevents them from being accessed by the ransomware.
  4. Install the latest security updates issued by software vendors of your OS and applications. Remember to patch early and patch often to close known vulnerabilities in operating systems, server software, browsers, and web plugins.
  5. Consider deploying security software to protect endpoints, email servers, and network systems from infection.
  6. Exercise cyber hygiene, such as using caution when opening email attachments and links.
  7. Segment your networks to keep critical computers isolated and to prevent the spread of malware in case of attack. Turn off unneeded network shares.
  8. Turn off admin rights for users who don’t require them. Give users the lowest system permissions they need to do their work.
  9. Restrict write permissions on file servers as much as possible.
  10. Educate yourself, your employees, and your family in best practices to keep malware out of your systems. Update everyone on the latest email phishing scams and human engineering aimed at turning victims into abettors.

Please Tell Us About Your Experiences with Ransomware

Have you endured a ransomware attack or have a strategy to avoid becoming a victim? Please tell us of your experiences in the comments.

The post Ransomware Update: Viruses Targeting Business IT Servers appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

QualysGuard – Vulnerability Management Tool

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2018/03/qualysguard-vulnerability-management-tool/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

QualysGuard – Vulnerability Management Tool

QualysGuard is a web-based vulnerability management tool provided by Qualys, Inc, which was the first company to deliver vulnerability management services as a SaaS-based web-service.

From reviews, it seems like a competent tool with a low rate of false positives that is fairly easy to work with and keep the more ‘dangerous’ parts of vulnerability scanning out of the hands of users, but with the flexibility for expert users to do what they need.

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Spectre & Meltdown Checker – Vulnerability Mitigation Tool For Linux

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2018/01/spectre-meltdown-checker-vulnerability-mitigation-tool-linux/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

Spectre & Meltdown Checker – Vulnerability Mitigation Tool For Linux

Spectre & Meltdown Checker is a simple shell script to tell if your Linux installation is vulnerable against the 3 “speculative execution” CVEs that were made public early 2018.

Without options, it’ll inspect you currently running kernel. You can also specify a kernel image on the command line, if you’d like to inspect a kernel you’re not running.

The script will do its best to detect mitigations, including backported non-vanilla patches, regardless of the advertised kernel version number.

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DAST vs SAST – Dynamic Application Security Testing vs Static

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2017/12/dast-vs-sast-dynamic-application-security-testing-vs-static/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

DAST vs SAST – Dynamic Application Security Testing vs Static

In security testing, much like most things technical there are two very contrary methods, Dynamic Application Security Testing or DAST and Static Application Security Testing or SAST.

Dynamic testing relying on a black-box external approach, attacking the application in it’s running state as a regular malicious attacker would.

Static testing is more white-box looking at the source-code of the application for potential flaws.

Personally, I don’t see them as ‘vs’ each other, but more like they compliment each other – it’s easy to have SAST tests as part of your CI/CD pipeline with tools like Code Climate.

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OSSIM Download – Open Source SIEM Tools & Software

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OSSIM Download – Open Source SIEM Tools & Software

OSSIM is a popular Open Source SIEM or Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) product, providing event collection, normalization and correlation.

OSSIM stands for Open Source Security Information Management, it was launched in 2003 by security engineers because of the lack of available open source products, OSSIM was created specifically to address the reality many security professionals face: A SIEM, whether it is open source or commercial, is virtually useless without the basic security controls necessary for security visibility.

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Rapid7 Nexpose Community Edition – Free Vulnerability Scanner

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2017/09/rapid7-nexpose-community-edition-free-vulnerability-scanner/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

Rapid7 Nexpose Community Edition – Free Vulnerability Scanner

Rapid7 Nexpose Community Edition is a free vulnerability scanner & security risk intelligence solution designed for organizations with large networks, prioritize and manage risk effectively.

It proactively supports the entire vulnerability management lifecycle, including discovery, detection, verification, risk classification, impact analysis, reporting and mitigation.

Nexpose Community Edition Features

Data breaches are growing at an alarming rate. Your attack surface is constantly changing, the adversary is becoming more nimble than your security teams, and your board wants to know what you are doing about it.

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FIR (Fast Incident Response) – Cyber Security Incident Management Platform

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FIR (Fast Incident Response) is a cyber security incident management platform designed for agility and speed. It allows for easy creation, tracking, and reporting of cybersecurity incidents. In the fields of computer security and information technology, computer security incident management involves the monitoring and detection of security events…

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CyberChef – Cyber Swiss Army Knife

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CyberChef is a simple, intuitive web app for carrying out all manner of “cyber” operations within a web browser. These operations include simple encoding like XOR or Base64, more complex encryption like AES, DES and Blowfish, creating binary and hexdumps, compression and decompression of data, calculating hashes and checksums, IPv6 and X.509…

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EtherApe – Graphical Network Monitor

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EtherApe is a graphical network monitor for Unix modelled after etherman. Featuring link layer, IP and TCP modes, it displays network activity graphically. Hosts and links change in size with traffic. Colour coded protocols display. It supports Ethernet, FDDI, Token Ring, ISDN, PPP, SLIP and WLAN devices, plus several encapsulation formats. It can…

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maltrail – Malicious Traffic Detection System

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Maltrail is a malicious traffic detection system, utilizing publicly available (black)lists containing malicious and/or generally suspicious trails, along with static trails compiled from various AV reports and custom user-defined lists, where trail can be anything from domain name (e.g. zvpprsensinaix.com for Banjori malware), URL (e.g….

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Massive Acunetix Online Update Brings New Features & UI

Post Syndicated from Darknet original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/darknethackers/~3/09ZZTAFoTSs/

So there’s been a massive Acunetix Online update that has pushed out a brand new UI plus a whole bunch of new features and capabilities, including really powerful stuff for security professionals and organisations who take their security seriously The update has focused a lot on Usability of the UI and features for infosec pros […]

The post…

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yarAnalyzer – Yara Rule Analyzer and Statistics Generator

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yarAnalyzer is a Python-based YARA rule analyzer that can also generate statistics from yara rulesets. It also has an inventory creation feature that can output a CSV file detailing the rules. It creates statistics on a YARA rule set and files in a sample directory. Place some signatures with .yar extension in the “signatures” folder…

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mongoaudit – MongoDB Auditing & Pen-testing Tool

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mongoaudit is a CLI tool for MongoDB auditing of servers, detecting poor security settings and performing automated penetration testing. It is widely known that there are quite a few holes in MongoDB’s default configuration settings. This fact, combined with abundant lazy system administrators and developers, has led to what the press has called…

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You don’t need printer security

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2017/02/you-dont-need-printer-security.html

So there’s this tweet:

What it’s probably refering to is this:

This is an obviously bad idea.

Well, not so “obvious”, so some people have ask me to clarify the situation. After all, without “security”, couldn’t a printer just be added to a botnet of IoT devices?

The answer is this:

Fixing insecurity is almost always better than adding a layer of security.

Adding security is notoriously problematic, for three reasons

  1. Hackers are active attackers. When presented with a barrier in front of an insecurity, they’ll often find ways around that barrier. It’s a common problem with “web application firewalls”, for example.
  2. The security software itself can become a source of vulnerabilities hackers can attack, which has happened frequently in anti-virus and intrusion prevention systems.
  3. Security features are usually snake-oil, sounding great on paper, with with no details, and no independent evaluation, provided to the public.

It’s the last one that’s most important. HP markets features, but there’s no guarantee they work. In particular, similar features in other products have proven not to work in the past.

HP describes its three special features in a brief whitepaper [*]. They aren’t bad, but at the same time, they aren’t particularly good. Windows already offers all these features. Indeed, as far as I know, they are just using Windows as their firmware operating system, and are just slapping an “HP” marketing name onto existing Windows functionality.

HP Sure Start: This refers to the standard feature in almost all devices these days of having a secure boot process. Windows supports this in UEFI boot. Apple’s iPhones work this way, which is why the FBI needed Apple’s help to break into a captured terrorist’s phone. It’s a feature built into most IoT hardware, though most don’t enable it in software.

Whitelisting: Their description sounds like “signed firmware updates”, but if that was they case, they’d call it that. Traditionally, “whitelisting” referred to a different feature, containing a list of hashes for programs that can run on the device. Either way, it’s a pretty common functionality.

Run-time intrusion detection: They have numerous, conflicting descriptions on their website. It may mean scanning memory for signatures of known viruses. It may mean stack cookies. It may mean double-checking kernel modules. Windows does all these things, and it has a tiny benefit on stopping security threats.

As for traditional threats for attacks against printers, none of these really are important. What you need to secure a printer is the ability to disable services you aren’t using (close ports), enable passwords and other access control, and delete files of old print jobs so hackers can’t grab them from the printer. HP has features to address these security problems, but then, so do its competitors.

Lastly, printers should be behind firewalls, not only protected from the Internet, but also segmented from the corporate network, so that only those designed ports, or flows between the printer and print servers, are enabled.

Conclusion

The features HP describes are snake oil. If they worked well, they’d still only address a small part of the spectrum of attacks against printers. And, since there’s no technical details or independent evaluation of the features, they are almost certainly lies.

If HP really cared about security, they’d make their software more secure. They use fuzzing tools like AFL to secure it. They’d enable ASLR and stack cookies. They’d compile C code with run-time buffer overflow checks. Thety’d have a bug bounty program. It’s not something they can easily market, but at least it’d be real.

If you cared about printer security, then do the steps I outline above, especially firewalling printers from the traditional network. Seriously, putting $100 firewall between a VLAN for your printers and the rest of the network is cheap and easy way to do a vast amount of security. If you can’t secure printers this way, buying snake oil features like HP describes won’t help you.

Abbrase – Abbreviated Passphrase Password Generator

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Abbrase is an abbreviated passphrase password generator. An ‘abbrase’ is one of the passwords it produces. It generates a password and a phrase like “phyeigdolrejutt” and “physical eight dollars rejected utterly”. Creating secure passwords is easy. Remembering them is hard. Pwgen makes them memorable though pronounceability. XKCD suggests using a…

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Barnyard2 – Dedicated Spooler for Snort Output

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Barnyard2 is an open source dedicated spooler for Snort output as unified2 binary output files. Its primary use is allowing Snort to write to disk in an efficient manner and leaving the task of parsing binary data into various formats to a separate process that will not cause Snort to miss network traffic. How it […]

The post Barnyard2…

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DBShield – Go Based Database Firewall

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DBShield is a Database Firewall written in Go that has protection for MySQL/MariaDB, Oracle and PostgreSQL databases. It works in a proxy fashion inspecting traffic and dropping abnormal queries after a learning period to populate the internal database with regular queries. Learning mode lets any query pass but it records information about it…

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Minion – Mozilla Security Testing Framework

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Minion is a security testing framework built by Mozilla to bridge the gap between developers and security testers. To do so, it enables developers to scan with a wide variety of security tools, using a simple HTML-based interface. It consists of three umbrella projects: Minion Frontend, a Python, angular.js, and Bootstrap-based website that…

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