All posts by Roger Thornton

Compliance, and why Raspberry Pi 4 may not be available in your country yet

Post Syndicated from Roger Thornton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/compliance-and-why-raspberry-pi-4-may-not-be-available-in-your-country-yet/

In June we launched Raspberry Pi 4, and it has been selling extremely well, with over 1 million devices already made. We launched the product in a select set of countries in June, and ever since, we’ve been steadily making it available in more and more places; currently, Raspberry Pi 4 is on the market in 55 countries.

Raspberry Pi 4 and compliance

There have been many questions around why Raspberry Pi 4 isn’t available in certain countries, and this post will give you some insight into this.

Whenever a company wants to sell a product on a market, it first has to prove that selling it is safe and legal. Compliance requirements vary between different products; rules that would apply to a complicated machine like a car will, naturally, not be the same as those that apply to a pair of trainers (although there is some overlap in the Venn diagram of rules).

Raspberry Pi Integrator Programme

Regions of the world within each of which products have to be separately tested

Different countries usually have slightly different sets of regulations, and testing has to be conducted at an accredited facility for the region the company intends to sell the product in.

Compliance for a country is broken into the following: testing, certification, and marking.

Testing

Compliance testing requirements vary from country to country; there is no single set of tests or approvals that allow you to sell a product globally. Often, it’s necessary to test the product within the country that compliance is needed for; only some countries accept test reports from other countries.

For the launch of Raspberry Pi 4, we tested to EU, FCC (USA), and IC (Canada) regulations, and we’ve used these test reports to apply for compliance in as many countries as possible.

Certification

Once testing is complete, a certificate is issued for the product. The time this takes is variable, and some countries post such certificates online publicly so people can search for products.

Testing in the remaining countries that require testing to happen in-country is now complete, and the respective certificates are being granted for Raspberry Pi 4 right now. However, whilst the certificate is being issued, the product isn’t yet compliant; we need to add the regulatory markings for this to happen.

Marking

Like testing requirements, product marking requirements may differ from country to country. The main difficulty of marking is that many countries require a unique certificate number to be printed on packaging, leaflets, and the product itself.

Some countries, such as the USA, allow companies to create the certificate number themselves (hence jazzy numbers like 2ABCB-RPI4B), and so we can place these on the product before launch. In other countries, however, the certificate number is issued at the end of the certification process.

For Raspberry Pi 4, we are now at the final stage for compliance: marking. All our certificates have been issued, and we are updating the packaging, leaflet, and product with the various certificate numbers needed to unlock the last few countries.

The countries that we have certificates for that require markings to be added: China, South Korea, Brazil, Mexico, Taiwan, Chile, and Japan.

The process is beginning, and Raspberry Pi 4 should be available in these markets soon.

We post all our product compliance information online.

Conclusion

This is a broad overview of the compliance process for Raspberry Pi, and there are some details omitted for the sake of clarity. Compliance is a complex and varied task, but it is very important to demonstrate that Raspberry Pi 4 is a compliant, safe, and trustworthy product.

We aim to make Raspberry Pi 4 available in more countries than ever before, ensuring that everyone can take advantage of the amazing features, power, and cost-effectiveness it offers.

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Help us make it easier for you to design products with Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Roger Thornton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/help-us-make-it-easier-for-you-to-design-products-with-raspberry-pi/

We want to improve the way we support companies that design with Raspberry Pi computers, and we need your help to do it.

Raspberry Pi’s success is thanks to the community that exists around it.  When we launched Raspberry Pi 4, our most powerful computer yet, we gave our community the chance to ask our engineers all about the new product.

A shiny Raspberry Pi 4 on a flat white surface, viewed at an angle

Now we’d like to turn the tables and ask you some questions as we work to improve the support we offer to people and organisations that design using Raspberry Pi.

If you have experience of designing products or industrial solutions that use Raspberry Pi, we would love to hear from you.

Raspberry Pi in products

Raspberry Pi has been used to power products from Compute Module-based industrial controllers made by Kunbus

Three smart, compact orange and grey RevPi Core 3 enclosures mounted on a din rail

…to Raspberry Pi-based washing machines with Raspberry Pi touchscreen displays from Marathon.

Sleek-looking charcoal grey washing machine with a dark red door trim and a large colour display screen

Organisations are increasingly using various kinds of Raspberry Pi computer to power products and solutions, and we want to do more to support designers.

Please help us!

If you have experience as a design consultancy that uses Raspberry Pi computers in products, or if you have used a designer to build a product that includes a Raspberry Pi, we would love to talk to you about it. You will help shape what we offer in the future, and make designing products with Raspberry Pi simple, quick, and powerful.

Get in touch

If you use Raspberry Pi in products or in industrial solutions, I want to talk to you. Please fill in this form with a few details of your experience so we can talk more.

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Introducing the Raspberry Pi TV HAT

Post Syndicated from Roger Thornton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-tv-hat/

Today we are excited to launch a new add-on board for your Raspberry Pi: the Raspberry Pi TV HAT.

A photograph of a Raspberry Pi a TV HAT with aerial lead connected Oct 2018

The TV HAT connects to the 40-pin GPIO header and to a suitable antenna, allowing your Raspberry Pi to receive DVB-T2 television broadcasts.

A photograph of a Raspberry Pi Zero W with TV HAT connected Oct 2018

Watch TV with your Raspberry Pi

With the board, you can receive and view television on a Raspberry Pi, or you can use your Pi as a server to stream television over a network to other devices. The TV HAT works with all 40-pin GPIO Raspberry Pi boards when running as a server. If you want to watch TV on the Pi itself, we recommend using a Pi 2, 3, or 3B+, as you may need more processing power for this.

A photograph of a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ with TV HAT connected Oct 2018

Stream television over your network

Viewing television is not restricted to Raspberry Pi computers: with a TV HAT connected to your network, you can view streams on any network-connected device. That includes other computers, mobile phones, and tablets. You can find instructions for setting up your TV HAT in our step-by-step guide.

A photograph of a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ with TV HAT connected Oct 2018
A photograph of a Raspberry Pi a TV HAT with aerial lead connected Oct 2018
A photograph of a Raspberry Pi Zero W with TV HAT connected Oct 2018

New HAT form factor

The Raspberry Pi TV HAT follows a new form factor of HAT (Hardware Attached on Top), which we are also announcing today. The TV HAT is a half-size HAT that matches the outline of Raspberry Pi Zero boards. A new HAT spec is available now. No features have changed electrically – this is a purely mechanical change.

Raspberry Pi TV HAT mechanical drawing Oct 2018

A mechanical drawing of a Raspberry Pi TV HAT, exemplifying the spec of the new HAT form factor. Click to embiggen.

The TV HAT has three bolt holes; we omitted the fourth so that the HAT can be placed on a large-size Pi without obstructing the display connector.

The board comes with a set of mechanical spacers, a 40-way header, and an aerial adaptor.

A photograph of a Raspberry Pi TV HAT Oct 2018

Licences

Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) is a widely adopted standard for transmitting broadcast television; see countries that have adopted the DVB standard here.

Initially, we will be offering the TV HAT in Europe only. Compliance work is already underway to open other DVB-T2 regions. If you purchase a TV HAT, you must have the appropriate license or approval to receive broadcast television. You can find a list of licenses for Europe here. If in doubt, please contact your local licensing body.

The Raspberry Pi TV HAT opens up some fantastic opportunities for people looking to embed a TV receiver into their networks. Head over to the TV HAT product page to find out where to get hold of yours. We can’t wait to see what you use it for!

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Introducing the PoE HAT – available now!

Post Syndicated from Roger Thornton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/introducing-power-over-ethernet-poe-hat/

In March 2018 we announced the launch of Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+. One of the many features added to the new board was the ability to be powered through Power over Ethernet (PoE) with a HAT. We are really pleased to announce that the PoE HAT is on sale from today.

Raspberry Pi PoE HAT Power over ethernet

The HAT connects to the Raspberry Pi 3+’ 0.1” headers; the 40-way GPIO; and the new 4-pin header near the USB connectors, which allows you to power the system using your Ethernet cable.

Power over Ethernet

Power over Ethernet is a widely adopted standard that places power on the Ethernet cable along with the data. It has no effect on the data, so you won’t lose bandwidth by using PoE. There are various standards of PoE; this HAT uses the most common standard 802.3af, which allows delivery of up to 15W. This means that the HAT is capable of providing all the power needed for running your Raspberry Pi. You will need power sourcing equipment to power your Pi. This is either provided by your network switch or with power injectors on an Ethernet cable.

Raspberry Pi PoE HAT Power over ethernet

Using the PoE HAT

The HAT is a compact, single-sided board that sits within the footprint of the Raspberry Pi. It will fit comfortably inside an official Raspberry Pi case. A small (25mm) fan is pre-installed on the board. We see the product as a useful component for people building systems that may be in tougher environments, so the addition of the fan helps with cooling. The fan is controlled over I2C via a small ATMEL processor which allows for it to be temperature-controlled: when your Raspberry Pi processor hits certain temperatures, the fan will be turned on to cool it down. To enable this you will need to get the latest firmware (sudo rpi-update).

Raspberry Pi PoE HAT Power over ethernet

Because the fan is controlled over I2C, none of the GPIO are used, so you can stack a second HAT on top of the connector. To do this you will need to buy some longer pass-through headers that expose the pins on the other side of the PoE HAT. You will need one for the 40-way and one for the 4-way connector that has the PoE splitters on it.


We’ve tested a variety of pass-through headers and can recommend the 2×20 pin header from Pimoroni and the 4-way risers from RS and element14.

Getting mains power to remote areas of buildings is often tricky. PoE support enables this with just an Ethernet cable, allowing you to provide power (and data) to your Pi wherever it is located. With the improved network booting you can now dispense with not only the power supply but also the SD Card, making deployment even cheaper for a Raspberry Pi based system in your factory or workplace.

Get ahead, get a HAT

We are very excited to see what new projects this enables for you. The Raspberry Pi Power over Ethernet HAT is available for sale now at $20, from Farnell, RS and The Approved Reseller Network.

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Introducing the Raspberry Pi Integrator Programme

Post Syndicated from Roger Thornton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-integrator-programme/

An ever-growing number of companies take advantage of Raspberry Pi technology and use our boards as part of their end products. Raspberry Pis are now essential components of everything from washing machines to underwater exploration vehicles. We love seeing these commercial applications, and are committed to helping bring Raspberry Pi-powered products to market. With this in mind, we are excited to announce our new Raspberry Pi Integrator Programme!

Raspberry Pi Integrator Programme

Product compliance testing

Whenever a company wants to sell a product on a market, it first has to prove that selling it is safe and legal. Compliance requirements vary between different products; rules that would apply to a complicated machine like a car will, naturally, not be the same as those that apply to a pair of trainers (although there is some overlap in the Venn diagram of rules).

Raspberry Pi Integrator Programme

Regions of the world within each of which products have to be separately tested

Different countries usually have slightly different sets of regulations, and testing has to be conducted at an accredited facility for the region the company intends to sell the product in. Companies have to put a vast amount of work into getting their product through compliance testing and certification to meet country-specific requirements. This is especially taxing for smaller enterprises.

Making testing easier

Raspberry Pi has assisted various companies that use Pi technology in their end products through this testing and certification process, and over time it has become clear that we can do even more to help. This realisation led us to work with our compliance testing and certification partner UL to create a system that simplifies and speeds up compliance processes. Thus we have started the Raspberry Pi Integrator Programme, designed to help anyone get their Raspberry Pi-based product tested and on the market quickly and efficiently.

The Raspberry Pi Integrator Programme

The programme provides access to the same test engineers who worked on our Raspberry Pis during their compliance testing. It connects the user to a dedicated team at UL who assess and test the user’s product, facilitated by their in-depth knowledge of Raspberry Pi. The team at UL work closely with the Raspberry Pi engineering team, so any unexpected issues that may arise during testing can be resolved quickly. Through the programme, UL will streamline the testing and certification process, which will in turn decrease the amount of time necessary to launch the product. Our Integrator Programme is openly available, it comes with no added cost beyond the usual testing fees at UL, and there are companies already taking advantage of it.

Get your product on the market more quickly

We have put the Integrator Programme in place in the hope of eliminating the burden of navigating complicated compliance issues and making it easier for companies to bring new, exciting products to consumers. With simplified testing, companies and individuals can get products to market in less time and with lower overhead costs.

The programme is now up and running, and ready to accept new clients. UL and Raspberry Pi hope that it will be an incredibly useful tool for creators of Raspberry Pi-powered commercial products. For more information, please email [email protected].

Powered by Raspberry Pi

As a producer of a Pi-based device, you can also apply to use our ‘Powered by Raspberry Pi’ logo on your product and its packaging. Doing so indicates to customers that a portion of their payment supports the educational work of the Raspberry Pi Foundation.

Powered by Pi Logo

You’ll find more information about the ‘Powered by Raspberry Pi’ logo and our simple approval process for using it here.

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element14 Pi IoT Smarter Spaces Design Challenge

Post Syndicated from Roger Thornton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/element14-pi-iot-smarter-spaces-design-challenge/

Earlier this year, I was asked to be a judge for the element14 Pi IoT Smarter Spaces Design Challenge. It has been fantastic to be involved in a contest where so many brilliant ideas were developed.

The purpose of the competition was to get designers to use a kit of components that included Raspberry Pi, various accessories, and EnOcean products, to take control of the spaces they are in. Spaces could be at home, at work, outdoors, or any other space the designer could think of.

Graphic showing a figure reflected in a mirror as they select breakfast from a menu displayed on its touchscreen surface

Each entrant provided an initial outline of what they wanted to achieve, after which they were given three months to design, build, and implement their system. All the designers have detailed their work fantastically on the element14 website, and if you’re looking for inspiration for your next project I would recommend you read through the entries to this challenge. It has been excellent to see such a great breadth of projects undertaken, all of which had a unique perspective on what “space” was and how it needed to be controlled.

3rd place

Gerrit Polder developed his Plant Health Camera. Gerrit’s project was fantastic, combining regular and NoIR Raspberry Pi Camera Modules with some very interesting software to monitor plant health in real time.

Pi IoT Plant Health Camera Summary

Element14 Pi IoT challenge Plant Health Camera Summary. For info about this project, visit: https://www.element14.com/community/community/design-challenges/pi-iot/blog/2016/08/29/pi-iot-plant-health-camera-11-summary

2nd place

Robin Eggenkamp created a system called Thuis – that’s Danish for “at home”, and is pronounced “thoosh”! Robin presented a comprehensive smart home system that connects to a variety of sensors and features in his home, including a keyless door lock and remote lighting control, and incorporates mood lighting and a home cinema system. He also produced a great video of the system in action.

Thuis app demo

Final demo of the Thuis app

1st place

Overall winner Frederick Vandenbosch constructed his Pi IoT Alarm Clock. Frederick produced a truly impressive set of devices which look fantastic and enable a raft of smart home technologies. The devices used in the system range from IP cameras, to energy monitors that can be dotted around the home, to a small bespoke unit that keeps track of house keys. These are controlled from well-designed hubs: an interactive one that includes a display and keypad, as well as the voice-activated alarm clock. The whole system comes together to provide a truly smart space, and I’d recommend reading Frederick’s blog to find out more.

My entry for element14’s PiIoT Design Challenge

This is my demonstration video for element14’s Pi IoT Design Challenge, sponsored by Duratool and EnOcean, in association with Raspberry Pi. Have feedback on this project? Ideas for another? Let me know in the comments!

Thanks to each and every designer in this competition, and to all the people in the element14 community who have helped make this a great competition to be part of. If you’re interested in taking part in a future design challenge run by element14, they are run regularly with some great topics – and the prizes aren’t bad, either.

I urge everyone to keep on designing, building, experimenting, and creating!

Pi IoT Smarter Spaces Design Challenges Winners Announcement

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