Tag Archives: AssumeRole

Serverless Dynamic Web Pages in AWS: Provisioned with CloudFormation

Post Syndicated from AWS Admin original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/serverless-dynamic-web-pages-in-aws-provisioned-with-cloudformation/

***This blog is authored by Mike Okner of Monsanto, an AWS customer. It originally appeared on the Monsanto company blog. Minor edits were made to the original post.***

Recently, I was looking to create a status page app to monitor a few important internal services. I wanted this app to be as lightweight, reliable, and hassle-free as possible, so using a “serverless” architecture that doesn’t require any patching or other maintenance was quite appealing.

I also don’t deploy anything in a production AWS environment outside of some sort of template (usually CloudFormation) as a rule. I don’t want to have to come back to something I created ad hoc in the console after 6 months and try to recall exactly how I architected all of the resources. I’ll inevitably forget something and create more problems before solving the original one. So building the status page in a template was a requirement.

The Design
I settled on a design using two Lambda functions, both written in Python 3.6.

The first Lambda function makes requests out to a list of important services and writes their current status to a DynamoDB table. This function is executed once per minute via CloudWatch Event Rule.

The second Lambda function reads each service’s status & uptime information from DynamoDB and renders a Jinja template. This function is behind an API Gateway that has been configured to return text/html instead of its default application/json Content-Type.

The CloudFormation Template
AWS provides a Serverless Application Model template transformer to streamline the templating of Lambda + API Gateway designs, but it assumes (like everything else about the API Gateway) that you’re actually serving an API that returns JSON content. So, unfortunately, it won’t work for this use-case because we want to return HTML content. Instead, we’ll have to enumerate every resource like usual.

The Skeleton
We’ll be using YAML for the template in this example. I find it easier to read than JSON, but you can easily convert between the two with a converter if you disagree.

---
AWSTemplateFormatVersion: '2010-09-09'
Description: Serverless status page app
Resources:
  # [...Resources]

The Status-Checker Lambda Resource
This one is triggered on a schedule by CloudWatch, and looks like:

# Status Checker Lambda
CheckerLambda:
  Type: AWS::Lambda::Function
  Properties:
    Code: ./lambda.zip
    Environment:
      Variables:
        TABLE_NAME: !Ref DynamoTable
    Handler: checker.handler
    Role:
      Fn::GetAtt:
      - CheckerLambdaRole
      - Arn
    Runtime: python3.6
    Timeout: 45
CheckerLambdaRole:
  Type: AWS::IAM::Role
  Properties:
    ManagedPolicyArns:
    - arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/AmazonDynamoDBFullAccess
    - arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/service-role/AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole
    AssumeRolePolicyDocument:
      Version: '2012-10-17'
      Statement:
      - Action:
        - sts:AssumeRole
        Effect: Allow
        Principal:
          Service:
          - lambda.amazonaws.com
CheckerLambdaTimer:
  Type: AWS::Events::Rule
  Properties:
    ScheduleExpression: rate(1 minute)
    Targets:
    - Id: CheckerLambdaTimerLambdaTarget
      Arn:
        Fn::GetAtt:
        - CheckerLambda
        - Arn
CheckerLambdaTimerPermission:
  Type: AWS::Lambda::Permission
  Properties:
    Action: lambda:invokeFunction
    FunctionName: !Ref CheckerLambda
    SourceArn:
      Fn::GetAtt:
      - CheckerLambdaTimer
      - Arn
    Principal: events.amazonaws.com

Let’s break that down a bit.

The CheckerLambda is the actual Lambda function. The Code section is a local path to a ZIP file containing the code and its dependencies. I’m using CloudFormation’s packaging feature to automatically push the deployable to S3.

The CheckerLambdaRole is the IAM role the Lambda will assume which grants it access to DynamoDB in addition to the usual Lambda logging permissions.

The CheckerLambdaTimer is the CloudWatch Events Rule that triggers the checker to run once per minute.

The CheckerLambdaTimerPermission grants CloudWatch the ability to invoke the checker Lambda function on its interval.

The Web Page Gateway
The API Gateway handles incoming requests for the web page, invokes the Lambda, and then returns the Lambda’s results as HTML content. Its template looks like:

# API Gateway for Web Page Lambda
PageGateway:
  Type: AWS::ApiGateway::RestApi
  Properties:
    Name: Service Checker Gateway
PageResource:
  Type: AWS::ApiGateway::Resource
  Properties:
    RestApiId: !Ref PageGateway
    ParentId:
      Fn::GetAtt:
      - PageGateway
      - RootResourceId
    PathPart: page
PageGatewayMethod:
  Type: AWS::ApiGateway::Method
  Properties:
    AuthorizationType: NONE
    HttpMethod: GET
    Integration:
      Type: AWS
      IntegrationHttpMethod: POST
      Uri:
        Fn::Sub: arn:aws:apigateway:${AWS::Region}:lambda:path/2015-03-31/functions/${WebRenderLambda.Arn}/invocations
      RequestTemplates:
        application/json: |
          {
              "method": "$context.httpMethod",
              "body" : $input.json('$'),
              "headers": {
                  #foreach($param in $input.params().header.keySet())
                  "$param": "$util.escapeJavaScript($input.params().header.get($param))"
                  #if($foreach.hasNext),#end
                  #end
              }
          }
      IntegrationResponses:
      - StatusCode: 200
        ResponseParameters:
          method.response.header.Content-Type: "'text/html'"
        ResponseTemplates:
          text/html: "$input.path('$')"
    ResourceId: !Ref PageResource
    RestApiId: !Ref PageGateway
    MethodResponses:
    - StatusCode: 200
      ResponseParameters:
        method.response.header.Content-Type: true
PageGatewayProdStage:
  Type: AWS::ApiGateway::Stage
  Properties:
    DeploymentId: !Ref PageGatewayDeployment
    RestApiId: !Ref PageGateway
    StageName: Prod
PageGatewayDeployment:
  Type: AWS::ApiGateway::Deployment
  DependsOn: PageGatewayMethod
  Properties:
    RestApiId: !Ref PageGateway
    Description: PageGateway deployment
    StageName: Stage

There’s a lot going on here, but the real meat is in the PageGatewayMethod section. There are a couple properties that deviate from the default which is why we couldn’t use the SAM transformer.

First, we’re passing request headers through to the Lambda in theRequestTemplates section. I’m doing this so I can validate incoming auth headers. The API Gateway can do some types of auth, but I found it easier to check auth myself in the Lambda function since the Gateway is designed to handle API calls and not browser requests.

Next, note that in the IntegrationResponses section we’re defining the Content-Type header to be ‘text/html’ (with single-quotes) and defining the ResponseTemplate to be $input.path(‘$’). This is what makes the request render as a HTML page in your browser instead of just raw text.

Due to the StageName and PathPart values in the other sections, your actual page will be accessible at https://someId.execute-api.region.amazonaws.com/Prod/page. I have the page behind an existing reverse-proxy and give it a saner URL for end-users. The reverse proxy also attaches the auth header I mentioned above. If that header isn’t present, the Lambda will render an error page instead so the proxy can’t be bypassed.

The Web Page Rendering Lambda
This Lambda is invoked by calls to the API Gateway and looks like:

# Web Page Lambda
WebRenderLambda:
  Type: AWS::Lambda::Function
  Properties:
    Code: ./lambda.zip
    Environment:
      Variables:
        TABLE_NAME: !Ref DynamoTable
    Handler: web.handler
    Role:
      Fn::GetAtt:
      - WebRenderLambdaRole
      - Arn
    Runtime: python3.6
    Timeout: 30
WebRenderLambdaRole:
  Type: AWS::IAM::Role
  Properties:
    ManagedPolicyArns:
    - arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/AmazonDynamoDBReadOnlyAccess
    - arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/service-role/AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole
    AssumeRolePolicyDocument:
      Version: '2012-10-17'
      Statement:
      - Action:
        - sts:AssumeRole
        Effect: Allow
        Principal:
          Service:
          - lambda.amazonaws.com
WebRenderLambdaGatewayPermission:
  Type: AWS::Lambda::Permission
  Properties:
    FunctionName: !Ref WebRenderLambda
    Action: lambda:invokeFunction
    Principal: apigateway.amazonaws.com
    SourceArn:
      Fn::Sub:
      - arn:aws:execute-api:${AWS::Region}:${AWS::AccountId}:${__ApiId__}/*/*/*
      - __ApiId__: !Ref PageGateway

The WebRenderLambda and WebRenderLambdaRole should look familiar.

The WebRenderLambdaGatewayPermission is similar to the Status Checker’s CloudWatch permission, only this time it allows the API Gateway to invoke this Lambda.

The DynamoDB Table
This one is straightforward.

# DynamoDB table
DynamoTable:
  Type: AWS::DynamoDB::Table
  Properties:
    AttributeDefinitions:
    - AttributeName: name
      AttributeType: S
    ProvisionedThroughput:
      WriteCapacityUnits: 1
      ReadCapacityUnits: 1
    TableName: status-page-checker-results
    KeySchema:
    - KeyType: HASH
      AttributeName: name

The Deployment
We’ve made it this far defining every resource in a template that we can check in to version control, so we might as well script the deployment as well rather than manually manage the CloudFormation Stack via the AWS web console.

Since I’m using the packaging feature, I first run:

$ aws cloudformation package \
    --template-file template.yaml \
    --s3-bucket <some-bucket-name> \
    --output-template-file template-packaged.yaml
Uploading to 34cd6e82c5e8205f9b35e71afd9e1548 1922559 / 1922559.0 (100.00%) Successfully packaged artifacts and wrote output template to file template-packaged.yaml.

Then to deploy the template (whether new or modified), I run:

$ aws cloudformation deploy \
    --region '<aws-region>' \
    --template-file template-packaged.yaml \
    --stack-name '<some-name>' \
    --capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM
Waiting for changeset to be created.. Waiting for stack create/update to complete Successfully created/updated stack - <some-name>

And that’s it! You’ve just created a dynamic web page that will never require you to SSH anywhere, patch a server, recover from a disaster after Amazon terminates your unhealthy EC2, or any other number of pitfalls that are now the problem of some ops person at AWS. And you can reproduce deployments and make changes with confidence because everything is defined in the template and can be tracked in version control.

Central Logging in Multi-Account Environments

Post Syndicated from matouk original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/central-logging-in-multi-account-environments/

Centralized logging is often required in large enterprise environments for a number of reasons, ranging from compliance and security to analytics and application-specific needs.

I’ve seen that in a multi-account environment, whether the accounts belong to the same line of business or multiple business units, collecting logs in a central, dedicated logging account is an established best practice. It helps security teams detect malicious activities both in real-time and during incident response. It provides protection to log data in case it is accidentally or intentionally deleted. It also helps application teams correlate and analyze log data across multiple application tiers.

This blog post provides a solution and building blocks to stream Amazon CloudWatch log data across accounts. In a multi-account environment this repeatable solution could be deployed multiple times to stream all relevant Amazon CloudWatch log data from all accounts to a centralized logging account.

Solution Summary 

The solution uses Amazon Kinesis Data Streams and a log destination to set up an endpoint in the logging account to receive streamed logs and uses Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose to deliver log data to the Amazon Simple Storage Solution (S3) bucket. Application accounts will subscribe to stream all (or part) of their Amazon CloudWatch logs to a defined destination in the logging account via subscription filters.

Below is a diagram illustrating how the various services work together.


In logging an account, a Kinesis Data Stream is created to receive streamed log data and a log destination is created to facilitate remote streaming, configured to use the Kinesis Data Stream as its target.

The Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose stream is created to deliver log data from the data stream to S3. The delivery stream uses a generic AWS Lambda function for data validation and transformation.

In each application account, a subscription filter is created between each Amazon CloudWatch log group and the destination created for this log group in the logging account.

The following steps are involved in setting up the central-logging solution:

  1. Create an Amazon S3 bucket for your central logging in the logging account
  2. Create an AWS Lambda function for log data transformation and decoding in logging account
  3. Create a central logging stack as a logging-account destination ready to receive streamed logs and deliver them to S3
  4. Create a subscription in application accounts to deliver logs from a specific CloudWatch log group to the logging account destination
  5. Create Amazon Athena tables to query and analyze log data in your logging account

Creating a log destination in your logging account

In this section, we will setup the logging account side of the solution, providing detail on the list above. The example I use is for the us-east-1 region, however any region where required services are available could be used.

It’s important to note that your logging-account destination and application-account subscription must be in the same region. You can deploy the solution multiple times to create destinations in all required regions if application accounts use multiple regions.

Step 1: Create an S3 bucket

Use the CloudFormation template below to create S3 bucket in logging account. This template also configures the bucket to archive log data to Glacier after 60 days.


{
  "AWSTemplateFormatVersion":"2010-09-09",
  "Description": "CF Template to create S3 bucket for central logging",
  "Parameters":{

    "BucketName":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"",
      "Description":"Central logging bucket name"
    }
  },
  "Resources":{
                        
   "CentralLoggingBucket" : {
      "Type" : "AWS::S3::Bucket",
      "Properties" : {
        "BucketName" : {"Ref": "BucketName"},
        "LifecycleConfiguration": {
            "Rules": [
                {
                  "Id": "ArchiveToGlacier",
                  "Prefix": "",
                  "Status": "Enabled",
                  "Transitions":[{
                      "TransitionInDays": "60",
                      "StorageClass": "GLACIER"
                  }]
                }
            ]
        }
      }
    }

  },
  "Outputs":{
    "CentralLogBucket":{
    	"Description" : "Central log bucket",
    	"Value" : {"Ref": "BucketName"} ,
    	"Export" : { "Name" : "CentralLogBucketName"}
    }
  }
} 

To create your central-logging bucket do the following:

  1. Save the template file to your local developer machine as “central-log-bucket.json”
  2. From the CloudFormation console, select “create new stack” and import the file “central-log-bucket.json”
  3. Fill in the parameters and complete stack creation steps (as indicated in the screenshot below)
  4. Verify the bucket has been created successfully and take a note of the bucket name

Step 2: Create data processing Lambda function

Use the template below to create a Lambda function in your logging account that will be used by Amazon Firehose for data transformation during the delivery process to S3. This function is based on the AWS Lambda kinesis-firehose-cloudwatch-logs-processor blueprint.

The function could be created manually from the blueprint or using the cloudformation template below. To find the blueprint navigate to Lambda -> Create -> Function -> Blueprints

This function will unzip the event message, parse it and verify that it is a valid CloudWatch log event. Additional processing can be added if needed. As this function is generic, it could be reused by all log-delivery streams.

{
  "AWSTemplateFormatVersion":"2010-09-09",
  "Description": "Create cloudwatch data processing lambda function",
  "Resources":{
      
    "LambdaRole": {
        "Type": "AWS::IAM::Role",
        "Properties": {
            "AssumeRolePolicyDocument": {
                "Version": "2012-10-17",
                "Statement": [
                    {
                        "Effect": "Allow",
                        "Principal": {
                            "Service": "lambda.amazonaws.com"
                        },
                        "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
                    }
                ]
            },
            "Path": "/",
            "Policies": [
                {
                    "PolicyName": "firehoseCloudWatchDataProcessing",
                    "PolicyDocument": {
                        "Version": "2012-10-17",
                        "Statement": [
                            {
                                "Effect": "Allow",
                                "Action": [
                                    "logs:CreateLogGroup",
                                    "logs:CreateLogStream",
                                    "logs:PutLogEvents"
                                ],
                                "Resource": "arn:aws:logs:*:*:*"
                            }
                        ]
                    }
                }
            ]
        }
    },
      
    "FirehoseDataProcessingFunction": {
        "Type": "AWS::Lambda::Function",
        "Properties": {
            "Handler": "index.handler",
            "Role": {"Fn::GetAtt": ["LambdaRole","Arn"]},
            "Description": "Firehose cloudwatch data processing",
            "Code": {
                "ZipFile" : { "Fn::Join" : ["\n", [
                  "'use strict';",
                  "const zlib = require('zlib');",
                  "function transformLogEvent(logEvent) {",
                  "       return Promise.resolve(`${logEvent.message}\n`);",
                  "}",
                  "exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {",
                  "    Promise.all(event.records.map(r => {",
                  "        const buffer = new Buffer(r.data, 'base64');",
                  "        const decompressed = zlib.gunzipSync(buffer);",
                  "        const data = JSON.parse(decompressed);",
                  "        if (data.messageType !== 'DATA_MESSAGE') {",
                  "            return Promise.resolve({",
                  "                recordId: r.recordId,",
                  "                result: 'ProcessingFailed',",
                  "            });",
                  "         } else {",
                  "            const promises = data.logEvents.map(transformLogEvent);",
                  "            return Promise.all(promises).then(transformed => {",
                  "                const payload = transformed.reduce((a, v) => a + v, '');",
                  "                const encoded = new Buffer(payload).toString('base64');",
                  "                console.log('---------------payloadv2:'+JSON.stringify(payload, null, 2));",
                  "                return {",
                  "                    recordId: r.recordId,",
                  "                    result: 'Ok',",
                  "                    data: encoded,",
                  "                };",
                  "           });",
                  "        }",
                  "    })).then(recs => callback(null, { records: recs }));",
                    "};"

                ]]}
            },
            "Runtime": "nodejs6.10",
            "Timeout": "60"
        }
    }

  },
  "Outputs":{
   "Function" : {
      "Description": "Function ARN",
      "Value": {"Fn::GetAtt": ["FirehoseDataProcessingFunction","Arn"]},
      "Export" : { "Name" : {"Fn::Sub": "${AWS::StackName}-Function" }}
    }
  }
}

To create the function follow the steps below:

  1. Save the template file as “central-logging-lambda.json”
  2. Login to logging account and, from the CloudFormation console, select “create new stack”
  3. Import the file “central-logging-lambda.json” and click next
  4. Follow the steps to create the stack and verify successful creation
  5. Take a note of Lambda function arn from the output section

Step 3: Create log destination in logging account

Log destination is used as the target of a subscription from application accounts, log destination can be shared between multiple subscriptions however according to the architecture suggested in this solution all logs streamed to the same destination will be stored in the same S3 location, if you would like to store log data in different hierarchy or in a completely different bucket you need to create separate destinations.

As noted previously, your destination and subscription have to be in the same region

Use the template below to create destination stack in logging account.

{
  "AWSTemplateFormatVersion":"2010-09-09",
  "Description": "Create log destination and required resources",
  "Parameters":{

    "LogBucketName":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"central-log-do-not-delete",
      "Description":"Destination logging bucket"
    },
    "LogS3Location":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"<BU>/<ENV>/<SOURCE_ACCOUNT>/<LOG_TYPE>/",
      "Description":"S3 location for the logs streamed to this destination; example marketing/prod/999999999999/flow-logs/"
    },
    "ProcessingLambdaARN":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"",
      "Description":"CloudWatch logs data processing function"
    },
    "SourceAccount":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"",
      "Description":"Source application account number"
    }
  },
    
  "Resources":{
    "MyStream": {
      "Type": "AWS::Kinesis::Stream",
      "Properties": {
        "Name": {"Fn::Join" : [ "", [{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-Stream"] ]},
        "RetentionPeriodHours" : 48,
        "ShardCount": 1,
        "Tags": [
          {
            "Key": "Solution",
            "Value": "CentralLogging"
          }
       ]
      }
    },
    "LogRole" : {
      "Type"  : "AWS::IAM::Role",
      "Properties" : {
          "AssumeRolePolicyDocument" : {
              "Statement" : [ {
                  "Effect" : "Allow",
                  "Principal" : {
                      "Service" : [ {"Fn::Join": [ "", [ "logs.", { "Ref": "AWS::Region" }, ".amazonaws.com" ] ]} ]
                  },
                  "Action" : [ "sts:AssumeRole" ]
              } ]
          },         
          "Path" : "/service-role/"
      }
    },
      
    "LogRolePolicy" : {
        "Type" : "AWS::IAM::Policy",
        "Properties" : {
            "PolicyName" : {"Fn::Join" : [ "", [{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-LogPolicy"] ]},
            "PolicyDocument" : {
              "Version": "2012-10-17",
              "Statement": [
                {
                  "Effect": "Allow",
                  "Action": ["kinesis:PutRecord"],
                  "Resource": [{ "Fn::GetAtt" : ["MyStream", "Arn"] }]
                },
                {
                  "Effect": "Allow",
                  "Action": ["iam:PassRole"],
                  "Resource": [{ "Fn::GetAtt" : ["LogRole", "Arn"] }]
                }
              ]
            },
            "Roles" : [ { "Ref" : "LogRole" } ]
        }
    },
      
    "LogDestination" : {
      "Type" : "AWS::Logs::Destination",
      "DependsOn" : ["MyStream","LogRole","LogRolePolicy"],
      "Properties" : {
        "DestinationName": {"Fn::Join" : [ "", [{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-Destination"] ]},
        "RoleArn": { "Fn::GetAtt" : ["LogRole", "Arn"] },
        "TargetArn": { "Fn::GetAtt" : ["MyStream", "Arn"] },
        "DestinationPolicy": { "Fn::Join" : ["",[
		
				"{\"Version\" : \"2012-10-17\",\"Statement\" : [{\"Effect\" : \"Allow\",",
                " \"Principal\" : {\"AWS\" : \"", {"Ref":"SourceAccount"} ,"\"},",
                "\"Action\" : \"logs:PutSubscriptionFilter\",",
                " \"Resource\" : \"", 
                {"Fn::Join": [ "", [ "arn:aws:logs:", { "Ref": "AWS::Region" }, ":" ,{ "Ref": "AWS::AccountId" }, ":destination:",{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-Destination" ] ]}  ,"\"}]}"

			]]}
          
          
      }
    },
      
    "S3deliveryStream": {
      "DependsOn": ["S3deliveryRole", "S3deliveryPolicy"],
      "Type": "AWS::KinesisFirehose::DeliveryStream",
      "Properties": {
        "DeliveryStreamName": {"Fn::Join" : [ "", [{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-DeliveryStream"] ]},
        "DeliveryStreamType": "KinesisStreamAsSource",
        "KinesisStreamSourceConfiguration": {
            "KinesisStreamARN": { "Fn::GetAtt" : ["MyStream", "Arn"] },
            "RoleARN": {"Fn::GetAtt" : ["S3deliveryRole", "Arn"] }
        },
        "ExtendedS3DestinationConfiguration": {
          "BucketARN": {"Fn::Join" : [ "", ["arn:aws:s3:::",{"Ref":"LogBucketName"}] ]},
          "BufferingHints": {
            "IntervalInSeconds": "60",
            "SizeInMBs": "50"
          },
          "CompressionFormat": "UNCOMPRESSED",
          "Prefix": {"Ref": "LogS3Location"},
          "RoleARN": {"Fn::GetAtt" : ["S3deliveryRole", "Arn"] },
          "ProcessingConfiguration" : {
              "Enabled": "true",
              "Processors": [
              {
                "Parameters": [ 
                { 
                    "ParameterName": "LambdaArn",
                    "ParameterValue": {"Ref":"ProcessingLambdaARN"}
                }],
                "Type": "Lambda"
              }]
          }
        }

      }
    },
      
    "S3deliveryRole": {
      "Type": "AWS::IAM::Role",
      "Properties": {
        "AssumeRolePolicyDocument": {
          "Version": "2012-10-17",
          "Statement": [
            {
              "Sid": "",
              "Effect": "Allow",
              "Principal": {
                "Service": "firehose.amazonaws.com"
              },
              "Action": "sts:AssumeRole",
              "Condition": {
                "StringEquals": {
                  "sts:ExternalId": {"Ref":"AWS::AccountId"}
                }
              }
            }
          ]
        }
      }
    },
      
    "S3deliveryPolicy": {
      "Type": "AWS::IAM::Policy",
      "Properties": {
        "PolicyName": {"Fn::Join" : [ "", [{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-FirehosePolicy"] ]},
        "PolicyDocument": {
          "Version": "2012-10-17",
          "Statement": [
            {
              "Effect": "Allow",
              "Action": [
                "s3:AbortMultipartUpload",
                "s3:GetBucketLocation",
                "s3:GetObject",
                "s3:ListBucket",
                "s3:ListBucketMultipartUploads",
                "s3:PutObject"
              ],
              "Resource": [
                {"Fn::Join": ["", [ {"Fn::Join" : [ "", ["arn:aws:s3:::",{"Ref":"LogBucketName"}] ]}]]},
                {"Fn::Join": ["", [ {"Fn::Join" : [ "", ["arn:aws:s3:::",{"Ref":"LogBucketName"}] ]}, "*"]]}
              ]
            },
            {
              "Effect": "Allow",
              "Action": [
                "lambda:InvokeFunction",
                "lambda:GetFunctionConfiguration",
                "logs:PutLogEvents",
                "kinesis:DescribeStream",
                "kinesis:GetShardIterator",
                "kinesis:GetRecords",
                "kms:Decrypt"
              ],
              "Resource": "*"
            }
          ]
        },
        "Roles": [{"Ref": "S3deliveryRole"}]
      }
    }

  },
  "Outputs":{
      
   "Destination" : {
      "Description": "Destination",
      "Value": {"Fn::Join": [ "", [ "arn:aws:logs:", { "Ref": "AWS::Region" }, ":" ,{ "Ref": "AWS::AccountId" }, ":destination:",{ "Ref" : "AWS::StackName" },"-Destination" ] ]},
      "Export" : { "Name" : {"Fn::Sub": "${AWS::StackName}-Destination" }}
    }

  }
} 

To create log your destination and all required resources, follow these steps:

  1. Save your template as “central-logging-destination.json”
  2. Login to your logging account and, from the CloudFormation console, select “create new stack”
  3. Import the file “central-logging-destination.json” and click next
  4. Fill in the parameters to configure the log destination and click Next
  5. Follow the default steps to create the stack and verify successful creation
    1. Bucket name is the same as in the “create central logging bucket” step
    2. LogS3Location is the directory hierarchy for saving log data that will be delivered to this destination
    3. ProcessingLambdaARN is as created in “create data processing Lambda function” step
    4. SourceAccount is the application account number where the subscription will be created
  6. Take a note of destination ARN as it appears in outputs section as you did above.

Step 4: Create the log subscription in your application account

In this section, we will create the subscription filter in one of the application accounts to stream logs from the CloudWatch log group to the log destination that was created in your logging account.

Create log subscription filter

The subscription filter is created between the CloudWatch log group and a destination endpoint. Asubscription could be filtered to send part (or all) of the logs in the log group. For example,you can create a subscription filter to stream only flow logs with status REJECT.

Use the CloudFormation template below to create subscription filter. Subscription filter and log destination must be in the same region.

{
  "AWSTemplateFormatVersion":"2010-09-09",
  "Description": "Create log subscription filter for a specific Log Group",
  "Parameters":{

    "DestinationARN":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"",
      "Description":"ARN of logs destination"
    },
    "LogGroupName":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"",
      "Description":"Name of LogGroup to forward logs from"
    },
    "FilterPattern":{
      "Type":"String",
      "Default":"",
      "Description":"Filter pattern to filter events to be sent to log destination; Leave empty to send all logs"
    }
  },
    
  "Resources":{
    "SubscriptionFilter" : {
      "Type" : "AWS::Logs::SubscriptionFilter",
      "Properties" : {
        "LogGroupName" : { "Ref" : "LogGroupName" },
        "FilterPattern" : { "Ref" : "FilterPattern" },
        "DestinationArn" : { "Ref" : "DestinationARN" }
      }
    }
  }
}

To create a subscription filter for one of CloudWatch log groups in your application account, follow the steps below:

  1. Save the template as “central-logging-subscription.json”
  2. Login to your application account and, from the CloudFormation console, select “create new stack”
  3. Select the file “central-logging-subscription.json” and click next
  4. Fill in the parameters as appropriate to your environment as you did above
    a.  DestinationARN is the value of obtained in “create log destination in logging account” step
    b.  FilterPatterns is the filter value for log data to be streamed to your logging account (leave empty to stream all logs in the selected log group)
    c.  LogGroupName is the log group as it appears under CloudWatch Logs
  5. Verify successful creation of the subscription

This completes the deployment process in both the logging- and application-account side. After a few minutes, log data will be streamed to the central-logging destination defined in your logging account.

Step 5: Analyzing log data

Once log data is centralized, it opens the door to run analytics on the consolidated data for business or security reasons. One of the powerful services that AWS offers is Amazon Athena.

Amazon Athena allows you to query data in S3 using standard SQL.

Follow the steps below to create a simple table and run queries on the flow logs data that has been collected from your application accounts

  1. Login to your logging account and from the Amazon Athena console, use the DDL below in your query  editor to create a new table

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE IF NOT EXISTS prod_vpc_flow_logs (

Version INT,

Account STRING,

InterfaceId STRING,

SourceAddress STRING,

DestinationAddress STRING,

SourcePort INT,

DestinationPort INT,

Protocol INT,

Packets INT,

Bytes INT,

StartTime INT,

EndTime INT,

Action STRING,

LogStatus STRING

)

ROW FORMAT SERDE ‘org.apache.hadoop.hive.serde2.RegexSerDe’

WITH SERDEPROPERTIES (

“input.regex” = “^([^ ]+)\\s+([0-9]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([0-9]+)\\s+([0-9]+)\\s+([^ ]+)\\s+([^ ]+)$”)

LOCATION ‘s3://central-logging-company-do-not-delete/’;

2. Click ”run query” and verify a successful run/ This creates the table “prod_vpc_flow_logs”

3. You can then run queries against the table data as below:

Conclusion

By following the steps I’ve outlined, you will build a central logging solution to stream CloudWatch logs from one application account to a central logging account. This solution is repeatable and could be deployed multiple times for multiple accounts and logging requirements.

 

About the Author

Mahmoud Matouk is a Senior Cloud Infrastructure Architect. He works with our customers to help accelerate migration and cloud adoption at the enterprise level.

 

How to Patch Linux Workloads on AWS

Post Syndicated from Koen van Blijderveen original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-patch-linux-workloads-on-aws/

Most malware tries to compromise your systems by using a known vulnerability that the operating system maker has already patched. As best practices to help prevent malware from affecting your systems, you should apply all operating system patches and actively monitor your systems for missing patches.

In this blog post, I show you how to patch Linux workloads using AWS Systems Manager. To accomplish this, I will show you how to use the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) to:

  1. Launch an Amazon EC2 instance for use with Systems Manager.
  2. Configure Systems Manager to patch your Amazon EC2 Linux instances.

In two previous blog posts (Part 1 and Part 2), I showed how to use the AWS Management Console to perform the necessary steps to patch, inspect, and protect Microsoft Windows workloads. You can implement those same processes for your Linux instances running in AWS by changing the instance tags and types shown in the previous blog posts.

Because most Linux system administrators are more familiar with using a command line, I show how to patch Linux workloads by using the AWS CLI in this blog post. The steps to use the Amazon EBS Snapshot Scheduler and Amazon Inspector are identical for both Microsoft Windows and Linux.

What you should know first

To follow along with the solution in this post, you need one or more Amazon EC2 instances. You may use existing instances or create new instances. For this post, I assume this is an Amazon EC2 for Amazon Linux instance installed from Amazon Machine Images (AMIs).

Systems Manager is a collection of capabilities that helps you automate management tasks for AWS-hosted instances on Amazon EC2 and your on-premises servers. In this post, I use Systems Manager for two purposes: to run remote commands and apply operating system patches. To learn about the full capabilities of Systems Manager, see What Is AWS Systems Manager?

As of Amazon Linux 2017.09, the AMI comes preinstalled with the Systems Manager agent. Systems Manager Patch Manager also supports Red Hat and Ubuntu. To install the agent on these Linux distributions or an older version of Amazon Linux, see Installing and Configuring SSM Agent on Linux Instances.

If you are not familiar with how to launch an Amazon EC2 instance, see Launching an Instance. I also assume you launched or will launch your instance in a private subnet. You must make sure that the Amazon EC2 instance can connect to the internet using a network address translation (NAT) instance or NAT gateway to communicate with Systems Manager. The following diagram shows how you should structure your VPC.

Diagram showing how to structure your VPC

Later in this post, you will assign tasks to a maintenance window to patch your instances with Systems Manager. To do this, the IAM user you are using for this post must have the iam:PassRole permission. This permission allows the IAM user assigning tasks to pass his own IAM permissions to the AWS service. In this example, when you assign a task to a maintenance window, IAM passes your credentials to Systems Manager. You also should authorize your IAM user to use Amazon EC2 and Systems Manager. As mentioned before, you will be using the AWS CLI for most of the steps in this blog post. Our documentation shows you how to get started with the AWS CLI. Make sure you have the AWS CLI installed and configured with an AWS access key and secret access key that belong to an IAM user that have the following AWS managed policies attached to the IAM user you are using for this example: AmazonEC2FullAccess and AmazonSSMFullAccess.

Step 1: Launch an Amazon EC2 Linux instance

In this section, I show you how to launch an Amazon EC2 instance so that you can use Systems Manager with the instance. This step requires you to do three things:

  1. Create an IAM role for Systems Manager before launching your Amazon EC2 instance.
  2. Launch your Amazon EC2 instance with Amazon EBS and the IAM role for Systems Manager.
  3. Add tags to the instances so that you can add your instances to a Systems Manager maintenance window based on tags.

A. Create an IAM role for Systems Manager

Before launching an Amazon EC2 instance, I recommend that you first create an IAM role for Systems Manager, which you will use to update the Amazon EC2 instance. AWS already provides a preconfigured policy that you can use for the new role and it is called AmazonEC2RoleforSSM.

  1. Create a JSON file named trustpolicy-ec2ssm.json that contains the following trust policy. This policy describes which principal (an entity that can take action on an AWS resource) is allowed to assume the role we are going to create. In this example, the principal is the Amazon EC2 service.
    {
      "Version": "2012-10-17",
      "Statement": {
        "Effect": "Allow",
        "Principal": {"Service": "ec2.amazonaws.com"},
        "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
      }
    }

  1. Use the following command to create a role named EC2SSM that has the AWS managed policy AmazonEC2RoleforSSM attached to it. This generates JSON-based output that describes the role and its parameters, if the command is successful.
    $ aws iam create-role --role-name EC2SSM --assume-role-policy-document file://trustpolicy-ec2ssm.json

  1. Use the following command to attach the AWS managed IAM policy (AmazonEC2RoleforSSM) to your newly created role.
    $ aws iam attach-role-policy --role-name EC2SSM --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/service-role/AmazonEC2RoleforSSM

  1. Use the following commands to create the IAM instance profile and add the role to the instance profile. The instance profile is needed to attach the role we created earlier to your Amazon EC2 instance.
    $ aws iam create-instance-profile --instance-profile-name EC2SSM-IP
    $ aws iam add-role-to-instance-profile --instance-profile-name EC2SSM-IP --role-name EC2SSM

B. Launch your Amazon EC2 instance

To follow along, you need an Amazon EC2 instance that is running Amazon Linux. You can use any existing instance you may have or create a new instance.

When launching a new Amazon EC2 instance, be sure that:

  1. Use the following command to launch a new Amazon EC2 instance using an Amazon Linux AMI available in the US East (N. Virginia) Region (also known as us-east-1). Replace YourKeyPair and YourSubnetId with your information. For more information about creating a key pair, see the create-key-pair documentation. Write down the InstanceId that is in the output because you will need it later in this post.
    $ aws ec2 run-instances --image-id ami-cb9ec1b1 --instance-type t2.micro --key-name YourKeyPair --subnet-id YourSubnetId --iam-instance-profile Name=EC2SSM-IP

  1. If you are using an existing Amazon EC2 instance, you can use the following command to attach the instance profile you created earlier to your instance.
    $ aws ec2 associate-iam-instance-profile --instance-id YourInstanceId --iam-instance-profile Name=EC2SSM-IP

C. Add tags

The final step of configuring your Amazon EC2 instances is to add tags. You will use these tags to configure Systems Manager in Step 2 of this post. For this example, I add a tag named Patch Group and set the value to Linux Servers. I could have other groups of Amazon EC2 instances that I treat differently by having the same tag name but a different tag value. For example, I might have a collection of other servers with the tag name Patch Group with a value of Web Servers.

  • Use the following command to add the Patch Group tag to your Amazon EC2 instance.
    $ aws ec2 create-tags --resources YourInstanceId --tags --tags Key="Patch Group",Value="Linux Servers"

Note: You must wait a few minutes until the Amazon EC2 instance is available before you can proceed to the next section. To make sure your Amazon EC2 instance is online and ready, you can use the following AWS CLI command:

$ aws ec2 describe-instance-status --instance-ids YourInstanceId

At this point, you now have at least one Amazon EC2 instance you can use to configure Systems Manager.

Step 2: Configure Systems Manager

In this section, I show you how to configure and use Systems Manager to apply operating system patches to your Amazon EC2 instances, and how to manage patch compliance.

To start, I provide some background information about Systems Manager. Then, I cover how to:

  1. Create the Systems Manager IAM role so that Systems Manager is able to perform patch operations.
  2. Create a Systems Manager patch baseline and associate it with your instance to define which patches Systems Manager should apply.
  3. Define a maintenance window to make sure Systems Manager patches your instance when you tell it to.
  4. Monitor patch compliance to verify the patch state of your instances.

You must meet two prerequisites to use Systems Manager to apply operating system patches. First, you must attach the IAM role you created in the previous section, EC2SSM, to your Amazon EC2 instance. Second, you must install the Systems Manager agent on your Amazon EC2 instance. If you have used a recent Amazon Linux AMI, Amazon has already installed the Systems Manager agent on your Amazon EC2 instance. You can confirm this by logging in to an Amazon EC2 instance and checking the Systems Manager agent log files that are located at /var/log/amazon/ssm/.

To install the Systems Manager agent on an instance that does not have the agent preinstalled or if you want to use the Systems Manager agent on your on-premises servers, see Installing and Configuring the Systems Manager Agent on Linux Instances. If you forgot to attach the newly created role when launching your Amazon EC2 instance or if you want to attach the role to already running Amazon EC2 instances, see Attach an AWS IAM Role to an Existing Amazon EC2 Instance by Using the AWS CLI or use the AWS Management Console.

A. Create the Systems Manager IAM role

For a maintenance window to be able to run any tasks, you must create a new role for Systems Manager. This role is a different kind of role than the one you created earlier: this role will be used by Systems Manager instead of Amazon EC2. Earlier, you created the role, EC2SSM, with the policy, AmazonEC2RoleforSSM, which allowed the Systems Manager agent on your instance to communicate with Systems Manager. In this section, you need a new role with the policy, AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole, so that the Systems Manager service can execute commands on your instance.

To create the new IAM role for Systems Manager:

  1. Create a JSON file named trustpolicy-maintenancewindowrole.json that contains the following trust policy. This policy describes which principal is allowed to assume the role you are going to create. This trust policy allows not only Amazon EC2 to assume this role, but also Systems Manager.
    {
       "Version":"2012-10-17",
       "Statement":[
          {
             "Sid":"",
             "Effect":"Allow",
             "Principal":{
                "Service":[
                   "ec2.amazonaws.com",
                   "ssm.amazonaws.com"
               ]
             },
             "Action":"sts:AssumeRole"
          }
       ]
    }

  1. Use the following command to create a role named MaintenanceWindowRole that has the AWS managed policy, AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole, attached to it. This command generates JSON-based output that describes the role and its parameters, if the command is successful.
    $ aws iam create-role --role-name MaintenanceWindowRole --assume-role-policy-document file://trustpolicy-maintenancewindowrole.json

  1. Use the following command to attach the AWS managed IAM policy (AmazonEC2RoleforSSM) to your newly created role.
    $ aws iam attach-role-policy --role-name MaintenanceWindowRole --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/service-role/AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole

B. Create a Systems Manager patch baseline and associate it with your instance

Next, you will create a Systems Manager patch baseline and associate it with your Amazon EC2 instance. A patch baseline defines which patches Systems Manager should apply to your instance. Before you can associate the patch baseline with your instance, though, you must determine if Systems Manager recognizes your Amazon EC2 instance. Use the following command to list all instances managed by Systems Manager. The --filters option ensures you look only for your newly created Amazon EC2 instance.

$ aws ssm describe-instance-information --filters Key=InstanceIds,Values= YourInstanceId

{
    "InstanceInformationList": [
        {
            "IsLatestVersion": true,
            "ComputerName": "ip-10-50-2-245",
            "PingStatus": "Online",
            "InstanceId": "YourInstanceId",
            "IPAddress": "10.50.2.245",
            "ResourceType": "EC2Instance",
            "AgentVersion": "2.2.120.0",
            "PlatformVersion": "2017.09",
            "PlatformName": "Amazon Linux AMI",
            "PlatformType": "Linux",
            "LastPingDateTime": 1515759143.826
        }
    ]
}

If your instance is missing from the list, verify that:

  1. Your instance is running.
  2. You attached the Systems Manager IAM role, EC2SSM.
  3. You deployed a NAT gateway in your public subnet to ensure your VPC reflects the diagram shown earlier in this post so that the Systems Manager agent can connect to the Systems Manager internet endpoint.
  4. The Systems Manager agent logs don’t include any unaddressed errors.

Now that you have checked that Systems Manager can manage your Amazon EC2 instance, it is time to create a patch baseline. With a patch baseline, you define which patches are approved to be installed on all Amazon EC2 instances associated with the patch baseline. The Patch Group resource tag you defined earlier will determine to which patch group an instance belongs. If you do not specifically define a patch baseline, the default AWS-managed patch baseline is used.

To create a patch baseline:

  1. Use the following command to create a patch baseline named AmazonLinuxServers. With approval rules, you can determine the approved patches that will be included in your patch baseline. In this example, you add all Critical severity patches to the patch baseline as soon as they are released, by setting the Auto approval delay to 0 days. By setting the Auto approval delay to 2 days, you add to this patch baseline the Important, Medium, and Low severity patches two days after they are released.
    $ aws ssm create-patch-baseline --name "AmazonLinuxServers" --description "Baseline containing all updates for Amazon Linux" --operating-system AMAZON_LINUX --approval-rules "PatchRules=[{PatchFilterGroup={PatchFilters=[{Values=[Critical],Key=SEVERITY}]},ApproveAfterDays=0,ComplianceLevel=CRITICAL},{PatchFilterGroup={PatchFilters=[{Values=[Important,Medium,Low],Key=SEVERITY}]},ApproveAfterDays=2,ComplianceLevel=HIGH}]"
    
    {
        "BaselineId": "YourBaselineId"
    }

  1. Use the following command to register the patch baseline you created with your instance. To do so, you use the Patch Group tag that you added to your Amazon EC2 instance.
    $ aws ssm register-patch-baseline-for-patch-group --baseline-id YourPatchBaselineId --patch-group "Linux Servers"
    
    {
        "PatchGroup": "Linux Servers",
        "BaselineId": "YourBaselineId"
    }

C.  Define a maintenance window

Now that you have successfully set up a role, created a patch baseline, and registered your Amazon EC2 instance with your patch baseline, you will define a maintenance window so that you can control when your Amazon EC2 instances will receive patches. By creating multiple maintenance windows and assigning them to different patch groups, you can make sure your Amazon EC2 instances do not all reboot at the same time.

To define a maintenance window:

  1. Use the following command to define a maintenance window. In this example command, the maintenance window will start every Saturday at 10:00 P.M. UTC. It will have a duration of 4 hours and will not start any new tasks 1 hour before the end of the maintenance window.
    $ aws ssm create-maintenance-window --name SaturdayNight --schedule "cron(0 0 22 ? * SAT *)" --duration 4 --cutoff 1 --allow-unassociated-targets
    
    {
        "WindowId": "YourMaintenanceWindowId"
    }

For more information about defining a cron-based schedule for maintenance windows, see Cron and Rate Expressions for Maintenance Windows.

  1. After defining the maintenance window, you must register the Amazon EC2 instance with the maintenance window so that Systems Manager knows which Amazon EC2 instance it should patch in this maintenance window. You can register the instance by using the same Patch Group tag you used to associate the Amazon EC2 instance with the AWS-provided patch baseline, as shown in the following command.
    $ aws ssm register-target-with-maintenance-window --window-id YourMaintenanceWindowId --resource-type INSTANCE --targets "Key=tag:Patch Group,Values=Linux Servers"
    
    {
        "WindowTargetId": "YourWindowTargetId"
    }

  1. Assign a task to the maintenance window that will install the operating system patches on your Amazon EC2 instance. The following command includes the following options.
    1. name is the name of your task and is optional. I named mine Patching.
    2. task-arn is the name of the task document you want to run.
    3. max-concurrency allows you to specify how many of your Amazon EC2 instances Systems Manager should patch at the same time. max-errors determines when Systems Manager should abort the task. For patching, this number should not be too low, because you do not want your entire patch task to stop on all instances if one instance fails. You can set this, for example, to 20%.
    4. service-role-arn is the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole role you created earlier in this blog post.
    5. task-invocation-parameters defines the parameters that are specific to the AWS-RunPatchBaseline task document and tells Systems Manager that you want to install patches with a timeout of 600 seconds (10 minutes).
      $ aws ssm register-task-with-maintenance-window --name "Patching" --window-id "YourMaintenanceWindowId" --targets "Key=WindowTargetIds,Values=YourWindowTargetId" --task-arn AWS-RunPatchBaseline --service-role-arn "arn:aws:iam::123456789012:role/MaintenanceWindowRole" --task-type "RUN_COMMAND" --task-invocation-parameters "RunCommand={Comment=,TimeoutSeconds=600,Parameters={SnapshotId=[''],Operation=[Install]}}" --max-concurrency "500" --max-errors "20%"
      
      {
          "WindowTaskId": "YourWindowTaskId"
      }

Now, you must wait for the maintenance window to run at least once according to the schedule you defined earlier. If your maintenance window has expired, you can check the status of any maintenance tasks Systems Manager has performed by using the following command.

$ aws ssm describe-maintenance-window-executions --window-id "YourMaintenanceWindowId"

{
    "WindowExecutions": [
        {
            "Status": "SUCCESS",
            "WindowId": "YourMaintenanceWindowId",
            "WindowExecutionId": "b594984b-430e-4ffa-a44c-a2e171de9dd3",
            "EndTime": 1515766467.487,
            "StartTime": 1515766457.691
        }
    ]
}

D.  Monitor patch compliance

You also can see the overall patch compliance of all Amazon EC2 instances using the following command in the AWS CLI.

$ aws ssm list-compliance-summaries

This command shows you the number of instances that are compliant with each category and the number of instances that are not in JSON format.

You also can see overall patch compliance by choosing Compliance under Insights in the navigation pane of the Systems Manager console. You will see a visual representation of how many Amazon EC2 instances are up to date, how many Amazon EC2 instances are noncompliant, and how many Amazon EC2 instances are compliant in relation to the earlier defined patch baseline.

Screenshot of the Compliance page of the Systems Manager console

In this section, you have set everything up for patch management on your instance. Now you know how to patch your Amazon EC2 instance in a controlled manner and how to check if your Amazon EC2 instance is compliant with the patch baseline you have defined. Of course, I recommend that you apply these steps to all Amazon EC2 instances you manage.

Summary

In this blog post, I showed how to use Systems Manager to create a patch baseline and maintenance window to keep your Amazon EC2 Linux instances up to date with the latest security patches. Remember that by creating multiple maintenance windows and assigning them to different patch groups, you can make sure your Amazon EC2 instances do not all reboot at the same time.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing any part of this solution, start a new thread on the Amazon EC2 forum or contact AWS Support.

– Koen

Sharing Secrets with AWS Lambda Using AWS Systems Manager Parameter Store

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/sharing-secrets-with-aws-lambda-using-aws-systems-manager-parameter-store/

This post courtesy of Roberto Iturralde, Sr. Application Developer- AWS Professional Services

Application architects are faced with key decisions throughout the process of designing and implementing their systems. One decision common to nearly all solutions is how to manage the storage and access rights of application configuration. Shared configuration should be stored centrally and securely with each system component having access only to the properties that it needs for functioning.

With AWS Systems Manager Parameter Store, developers have access to central, secure, durable, and highly available storage for application configuration and secrets. Parameter Store also integrates with AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), allowing fine-grained access control to individual parameters or branches of a hierarchical tree.

This post demonstrates how to create and access shared configurations in Parameter Store from AWS Lambda. Both encrypted and plaintext parameter values are stored with only the Lambda function having permissions to decrypt the secrets. You also use AWS X-Ray to profile the function.

Solution overview

This example is made up of the following components:

  • An AWS SAM template that defines:
    • A Lambda function and its permissions
    • An unencrypted Parameter Store parameter that the Lambda function loads
    • A KMS key that only the Lambda function can access. You use this key to create an encrypted parameter later.
  • Lambda function code in Python 3.6 that demonstrates how to load values from Parameter Store at function initialization for reuse across invocations.

Launch the AWS SAM template

To create the resources shown in this post, you can download the SAM template or choose the button to launch the stack. The template requires one parameter, an IAM user name, which is the name of the IAM user to be the admin of the KMS key that you create. In order to perform the steps listed in this post, this IAM user will need permissions to execute Lambda functions, create Parameter Store parameters, administer keys in KMS, and view the X-Ray console. If you have these privileges in your IAM user account you can use your own account to complete the walkthrough. You can not use the root user to administer the KMS keys.

SAM template resources

The following sections show the code for the resources defined in the template.
Lambda function

ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev:
    Type: 'AWS::Serverless::Function'
    Properties:
      FunctionName: 'ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev'
      Description: 'Integrating lambda with Parameter Store'
      Handler: 'lambda_function.lambda_handler'
      Role: !GetAtt ParameterStoreBlogFunctionRoleDev.Arn
      CodeUri: './code'
      Environment:
        Variables:
          ENV: 'dev'
          APP_CONFIG_PATH: 'parameterStoreBlog'
          AWS_XRAY_TRACING_NAME: 'ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev'
      Runtime: 'python3.6'
      Timeout: 5
      Tracing: 'Active'

  ParameterStoreBlogFunctionRoleDev:
    Type: AWS::IAM::Role
    Properties:
      AssumeRolePolicyDocument:
        Version: '2012-10-17'
        Statement:
          -
            Effect: Allow
            Principal:
              Service:
                - 'lambda.amazonaws.com'
            Action:
              - 'sts:AssumeRole'
      ManagedPolicyArns:
        - 'arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/service-role/AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole'
      Policies:
        -
          PolicyName: 'ParameterStoreBlogDevParameterAccess'
          PolicyDocument:
            Version: '2012-10-17'
            Statement:
              -
                Effect: Allow
                Action:
                  - 'ssm:GetParameter*'
                Resource: !Sub 'arn:aws:ssm:${AWS::Region}:${AWS::AccountId}:parameter/dev/parameterStoreBlog*'
        -
          PolicyName: 'ParameterStoreBlogDevXRayAccess'
          PolicyDocument:
            Version: '2012-10-17'
            Statement:
              -
                Effect: Allow
                Action:
                  - 'xray:PutTraceSegments'
                  - 'xray:PutTelemetryRecords'
                Resource: '*'

In this YAML code, you define a Lambda function named ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev using the SAM AWS::Serverless::Function type. The environment variables for this function include the ENV (dev) and the APP_CONFIG_PATH where you find the configuration for this app in Parameter Store. X-Ray tracing is also enabled for profiling later.

The IAM role for this function extends the AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole by adding IAM policies that grant the function permissions to write to X-Ray and get parameters from Parameter Store, limited to paths under /dev/parameterStoreBlog*.
Parameter Store parameter

SimpleParameter:
    Type: AWS::SSM::Parameter
    Properties:
      Name: '/dev/parameterStoreBlog/appConfig'
      Description: 'Sample dev config values for my app'
      Type: String
      Value: '{"key1": "value1","key2": "value2","key3": "value3"}'

This YAML code creates a plaintext string parameter in Parameter Store in a path that your Lambda function can access.
KMS encryption key

ParameterStoreBlogDevEncryptionKeyAlias:
    Type: AWS::KMS::Alias
    Properties:
      AliasName: 'alias/ParameterStoreBlogKeyDev'
      TargetKeyId: !Ref ParameterStoreBlogDevEncryptionKey

  ParameterStoreBlogDevEncryptionKey:
    Type: AWS::KMS::Key
    Properties:
      Description: 'Encryption key for secret config values for the Parameter Store blog post'
      Enabled: True
      EnableKeyRotation: False
      KeyPolicy:
        Version: '2012-10-17'
        Id: 'key-default-1'
        Statement:
          -
            Sid: 'Allow administration of the key & encryption of new values'
            Effect: Allow
            Principal:
              AWS:
                - !Sub 'arn:aws:iam::${AWS::AccountId}:user/${IAMUsername}'
            Action:
              - 'kms:Create*'
              - 'kms:Encrypt'
              - 'kms:Describe*'
              - 'kms:Enable*'
              - 'kms:List*'
              - 'kms:Put*'
              - 'kms:Update*'
              - 'kms:Revoke*'
              - 'kms:Disable*'
              - 'kms:Get*'
              - 'kms:Delete*'
              - 'kms:ScheduleKeyDeletion'
              - 'kms:CancelKeyDeletion'
            Resource: '*'
          -
            Sid: 'Allow use of the key'
            Effect: Allow
            Principal:
              AWS: !GetAtt ParameterStoreBlogFunctionRoleDev.Arn
            Action:
              - 'kms:Encrypt'
              - 'kms:Decrypt'
              - 'kms:ReEncrypt*'
              - 'kms:GenerateDataKey*'
              - 'kms:DescribeKey'
            Resource: '*'

This YAML code creates an encryption key with a key policy with two statements.

The first statement allows a given user (${IAMUsername}) to administer the key. Importantly, this includes the ability to encrypt values using this key and disable or delete this key, but does not allow the administrator to decrypt values that were encrypted with this key.

The second statement grants your Lambda function permission to encrypt and decrypt values using this key. The alias for this key in KMS is ParameterStoreBlogKeyDev, which is how you reference it later.

Lambda function

Here I walk you through the Lambda function code.

import os, traceback, json, configparser, boto3
from aws_xray_sdk.core import patch_all
patch_all()

# Initialize boto3 client at global scope for connection reuse
client = boto3.client('ssm')
env = os.environ['ENV']
app_config_path = os.environ['APP_CONFIG_PATH']
full_config_path = '/' + env + '/' + app_config_path
# Initialize app at global scope for reuse across invocations
app = None

class MyApp:
    def __init__(self, config):
        """
        Construct new MyApp with configuration
        :param config: application configuration
        """
        self.config = config

    def get_config(self):
        return self.config

def load_config(ssm_parameter_path):
    """
    Load configparser from config stored in SSM Parameter Store
    :param ssm_parameter_path: Path to app config in SSM Parameter Store
    :return: ConfigParser holding loaded config
    """
    configuration = configparser.ConfigParser()
    try:
        # Get all parameters for this app
        param_details = client.get_parameters_by_path(
            Path=ssm_parameter_path,
            Recursive=False,
            WithDecryption=True
        )

        # Loop through the returned parameters and populate the ConfigParser
        if 'Parameters' in param_details and len(param_details.get('Parameters')) > 0:
            for param in param_details.get('Parameters'):
                param_path_array = param.get('Name').split("/")
                section_position = len(param_path_array) - 1
                section_name = param_path_array[section_position]
                config_values = json.loads(param.get('Value'))
                config_dict = {section_name: config_values}
                print("Found configuration: " + str(config_dict))
                configuration.read_dict(config_dict)

    except:
        print("Encountered an error loading config from SSM.")
        traceback.print_exc()
    finally:
        return configuration

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    global app
    # Initialize app if it doesn't yet exist
    if app is None:
        print("Loading config and creating new MyApp...")
        config = load_config(full_config_path)
        app = MyApp(config)

    return "MyApp config is " + str(app.get_config()._sections)

Beneath the import statements, you import the patch_all function from the AWS X-Ray library, which you use to patch boto3 to create X-Ray segments for all your boto3 operations.

Next, you create a boto3 SSM client at the global scope for reuse across function invocations, following Lambda best practices. Using the function environment variables, you assemble the path where you expect to find your configuration in Parameter Store. The class MyApp is meant to serve as an example of an application that would need its configuration injected at construction. In this example, you create an instance of ConfigParser, a class in Python’s standard library for handling basic configurations, to give to MyApp.

The load_config function loads the all the parameters from Parameter Store at the level immediately beneath the path provided in the Lambda function environment variables. Each parameter found is put into a new section in ConfigParser. The name of the section is the name of the parameter, less the base path. In this example, the full parameter name is /dev/parameterStoreBlog/appConfig, which is put in a section named appConfig.

Finally, the lambda_handler function initializes an instance of MyApp if it doesn’t already exist, constructing it with the loaded configuration from Parameter Store. Then it simply returns the currently loaded configuration in MyApp. The impact of this design is that the configuration is only loaded from Parameter Store the first time that the Lambda function execution environment is initialized. Subsequent invocations reuse the existing instance of MyApp, resulting in improved performance. You see this in the X-Ray traces later in this post. For more advanced use cases where configuration changes need to be received immediately, you could implement an expiry policy for your configuration entries or push notifications to your function.

To confirm that everything was created successfully, test the function in the Lambda console.

  1. Open the Lambda console.
  2. In the navigation pane, choose Functions.
  3. In the Functions pane, filter to ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev to find the function created by the SAM template earlier. Open the function name to view its details.
  4. On the top right of the function detail page, choose Test. You may need to create a new test event. The input JSON doesn’t matter as this function ignores the input.

After running the test, you should see output similar to the following. This demonstrates that the function successfully fetched the unencrypted configuration from Parameter Store.

Create an encrypted parameter

You currently have a simple, unencrypted parameter and a Lambda function that can access it.

Next, you create an encrypted parameter that only your Lambda function has permission to use for decryption. This limits read access for this parameter to only this Lambda function.

To follow along with this section, deploy the SAM template for this post in your account and make your IAM user name the KMS key admin mentioned earlier.

  1. In the Systems Manager console, under Shared Resources, choose Parameter Store.
  2. Choose Create Parameter.
    • For Name, enter /dev/parameterStoreBlog/appSecrets.
    • For Type, select Secure String.
    • For KMS Key ID, choose alias/ParameterStoreBlogKeyDev, which is the key that your SAM template created.
    • For Value, enter {"secretKey": "secretValue"}.
    • Choose Create Parameter.
  3. If you now try to view the value of this parameter by choosing the name of the parameter in the parameters list and then choosing Show next to the Value field, you won’t see the value appear. This is because, even though you have permission to encrypt values using this KMS key, you do not have permissions to decrypt values.
  4. In the Lambda console, run another test of your function. You now also see the secret parameter that you created and its decrypted value.

If you do not see the new parameter in the Lambda output, this may be because the Lambda execution environment is still warm from the previous test. Because the parameters are loaded at Lambda startup, you need a fresh execution environment to refresh the values.

Adjust the function timeout to a different value in the Advanced Settings at the bottom of the Lambda Configuration tab. Choose Save and test to trigger the creation of a new Lambda execution environment.

Profiling the impact of querying Parameter Store using AWS X-Ray

By using the AWS X-Ray SDK to patch boto3 in your Lambda function code, each invocation of the function creates traces in X-Ray. In this example, you can use these traces to validate the performance impact of your design decision to only load configuration from Parameter Store on the first invocation of the function in a new execution environment.

From the Lambda function details page where you tested the function earlier, under the function name, choose Monitoring. Choose View traces in X-Ray.

This opens the X-Ray console in a new window filtered to your function. Be aware of the time range field next to the search bar if you don’t see any search results.
In this screenshot, I’ve invoked the Lambda function twice, one time 10.3 minutes ago with a response time of 1.1 seconds and again 9.8 minutes ago with a response time of 8 milliseconds.

Looking at the details of the longer running trace by clicking the trace ID, you can see that the Lambda function spent the first ~350 ms of the full 1.1 sec routing the request through Lambda and creating a new execution environment for this function, as this was the first invocation with this code. This is the portion of time before the initialization subsegment.

Next, it took 725 ms to initialize the function, which includes executing the code at the global scope (including creating the boto3 client). This is also a one-time cost for a fresh execution environment.

Finally, the function executed for 65 ms, of which 63.5 ms was the GetParametersByPath call to Parameter Store.

Looking at the trace for the second, much faster function invocation, you see that the majority of the 8 ms execution time was Lambda routing the request to the function and returning the response. Only 1 ms of the overall execution time was attributed to the execution of the function, which makes sense given that after the first invocation you’re simply returning the config stored in MyApp.

While the Traces screen allows you to view the details of individual traces, the X-Ray Service Map screen allows you to view aggregate performance data for all traced services over a period of time.

In the X-Ray console navigation pane, choose Service map. Selecting a service node shows the metrics for node-specific requests. Selecting an edge between two nodes shows the metrics for requests that traveled that connection. Again, be aware of the time range field next to the search bar if you don’t see any search results.

After invoking your Lambda function several more times by testing it from the Lambda console, you can view some aggregate performance metrics. Look at the following:

  • From the client perspective, requests to the Lambda service for the function are taking an average of 50 ms to respond. The function is generating ~1 trace per minute.
  • The function itself is responding in an average of 3 ms. In the following screenshot, I’ve clicked on this node, which reveals a latency histogram of the traced requests showing that over 95% of requests return in under 5 ms.
  • Parameter Store is responding to requests in an average of 64 ms, but note the much lower trace rate in the node. This is because you only fetch data from Parameter Store on the initialization of the Lambda execution environment.

Conclusion

Deduplication, encryption, and restricted access to shared configuration and secrets is a key component to any mature architecture. Serverless architectures designed using event-driven, on-demand, compute services like Lambda are no different.

In this post, I walked you through a sample application accessing unencrypted and encrypted values in Parameter Store. These values were created in a hierarchy by application environment and component name, with the permissions to decrypt secret values restricted to only the function needing access. The techniques used here can become the foundation of secure, robust configuration management in your enterprise serverless applications.

Build a Multi-Tenant Amazon EMR Cluster with Kerberos, Microsoft Active Directory Integration and EMRFS Authorization

Post Syndicated from Songzhi Liu original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/build-a-multi-tenant-amazon-emr-cluster-with-kerberos-microsoft-active-directory-integration-and-emrfs-authorization/

One of the challenges faced by our customers—especially those in highly regulated industries—is balancing the need for security with flexibility. In this post, we cover how to enable multi-tenancy and increase security by using EMRFS (EMR File System) authorization, the Amazon S3 storage-level authorization on Amazon EMR.

Amazon EMR is an easy, fast, and scalable analytics platform enabling large-scale data processing. EMRFS authorization provides Amazon S3 storage-level authorization by configuring EMRFS with multiple IAM roles. With this functionality enabled, different users and groups can share the same cluster and assume their own IAM roles respectively.

Simply put, on Amazon EMR, we can now have an Amazon EC2 role per user assumed at run time instead of one general EC2 role at the cluster level. When the user is trying to access Amazon S3 resources, Amazon EMR evaluates against a predefined mappings list in EMRFS configurations and picks up the right role for the user.

In this post, we will discuss what EMRFS authorization is (Amazon S3 storage-level access control) and show how to configure the role mappings with detailed examples. You will then have the desired permissions in a multi-tenant environment. We also demo Amazon S3 access from HDFS command line, Apache Hive on Hue, and Apache Spark.

EMRFS authorization for Amazon S3

There are two prerequisites for using this feature:

  1. Users must be authenticated, because EMRFS needs to map the current user/group/prefix to a predefined user/group/prefix. There are several authentication options. In this post, we launch a Kerberos-enabled cluster that manages the Key Distribution Center (KDC) on the master node, and enable a one-way trust from the KDC to a Microsoft Active Directory domain.
  2. The application must support accessing Amazon S3 via Applications that have their own S3FileSystem APIs (for example, Presto) are not supported at this time.

EMRFS supports three types of mapping entries: user, group, and Amazon S3 prefix. Let’s use an example to show how this works.

Assume that you have the following three identities in your organization, and they are defined in the Active Directory:

To enable all these groups and users to share the EMR cluster, you need to define the following IAM roles:

In this case, you create a separate Amazon EC2 role that doesn’t give any permission to Amazon S3. Let’s call the role the base role (the EC2 role attached to the EMR cluster), which in this example is named EMR_EC2_RestrictedRole. Then, you define all the Amazon S3 permissions for each specific user or group in their own roles. The restricted role serves as the fallback role when the user doesn’t belong to any user/group, nor does the user try to access any listed Amazon S3 prefixes defined on the list.

Important: For all other roles, like emrfs_auth_group_role_data_eng, you need to add the base role (EMR_EC2_RestrictedRole) as the trusted entity so that it can assume other roles. See the following example:

{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "Service": "ec2.amazonaws.com"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
    },
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "AWS": "arn:aws:iam::511586466501:role/EMR_EC2_RestrictedRole"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
    }
  ]
}

The following is an example policy for the admin user role (emrfs_auth_user_role_admin_user):

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": "s3:*",
            "Resource": "*"
        }
    ]
}

We are assuming the admin user has access to all buckets in this example.

The following is an example policy for the data science group role (emrfs_auth_group_role_data_sci):

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:s3:::emrfs-auth-data-science-bucket-demo/*",
                "arn:aws:s3:::emrfs-auth-data-science-bucket-demo"
            ],
            "Action": [
                "s3:*"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

This role grants all Amazon S3 permissions to the emrfs-auth-data-science-bucket-demo bucket and all the objects in it. Similarly, the policy for the role emrfs_auth_group_role_data_eng is shown below:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:s3:::emrfs-auth-data-engineering-bucket-demo/*",
                "arn:aws:s3:::emrfs-auth-data-engineering-bucket-demo"
            ],
            "Action": [
                "s3:*"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

Example role mappings configuration

To configure EMRFS authorization, you use EMR security configuration. Here is the configuration we use in this post

Consider the following scenario.

First, the admin user admin1 tries to log in and run a command to access Amazon S3 data through EMRFS. The first role emrfs_auth_user_role_admin_user on the mapping list, which is a user role, is mapped and picked up. Then admin1 has access to the Amazon S3 locations that are defined in this role.

Then a user from the data engineer group (grp_data_engineering) tries to access a data bucket to run some jobs. When EMRFS sees that the user is a member of the grp_data_engineering group, the group role emrfs_auth_group_role_data_eng is assumed, and the user has proper access to Amazon S3 that is defined in the emrfs_auth_group_role_data_eng role.

Next, the third user comes, who is not an admin and doesn’t belong to any of the groups. After failing evaluation of the top three entries, EMRFS evaluates whether the user is trying to access a certain Amazon S3 prefix defined in the last mapping entry. This type of mapping entry is called the prefix type. If the user is trying to access s3://emrfs-auth-default-bucket-demo/, then the prefix mapping is in effect, and the prefix role emrfs_auth_prefix_role_default_s3_prefix is assumed.

If the user is not trying to access any of the Amazon S3 paths that are defined on the list—which means it failed the evaluation of all the entries—it only has the permissions defined in the EMR_EC2RestrictedRole. This role is assumed by the EC2 instances in the cluster.

In this process, all the mappings defined are evaluated in the defined order, and the first role that is mapped is assumed, and the rest of the list is skipped.

Setting up an EMR cluster and mapping Active Directory users and groups

Now that we know how EMRFS authorization role mapping works, the next thing we need to think about is how we can use this feature in an easy and manageable way.

Active Directory setup

Many customers manage their users and groups using Microsoft Active Directory or other tools like OpenLDAP. In this post, we create the Active Directory on an Amazon EC2 instance running Windows Server and create the users and groups we will be using in the example below. After setting up Active Directory, we use the Amazon EMR Kerberos auto-join capability to establish a one-way trust from the KDC running on the EMR master node to the Active Directory domain on the EC2 instance. You can use your own directory services as long as it talks to the LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol).

To create and join Active Directory to Amazon EMR, follow the steps in the blog post Use Kerberos Authentication to Integrate Amazon EMR with Microsoft Active Directory.

After configuring Active Directory, you can create all the users and groups using the Active Directory tools and add users to appropriate groups. In this example, we created users like admin1, dataeng1, datascientist1, grp_data_engineering, and grp_data_science, and then add the users to the right groups.

Join the EMR cluster to an Active Directory domain

For clusters with Kerberos, Amazon EMR now supports automated Active Directory domain joins. You can use the security configuration to configure the one-way trust from the KDC to the Active Directory domain. You also configure the EMRFS role mappings in the same security configuration.

The following is an example of the EMR security configuration with a trusted Active Directory domain EMRKRB.TEST.COM and the EMRFS role mappings as we discussed earlier:

The EMRFS role mapping configuration is shown in this example:

We will also provide an example AWS CLI command that you can run.

Launching the EMR cluster and running the tests

Now you have configured Kerberos and EMRFS authorization for Amazon S3.

Additionally, you need to configure Hue with Active Directory using the Amazon EMR configuration API in order to log in using the AD users created before. The following is an example of Hue AD configuration.

[
  {
    "Classification":"hue-ini",
    "Properties":{

    },
    "Configurations":[
      {
        "Classification":"desktop",
        "Properties":{

        },
        "Configurations":[
          {
            "Classification":"ldap",
            "Properties":{

            },
            "Configurations":[
              {
                "Classification":"ldap_servers",
                "Properties":{

                },
                "Configurations":[
                  {
                    "Classification":"AWS",
                    "Properties":{
                      "base_dn":"DC=emrkrb,DC=test,DC=com",
                      "ldap_url":"ldap://emrkrb.test.com",
                      "search_bind_authentication":"false",
                      "bind_dn":"CN=adjoiner,CN=users,DC=emrkrb,DC=test,DC=com",
                      "bind_password":"Abc123456",
                      "create_users_on_login":"true",
                      "nt_domain":"emrkrb.test.com"
                    },
                    "Configurations":[

                    ]
                  }
                ]
              }
            ]
          },
          {
            "Classification":"auth",
            "Properties":{
              "backend":"desktop.auth.backend.LdapBackend"
            },
            "Configurations":[

            ]
          }
        ]
      }
    ]
  }

Note: In the preceding configuration JSON file, change the values as required before pasting it into the software setting section in the Amazon EMR console.

Now let’s use this configuration and the security configuration you created before to launch the cluster.

In the Amazon EMR console, choose Create cluster. Then choose Go to advanced options. On the Step1: Software and Steps page, under Edit software settings (optional), paste the configuration in the box.

The rest of the setup is the same as an ordinary cluster setup, except in the Security Options section. In Step 4: Security, under Permissions, choose Custom, and then choose the RestrictedRole that you created before.

Choose the appropriate subnets (these should meet the base requirement in order for a successful Active Directory join—see the Amazon EMR Management Guide for more details), and choose the appropriate security groups to make sure it talks to the Active Directory. Choose a key so that you can log in and configure the cluster.

Most importantly, choose the security configuration that you created earlier to enable Kerberos and EMRFS authorization for Amazon S3.

You can use the following AWS CLI command to create a cluster.

aws emr create-cluster --name "TestEMRFSAuthorization" \ 
--release-label emr-5.10.0 \ --instance-type m3.xlarge \ 
--instance-count 3 \ 
--ec2-attributes InstanceProfile=EMR_EC2_DefaultRole,KeyName=MyEC2KeyPair \ --service-role EMR_DefaultRole \ 
--security-configuration MyKerberosConfig \ 
--configurations file://hue-config.json \
--applications Name=Hadoop Name=Hive Name=Hue Name=Spark \ 
--kerberos-attributes Realm=EC2.INTERNAL, \ KdcAdminPassword=<YourClusterKDCAdminPassword>, \ ADDomainJoinUser=<YourADUserLogonName>,ADDomainJoinPassword=<YourADUserPassword>, \ 
CrossRealmTrustPrincipalPassword=<MatchADTrustPwd>

Note: If you create the cluster using CLI, you need to save the JSON configuration for Hue into a file named hue-config.json and place it on the server where you run the CLI command.

After the cluster gets into the Waiting state, try to connect by using SSH into the cluster using the Active Directory user name and password.

ssh -l [email protected] <EMR IP or DNS name>

Quickly run two commands to show that the Active Directory join is successful:

  1. id [user name] shows the mapped AD users and groups in Linux.
  2. hdfs groups [user name] shows the mapped group in Hadoop.

Both should return the current Active Directory user and group information if the setup is correct.

Now, you can test the user mapping first. Log in with the admin1 user, and run a Hadoop list directory command:

hadoop fs -ls s3://emrfs-auth-data-science-bucket-demo/

Now switch to a user from the data engineer group.

Retry the previous command to access the admin’s bucket. It should throw an Amazon S3 Access Denied exception.

When you try listing the Amazon S3 bucket that a data engineer group member has accessed, it triggers the group mapping.

hadoop fs -ls s3://emrfs-auth-data-engineering-bucket-demo/

It successfully returns the listing results. Next we will test Apache Hive and then Apache Spark.

 

To run jobs successfully, you need to create a home directory for every user in HDFS for staging data under /user/<username>. Users can configure a step to create a home directory at cluster launch time for every user who has access to the cluster. In this example, you use Hue since Hue will create the home directory in HDFS for the user at the first login. Here Hue also needs to be integrated with the same Active Directory as explained in the example configuration described earlier.

First, log in to Hue as a data engineer user, and open a Hive Notebook in Hue. Then run a query to create a new table pointing to the data engineer bucket, s3://emrfs-auth-data-engineering-bucket-demo/table1_data_eng/.

You can see that the table was created successfully. Now try to create another table pointing to the data science group’s bucket, where the data engineer group doesn’t have access.

It failed and threw an Amazon S3 Access Denied error.

Now insert one line of data into the successfully create table.

Next, log out, switch to a data science group user, and create another table, test2_datasci_tb.

The creation is successful.

The last task is to test Spark (it requires the user directory, but Hue created one in the previous step).

Now let’s come back to the command line and run some Spark commands.

Login to the master node using the datascientist1 user:

Start the SparkSQL interactive shell by typing spark-sql, and run the show tables command. It should list the tables that you created using Hive.

As a data science group user, try select on both tables. You will find that you can only select the table defined in the location that your group has access to.

Conclusion

EMRFS authorization for Amazon S3 enables you to have multiple roles on the same cluster, providing flexibility to configure a shared cluster for different teams to achieve better efficiency. The Active Directory integration and group mapping make it much easier for you to manage your users and groups, and provides better auditability in a multi-tenant environment.


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Use Kerberos Authentication to Integrate Amazon EMR with Microsoft Active Directory and Launching and Running an Amazon EMR Cluster inside a VPC.


About the Authors

Songzhi Liu is a Big Data Consultant with AWS Professional Services. He works closely with AWS customers to provide them Big Data & Machine Learning solutions and best practices on the Amazon cloud.

 

 

 

 

Power data ingestion into Splunk using Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose

Post Syndicated from Tarik Makota original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/power-data-ingestion-into-splunk-using-amazon-kinesis-data-firehose/

In late September, during the annual Splunk .conf, Splunk and Amazon Web Services (AWS) jointly announced that Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose now supports Splunk Enterprise and Splunk Cloud as a delivery destination. This native integration between Splunk Enterprise, Splunk Cloud, and Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose is designed to make AWS data ingestion setup seamless, while offering a secure and fault-tolerant delivery mechanism. We want to enable customers to monitor and analyze machine data from any source and use it to deliver operational intelligence and optimize IT, security, and business performance.

With Kinesis Data Firehose, customers can use a fully managed, reliable, and scalable data streaming solution to Splunk. In this post, we tell you a bit more about the Kinesis Data Firehose and Splunk integration. We also show you how to ingest large amounts of data into Splunk using Kinesis Data Firehose.

Push vs. Pull data ingestion

Presently, customers use a combination of two ingestion patterns, primarily based on data source and volume, in addition to existing company infrastructure and expertise:

  1. Pull-based approach: Using dedicated pollers running the popular Splunk Add-on for AWS to pull data from various AWS services such as Amazon CloudWatch or Amazon S3.
  2. Push-based approach: Streaming data directly from AWS to Splunk HTTP Event Collector (HEC) by using AWS Lambda. Examples of applicable data sources include CloudWatch Logs and Amazon Kinesis Data Streams.

The pull-based approach offers data delivery guarantees such as retries and checkpointing out of the box. However, it requires more ops to manage and orchestrate the dedicated pollers, which are commonly running on Amazon EC2 instances. With this setup, you pay for the infrastructure even when it’s idle.

On the other hand, the push-based approach offers a low-latency scalable data pipeline made up of serverless resources like AWS Lambda sending directly to Splunk indexers (by using Splunk HEC). This approach translates into lower operational complexity and cost. However, if you need guaranteed data delivery then you have to design your solution to handle issues such as a Splunk connection failure or Lambda execution failure. To do so, you might use, for example, AWS Lambda Dead Letter Queues.

How about getting the best of both worlds?

Let’s go over the new integration’s end-to-end solution and examine how Kinesis Data Firehose and Splunk together expand the push-based approach into a native AWS solution for applicable data sources.

By using a managed service like Kinesis Data Firehose for data ingestion into Splunk, we provide out-of-the-box reliability and scalability. One of the pain points of the old approach was the overhead of managing the data collection nodes (Splunk heavy forwarders). With the new Kinesis Data Firehose to Splunk integration, there are no forwarders to manage or set up. Data producers (1) are configured through the AWS Management Console to drop data into Kinesis Data Firehose.

You can also create your own data producers. For example, you can drop data into a Firehose delivery stream by using Amazon Kinesis Agent, or by using the Firehose API (PutRecord(), PutRecordBatch()), or by writing to a Kinesis Data Stream configured to be the data source of a Firehose delivery stream. For more details, refer to Sending Data to an Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose Delivery Stream.

You might need to transform the data before it goes into Splunk for analysis. For example, you might want to enrich it or filter or anonymize sensitive data. You can do so using AWS Lambda. In this scenario, Kinesis Data Firehose buffers data from the incoming source data, sends it to the specified Lambda function (2), and then rebuffers the transformed data to the Splunk Cluster. Kinesis Data Firehose provides the Lambda blueprints that you can use to create a Lambda function for data transformation.

Systems fail all the time. Let’s see how this integration handles outside failures to guarantee data durability. In cases when Kinesis Data Firehose can’t deliver data to the Splunk Cluster, data is automatically backed up to an S3 bucket. You can configure this feature while creating the Firehose delivery stream (3). You can choose to back up all data or only the data that’s failed during delivery to Splunk.

In addition to using S3 for data backup, this Firehose integration with Splunk supports Splunk Indexer Acknowledgments to guarantee event delivery. This feature is configured on Splunk’s HTTP Event Collector (HEC) (4). It ensures that HEC returns an acknowledgment to Kinesis Data Firehose only after data has been indexed and is available in the Splunk cluster (5).

Now let’s look at a hands-on exercise that shows how to forward VPC flow logs to Splunk.

How-to guide

To process VPC flow logs, we implement the following architecture.

Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) delivers flow log files into an Amazon CloudWatch Logs group. Using a CloudWatch Logs subscription filter, we set up real-time delivery of CloudWatch Logs to an Kinesis Data Firehose stream.

Data coming from CloudWatch Logs is compressed with gzip compression. To work with this compression, we need to configure a Lambda-based data transformation in Kinesis Data Firehose to decompress the data and deposit it back into the stream. Firehose then delivers the raw logs to the Splunk Http Event Collector (HEC).

If delivery to the Splunk HEC fails, Firehose deposits the logs into an Amazon S3 bucket. You can then ingest the events from S3 using an alternate mechanism such as a Lambda function.

When data reaches Splunk (Enterprise or Cloud), Splunk parsing configurations (packaged in the Splunk Add-on for Kinesis Data Firehose) extract and parse all fields. They make data ready for querying and visualization using Splunk Enterprise and Splunk Cloud.

Walkthrough

Install the Splunk Add-on for Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose

The Splunk Add-on for Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose enables Splunk (be it Splunk Enterprise, Splunk App for AWS, or Splunk Enterprise Security) to use data ingested from Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose. Install the Add-on on all the indexers with an HTTP Event Collector (HEC). The Add-on is available for download from Splunkbase.

HTTP Event Collector (HEC)

Before you can use Kinesis Data Firehose to deliver data to Splunk, set up the Splunk HEC to receive the data. From Splunk web, go to the Setting menu, choose Data Inputs, and choose HTTP Event Collector. Choose Global Settings, ensure All tokens is enabled, and then choose Save. Then choose New Token to create a new HEC endpoint and token. When you create a new token, make sure that Enable indexer acknowledgment is checked.

When prompted to select a source type, select aws:cloudwatch:vpcflow.

Create an S3 backsplash bucket

To provide for situations in which Kinesis Data Firehose can’t deliver data to the Splunk Cluster, we use an S3 bucket to back up the data. You can configure this feature to back up all data or only the data that’s failed during delivery to Splunk.

Note: Bucket names are unique. Thus, you can’t use tmak-backsplash-bucket.

aws s3 create-bucket --bucket tmak-backsplash-bucket --create-bucket-configuration LocationConstraint=ap-northeast-1

Create an IAM role for the Lambda transform function

Firehose triggers an AWS Lambda function that transforms the data in the delivery stream. Let’s first create a role for the Lambda function called LambdaBasicRole.

Note: You can also set this role up when creating your Lambda function.

$ aws iam create-role --role-name LambdaBasicRole --assume-role-policy-document file://TrustPolicyForLambda.json

Here is TrustPolicyForLambda.json.

{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "Service": "lambda.amazonaws.com"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
    }
  ]
}

 

After the role is created, attach the managed Lambda basic execution policy to it.

$ aws iam attach-role-policy 
  --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/service-role/AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole 
  --role-name LambdaBasicRole

 

Create a Firehose Stream

On the AWS console, open the Amazon Kinesis service, go to the Firehose console, and choose Create Delivery Stream.

In the next section, you can specify whether you want to use an inline Lambda function for transformation. Because incoming CloudWatch Logs are gzip compressed, choose Enabled for Record transformation, and then choose Create new.

From the list of the available blueprint functions, choose Kinesis Data Firehose CloudWatch Logs Processor. This function unzips data and place it back into the Firehose stream in compliance with the record transformation output model.

Enter a name for the Lambda function, choose Choose an existing role, and then choose the role you created earlier. Then choose Create Function.

Go back to the Firehose Stream wizard, choose the Lambda function you just created, and then choose Next.

Select Splunk as the destination, and enter your Splunk Http Event Collector information.

Note: Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose requires the Splunk HTTP Event Collector (HEC) endpoint to be terminated with a valid CA-signed certificate matching the DNS hostname used to connect to your HEC endpoint. You receive delivery errors if you are using a self-signed certificate.

In this example, we only back up logs that fail during delivery.

To monitor your Firehose delivery stream, enable error logging. Doing this means that you can monitor record delivery errors.

Create an IAM role for the Firehose stream by choosing Create new, or Choose. Doing this brings you to a new screen. Choose Create a new IAM role, give the role a name, and then choose Allow.

If you look at the policy document, you can see that the role gives Kinesis Data Firehose permission to publish error logs to CloudWatch, execute your Lambda function, and put records into your S3 backup bucket.

You now get a chance to review and adjust the Firehose stream settings. When you are satisfied, choose Create Stream. You get a confirmation once the stream is created and active.

Create a VPC Flow Log

To send events from Amazon VPC, you need to set up a VPC flow log. If you already have a VPC flow log you want to use, you can skip to the “Publish CloudWatch to Kinesis Data Firehose” section.

On the AWS console, open the Amazon VPC service. Then choose VPC, Your VPC, and choose the VPC you want to send flow logs from. Choose Flow Logs, and then choose Create Flow Log. If you don’t have an IAM role that allows your VPC to publish logs to CloudWatch, choose Set Up Permissions and Create new role. Use the defaults when presented with the screen to create the new IAM role.

Once active, your VPC flow log should look like the following.

Publish CloudWatch to Kinesis Data Firehose

When you generate traffic to or from your VPC, the log group is created in Amazon CloudWatch. The new log group has no subscription filter, so set up a subscription filter. Setting this up establishes a real-time data feed from the log group to your Firehose delivery stream.

At present, you have to use the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) to create a CloudWatch Logs subscription to a Kinesis Data Firehose stream. However, you can use the AWS console to create subscriptions to Lambda and Amazon Elasticsearch Service.

To allow CloudWatch to publish to your Firehose stream, you need to give it permissions.

$ aws iam create-role --role-name CWLtoKinesisFirehoseRole --assume-role-policy-document file://TrustPolicyForCWLToFireHose.json


Here is the content for TrustPolicyForCWLToFireHose.json.

{
  "Statement": {
    "Effect": "Allow",
    "Principal": { "Service": "logs.us-east-1.amazonaws.com" },
    "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
  }
}

 

Attach the policy to the newly created role.

$ aws iam put-role-policy 
    --role-name CWLtoKinesisFirehoseRole 
    --policy-name Permissions-Policy-For-CWL 
    --policy-document file://PermissionPolicyForCWLToFireHose.json

Here is the content for PermissionPolicyForCWLToFireHose.json.

{
    "Statement":[
      {
        "Effect":"Allow",
        "Action":["firehose:*"],
        "Resource":["arn:aws:firehose:us-east-1:YOUR-AWS-ACCT-NUM:deliverystream/ FirehoseSplunkDeliveryStream"]
      },
      {
        "Effect":"Allow",
        "Action":["iam:PassRole"],
        "Resource":["arn:aws:iam::YOUR-AWS-ACCT-NUM:role/CWLtoKinesisFirehoseRole"]
      }
    ]
}

Finally, create a subscription filter.

$ aws logs put-subscription-filter 
   --log-group-name " /vpc/flowlog/FirehoseSplunkDemo" 
   --filter-name "Destination" 
   --filter-pattern "" 
   --destination-arn "arn:aws:firehose:us-east-1:YOUR-AWS-ACCT-NUM:deliverystream/FirehoseSplunkDeliveryStream" 
   --role-arn "arn:aws:iam::YOUR-AWS-ACCT-NUM:role/CWLtoKinesisFirehoseRole"

When you run the AWS CLI command preceding, you don’t get any acknowledgment. To validate that your CloudWatch Log Group is subscribed to your Firehose stream, check the CloudWatch console.

As soon as the subscription filter is created, the real-time log data from the log group goes into your Firehose delivery stream. Your stream then delivers it to your Splunk Enterprise or Splunk Cloud environment for querying and visualization. The screenshot following is from Splunk Enterprise.

In addition, you can monitor and view metrics associated with your delivery stream using the AWS console.

Conclusion

Although our walkthrough uses VPC Flow Logs, the pattern can be used in many other scenarios. These include ingesting data from AWS IoT, other CloudWatch logs and events, Kinesis Streams or other data sources using the Kinesis Agent or Kinesis Producer Library. We also used Lambda blueprint Kinesis Data Firehose CloudWatch Logs Processor to transform streaming records from Kinesis Data Firehose. However, you might need to use a different Lambda blueprint or disable record transformation entirely depending on your use case. For an additional use case using Kinesis Data Firehose, check out This is My Architecture Video, which discusses how to securely centralize cross-account data analytics using Kinesis and Splunk.

 


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Integrating Splunk with Amazon Kinesis Streams and Using Amazon EMR and Hunk for Rapid Response Log Analysis and Review.


About the Authors

Tarik Makota is a solutions architect with the Amazon Web Services Partner Network. He provides technical guidance, design advice and thought leadership to AWS’ most strategic software partners. His career includes work in an extremely broad software development and architecture roles across ERP, financial printing, benefit delivery and administration and financial services. He holds an M.S. in Software Development and Management from Rochester Institute of Technology.

 

 

 

Roy Arsan is a solutions architect in the Splunk Partner Integrations team. He has a background in product development, cloud architecture, and building consumer and enterprise cloud applications. More recently, he has architected Splunk solutions on major cloud providers, including an AWS Quick Start for Splunk that enables AWS users to easily deploy distributed Splunk Enterprise straight from their AWS console. He’s also the co-author of the AWS Lambda blueprints for Splunk. He holds an M.S. in Computer Science Engineering from the University of Michigan.

 

 

 

How to Patch, Inspect, and Protect Microsoft Windows Workloads on AWS—Part 1

Post Syndicated from Koen van Blijderveen original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-patch-inspect-and-protect-microsoft-windows-workloads-on-aws-part-1/

Most malware tries to compromise your systems by using a known vulnerability that the maker of the operating system has already patched. To help prevent malware from affecting your systems, two security best practices are to apply all operating system patches to your systems and actively monitor your systems for missing patches. In case you do need to recover from a malware attack, you should make regular backups of your data.

In today’s blog post (Part 1 of a two-part post), I show how to keep your Amazon EC2 instances that run Microsoft Windows up to date with the latest security patches by using Amazon EC2 Systems Manager. Tomorrow in Part 2, I show how to take regular snapshots of your data by using Amazon EBS Snapshot Scheduler and how to use Amazon Inspector to check if your EC2 instances running Microsoft Windows contain any common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs).

What you should know first

To follow along with the solution in this post, you need one or more EC2 instances. You may use existing instances or create new instances. For the blog post, I assume this is an EC2 for Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 instance installed from the Amazon Machine Images (AMIs). If you are not familiar with how to launch an EC2 instance, see Launching an Instance. I also assume you launched or will launch your instance in a private subnet. A private subnet is not directly accessible via the internet, and access to it requires either a VPN connection to your on-premises network or a jump host in a public subnet (a subnet with access to the internet). You must make sure that the EC2 instance can connect to the internet using a network address translation (NAT) instance or NAT gateway to communicate with Systems Manager and Amazon Inspector. The following diagram shows how you should structure your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC). You should also be familiar with Restoring an Amazon EBS Volume from a Snapshot and Attaching an Amazon EBS Volume to an Instance.

Later on, you will assign tasks to a maintenance window to patch your instances with Systems Manager. To do this, the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) user you are using for this post must have the iam:PassRole permission. This permission allows this IAM user to assign tasks to pass their own IAM permissions to the AWS service. In this example, when you assign a task to a maintenance window, IAM passes your credentials to Systems Manager. This safeguard ensures that the user cannot use the creation of tasks to elevate their IAM privileges because their own IAM privileges limit which tasks they can run against an EC2 instance. You should also authorize your IAM user to use EC2, Amazon Inspector, Amazon CloudWatch, and Systems Manager. You can achieve this by attaching the following AWS managed policies to the IAM user you are using for this example: AmazonInspectorFullAccess, AmazonEC2FullAccess, and AmazonSSMFullAccess.

Architectural overview

The following diagram illustrates the components of this solution’s architecture.

Diagram showing the components of this solution's architecture

For this blog post, Microsoft Windows EC2 is Amazon EC2 for Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 instances with attached Amazon Elastic Block Store (Amazon EBS) volumes, which are running in your VPC. These instances may be standalone Windows instances running your Windows workloads, or you may have joined them to an Active Directory domain controller. For instances joined to a domain, you can be using Active Directory running on an EC2 for Windows instance, or you can use AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory.

Amazon EC2 Systems Manager is a scalable tool for remote management of your EC2 instances. You will use the Systems Manager Run Command to install the Amazon Inspector agent. The agent enables EC2 instances to communicate with the Amazon Inspector service and run assessments, which I explain in detail later in this blog post. You also will create a Systems Manager association to keep your EC2 instances up to date with the latest security patches.

You can use the EBS Snapshot Scheduler to schedule automated snapshots at regular intervals. You will use it to set up regular snapshots of your Amazon EBS volumes. EBS Snapshot Scheduler is a prebuilt solution by AWS that you will deploy in your AWS account. With Amazon EBS snapshots, you pay only for the actual data you store. Snapshots save only the data that has changed since the previous snapshot, which minimizes your cost.

You will use Amazon Inspector to run security assessments on your EC2 for Windows Server instance. In this post, I show how to assess if your EC2 for Windows Server instance is vulnerable to any of the more than 50,000 CVEs registered with Amazon Inspector.

In today’s and tomorrow’s posts, I show you how to:

  1. Launch an EC2 instance with an IAM role, Amazon EBS volume, and tags that Systems Manager and Amazon Inspector will use.
  2. Configure Systems Manager to install the Amazon Inspector agent and patch your EC2 instances.
  3. Take EBS snapshots by using EBS Snapshot Scheduler to automate snapshots based on instance tags.
  4. Use Amazon Inspector to check if your EC2 instances running Microsoft Windows contain any common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs).

Step 1: Launch an EC2 instance

In this section, I show you how to launch your EC2 instances so that you can use Systems Manager with the instances and use instance tags with EBS Snapshot Scheduler to automate snapshots. This requires three things:

  • Create an IAM role for Systems Manager before launching your EC2 instance.
  • Launch your EC2 instance with Amazon EBS and the IAM role for Systems Manager.
  • Add tags to instances so that you can automate policies for which instances you take snapshots of and when.

Create an IAM role for Systems Manager

Before launching your EC2 instance, I recommend that you first create an IAM role for Systems Manager, which you will use to update the EC2 instance you will launch. AWS already provides a preconfigured policy that you can use for your new role, and it is called AmazonEC2RoleforSSM.

  1. Sign in to the IAM console and choose Roles in the navigation pane. Choose Create new role.
    Screenshot of choosing "Create role"
  2. In the role-creation workflow, choose AWS service > EC2 > EC2 to create a role for an EC2 instance.
    Screenshot of creating a role for an EC2 instance
  3. Choose the AmazonEC2RoleforSSM policy to attach it to the new role you are creating.
    Screenshot of attaching the AmazonEC2RoleforSSM policy to the new role you are creating
  4. Give the role a meaningful name (I chose EC2SSM) and description, and choose Create role.
    Screenshot of giving the role a name and description

Launch your EC2 instance

To follow along, you need an EC2 instance that is running Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 and that has an Amazon EBS volume attached. You can use any existing instance you may have or create a new instance.

When launching your new EC2 instance, be sure that:

  • The operating system is Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2.
  • You attach at least one Amazon EBS volume to the EC2 instance.
  • You attach the newly created IAM role (EC2SSM).
  • The EC2 instance can connect to the internet through a network address translation (NAT) gateway or a NAT instance.
  • You create the tags shown in the following screenshot (you will use them later).

If you are using an already launched EC2 instance, you can attach the newly created role as described in Easily Replace or Attach an IAM Role to an Existing EC2 Instance by Using the EC2 Console.

Add tags

The final step of configuring your EC2 instances is to add tags. You will use these tags to configure Systems Manager in Step 2 of this blog post and to configure Amazon Inspector in Part 2. For this example, I add a tag key, Patch Group, and set the value to Windows Servers. I could have other groups of EC2 instances that I treat differently by having the same tag key but a different tag value. For example, I might have a collection of other servers with the Patch Group tag key with a value of IAS Servers.

Screenshot of adding tags

Note: You must wait a few minutes until the EC2 instance becomes available before you can proceed to the next section.

At this point, you now have at least one EC2 instance you can use to configure Systems Manager, use EBS Snapshot Scheduler, and use Amazon Inspector.

Note: If you have a large number of EC2 instances to tag, you may want to use the EC2 CreateTags API rather than manually apply tags to each instance.

Step 2: Configure Systems Manager

In this section, I show you how to use Systems Manager to apply operating system patches to your EC2 instances, and how to manage patch compliance.

To start, I will provide some background information about Systems Manager. Then, I will cover how to:

  • Create the Systems Manager IAM role so that Systems Manager is able to perform patch operations.
  • Associate a Systems Manager patch baseline with your instance to define which patches Systems Manager should apply.
  • Define a maintenance window to make sure Systems Manager patches your instance when you tell it to.
  • Monitor patch compliance to verify the patch state of your instances.

Systems Manager is a collection of capabilities that helps you automate management tasks for AWS-hosted instances on EC2 and your on-premises servers. In this post, I use Systems Manager for two purposes: to run remote commands and apply operating system patches. To learn about the full capabilities of Systems Manager, see What Is Amazon EC2 Systems Manager?

Patch management is an important measure to prevent malware from infecting your systems. Most malware attacks look for vulnerabilities that are publicly known and in most cases are already patched by the maker of the operating system. These publicly known vulnerabilities are well documented and therefore easier for an attacker to exploit than having to discover a new vulnerability.

Patches for these new vulnerabilities are available through Systems Manager within hours after Microsoft releases them. There are two prerequisites to use Systems Manager to apply operating system patches. First, you must attach the IAM role you created in the previous section, EC2SSM, to your EC2 instance. Second, you must install the Systems Manager agent on your EC2 instance. If you have used a recent Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 AMI published by AWS, Amazon has already installed the Systems Manager agent on your EC2 instance. You can confirm this by logging in to an EC2 instance and looking for Amazon SSM Agent under Programs and Features in Windows. To install the Systems Manager agent on an instance that does not have the agent preinstalled or if you want to use the Systems Manager agent on your on-premises servers, see the documentation about installing the Systems Manager agent. If you forgot to attach the newly created role when launching your EC2 instance or if you want to attach the role to already running EC2 instances, see Attach an AWS IAM Role to an Existing Amazon EC2 Instance by Using the AWS CLI or use the AWS Management Console.

To make sure your EC2 instance receives operating system patches from Systems Manager, you will use the default patch baseline provided and maintained by AWS, and you will define a maintenance window so that you control when your EC2 instances should receive patches. For the maintenance window to be able to run any tasks, you also must create a new role for Systems Manager. This role is a different kind of role than the one you created earlier: Systems Manager will use this role instead of EC2. Earlier we created the EC2SSM role with the AmazonEC2RoleforSSM policy, which allowed the Systems Manager agent on our instance to communicate with the Systems Manager service. Here we need a new role with the policy AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole to make sure the Systems Manager service is able to execute commands on our instance.

Create the Systems Manager IAM role

To create the new IAM role for Systems Manager, follow the same procedure as in the previous section, but in Step 3, choose the AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole policy instead of the previously selected AmazonEC2RoleforSSM policy.

Screenshot of creating the new IAM role for Systems Manager

Finish the wizard and give your new role a recognizable name. For example, I named my role MaintenanceWindowRole.

Screenshot of finishing the wizard and giving your new role a recognizable name

By default, only EC2 instances can assume this new role. You must update the trust policy to enable Systems Manager to assume this role.

To update the trust policy associated with this new role:

  1. Navigate to the IAM console and choose Roles in the navigation pane.
  2. Choose MaintenanceWindowRole and choose the Trust relationships tab. Then choose Edit trust relationship.
  3. Update the policy document by copying the following policy and pasting it in the Policy Document box. As you can see, I have added the ssm.amazonaws.com service to the list of allowed Principals that can assume this role. Choose Update Trust Policy.
    {
       "Version":"2012-10-17",
       "Statement":[
          {
             "Sid":"",
             "Effect":"Allow",
             "Principal":{
                "Service":[
                   "ec2.amazonaws.com",
                   "ssm.amazonaws.com"
               ]
             },
             "Action":"sts:AssumeRole"
          }
       ]
    }

Associate a Systems Manager patch baseline with your instance

Next, you are going to associate a Systems Manager patch baseline with your EC2 instance. A patch baseline defines which patches Systems Manager should apply. You will use the default patch baseline that AWS manages and maintains. Before you can associate the patch baseline with your instance, though, you must determine if Systems Manager recognizes your EC2 instance.

Navigate to the EC2 console, scroll down to Systems Manager Shared Resources in the navigation pane, and choose Managed Instances. Your new EC2 instance should be available there. If your instance is missing from the list, verify the following:

  1. Go to the EC2 console and verify your instance is running.
  2. Select your instance and confirm you attached the Systems Manager IAM role, EC2SSM.
  3. Make sure that you deployed a NAT gateway in your public subnet to ensure your VPC reflects the diagram at the start of this post so that the Systems Manager agent can connect to the Systems Manager internet endpoint.
  4. Check the Systems Manager Agent logs for any errors.

Now that you have confirmed that Systems Manager can manage your EC2 instance, it is time to associate the AWS maintained patch baseline with your EC2 instance:

  1. Choose Patch Baselines under Systems Manager Services in the navigation pane of the EC2 console.
  2. Choose the default patch baseline as highlighted in the following screenshot, and choose Modify Patch Groups in the Actions drop-down.
    Screenshot of choosing Modify Patch Groups in the Actions drop-down
  3. In the Patch group box, enter the same value you entered under the Patch Group tag of your EC2 instance in “Step 1: Configure your EC2 instance.” In this example, the value I enter is Windows Servers. Choose the check mark icon next to the patch group and choose Close.Screenshot of modifying the patch group

Define a maintenance window

Now that you have successfully set up a role and have associated a patch baseline with your EC2 instance, you will define a maintenance window so that you can control when your EC2 instances should receive patches. By creating multiple maintenance windows and assigning them to different patch groups, you can make sure your EC2 instances do not all reboot at the same time. The Patch Group resource tag you defined earlier will determine to which patch group an instance belongs.

To define a maintenance window:

  1. Navigate to the EC2 console, scroll down to Systems Manager Shared Resources in the navigation pane, and choose Maintenance Windows. Choose Create a Maintenance Window.
    Screenshot of starting to create a maintenance window in the Systems Manager console
  2. Select the Cron schedule builder to define the schedule for the maintenance window. In the example in the following screenshot, the maintenance window will start every Saturday at 10:00 P.M. UTC.
  3. To specify when your maintenance window will end, specify the duration. In this example, the four-hour maintenance window will end on the following Sunday morning at 2:00 A.M. UTC (in other words, four hours after it started).
  4. Systems manager completes all tasks that are in process, even if the maintenance window ends. In my example, I am choosing to prevent new tasks from starting within one hour of the end of my maintenance window because I estimated my patch operations might take longer than one hour to complete. Confirm the creation of the maintenance window by choosing Create maintenance window.
    Screenshot of completing all boxes in the maintenance window creation process
  5. After creating the maintenance window, you must register the EC2 instance to the maintenance window so that Systems Manager knows which EC2 instance it should patch in this maintenance window. To do so, choose Register new targets on the Targets tab of your newly created maintenance window. You can register your targets by using the same Patch Group tag you used before to associate the EC2 instance with the AWS-provided patch baseline.
    Screenshot of registering new targets
  6. Assign a task to the maintenance window that will install the operating system patches on your EC2 instance:
    1. Open Maintenance Windows in the EC2 console, select your previously created maintenance window, choose the Tasks tab, and choose Register run command task from the Register new task drop-down.
    2. Choose the AWS-RunPatchBaseline document from the list of available documents.
    3. For Parameters:
      1. For Role, choose the role you created previously (called MaintenanceWindowRole).
      2. For Execute on, specify how many EC2 instances Systems Manager should patch at the same time. If you have a large number of EC2 instances and want to patch all EC2 instances within the defined time, make sure this number is not too low. For example, if you have 1,000 EC2 instances, a maintenance window of 4 hours, and 2 hours’ time for patching, make this number at least 500.
      3. For Stop after, specify after how many errors Systems Manager should stop.
      4. For Operation, choose Install to make sure to install the patches.
        Screenshot of stipulating maintenance window parameters

Now, you must wait for the maintenance window to run at least once according to the schedule you defined earlier. Note that if you don’t want to wait, you can adjust the schedule to run sooner by choosing Edit maintenance window on the Maintenance Windows page of Systems Manager. If your maintenance window has expired, you can check the status of any maintenance tasks Systems Manager has performed on the Maintenance Windows page of Systems Manager and select your maintenance window.

Screenshot of the maintenance window successfully created

Monitor patch compliance

You also can see the overall patch compliance of all EC2 instances that are part of defined patch groups by choosing Patch Compliance under Systems Manager Services in the navigation pane of the EC2 console. You can filter by Patch Group to see how many EC2 instances within the selected patch group are up to date, how many EC2 instances are missing updates, and how many EC2 instances are in an error state.

Screenshot of monitoring patch compliance

In this section, you have set everything up for patch management on your instance. Now you know how to patch your EC2 instance in a controlled manner and how to check if your EC2 instance is compliant with the patch baseline you have defined. Of course, I recommend that you apply these steps to all EC2 instances you manage.

Summary

In Part 1 of this blog post, I have shown how to configure EC2 instances for use with Systems Manager, EBS Snapshot Scheduler, and Amazon Inspector. I also have shown how to use Systems Manager to keep your Microsoft Windows–based EC2 instances up to date. In Part 2 of this blog post tomorrow, I will show how to take regular snapshots of your data by using EBS Snapshot Scheduler and how to use Amazon Inspector to check if your EC2 instances running Microsoft Windows contain any CVEs.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing this solution, start a new thread on the EC2 forum or the Amazon Inspector forum, or contact AWS Support.

– Koen

Capturing Custom, High-Resolution Metrics from Containers Using AWS Step Functions and AWS Lambda

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/capturing-custom-high-resolution-metrics-from-containers-using-aws-step-functions-and-aws-lambda/

Contributed by Trevor Sullivan, AWS Solutions Architect

When you deploy containers with Amazon ECS, are you gathering all of the key metrics so that you can correctly monitor the overall health of your ECS cluster?

By default, ECS writes metrics to Amazon CloudWatch in 5-minute increments. For complex or large services, this may not be sufficient to make scaling decisions quickly. You may want to respond immediately to changes in workload or to identify application performance problems. Last July, CloudWatch announced support for high-resolution metrics, up to a per-second basis.

These high-resolution metrics can be used to give you a clearer picture of the load and performance for your applications, containers, clusters, and hosts. In this post, I discuss how you can use AWS Step Functions, along with AWS Lambda, to cost effectively record high-resolution metrics into CloudWatch. You implement this solution using a serverless architecture, which keeps your costs low and makes it easier to troubleshoot the solution.

To show how this works, you retrieve some useful metric data from an ECS cluster running in the same AWS account and region (Oregon, us-west-2) as the Step Functions state machine and Lambda function. However, you can use this architecture to retrieve any custom application metrics from any resource in any AWS account and region.

Why Step Functions?

Step Functions enables you to orchestrate multi-step tasks in the AWS Cloud that run for any period of time, up to a year. Effectively, you’re building a blueprint for an end-to-end process. After it’s built, you can execute the process as many times as you want.

For this architecture, you gather metrics from an ECS cluster, every five seconds, and then write the metric data to CloudWatch. After your ECS cluster metrics are stored in CloudWatch, you can create CloudWatch alarms to notify you. An alarm can also trigger an automated remediation activity such as scaling ECS services, when a metric exceeds a threshold defined by you.

When you build a Step Functions state machine, you define the different states inside it as JSON objects. The bulk of the work in Step Functions is handled by the common task state, which invokes Lambda functions or Step Functions activities. There is also a built-in library of other useful states that allow you to control the execution flow of your program.

One of the most useful state types in Step Functions is the parallel state. Each parallel state in your state machine can have one or more branches, each of which is executed in parallel. Another useful state type is the wait state, which waits for a period of time before moving to the next state.

In this walkthrough, you combine these three states (parallel, wait, and task) to create a state machine that triggers a Lambda function, which then gathers metrics from your ECS cluster.

Step Functions pricing

This state machine is executed every minute, resulting in 60 executions per hour, and 1,440 executions per day. Step Functions is billed per state transition, including the Start and End state transitions, and giving you approximately 37,440 state transitions per day. To reach this number, I’m using this estimated math:

26 state transitions per-execution x 60 minutes x 24 hours

Based on current pricing, at $0.000025 per state transition, the daily cost of this metric gathering state machine would be $0.936.

Step Functions offers an indefinite 4,000 free state transitions every month. This benefit is available to all customers, not just customers who are still under the 12-month AWS Free Tier. For more information and cost example scenarios, see Step Functions pricing.

Why Lambda?

The goal is to capture metrics from an ECS cluster, and write the metric data to CloudWatch. This is a straightforward, short-running process that makes Lambda the perfect place to run your code. Lambda is one of the key services that makes up “Serverless” application architectures. It enables you to consume compute capacity only when your code is actually executing.

The process of gathering metric data from ECS and writing it to CloudWatch takes a short period of time. In fact, my average Lambda function execution time, while developing this post, is only about 250 milliseconds on average. For every five-second interval that occurs, I’m only using 1/20th of the compute time that I’d otherwise be paying for.

Lambda pricing

For billing purposes, Lambda execution time is rounded up to the nearest 100-ms interval. In general, based on the metrics that I observed during development, a 250-ms runtime would be billed at 300 ms. Here, I calculate the cost of this Lambda function executing on a daily basis.

Assuming 31 days in each month, there would be 535,680 five-second intervals (31 days x 24 hours x 60 minutes x 12 five-second intervals = 535,680). The Lambda function is invoked every five-second interval, by the Step Functions state machine, and runs for a 300-ms period. At current Lambda pricing, for a 128-MB function, you would be paying approximately the following:

Total compute

Total executions = 535,680
Total compute = total executions x (3 x $0.000000208 per 100 ms) = $0.334 per day

Total requests

Total requests = (535,680 / 1000000) * $0.20 per million requests = $0.11 per day

Total Lambda Cost

$0.11 requests + $0.334 compute time = $0.444 per day

Similar to Step Functions, Lambda offers an indefinite free tier. For more information, see Lambda Pricing.

Walkthrough

In the following sections, I step through the process of configuring the solution just discussed. If you follow along, at a high level, you will:

  • Configure an IAM role and policy
  • Create a Step Functions state machine to control metric gathering execution
  • Create a metric-gathering Lambda function
  • Configure a CloudWatch Events rule to trigger the state machine
  • Validate the solution

Prerequisites

You should already have an AWS account with a running ECS cluster. If you don’t have one running, you can easily deploy a Docker container on an ECS cluster using the AWS Management Console. In the example produced for this post, I use an ECS cluster running Windows Server (currently in beta), but either a Linux or Windows Server cluster works.

Create an IAM role and policy

First, create an IAM role and policy that enables Step Functions, Lambda, and CloudWatch to communicate with each other.

  • The CloudWatch Events rule needs permissions to trigger the Step Functions state machine.
  • The Step Functions state machine needs permissions to trigger the Lambda function.
  • The Lambda function needs permissions to query ECS and then write to CloudWatch Logs and metrics.

When you create the state machine, Lambda function, and CloudWatch Events rule, you assign this role to each of those resources. Upon execution, each of these resources assumes the specified role and executes using the role’s permissions.

  1. Open the IAM console.
  2. Choose Roles, create New Role.
  3. For Role Name, enter WriteMetricFromStepFunction.
  4. Choose Save.

Create the IAM role trust relationship
The trust relationship (also known as the assume role policy document) for your IAM role looks like the following JSON document. As you can see from the document, your IAM role needs to trust the Lambda, CloudWatch Events, and Step Functions services. By configuring your role to trust these services, they can assume this role and inherit the role permissions.

  1. Open the IAM console.
  2. Choose Roles and select the IAM role previously created.
  3. Choose Trust RelationshipsEdit Trust Relationships.
  4. Enter the following trust policy text and choose Save.
{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "Service": "lambda.amazonaws.com"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
    },
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "Service": "events.amazonaws.com"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
    },
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "Service": "states.us-west-2.amazonaws.com"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
    }
  ]
}

Create an IAM policy

After you’ve finished configuring your role’s trust relationship, grant the role access to the other AWS resources that make up the solution.

The IAM policy is what gives your IAM role permissions to access various resources. You must whitelist explicitly the specific resources to which your role has access, because the default IAM behavior is to deny access to any AWS resources.

I’ve tried to keep this policy document as generic as possible, without allowing permissions to be too open. If the name of your ECS cluster is different than the one in the example policy below, make sure that you update the policy document before attaching it to your IAM role. You can attach this policy as an inline policy, instead of creating the policy separately first. However, either approach is valid.

  1. Open the IAM console.
  2. Select the IAM role, and choose Permissions.
  3. Choose Add in-line policy.
  4. Choose Custom Policy and then enter the following policy. The inline policy name does not matter.
{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [ "logs:*" ],
            "Resource": "*"
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [ "cloudwatch:PutMetricData" ],
            "Resource": "*"
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [ "states:StartExecution" ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:states:*:*:stateMachine:WriteMetricFromStepFunction"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [ "lambda:InvokeFunction" ],
            "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:*:*:function:WriteMetricFromStepFunction"
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [ "ecs:Describe*" ],
            "Resource": "arn:aws:ecs:*:*:cluster/ECSEsgaroth"
        }
    ]
}

Create a Step Functions state machine

In this section, you create a Step Functions state machine that invokes the metric-gathering Lambda function every five (5) seconds, for a one-minute period. If you divide a minute (60) seconds into equal parts of five-second intervals, you get 12. Based on this math, you create 12 branches, in a single parallel state, in the state machine. Each branch triggers the metric-gathering Lambda function at a different five-second marker, throughout the one-minute period. After all of the parallel branches finish executing, the Step Functions execution completes and another begins.

Follow these steps to create your Step Functions state machine:

  1. Open the Step Functions console.
  2. Choose DashboardCreate State Machine.
  3. For State Machine Name, enter WriteMetricFromStepFunction.
  4. Enter the state machine code below into the editor. Make sure that you insert your own AWS account ID for every instance of “676655494xxx”
  5. Choose Create State Machine.
  6. Select the WriteMetricFromStepFunction IAM role that you previously created.
{
    "Comment": "Writes ECS metrics to CloudWatch every five seconds, for a one-minute period.",
    "StartAt": "ParallelMetric",
    "States": {
      "ParallelMetric": {
        "Type": "Parallel",
        "Branches": [
          {
            "StartAt": "WriteMetricLambda",
            "States": {
             	"WriteMetricLambda": {
                  "Type": "Task",
				  "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:676655494xxx:function:WriteMetricFromStepFunction",
                  "End": true
                } 
            }
          },
    	  {
            "StartAt": "WaitFive",
            "States": {
            	"WaitFive": {
            		"Type": "Wait",
            		"Seconds": 5,
            		"Next": "WriteMetricLambdaFive"
          		},
             	"WriteMetricLambdaFive": {
                  "Type": "Task",
				  "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:676655494xxx:function:WriteMetricFromStepFunction",
                  "End": true
                } 
            }
          },
    	  {
            "StartAt": "WaitTen",
            "States": {
            	"WaitTen": {
            		"Type": "Wait",
            		"Seconds": 10,
            		"Next": "WriteMetricLambda10"
          		},
             	"WriteMetricLambda10": {
                  "Type": "Task",
                  "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:676655494xxx:function:WriteMetricFromStepFunction",
                  "End": true
                } 
            }
          },
    	  {
            "StartAt": "WaitFifteen",
            "States": {
            	"WaitFifteen": {
            		"Type": "Wait",
            		"Seconds": 15,
            		"Next": "WriteMetricLambda15"
          		},
             	"WriteMetricLambda15": {
                  "Type": "Task",
                  "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:676655494xxx:function:WriteMetricFromStepFunction",
                  "End": true
                } 
            }
          },
          {
            "StartAt": "Wait20",
            "States": {
            	"Wait20": {
            		"Type": "Wait",
            		"Seconds": 20,
            		"Next": "WriteMetricLambda20"
          		},
             	"WriteMetricLambda20": {
                  "Type": "Task",
                  "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:676655494xxx:function:WriteMetricFromStepFunction",
                  "End": true
                } 
            }
          },
          {
            "StartAt": "Wait25",
            "States": {
            	"Wait25": {
            		"Type": "Wait",
            		"Seconds": 25,
            		"Next": "WriteMetricLambda25"
          		},
             	"WriteMetricLambda25": {
                  "Type": "Task",
                  "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:676655494xxx:function:WriteMetricFromStepFunction",
                  "End": true
                } 
            }
          },
          {
            "StartAt": "Wait30",
            "States": {
            	"Wait30": {
            		"Type": "Wait",
            		"Seconds": 30,
            		"Next": "WriteMetricLambda30"
          		},
             	"WriteMetricLambda30": {
                  "Type": "Task",
                  "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:676655494xxx:function:WriteMetricFromStepFunction",
                  "End": true
                } 
            }
          },
          {
            "StartAt": "Wait35",
            "States": {
            	"Wait35": {
            		"Type": "Wait",
            		"Seconds": 35,
            		"Next": "WriteMetricLambda35"
          		},
             	"WriteMetricLambda35": {
                  "Type": "Task",
                  "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:676655494xxx:function:WriteMetricFromStepFunction",
                  "End": true
                } 
            }
          },
          {
            "StartAt": "Wait40",
            "States": {
            	"Wait40": {
            		"Type": "Wait",
            		"Seconds": 40,
            		"Next": "WriteMetricLambda40"
          		},
             	"WriteMetricLambda40": {
                  "Type": "Task",
                  "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:676655494xxx:function:WriteMetricFromStepFunction",
                  "End": true
                } 
            }
          },
          {
            "StartAt": "Wait45",
            "States": {
            	"Wait45": {
            		"Type": "Wait",
            		"Seconds": 45,
            		"Next": "WriteMetricLambda45"
          		},
             	"WriteMetricLambda45": {
                  "Type": "Task",
                  "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:676655494xxx:function:WriteMetricFromStepFunction",
                  "End": true
                } 
            }
          },
          {
            "StartAt": "Wait50",
            "States": {
            	"Wait50": {
            		"Type": "Wait",
            		"Seconds": 50,
            		"Next": "WriteMetricLambda50"
          		},
             	"WriteMetricLambda50": {
                  "Type": "Task",
                  "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:676655494xxx:function:WriteMetricFromStepFunction",
                  "End": true
                } 
            }
          },
          {
            "StartAt": "Wait55",
            "States": {
            	"Wait55": {
            		"Type": "Wait",
            		"Seconds": 55,
            		"Next": "WriteMetricLambda55"
          		},
             	"WriteMetricLambda55": {
                  "Type": "Task",
                  "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:676655494xxx:function:WriteMetricFromStepFunction",
                  "End": true
                } 
            }
          }
        ],
        "End": true
      }
  }
}

Now you’ve got a shiny new Step Functions state machine! However, you might ask yourself, “After the state machine has been created, how does it get executed?” Before I answer that question, create the Lambda function that writes the custom metric, and then you get the end-to-end process moving.

Create a Lambda function

The meaty part of the solution is a Lambda function, written to consume the Python 3.6 runtime, that retrieves metric values from ECS, and then writes them to CloudWatch. This Lambda function is what the Step Functions state machine is triggering every five seconds, via the Task states. Key points to remember:

The Lambda function needs permission to:

  • Write CloudWatch metrics (PutMetricData API).
  • Retrieve metrics from ECS clusters (DescribeCluster API).
  • Write StdOut to CloudWatch Logs.

Boto3, the AWS SDK for Python, is included in the Lambda execution environment for Python 2.x and 3.x.

Because Lambda includes the AWS SDK, you don’t have to worry about packaging it up and uploading it to Lambda. You can focus on writing code and automatically take a dependency on boto3.

As for permissions, you’ve already created the IAM role and attached a policy to it that enables your Lambda function to access the necessary API actions. When you create your Lambda function, make sure that you select the correct IAM role, to ensure it is invoked with the correct permissions.

The following Lambda function code is generic. So how does the Lambda function know which ECS cluster to gather metrics for? Your Step Functions state machine automatically passes in its state to the Lambda function. When you create your CloudWatch Events rule, you specify a simple JSON object that passes the desired ECS cluster name into your Step Functions state machine, which then passes it to the Lambda function.

Use the following property values as you create your Lambda function:

Function Name: WriteMetricFromStepFunction
Description: This Lambda function retrieves metric values from an ECS cluster and writes them to Amazon CloudWatch.
Runtime: Python3.6
Memory: 128 MB
IAM Role: WriteMetricFromStepFunction

import boto3

def handler(event, context):
    cw = boto3.client('cloudwatch')
    ecs = boto3.client('ecs')
    print('Got boto3 client objects')
    
    Dimension = {
        'Name': 'ClusterName',
        'Value': event['ECSClusterName']
    }

    cluster = get_ecs_cluster(ecs, Dimension['Value'])
    
    cw_args = {
       'Namespace': 'ECS',
       'MetricData': [
           {
               'MetricName': 'RunningTask',
               'Dimensions': [ Dimension ],
               'Value': cluster['runningTasksCount'],
               'Unit': 'Count',
               'StorageResolution': 1
           },
           {
               'MetricName': 'PendingTask',
               'Dimensions': [ Dimension ],
               'Value': cluster['pendingTasksCount'],
               'Unit': 'Count',
               'StorageResolution': 1
           },
           {
               'MetricName': 'ActiveServices',
               'Dimensions': [ Dimension ],
               'Value': cluster['activeServicesCount'],
               'Unit': 'Count',
               'StorageResolution': 1
           },
           {
               'MetricName': 'RegisteredContainerInstances',
               'Dimensions': [ Dimension ],
               'Value': cluster['registeredContainerInstancesCount'],
               'Unit': 'Count',
               'StorageResolution': 1
           }
        ]
    }
    cw.put_metric_data(**cw_args)
    print('Finished writing metric data')
    
def get_ecs_cluster(client, cluster_name):
    cluster = client.describe_clusters(clusters = [ cluster_name ])
    print('Retrieved cluster details from ECS')
    return cluster['clusters'][0]

Create the CloudWatch Events rule

Now you’ve created an IAM role and policy, Step Functions state machine, and Lambda function. How do these components actually start communicating with each other? The final step in this process is to set up a CloudWatch Events rule that triggers your metric-gathering Step Functions state machine every minute. You have two choices for your CloudWatch Events rule expression: rate or cron. In this example, use the cron expression.

A couple key learning points from creating the CloudWatch Events rule:

  • You can specify one or more targets, of different types (for example, Lambda function, Step Functions state machine, SNS topic, and so on).
  • You’re required to specify an IAM role with permissions to trigger your target.
    NOTE: This applies only to certain types of targets, including Step Functions state machines.
  • Each target that supports IAM roles can be triggered using a different IAM role, in the same CloudWatch Events rule.
  • Optional: You can provide custom JSON that is passed to your target Step Functions state machine as input.

Follow these steps to create the CloudWatch Events rule:

  1. Open the CloudWatch console.
  2. Choose Events, RulesCreate Rule.
  3. Select Schedule, Cron Expression, and then enter the following rule:
    0/1 * * * ? *
  4. Choose Add Target, Step Functions State MachineWriteMetricFromStepFunction.
  5. For Configure Input, select Constant (JSON Text).
  6. Enter the following JSON input, which is passed to Step Functions, while changing the cluster name accordingly:
    { "ECSClusterName": "ECSEsgaroth" }
  7. Choose Use Existing Role, WriteMetricFromStepFunction (the IAM role that you previously created).

After you’ve completed with these steps, your screen should look similar to this:

Validate the solution

Now that you have finished implementing the solution to gather high-resolution metrics from ECS, validate that it’s working properly.

  1. Open the CloudWatch console.
  2. Choose Metrics.
  3. Choose custom and select the ECS namespace.
  4. Choose the ClusterName metric dimension.

You should see your metrics listed below.

Troubleshoot configuration issues

If you aren’t receiving the expected ECS cluster metrics in CloudWatch, check for the following common configuration issues. Review the earlier procedures to make sure that the resources were properly configured.

  • The IAM role’s trust relationship is incorrectly configured.
    Make sure that the IAM role trusts Lambda, CloudWatch Events, and Step Functions in the correct region.
  • The IAM role does not have the correct policies attached to it.
    Make sure that you have copied the IAM policy correctly as an inline policy on the IAM role.
  • The CloudWatch Events rule is not triggering new Step Functions executions.
    Make sure that the target configuration on the rule has the correct Step Functions state machine and IAM role selected.
  • The Step Functions state machine is being executed, but failing part way through.
    Examine the detailed error message on the failed state within the failed Step Functions execution. It’s possible that the
  • IAM role does not have permissions to trigger the target Lambda function, that the target Lambda function may not exist, or that the Lambda function failed to complete successfully due to invalid permissions.
    Although the above list covers several different potential configuration issues, it is not comprehensive. Make sure that you understand how each service is connected to each other, how permissions are granted through IAM policies, and how IAM trust relationships work.

Conclusion

In this post, you implemented a Serverless solution to gather and record high-resolution application metrics from containers running on Amazon ECS into CloudWatch. The solution consists of a Step Functions state machine, Lambda function, CloudWatch Events rule, and an IAM role and policy. The data that you gather from this solution helps you rapidly identify issues with an ECS cluster.

To gather high-resolution metrics from any service, modify your Lambda function to gather the correct metrics from your target. If you prefer not to use Python, you can implement a Lambda function using one of the other supported runtimes, including Node.js, Java, or .NET Core. However, this post should give you the fundamental basics about capturing high-resolution metrics in CloudWatch.

If you found this post useful, or have questions, please comment below.

Creating a Cost-Efficient Amazon ECS Cluster for Scheduled Tasks

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/creating-a-cost-efficient-amazon-ecs-cluster-for-scheduled-tasks/

Madhuri Peri
Sr. DevOps Consultant

When you use Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS), depending on the logging levels on the RDS instances and the volume of transactions, you could generate a lot of log data. To ensure that everything is running smoothly, many customers search for log error patterns using different log aggregation and visualization systems, such as Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Splunk, or other tool of their choice. A module needs to periodically retrieve the RDS logs using the SDK, and then send them to Amazon S3. From there, you can stream them to your log aggregation tool.

One option is writing an AWS Lambda function to retrieve the log files. However, because of the time that this function needs to execute, depending on the volume of log files retrieved and transferred, it is possible that Lambda could time out on many instances.  Another approach is launching an Amazon EC2 instance that runs this job periodically. However, this would require you to run an EC2 instance continuously, not an optimal use of time or money.

Using the new Amazon CloudWatch integration with Amazon EC2 Container Service, you can trigger this job to run in a container on an existing Amazon ECS cluster. Additionally, this would allow you to improve costs by running containers on a fleet of Spot Instances.

In this post, I will show you how to use the new scheduled tasks (cron) feature in Amazon ECS and launch tasks using CloudWatch events, while leveraging Spot Fleet to maximize availability and cost optimization for containerized workloads.

Architecture

The following diagram shows how the various components described schedule a task that retrieves log files from Amazon RDS database instances, and deposits the logs into an S3 bucket.

Amazon ECS cluster container instances are using Spot Fleet, which is a perfect match for the workload that needs to run when it can. This improves cluster costs.

The task definition defines which Docker image to retrieve from the Amazon EC2 Container Registry (Amazon ECR) repository and run on the Amazon ECS cluster.

The container image has Python code functions to make AWS API calls using boto3. It iterates over the RDS database instances, retrieves the logs, and deposits them in the S3 bucket. Many customers choose these logs to be delivered to their centralized log-store. CloudWatch Events defines the schedule for when the container task has to be launched.

Walkthrough

To provide the basic framework, we have built an AWS CloudFormation template that creates the following resources:

  • Amazon ECR repository for storing the Docker image to be used in the task definition
  • S3 bucket that holds the transferred logs
  • Task definition, with image name and S3 bucket as environment variables provided via input parameter
  • CloudWatch Events rule
  • Amazon ECS cluster
  • Amazon ECS container instances using Spot Fleet
  • IAM roles required for the container instance profiles

Before you begin

Ensure that Git, Docker, and the AWS CLI are installed on your computer.

In your AWS account, instantiate one Amazon Aurora instance using the console. For more information, see Creating an Amazon Aurora DB Cluster.

Implementation Steps

  1. Clone the code from GitHub that performs RDS API calls to retrieve the log files.
    git clone https://github.com/awslabs/aws-ecs-scheduled-tasks.git
  2. Build and tag the image.
    cd aws-ecs-scheduled-tasks/container-code/src && ls

    Dockerfile		rdslogsshipper.py	requirements.txt

    docker build -t rdslogsshipper .

    Sending build context to Docker daemon 9.728 kB
    Step 1 : FROM python:3
     ---> 41397f4f2887
    Step 2 : WORKDIR /usr/src/app
     ---> Using cache
     ---> 59299c020e7e
    Step 3 : COPY requirements.txt ./
     ---> 8c017e931c3b
    Removing intermediate container df09e1bed9f2
    Step 4 : COPY rdslogsshipper.py /usr/src/app
     ---> 099a49ca4325
    Removing intermediate container 1b1da24a6699
    Step 5 : RUN pip install --no-cache-dir -r requirements.txt
     ---> Running in 3ed98b30901d
    Collecting boto3 (from -r requirements.txt (line 1))
      Downloading boto3-1.4.6-py2.py3-none-any.whl (128kB)
    Collecting botocore (from -r requirements.txt (line 2))
      Downloading botocore-1.6.7-py2.py3-none-any.whl (3.6MB)
    Collecting s3transfer<0.2.0,>=0.1.10 (from boto3->-r requirements.txt (line 1))
      Downloading s3transfer-0.1.10-py2.py3-none-any.whl (54kB)
    Collecting jmespath<1.0.0,>=0.7.1 (from boto3->-r requirements.txt (line 1))
      Downloading jmespath-0.9.3-py2.py3-none-any.whl
    Collecting python-dateutil<3.0.0,>=2.1 (from botocore->-r requirements.txt (line 2))
      Downloading python_dateutil-2.6.1-py2.py3-none-any.whl (194kB)
    Collecting docutils>=0.10 (from botocore->-r requirements.txt (line 2))
      Downloading docutils-0.14-py3-none-any.whl (543kB)
    Collecting six>=1.5 (from python-dateutil<3.0.0,>=2.1->botocore->-r requirements.txt (line 2))
      Downloading six-1.10.0-py2.py3-none-any.whl
    Installing collected packages: six, python-dateutil, docutils, jmespath, botocore, s3transfer, boto3
    Successfully installed boto3-1.4.6 botocore-1.6.7 docutils-0.14 jmespath-0.9.3 python-dateutil-2.6.1 s3transfer-0.1.10 six-1.10.0
     ---> f892d3cb7383
    Removing intermediate container 3ed98b30901d
    Step 6 : COPY . .
     ---> ea7550c04fea
    Removing intermediate container b558b3ebd406
    Successfully built ea7550c04fea
  3. Run the CloudFormation stack and get the names for the Amazon ECR repo and S3 bucket. In the stack, choose Outputs.
  4. Open the ECS console and choose Repositories. The rdslogs repo has been created. Choose View Push Commands and follow the instructions to connect to the repository and push the image for the code that you built in Step 2. The screenshot shows the final result:
  5. Associate the CloudWatch scheduled task with the created Amazon ECS Task Definition, using a new CloudWatch event rule that is scheduled to run at intervals. The following rule is scheduled to run every 15 minutes:
    aws --profile default --region us-west-2 events put-rule --name demo-ecs-task-rule  --schedule-expression "rate(15 minutes)"

    {
        "RuleArn": "arn:aws:events:us-west-2:12345678901:rule/demo-ecs-task-rule"
    }
  6. CloudWatch requires IAM permissions to place a task on the Amazon ECS cluster when the CloudWatch event rule is executed, in addition to an IAM role that can be assumed by CloudWatch Events. This is done in three steps:
    1. Create the IAM role to be assumed by CloudWatch.
      aws --profile default --region us-west-2 iam create-role --role-name Test-Role --assume-role-policy-document file://event-role.json

      {
          "Role": {
              "AssumeRolePolicyDocument": {
                  "Version": "2012-10-17", 
                  "Statement": [
                      {
                          "Action": "sts:AssumeRole", 
                          "Effect": "Allow", 
                          "Principal": {
                              "Service": "events.amazonaws.com"
                          }
                      }
                  ]
              }, 
              "RoleId": "AROAIRYYLDCVZCUACT7FS", 
              "CreateDate": "2017-07-14T22:44:52.627Z", 
              "RoleName": "Test-Role", 
              "Path": "/", 
              "Arn": "arn:aws:iam::12345678901:role/Test-Role"
          }
      }

      The following is an example of the event-role.json file used earlier:

      {
          "Version": "2012-10-17",
          "Statement": [
              {
                  "Effect": "Allow",
                  "Principal": {
                    "Service": "events.amazonaws.com"
                  },
                  "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
              }
          ]
      }
    2. Create the IAM policy defining the ECS cluster and task definition. You need to get these values from the CloudFormation outputs and resources.
      aws --profile default --region us-west-2 iam create-policy --policy-name test-policy --policy-document file://event-policy.json

      {
          "Policy": {
              "PolicyName": "test-policy", 
              "CreateDate": "2017-07-14T22:51:20.293Z", 
              "AttachmentCount": 0, 
              "IsAttachable": true, 
              "PolicyId": "ANPAI7XDIQOLTBUMDWGJW", 
              "DefaultVersionId": "v1", 
              "Path": "/", 
              "Arn": "arn:aws:iam::123455678901:policy/test-policy", 
              "UpdateDate": "2017-07-14T22:51:20.293Z"
          }
      }

      The following is an example of the event-policy.json file used earlier:

      {
          "Version": "2012-10-17",
          "Statement": [
            {
                "Effect": "Allow",
                "Action": [
                    "ecs:RunTask"
                ],
                "Resource": [
                    "arn:aws:ecs:*::task-definition/"
                ],
                "Condition": {
                    "ArnLike": {
                        "ecs:cluster": "arn:aws:ecs:*::cluster/"
                    }
                }
            }
          ]
      }
    3. Attach the IAM policy to the role.
      aws --profile default --region us-west-2 iam attach-role-policy --role-name Test-Role --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::1234567890:policy/test-policy
  7. Associate the CloudWatch rule created earlier to place the task on the ECS cluster. The following command shows an example. Replace the AWS account ID and region with your settings.
    aws events put-targets --rule demo-ecs-task-rule --targets "Id"="1","Arn"="arn:aws:ecs:us-west-2:12345678901:cluster/test-cwe-blog-ecsCluster-15HJFWCH4SP67","EcsParameters"={"TaskDefinitionArn"="arn:aws:ecs:us-west-2:12345678901:task-definition/test-cwe-blog-taskdef:8"},"RoleArn"="arn:aws:iam::12345678901:role/Test-Role"

    {
        "FailedEntries": [], 
        "FailedEntryCount": 0
    }

That’s it. The logs now run based on the defined schedule.

To test this, open the Amazon ECS console, select the Amazon ECS cluster that you created, and then choose Tasks, Run New Task. Select the task definition created by the CloudFormation template, and the cluster should be selected automatically. As this runs, the S3 bucket should be populated with the RDS logs for the instance.

Conclusion

In this post, you’ve seen that the choices for workloads that need to run at a scheduled time include Lambda with CloudWatch events or EC2 with cron. However, sometimes the job could run outside of Lambda execution time limits or be not cost-effective for an EC2 instance.

In such cases, you can schedule the tasks on an ECS cluster using CloudWatch rules. In addition, you can use a Spot Fleet cluster with Amazon ECS for cost-conscious workloads that do not have hard requirements on execution time or instance availability in the Spot Fleet. For more information, see Powering your Amazon ECS Cluster with Amazon EC2 Spot Instances and Scheduled Events.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

Build a Serverless Architecture to Analyze Amazon CloudFront Access Logs Using AWS Lambda, Amazon Athena, and Amazon Kinesis Analytics

Post Syndicated from Rajeev Srinivasan original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/build-a-serverless-architecture-to-analyze-amazon-cloudfront-access-logs-using-aws-lambda-amazon-athena-and-amazon-kinesis-analytics/

Nowadays, it’s common for a web server to be fronted by a global content delivery service, like Amazon CloudFront. This type of front end accelerates delivery of websites, APIs, media content, and other web assets to provide a better experience to users across the globe.

The insights gained by analysis of Amazon CloudFront access logs helps improve website availability through bot detection and mitigation, optimizing web content based on the devices and browser used to view your webpages, reducing perceived latency by caching of popular object closer to its viewer, and so on. This results in a significant improvement in the overall perceived experience for the user.

This blog post provides a way to build a serverless architecture to generate some of these insights. To do so, we analyze Amazon CloudFront access logs both at rest and in transit through the stream. This serverless architecture uses Amazon Athena to analyze large volumes of CloudFront access logs (on the scale of terabytes per day), and Amazon Kinesis Analytics for streaming analysis.

The analytic queries in this blog post focus on three common use cases:

  1. Detection of common bots using the user agent string
  2. Calculation of current bandwidth usage per Amazon CloudFront distribution per edge location
  3. Determination of the current top 50 viewers

However, you can easily extend the architecture described to power dashboards for monitoring, reporting, and trigger alarms based on deeper insights gained by processing and analyzing the logs. Some examples are dashboards for cache performance, usage and viewer patterns, and so on.

Following we show a diagram of this architecture.

Prerequisites

Before you set up this architecture, install the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) tool on your local machine, if you don’t have it already.

Setup summary

The following steps are involved in setting up the serverless architecture on the AWS platform:

  1. Create an Amazon S3 bucket for your Amazon CloudFront access logs to be delivered to and stored in.
  2. Create a second Amazon S3 bucket to receive processed logs and store the partitioned data for interactive analysis.
  3. Create an Amazon Kinesis Firehose delivery stream to batch, compress, and deliver the preprocessed logs for analysis.
  4. Create an AWS Lambda function to preprocess the logs for analysis.
  5. Configure Amazon S3 event notification on the CloudFront access logs bucket, which contains the raw logs, to trigger the Lambda preprocessing function.
  6. Create an Amazon DynamoDB table to look up partition details, such as partition specification and partition location.
  7. Create an Amazon Athena table for interactive analysis.
  8. Create a second AWS Lambda function to add new partitions to the Athena table based on the log delivered to the processed logs bucket.
  9. Configure Amazon S3 event notification on the processed logs bucket to trigger the Lambda partitioning function.
  10. Configure Amazon Kinesis Analytics application for analysis of the logs directly from the stream.

ETL and preprocessing

In this section, we parse the CloudFront access logs as they are delivered, which occurs multiple times in an hour. We filter out commented records and use the user agent string to decipher the browser name, the name of the operating system, and whether the request has been made by a bot. For more details on how to decipher the preceding information based on the user agent string, see user-agents 1.1.0 in the Python documentation.

We use the Lambda preprocessing function to perform these tasks on individual rows of the access log. On successful completion, the rows are pushed to an Amazon Kinesis Firehose delivery stream to be persistently stored in an Amazon S3 bucket, the processed logs bucket.

To create a Firehose delivery stream with a new or existing S3 bucket as the destination, follow the steps described in Create a Firehose Delivery Stream to Amazon S3 in the S3 documentation. Keep most of the default settings, but select an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) role that has write access to your S3 bucket and specify GZIP compression. Name the delivery stream CloudFrontLogsToS3.

Another pre-requisite for this setup is to create an IAM role that provides the necessary permissions our AWS Lambda function to get the data from S3, process it, and deliver it to the CloudFrontLogsToS3 delivery stream.

Let’s use the AWS CLI to create the IAM role using the following the steps:

  1. Create the IAM policy (lambda-exec-policy) for the Lambda execution role to use.
  2. Create the Lambda execution role (lambda-cflogs-exec-role) and assign the service to use this role.
  3. Attach the policy created in step 1 to the Lambda execution role.

To download the policy document to your local machine, type the following command.

aws s3 cp s3://aws-bigdata-blog/artifacts/Serverless-CF-Analysis/preprocessiong-lambda/lambda-exec-policy.json  <path_on_your_local_machine>

To download the assume policy document to your local machine, type the following command.

aws s3 cp s3://aws-bigdata-blog/artifacts/Serverless-CF-Analysis/preprocessiong-lambda/assume-lambda-policy.json  <path_on_your_local_machine>

Following is the lambda-exec-policy.json file, which is the IAM policy used by the Lambda execution role.

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Sid": "CloudWatchAccess",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "logs:CreateLogGroup",
                "logs:CreateLogStream",
                "logs:PutLogEvents"
            ],
            "Resource": "arn:aws:logs:*:*:*"
        },
        {
            "Sid": "S3Access",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "s3:GetObject",
                "s3:PutObject"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:s3:::*"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Sid": "FirehoseAccess",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "firehose:ListDeliveryStreams",
                "firehose:PutRecord",
                "firehose:PutRecordBatch"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:firehose:*:*:deliverystream/CloudFrontLogsToS3"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

To create the IAM policy used by Lambda execution role, type the following command.

aws iam create-policy --policy-name lambda-exec-policy --policy-document file://<path>/lambda-exec-policy.json

To create the AWS Lambda execution role and assign the service to use this role, type the following command.

aws iam create-role --role-name lambda-cflogs-exec-role --assume-role-policy-document file://<path>/assume-lambda-policy.json

Following is the assume-lambda-policy.json file, to grant Lambda permission to assume a role.

{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "Service": "lambda.amazonaws.com"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
    }
  ]
}

To attach the policy (lambda-exec-policy) created to the AWS Lambda execution role (lambda-cflogs-exec-role), type the following command.

aws iam attach-role-policy --role-name lambda-cflogs-exec-role --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::<your-account-id>:policy/lambda-exec-policy

Now that we have created the CloudFrontLogsToS3 Firehose delivery stream and the lambda-cflogs-exec-role IAM role for Lambda, the next step is to create a Lambda preprocessing function.

This Lambda preprocessing function parses the CloudFront access logs delivered into the S3 bucket and performs a few transformation and mapping operations on the data. The Lambda function adds descriptive information, such as the browser and the operating system that were used to make this request based on the user agent string found in the logs. The Lambda function also adds information about the web distribution to support scenarios where CloudFront access logs are delivered to a centralized S3 bucket from multiple distributions. With the solution in this blog post, you can get insights across distributions and their edge locations.

Use the Lambda Management Console to create a new Lambda function with a Python 2.7 runtime and the s3-get-object-python blueprint. Open the console, and on the Configure triggers page, choose the name of the S3 bucket where the CloudFront access logs are delivered. Choose Put for Event type. For Prefix, type the name of the prefix, if any, for the folder where CloudFront access logs are delivered, for example cloudfront-logs/. To invoke Lambda to retrieve the logs from the S3 bucket as they are delivered, select Enable trigger.

Choose Next and provide a function name to identify this Lambda preprocessing function.

For Code entry type, choose Upload a file from Amazon S3. For S3 link URL, type https.amazonaws.com//preprocessing-lambda/pre-data.zip. In the section, also create an environment variable with the key KINESIS_FIREHOSE_STREAM and a value with the name of the Firehose delivery stream as CloudFrontLogsToS3.

Choose lambda-cflogs-exec-role as the IAM role for the Lambda function, and type prep-data.lambda_handler for the value for Handler.

Choose Next, and then choose Create Lambda.

Table creation in Amazon Athena

In this step, we will build the Athena table. Use the Athena console in the same region and create the table using the query editor.

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE IF NOT EXISTS cf_logs (
  logdate date,
  logtime string,
  location string,
  bytes bigint,
  requestip string,
  method string,
  host string,
  uri string,
  status bigint,
  referrer string,
  useragent string,
  uriquery string,
  cookie string,
  resulttype string,
  requestid string,
  header string,
  csprotocol string,
  csbytes string,
  timetaken bigint,
  forwardedfor string,
  sslprotocol string,
  sslcipher string,
  responseresulttype string,
  protocolversion string,
  browserfamily string,
  osfamily string,
  isbot string,
  filename string,
  distribution string
)
PARTITIONED BY(year string, month string, day string, hour string)
ROW FORMAT DELIMITED
FIELDS TERMINATED BY '\t'
LOCATION 's3://<pre-processing-log-bucket>/prefix/';

Creation of the Athena partition

A popular website with millions of requests each day routed using Amazon CloudFront can generate a large volume of logs, on the order of a few terabytes a day. We strongly recommend that you partition your data to effectively restrict the amount of data scanned by each query. Partitioning significantly improves query performance and substantially reduces cost. The Lambda partitioning function adds the partition information to the Athena table for the data delivered to the preprocessed logs bucket.

Before delivering the preprocessed Amazon CloudFront logs file into the preprocessed logs bucket, Amazon Kinesis Firehose adds a UTC time prefix in the format YYYY/MM/DD/HH. This approach supports multilevel partitioning of the data by year, month, date, and hour. You can invoke the Lambda partitioning function every time a new processed Amazon CloudFront log is delivered to the preprocessed logs bucket. To do so, configure the Lambda partitioning function to be triggered by an S3 Put event.

For a website with millions of requests, a large number of preprocessed logs can be delivered multiple times in an hour—for example, at the interval of one each second. To avoid querying the Athena table for partition information every time a preprocessed log file is delivered, you can create an Amazon DynamoDB table for fast lookup.

Based on the year, month, data and hour in the prefix of the delivered log, the Lambda partitioning function checks if the partition specification exists in the Amazon DynamoDB table. If it doesn’t, it’s added to the table using an atomic operation, and then the Athena table is updated.

Type the following command to create the Amazon DynamoDB table.

aws dynamodb create-table --table-name athenapartitiondetails \
--attribute-definitions AttributeName=PartitionSpec,AttributeType=S \
--key-schema AttributeName=PartitionSpec,KeyType=HASH \
--provisioned-throughput ReadCapacityUnits=100,WriteCapacityUnits=100

Here the following is true:

  • PartitionSpec is the hash key and is a representation of the partition signature—for example, year=”2017”; month=”05”; day=”15”; hour=”10”.
  • Depending on the rate at which the processed log files are delivered to the processed log bucket, you might have to increase the ReadCapacityUnits and WriteCapacityUnits values, if these are throttled.

The other attributes besides PartitionSpec are the following:

  • PartitionPath – The S3 path associated with the partition.
  • PartitionType – The type of partition used (Hour, Month, Date, Year, or ALL). In this case, ALL is used.

Next step is to create the IAM role to provide permissions for the Lambda partitioning function. You require permissions to do the following:

  1. Look up and write partition information to DynamoDB.
  2. Alter the Athena table with new partition information.
  3. Perform Amazon CloudWatch logs operations.
  4. Perform Amazon S3 operations.

To download the policy document to your local machine, type following command.

aws s3 cp s3://aws-bigdata-blog/artifacts/Serverless-CF-Analysis/partitioning-lambda/lambda-partition-function-execution-policy.json  <path_on_your_local_machine>

To download the assume policy document to your local machine, type the following command.

aws s3 cp s3://aws-bigdata-blog/artifacts/Serverless-CF-Analysis/partitioning-lambda/assume-lambda-policy.json <path_on_your_local_machine>

To create the Lambda execution role and assign the service to use this role, type the following command.

aws iam create-role --role-name lambda-cflogs-exec-role --assume-role-policy-document file://<path>/assume-lambda-policy.json

Let’s use the AWS CLI to create the IAM role using the following three steps:

  1. Create the IAM policy(lambda-partition-exec-policy) used by the Lambda execution role.
  2. Create the Lambda execution role (lambda-partition-execution-role)and assign the service to use this role.
  3. Attach the policy created in step 1 to the Lambda execution role.

To create the IAM policy used by Lambda execution role, type the following command.

aws iam create-policy --policy-name lambda-partition-exec-policy --policy-document file://<path>/lambda-partition-function-execution-policy.json

To create the Lambda execution role and assign the service to use this role, type the following command.

aws iam create-role --role-name lambda-partition-execution-role --assume-role-policy-document file://<path>/assume-lambda-policy.json

To attach the policy (lambda-partition-exec-policy) created to the AWS Lambda execution role (lambda-partition-execution-role), type the following command.

aws iam attach-role-policy --role-name lambda-partition-execution-role --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::<your-account-id>:policy/lambda-partition-exec-policy

Following is the lambda-partition-function-execution-policy.json file, which is the IAM policy used by the Lambda execution role.

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
      	{
            	"Sid": "DDBTableAccess",
            	"Effect": "Allow",
            	"Action": "dynamodb:PutItem"
            	"Resource": "arn:aws:dynamodb*:*:table/athenapartitiondetails"
        	},
        	{
            	"Sid": "S3Access",
            	"Effect": "Allow",
            	"Action": [
                		"s3:GetBucketLocation",
                		"s3:GetObject",
                		"s3:ListBucket",
                		"s3:ListBucketMultipartUploads",
                		"s3:ListMultipartUploadParts",
                		"s3:AbortMultipartUpload",
                		"s3:PutObject"
            	],
          		"Resource":"arn:aws:s3:::*"
		},
	              {
		      "Sid": "AthenaAccess",
      		"Effect": "Allow",
      		"Action": [ "athena:*" ],
      		"Resource": [ "*" ]
	      },
        	{
            	"Sid": "CloudWatchLogsAccess",
            	"Effect": "Allow",
            	"Action": [
                		"logs:CreateLogGroup",
                		"logs:CreateLogStream",
             	   	"logs:PutLogEvents"
            	],
            	"Resource": "arn:aws:logs:*:*:*"
        	}
    ]
}

Download the .jar file containing the Java deployment package to your local machine.

aws s3 cp s3://aws-bigdata-blog/artifacts/Serverless-CF-Analysis/partitioning-lambda/aws-lambda-athena-1.0.0.jar <path_on_your_local_machine>

From the AWS Management Console, create a new Lambda function with Java8 as the runtime. Select the Blank Function blueprint.

On the Configure triggers page, choose the name of the S3 bucket where the preprocessed logs are delivered. Choose Put for the Event Type. For Prefix, type the name of the prefix folder, if any, where preprocessed logs are delivered by Firehose—for example, out/. For Suffix, type the name of the compression format that the Firehose stream (CloudFrontLogToS3) delivers the preprocessed logs —for example, gz. To invoke Lambda to retrieve the logs from the S3 bucket as they are delivered, select Enable Trigger.

Choose Next and provide a function name to identify this Lambda partitioning function.

Choose Java8 for Runtime for the AWS Lambda function. Choose Upload a .ZIP or .JAR file for the Code entry type, and choose Upload to upload the downloaded aws-lambda-athena-1.0.0.jar file.

Next, create the following environment variables for the Lambda function:

  • TABLE_NAME – The name of the Athena table (for example, cf_logs).
  • PARTITION_TYPE – The partition to be created based on the Athena table for the logs delivered to the sub folders in S3 bucket based on Year, Month, Date, Hour, or Set this to ALL to use Year, Month, Date, and Hour.
  • DDB_TABLE_NAME – The name of the DynamoDB table holding partition information (for example, athenapartitiondetails).
  • ATHENA_REGION – The current AWS Region for the Athena table to construct the JDBC connection string.
  • S3_STAGING_DIR – The Amazon S3 location where your query output is written. The JDBC driver asks Athena to read the results and provide rows of data back to the user (for example, s3://<bucketname>/<folder>/).

To configure the function handler and IAM, for Handler copy and paste the name of the handler: com.amazonaws.services.lambda.CreateAthenaPartitionsBasedOnS3EventWithDDB::handleRequest. Choose the existing IAM role, lambda-partition-execution-role.

Choose Next and then Create Lambda.

Interactive analysis using Amazon Athena

In this section, we analyze the historical data that’s been collected since we added the partitions to the Amazon Athena table for data delivered to the preprocessing logs bucket.

Scenario 1 is robot traffic by edge location.

SELECT COUNT(*) AS ct, requestip, location FROM cf_logs
WHERE isbot='True'
GROUP BY requestip, location
ORDER BY ct DESC;

Scenario 2 is total bytes transferred per distribution for each edge location for your website.

SELECT distribution, location, SUM(bytes) as totalBytes
FROM cf_logs
GROUP BY location, distribution;

Scenario 3 is the top 50 viewers of your website.

SELECT requestip, COUNT(*) AS ct  FROM cf_logs
GROUP BY requestip
ORDER BY ct DESC;

Streaming analysis using Amazon Kinesis Analytics

In this section, you deploy a stream processing application using Amazon Kinesis Analytics to analyze the preprocessed Amazon CloudFront log streams. This application analyzes directly from the Amazon Kinesis Stream as it is delivered to the preprocessing logs bucket. The stream queries in section are focused on gaining the following insights:

  • The IP address of the bot, identified by its Amazon CloudFront edge location, that is currently sending requests to your website. The query also includes the total bytes transferred as part of the response.
  • The total bytes served per distribution per population for your website.
  • The top 10 viewers of your website.

To download the firehose-access-policy.json file, type the following.

aws s3 cp s3://aws-bigdata-blog/artifacts/Serverless-CF-Analysis/kinesisanalytics/firehose-access-policy.json  <path_on_your_local_machine>

To download the kinesisanalytics-policy.json file, type the following.

aws s3 cp s3://aws-bigdata-blog/artifacts/Serverless-CF-Analysis/kinesisanalytics/assume-kinesisanalytics-policy.json <path_on_your_local_machine>

Before we create the Amazon Kinesis Analytics application, we need to create the IAM role to provide permission for the analytics application to access Amazon Kinesis Firehose stream.

Let’s use the AWS CLI to create the IAM role using the following three steps:

  1. Create the IAM policy(firehose-access-policy) for the Lambda execution role to use.
  2. Create the Lambda execution role (ka-execution-role) and assign the service to use this role.
  3. Attach the policy created in step 1 to the Lambda execution role.

Following is the firehose-access-policy.json file, which is the IAM policy used by Kinesis Analytics to read Firehose delivery stream.

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
      	{
    	"Sid": "AmazonFirehoseAccess",
    	"Effect": "Allow",
    	"Action": [
       	"firehose:DescribeDeliveryStream",
        	"firehose:Get*"
    	],
    	"Resource": [
              "arn:aws:firehose:*:*:deliverystream/CloudFrontLogsToS3”
       ]
     }
}

Following is the assume-kinesisanalytics-policy.json file, to grant Amazon Kinesis Analytics permissions to assume a role.

{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "Service": "kinesisanalytics.amazonaws.com"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
    }
  ]
}

To create the IAM policy used by Analytics access role, type the following command.

aws iam create-policy --policy-name firehose-access-policy --policy-document file://<path>/firehose-access-policy.json

To create the Analytics execution role and assign the service to use this role, type the following command.

aws iam attach-role-policy --role-name ka-execution-role --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::<your-account-id>:policy/firehose-access-policy

To attach the policy (irehose-access-policy) created to the Analytics execution role (ka-execution-role), type the following command.

aws iam attach-role-policy --role-name ka-execution-role --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::<your-account-id>:policy/firehose-access-policy

To deploy the Analytics application, first download the configuration file and then modify ResourceARN and RoleARN for the Amazon Kinesis Firehose input configuration.

"KinesisFirehoseInput": { 
    "ResourceARN": "arn:aws:firehose:<region>:<account-id>:deliverystream/CloudFrontLogsToS3", 
    "RoleARN": "arn:aws:iam:<account-id>:role/ka-execution-role"
}

To download the Analytics application configuration file, type the following command.

aws s3 cp s3://aws-bigdata-blog/artifacts/Serverless-CF-Analysis//kinesisanalytics/kinesis-analytics-app-configuration.json <path_on_your_local_machine>

To deploy the application, type the following command.

aws kinesisanalytics create-application --application-name "cf-log-analysis" --cli-input-json file://<path>/kinesis-analytics-app-configuration.json

To start the application, type the following command.

aws kinesisanalytics start-application --application-name "cf-log-analysis" --input-configuration Id="1.1",InputStartingPositionConfiguration={InputStartingPosition="NOW"}

SQL queries using Amazon Kinesis Analytics

Scenario 1 is a query for detecting bots for sending request to your website detection for your website.

-- Create output stream, which can be used to send to a destination
CREATE OR REPLACE STREAM "BOT_DETECTION" (requesttime TIME, destribution VARCHAR(16), requestip VARCHAR(64), edgelocation VARCHAR(64), totalBytes BIGINT);
-- Create pump to insert into output 
CREATE OR REPLACE PUMP "BOT_DETECTION_PUMP" AS INSERT INTO "BOT_DETECTION"
--
SELECT STREAM 
    STEP("CF_LOG_STREAM_001"."request_time" BY INTERVAL '1' SECOND) as requesttime,
    "distribution_name" as distribution,
    "request_ip" as requestip, 
    "edge_location" as edgelocation, 
    SUM("bytes") as totalBytes
FROM "CF_LOG_STREAM_001"
WHERE "is_bot" = true
GROUP BY "request_ip", "edge_location", "distribution_name",
STEP("CF_LOG_STREAM_001"."request_time" BY INTERVAL '1' SECOND),
STEP("CF_LOG_STREAM_001".ROWTIME BY INTERVAL '1' SECOND);

Scenario 2 is a query for total bytes transferred per distribution for each edge location for your website.

-- Create output stream, which can be used to send to a destination
CREATE OR REPLACE STREAM "BYTES_TRANSFFERED" (requesttime TIME, destribution VARCHAR(16), edgelocation VARCHAR(64), totalBytes BIGINT);
-- Create pump to insert into output 
CREATE OR REPLACE PUMP "BYTES_TRANSFFERED_PUMP" AS INSERT INTO "BYTES_TRANSFFERED"
-- Bytes Transffered per second per web destribution by edge location
SELECT STREAM 
    STEP("CF_LOG_STREAM_001"."request_time" BY INTERVAL '1' SECOND) as requesttime,
    "distribution_name" as distribution,
    "edge_location" as edgelocation, 
    SUM("bytes") as totalBytes
FROM "CF_LOG_STREAM_001"
GROUP BY "distribution_name", "edge_location", "request_date",
STEP("CF_LOG_STREAM_001"."request_time" BY INTERVAL '1' SECOND),
STEP("CF_LOG_STREAM_001".ROWTIME BY INTERVAL '1' SECOND);

Scenario 3 is a query for the top 50 viewers for your website.

-- Create output stream, which can be used to send to a destination
CREATE OR REPLACE STREAM "TOP_TALKERS" (requestip VARCHAR(64), requestcount DOUBLE);
-- Create pump to insert into output 
CREATE OR REPLACE PUMP "TOP_TALKERS_PUMP" AS INSERT INTO "TOP_TALKERS"
-- Top Ten Talker
SELECT STREAM ITEM as requestip, ITEM_COUNT as requestcount FROM TABLE(TOP_K_ITEMS_TUMBLING(
  CURSOR(SELECT STREAM * FROM "CF_LOG_STREAM_001"),
  'request_ip', -- name of column in single quotes
  50, -- number of top items
  60 -- tumbling window size in seconds
  )
);

Conclusion

Following the steps in this blog post, you just built an end-to-end serverless architecture to analyze Amazon CloudFront access logs. You analyzed these both in interactive and streaming mode, using Amazon Athena and Amazon Kinesis Analytics respectively.

By creating a partition in Athena for the logs delivered to a centralized bucket, this architecture is optimized for performance and cost when analyzing large volumes of logs for popular websites that receive millions of requests. Here, we have focused on just three common use cases for analysis, sharing the analytic queries as part of the post. However, you can extend this architecture to gain deeper insights and generate usage reports to reduce latency and increase availability. This way, you can provide a better experience on your websites fronted with Amazon CloudFront.

In this blog post, we focused on building serverless architecture to analyze Amazon CloudFront access logs. Our plan is to extend the solution to provide rich visualization as part of our next blog post.


About the Authors

Rajeev Srinivasan is a Senior Solution Architect for AWS. He works very close with our customers to provide big data and NoSQL solution leveraging the AWS platform and enjoys coding . In his spare time he enjoys riding his motorcycle and reading books.

 

Sai Sriparasa is a consultant with AWS Professional Services. He works with our customers to provide strategic and tactical big data solutions with an emphasis on automation, operations & security on AWS. In his spare time, he follows sports and current affairs.

 

 


Related

Analyzing VPC Flow Logs with Amazon Kinesis Firehose, Amazon Athena, and Amazon QuickSight