Tag Archives: certifications

Getting Ready for AWS re:Invent 2017

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/getting-ready-for-aws-reinvent-2017/

With just 40 days remaining before AWS re:Invent begins, my colleagues and I want to share some tips that will help you to make the most of your time in Las Vegas. As always, our focus is on training and education, mixed in with some after-hours fun and recreation for balance.

Locations, Locations, Locations
The re:Invent Campus will span the length of the Las Vegas strip, with events taking place at the MGM Grand, Aria, Mirage, Venetian, Palazzo, the Sands Expo Hall, the Linq Lot, and the Encore. Each venue will host tracks devoted to specific topics:

MGM Grand – Business Apps, Enterprise, Security, Compliance, Identity, Windows.

Aria – Analytics & Big Data, Alexa, Container, IoT, AI & Machine Learning, and Serverless.

Mirage – Bootcamps, Certifications & Certification Exams.

Venetian / Palazzo / Sands Expo Hall – Architecture, AWS Marketplace & Service Catalog, Compute, Content Delivery, Database, DevOps, Mobile, Networking, and Storage.

Linq Lot – Alexa Hackathons, Gameday, Jam Sessions, re:Play Party, Speaker Meet & Greets.

EncoreBookable meeting space.

If your interests span more than one topic, plan to take advantage of the re:Invent shuttles that will be making the rounds between the venues.

Lots of Content
The re:Invent Session Catalog is now live and you should start to choose the sessions of interest to you now.

With more than 1100 sessions on the agenda, planning is essential! Some of the most popular “deep dive” sessions will be run more than once and others will be streamed to overflow rooms at other venues. We’ve analyzed a lot of data, run some simulations, and are doing our best to provide you with multiple opportunities to build an action-packed schedule.

We’re just about ready to let you reserve seats for your sessions (follow me and/or @awscloud on Twitter for a heads-up). Based on feedback from earlier years, we have fine-tuned our seat reservation model. This year, 75% of the seats for each session will be reserved and the other 25% are for walk-up attendees. We’ll start to admit walk-in attendees 10 minutes before the start of the session.

Las Vegas never sleeps and neither should you! This year we have a host of late-night sessions, workshops, chalk talks, and hands-on labs to keep you busy after dark.

To learn more about our plans for sessions and content, watch the Get Ready for re:Invent 2017 Content Overview video.

Have Fun
After you’ve had enough training and learning for the day, plan to attend the Pub Crawl, the re:Play party, the Tatonka Challenge (two locations this year), our Hands-On LEGO Activities, and the Harley Ride. Stay fit with our 4K Run, Spinning Challenge, Fitness Bootcamps, and Broomball (a longstanding Amazon tradition).

See You in Vegas
As always, I am looking forward to meeting as many AWS users and blog readers as possible. Never hesitate to stop me and to say hello!

Jeff;

 

 

Skill up on how to perform CI/CD with AWS Developer tools

Post Syndicated from Chirag Dhull original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/skill-up-on-how-to-perform-cicd-with-aws-devops-tools/

This is a guest post from Paul Duvall, CTO of Stelligent, a division of HOSTING.

I co-founded Stelligent, a technology services company that provides DevOps Automation on AWS as a result of my own frustration in implementing all the “behind the scenes” infrastructure (including builds, tests, deployments, etc.) on software projects on which I was developing software. At Stelligent, we have worked with numerous customers looking to get software delivered to users quicker and with greater confidence. This sounds simple but it often consists of properly configuring and integrating myriad tools including, but not limited to, version control, build, static analysis, testing, security, deployment, and software release orchestration. What some might not realize is that there’s a new breed of build, deploy, test, and release tools that help reduce much of the undifferentiated heavy lifting of deploying and releasing software to users.

 
I’ve been using AWS since 2009 and I, along with many at Stelligent – have worked with the AWS Service Teams as part of the AWS Developer Tools betas that are now generally available (including AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodeBuild, and AWS CodeDeploy). I’ve combined the experience we’ve had with customers along with this specialized knowledge of the AWS Developer and Management Tools to provide a unique course that shows multiple ways to use these services to deliver software to users quicker and with confidence.

 
In DevOps Essentials on AWS, you’ll learn how to accelerate software delivery and speed up feedback loops by learning how to use AWS Developer Tools to automate infrastructure and deployment pipelines for applications running on AWS. The course demonstrates solutions for various DevOps use cases for Amazon EC2, AWS OpsWorks, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, AWS Lambda (Serverless), Amazon ECS (Containers), while defining infrastructure as code and learning more about AWS Developer Tools including AWS CodeStar, AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodeBuild, AWS CodePipeline, and AWS CodeDeploy.

 
In this course, you see me use the AWS Developer and Management Tools to create comprehensive continuous delivery solutions for a sample application using many types of AWS service platforms. You can run the exact same sample and/or fork the GitHub repository (https://github.com/stelligent/devops-essentials) and extend or modify the solutions. I’m excited to share how you can use AWS Developer Tools to create these solutions for your customers as well. There’s also an accompanying website for the course (http://www.devopsessentialsaws.com/) that I use in the video to walk through the course examples which link to resources located in GitHub or Amazon S3. In this course, you will learn how to:

  • Use AWS Developer and Management Tools to create a full-lifecycle software delivery solution
  • Use AWS CloudFormation to automate the provisioning of all AWS resources
  • Use AWS CodePipeline to orchestrate the deployments of all applications
  • Use AWS CodeCommit while deploying an application onto EC2 instances using AWS CodeBuild and AWS CodeDeploy
  • Deploy applications using AWS OpsWorks and AWS Elastic Beanstalk
  • Deploy an application using Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) along with AWS CloudFormation
  • Deploy serverless applications that use AWS Lambda and API Gateway
  • Integrate all AWS Developer Tools into an end-to-end solution with AWS CodeStar

To learn more, see DevOps Essentials on AWS video course on Udemy. For a limited time, you can enroll in this course for $40 and save 80%, a $160 saving. Simply use the code AWSDEV17.

 
Stelligent, an AWS Partner Network Advanced Consulting Partner holds the AWS DevOps Competency and over 100 AWS technical certifications. To stay updated on DevOps best practices, visit www.stelligent.com.

AWS Earns Department of Defense Impact Level 5 Provisional Authorization

Post Syndicated from Chris Gile original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-earns-department-of-defense-impact-level-5-provisional-authorization/

AWS GovCloud (US) Region image

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) has granted the AWS GovCloud (US) Region an Impact Level 5 (IL5) Department of Defense (DoD) Cloud Computing Security Requirements Guide (CC SRG) Provisional Authorization (PA) for six core services. This means that AWS’s DoD customers and partners can now deploy workloads for Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) exceeding IL4 and for unclassified National Security Systems (NSS).

We have supported sensitive Defense community workloads in the cloud for more than four years, and this latest IL5 authorization is complementary to our FedRAMP High Provisional Authorization that covers 18 services in the AWS GovCloud (US) Region. Our customers now have the flexibility to deploy any range of IL 2, 4, or 5 workloads by leveraging AWS’s services, attestations, and certifications. For example, when the US Air Force needed compute scale to support the Next Generation GPS Operational Control System Program, they turned to AWS.

In partnership with a certified Third Party Assessment Organization (3PAO), an independent validation was conducted to assess both our technical and nontechnical security controls to confirm that they meet the DoD’s stringent CC SRG standards for IL5 workloads. Effective immediately, customers can begin leveraging the IL5 authorization for the following six services in the AWS GovCloud (US) Region:

AWS has been a long-standing industry partner with DoD, federal-agency customers, and private-sector customers to enhance cloud security and policy. We continue to collaborate on the DoD CC SRG, Defense Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) and other government requirements to ensure that policy makers enact policies to support next-generation security capabilities.

In an effort to reduce the authorization burden of our DoD customers, we’ve worked with DISA to port our assessment results into an easily ingestible format by the Enterprise Mission Assurance Support Service (eMASS) system. Additionally, we undertook a separate effort to empower our industry partners and customers to efficiently solve their compliance, governance, and audit challenges by launching the AWS Customer Compliance Center, a portal providing a breadth of AWS-specific compliance and regulatory information.

We look forward to providing sustained cloud security and compliance support at scale for our DoD customers and adding additional services within the IL5 authorization boundary. See AWS Services in Scope by Compliance Program for updates. To request access to AWS’s DoD security and authorization documentation, contact AWS Sales and Business Development. For a list of frequently asked questions related to AWS DoD SRG compliance, see the AWS DoD SRG page.

To learn more about the announcement in this post, tune in for the AWS Automating DoD SRG Impact Level 5 Compliance in AWS GovCloud (US) webinar on October 11, 2017, at 11:00 A.M. Pacific Time.

– Chris Gile, Senior Manager, AWS Public Sector Risk & Compliance

 

 

VMware Cloud on AWS – Now Available

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/vmware-cloud-on-aws-now-available/

Last year I told you about the work that we are doing with our friends at VMware to build the VMware Cloud on AWS. As I shared at the time, this is a native, fully-managed offering that runs the VMware SDDC stack directly on bare-metal AWS infrastructure that maintains the elasticity and security customers have come to expect. This allows you to benefit from the scalability and resiliency of AWS, along with the networking and system-level hardware features that are fundamental parts of our security-first architecture.

VMware Cloud on AWS allows you take advantage of what you already know and own. Your existing skills, your investment in training, your operational practices, and your investment in software licenses remain relevant and applicable when you move to the public cloud. As part of that move you can forget about building & running data centers, modernizing hardware, and scaling to meet transient or short-term demand. You can also take advantage of a long list of AWS compute, database, analytics, IoT, AI, security, mobile, deployment and application services.

Initial Availability
After incorporating feedback from many customers and partners in our Early Access beta program, today at VMworld, VMware and Amazon announced the initial availability of VMware Cloud on AWS. This service is initially available in the US West (Oregon) region through VMware and members of the VMware Partner Network. It is designed to support popular use cases such as data center extension, application development & testing, and application migration.

This offering is sold, delivered, supported, and billed by VMware. It supports custom-sized VMs, runs any OS that is supported by VMware, and makes use of single-tenant bare-metal AWS infrastructure so that you can bring your Windows Server licenses to the cloud. Each SDDC (Software-Defined Data Center) consists of 4 to 16 instances, each with 36 cores, 512 GB of memory, and 15.2 TB of NVMe storage. Clusters currently run in a single AWS Availability Zone (AZ) with support in the works for clusters that span AZs. You can spin up an entire VMware SDDC in a couple of hours, and scale host capacity up and down in minutes.

The NSX networking platform (powered by the AWS Elastic Networking Adapter running at up to 25 Gbps) supports multicast traffic, separate networks for management and compute, and IPSec VPN tunnels to on-premises firewalls, routers, and so forth.

Here’s an overview to show you how all of the parts fit together:

The VMware and third-party management tools (vCenter Server, PowerCLI, the vRealize Suite, and code that calls the vSphere API) that you use today will work just fine when you build a hybrid VMware environment that combines your existing on-premises resources and those that you launch in AWS. This hybrid environment will use a new VMware Hybrid Linked Mode to create a single, unified view of your on-premises and cloud resources. You can use familiar VMware tools to manage your applications, without having to purchase any new or custom hardware, rewrite applications, or modify your operating model.

Your applications and your code can access the full range of AWS services (the database, analytical, and AI services are a good place to start). Use for these services is billed separately and you’ll need to create an AWS account.

Learn More at VMworld
If you are attending VMworld in Las Vegas, please be sure to check out some of the 90+ AWS sessions:

Also, be sure to stop by booth #300 and say hello to my colleagues from the AWS team.

In the Works
Our teams have come a long way since last year, but things are just getting revved up!

VMware and AWS are continuing to invest to enable support for new capabilities and use cases, such as application migration, data center expansion, and application test and development. Work is under way to add additional AWS regions, support more use cases such as disaster recovery and data center consolidation, add certifications, and enable even deeper integration with AWS services.

Jeff;

 

Announcing the New Customer Compliance Center

Post Syndicated from Chad Woolf original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/announcing-the-new-customer-compliance-center/

AWS has the longest running, most effective, and most customer-obsessed compliance program in the cloud market. We have always centered our program around customers, obtaining the certifications needed to provide our customers with the proper level of validated transparency in order to enable them to certify their own AWS workloads [download .pdf of AWS certifications]. We also offer a rich suite of embedded compliance tooling, enabling customers and partners to more effectively manage security controls and in turn provide evidence of effective control operation to their auditors. Along with our customers and partners, we have the largest, most diverse, and most comprehensive compliance footprint in the industry.

Enabling customers is a core part of the AWS DNA. Today, in the spirit of that pedigree, I’m happy to announce we’ve launched a new AWS Customer Compliance Center. This center is focused on the security and compliance of our customers on AWS. You can learn from other customer experiences and discover how your peers have solved the compliance, governance, and audit challenges present in today’s regulatory environment. You can also access our industry-first cloud Auditor Learning Path via the customer center. These online university learning resources are logical learning paths, specifically designed for security, compliance and audit professionals, allowing you to build on the IT skills you have to move your environment to the next generation of audit and security assurance. As we engage with our security and compliance customer colleagues on this topic, we will continue to update and improve upon the existing resource and publish new enablers in the coming months.

We are excited to continue to work with our customers on moving from the old-guard manual audit world to the new cloud-enabled, automated, “secure and compliant by default” model we’ve been leading over the past few years.

– Chad Woolf, AWS Security & Compliance

Amazon Redshift Spectrum Extends Data Warehousing Out to Exabytes—No Loading Required

Post Syndicated from Maor Kleider original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/amazon-redshift-spectrum-extends-data-warehousing-out-to-exabytes-no-loading-required/

When we first looked into the possibility of building a cloud-based data warehouse many years ago, we were struck by the fact that our customers were storing ever-increasing amounts of data, and yet only a small fraction of that data ever made it into a data warehouse or Hadoop system for analysis. We saw that this wasn’t just a cloud-specific anomaly. It was also true in the broader industry, where the growth rate of the enterprise storage market segment greatly surpassed that of the data warehousing market segment.

We dubbed this the “dark data” problem. Our customers knew that there was untapped value in the data they collected; why else would they spend money to store it? But the systems available to them to analyze this data were simply too slow, complex, and expensive for them to use on all but a select subset of this data. They were storing it with optimistic hope that, someday, someone would find a solution.

Amazon Redshift became one of the fastest-growing AWS services because it helped solve the dark data problem. It was at least an order of magnitude less expensive and faster than most alternatives available. And Amazon Redshift was fully managed from the start—you didn’t have to worry about capacity, provisioning, patching, monitoring, backups, and a host of other DBA headaches. Many customers, including Vevo, Yelp, Redfin, and Edmunds, migrated to Amazon Redshift to improve query performance, reduce DBA overhead, and lower the cost of analytics.

And our customers’ data continues to grow at a very fast rate. Across the board, gigabytes to petabytes, the average Amazon Redshift customer doubles the data analyzed every year. That’s why we implement features that help customers handle their growing data, for example to double the query throughput or improve the compression ratios from 3x to 4x. That gives our customers some time before they have to consider throwing away data or removing it from their analytic environments. However, there is an increasing number of AWS customers who each generate a petabyte of data every day—that’s an exabyte in only three years. There wasn’t a solution for customers like that. If your data is doubling every year, it’s not long before you have to find new, disruptive approaches that transform the cost, performance, and simplicity curves for managing data.

Let’s look at the options available today. You can use Hadoop-based technologies like Apache Hive with Amazon EMR. This is actually a pretty great solution because it makes it easy and cost-effective to operate directly on data in Amazon S3 without ingestion or transformation. You can spin up clusters as you wish when you need, and size them right for that specific job you’re running. These systems are great at high scale-out processing like scans, filters, and aggregates. On the other hand, they’re not that good at complex query processing. For example, join processing requires data to be shuffled across nodes—for a large amount of data and large numbers of nodes that gets very slow. And joins are intrinsic to any meaningful analytics problem.

You can also use a columnar MPP data warehouse like Amazon Redshift. These systems make it simple to run complex analytic queries with orders of magnitude faster performance for joins and aggregations performed over large datasets. Amazon Redshift, in particular, leverages high-performance local disks, sophisticated query execution. and join-optimized data formats. Because it is just standard SQL, you can keep using your existing ETL and BI tools. But you do have to load data, and you have to provision clusters against the storage and CPU requirements you need.

Both solutions have powerful attributes, but they force you to choose which attributes you want. We see this as a “tyranny of OR.” You can have the throughput of local disks OR the scale of Amazon S3. You can have sophisticated query optimization OR high-scale data processing. You can have fast join performance with optimized formats OR a range of data processing engines that work against common data formats. But you shouldn’t have to choose. At this scale, you really can’t afford to choose. You need “all of the above.”

Redshift Spectrum

We built Redshift Spectrum to end this “tyranny of OR.” With Redshift Spectrum, Amazon Redshift customers can easily query their data in Amazon S3. Like Amazon EMR, you get the benefits of open data formats and inexpensive storage, and you can scale out to thousands of nodes to pull data, filter, project, aggregate, group, and sort. Like Amazon Athena, Redshift Spectrum is serverless and there’s nothing to provision or manage. You just pay for the resources you consume for the duration of your Redshift Spectrum query. Like Amazon Redshift itself, you get the benefits of a sophisticated query optimizer, fast access to data on local disks, and standard SQL. And like nothing else, Redshift Spectrum can execute highly sophisticated queries against an exabyte of data or more—in just minutes.

Redshift Spectrum is a built-in feature of Amazon Redshift, and your existing queries and BI tools will continue to work seamlessly. Under the covers, we manage a fleet of thousands of Redshift Spectrum nodes spread across multiple Availability Zones. These are transparently scaled and allocated to your queries based on the data that you need to process, with no provisioning or commitments. Redshift Spectrum is also highly concurrent—you can access your Amazon S3 data from any number of Amazon Redshift clusters.

The life of a Redshift Spectrum query

It all starts when Redshift Spectrum queries are submitted to the leader node of your Amazon Redshift cluster. The leader node optimizes, compiles, and pushes the query execution to the compute nodes in your Amazon Redshift cluster. Next, the compute nodes obtain the information describing the external tables from your data catalog, dynamically pruning nonrelevant partitions based on the filters and joins in your queries. The compute nodes also examine the data available locally and push down predicates to efficiently scan only the relevant objects in Amazon S3.

The Amazon Redshift compute nodes then generate multiple requests depending on the number of objects that need to be processed, and submit them concurrently to Redshift Spectrum, which pools thousands of Amazon EC2 instances per AWS Region. The Redshift Spectrum worker nodes scan, filter, and aggregate your data from Amazon S3, streaming required data for processing back to your Amazon Redshift cluster. Then, the final join and merge operations are performed locally in your cluster and the results are returned to your client.

Redshift Spectrum’s architecture offers several advantages. First, it elastically scales compute resources separately from the storage layer in Amazon S3. Second, it offers significantly higher concurrency because you can run multiple Amazon Redshift clusters and query the same data in Amazon S3. Third, Redshift Spectrum leverages the Amazon Redshift query optimizer to generate efficient query plans, even for complex queries with multi-table joins and window functions. Fourth, it operates directly on your source data in its native format (Parquet, RCFile, CSV, TSV, Sequence, Avro, RegexSerDe and more to come soon). This means that no data loading or transformation is needed. This also eliminates data duplication and associated costs. Fifth, operating on open data formats gives you the flexibility to leverage other AWS services and execution engines across your various teams to collaborate on the same data in Amazon S3. You get all of this, and because Redshift Spectrum is a feature of Amazon Redshift, you get the same level of end-to-end security, compliance, and certifications as with Amazon Redshift.

Designed for performance and cost-effectiveness

With Amazon Redshift Spectrum, you pay only for the queries you run against the data that you actually scan. We encourage you to leverage file partitioning, columnar data formats, and data compression to significantly minimize the amount of data scanned in Amazon S3. This is important for data warehousing because it dramatically improves query performance and reduces cost. Partitioning your data in Amazon S3 by date, time, or any other custom keys enables Redshift Spectrum to dynamically prune nonrelevant partitions to minimize the amount of data processed. If you store data in a columnar format, such as Parquet, Redshift Spectrum scans only the columns needed by your query, rather than processing entire rows. Similarly, if you compress your data using one of Redshift Spectrum’s supported compression algorithms, less data is scanned.

Amazon Redshift and Redshift Spectrum give you the best of both worlds. If you need to run frequent queries on the same data, you can normalize it, store it in Amazon Redshift, and get all of the benefits of a fully featured data warehouse for storing and querying structured data at a flat rate. At the same time, you can keep your additional data in multiple open file formats in Amazon S3, whether it is historical data or the most recent data, and extend your Amazon Redshift queries across your Amazon S3 data lake.

And that is how Amazon Redshift Spectrum scales data warehousing to exabytes—with no loading required. Redshift Spectrum ends the “tyranny of OR,” enabling you to store your data where you want, in the format you want, and have it available for fast processing using standard SQL when you need it, now and in the future.


Additional Reading

10 Best Practices for Amazon Redshift Spectrum
Amazon QuickSight Adds Support for Amazon Redshift Spectrum
Amazon Redshift Spectrum – Exabyte-Scale In-Place Queries of S3 Data

 


 

About the Author

Maor Kleider is a Senior Product Manager for Amazon Redshift, a fast, simple and cost-effective data warehouse. Maor is passionate about collaborating with customers and partners, learning about their unique big data use cases and making their experience even better. In his spare time, Maor enjoys traveling and exploring new restaurants with his family.

 

 

 

Safety and Security and the Internet of Things

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/06/safety_and_secu.html

Ross Anderson blogged about his new paper on security and safety concerns about the Internet of Things. (See also this short video.)

It’s very much along the lines of what I’ve been writing.