Tag Archives: auditing

AWS achieves its second ISMAP authorization in Japan

Post Syndicated from Hidetoshi Takeuchi original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-achieves-its-second-ismap-authorization-in-japan/

Earning and maintaining customer trust is an ongoing commitment at Amazon Web Services (AWS). Our customers’ security requirements drive the scope and portfolio of the compliance reports, attestations, and certifications we pursue. We’re excited to announce that AWS has achieved authorization under the Information System Security Management and Assessment Program (ISMAP) program, effective from April 1, 2022 to March 31, 2023. The authorization scope covers a total of 145 AWS services (an increase of 22 services over the previous authorization) across 22 AWS Regions, including the Asia Pacific (Tokyo) Region and the Asia Pacific (Osaka) Region. This is the second time AWS has undergone an assessment since ISMAP was first published by the ISMAP steering committee in March 2020.

ISMAP is a Japanese government program for assessing the security of public cloud services. The purpose of ISMAP is to provide a common set of security standards for cloud service providers (CSPs) to comply with as a baseline requirement for government procurement. ISMAP introduces security requirements for cloud domains, practices, and procedures that CSPs must implement. CSPs must engage with an ISMAP-approved third-party assessor to assess compliance with the ISMAP security requirements in order to apply as an ISMAP-registered CSP. The ISMAP program will evaluate the security of each CSP and register those that satisfy the Japanese government’s security requirements. Upon successful ISMAP registration of CSPs, government procurement departments and agencies can accelerate their engagement with the registered CSPs and contribute to the smooth introduction of cloud services in government information systems.

The achievement of this authorization demonstrates the proactive approach AWS has taken to help customers meet compliance requirements set by the Japanese government and to deliver secure AWS services to our customers. Service providers and customers of AWS can use the ISMAP authorization of AWS services to support their own ISMAP authorization programs. The full list of 145 ISMAP-authorized AWS services is available on the AWS Services in Scope by Compliance Program webpage, and you can also use the ISMAP Customer Package on AWS Artifact. You can confirm the AWS ISMAP authorization status and find detailed scope information on the ISMAP Portal.

As always, we are committed to bringing new services and Regions into the scope of our ISMAP program, based on your business needs. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact your AWS Account Manager.

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Hidetoshi Takeuchi

Hidetoshi Takeuchi

Hidetoshi is the Audit Program Manager for the Asia Pacific Region, leading Japan security certification and authorization programs. Hidetoshi has worked in information technology security, risk management, security assurance, and technology audits for the past 25 years. He is passionate about delivering programs that build customers’ trust and provide them with assurance on cloud security.

AWS achieves TISAX certification (Information with Very High Protection Needs (AL3)

Post Syndicated from Janice Leung original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-achieves-tisax-certification-information-with-very-high-protection-needs-al3/

We’re excited to announce the completion of the Trusted Information Security Assessment Exchange (TISAX) certification on June 30, 2022 for 19 AWS Regions. These Regions achieved the Information with Very High Protection Needs (AL3) label for the control domains Information Handling and Data Protection. This alignment with TISAX requirements demonstrates our continued commitment to adhere to the heightened expectations for cloud service providers. AWS automotive customers can run their applications in the AWS Cloud certified Regions in confidence.

The following 19 Regions are currently TISAX certified:

  • US East (Ohio)
  • US East (Northern Virginia)
  • US West (Oregon)
  • Africa (Cape Town)
  • Asia Pacific (Hong Kong)
  • Asia Pacific (Mumbai)
  • Asia Pacific (Osaka)
  • Asia Pacific (Korea)
  • Asia Pacific (Singapore)
  • Asia Pacific (Sydney)
  • Asia Pacific (Tokyo)
  • Canada (Central)
  • Europe (Frankfurt)
  • Europe (Ireland)
  • Europe (London)
  • Europe (Milan)
  • Europe (Paris)
  • Europe (Stockholm)
  • South America (Sao Paulo)

TISAX is a European automotive industry-standard information security assessment (ISA) catalog based on key aspects of information security, such as data protection and connection to third parties.

AWS was evaluated and certified by independent third-party auditors on June 30, 2022. The Certificate of Compliance demonstrating the AWS compliance status is available on the European Network Exchange (ENX) Portal (the scope ID and assessment ID are SM22TH and AYA2D4-1, respectively) and through AWS Artifact. AWS Artifact is a self-service portal for on-demand access to AWS compliance reports. Sign in to AWS Artifact in the AWS Management Console, or learn more at Getting Started with AWS Artifact.

For up-to-date information, including when additional Regions are added, see the AWS Compliance Program, and choose TISAX.

AWS strives to continuously bring services into scope of its compliance programs to help you meet your architectural and regulatory needs. Please reach out to your AWS account team if you have questions or feedback about TISAX compliance.

To learn more about our compliance and security programs, see AWS Compliance Programs. As always, we value your feedback and questions; reach out to the AWS Compliance team through the Contact Us page.

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Author

Janice Leung

Janice is a security audit program manager at AWS, based in New York. She leads security audits across Europe and has previously worked in security assurance and technology risk management in the financial industry for 10 years.

AWS achieves HDS certification to three additional Regions

Post Syndicated from Janice Leung original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-achieves-hds-certification-to-three-additional-regions/

We’re excited to announce that three additional AWS Regions—Asia Pacific (Korea), Europe (London), and Europe (Stockholm)—have been granted the Health Data Hosting (Hébergeur de Données de Santé, HDS) certification. This alignment with the HDS requirements demonstrates our continued commitment to adhere to the heightened expectations for cloud service providers. AWS customers who handle personal health data can be hosted in the AWS Cloud certified Regions with confidence.

The following 16 Regions are now in scope of this certification:

  • US East (Ohio)
  • US East (Northern Virginia)
  • US West (Northern California)
  • US West (Oregon)
  • Asia Pacific (Mumbai)
  • Asia Pacific (Korea)
  • Asia Pacific (Singapore)
  • Asia Pacific (Sydney)
  • Asia Pacific (Tokyo)
  • Canada (Central)
  • Europe (Frankfurt)
  • Europe (Ireland)
  • Europe (London)
  • Europe (Paris)
  • Europe (Stockholm)
  • South America (Sao Paulo)

Introduced by the French governmental agency for health, Agence Française de la Santé Numérique (ASIP Santé), HDS certification aims to strengthen the security and protection of personal health data. Achieving this certification demonstrates that AWS provides a framework for technical and governance measures to secure and protect personal health data, governed by French law.

AWS was evaluated and certified by independent third-party auditors on June 30, 2022. The Certificate of Compliance demonstrating the AWS compliance status is available on the Agence du Numérique en Santé (ANS) website and through AWS Artifact. AWS Artifact is a self-service portal for on-demand access to AWS compliance reports. Sign in to AWS Artifact in the AWS Management Console, or learn more at Getting Started with AWS Artifact.

For up-to-date information, including when additional Regions are added, see the AWS Compliance Program, and choose HDS.

AWS strives to continuously bring services into scope of its compliance programs to help you meet your architectural and regulatory needs. Please reach out to your AWS account team if you have questions or feedback about HDS compliance.

To learn more about our compliance and security programs, see AWS Compliance Programs. As always, we value your feedback and questions; reach out to the AWS Compliance team through the Contact Us page.

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Author

Janice Leung

Janice is a security audit program manager at AWS, based in New York. She leads security audits across Europe and has previously worked in security assurance and technology risk management in the financial industry for 10 years.

C5 Type 2 attestation report now available with 141 services in scope

Post Syndicated from Mercy Kanengoni original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/c5-type-2-attestation-report-now-available-with-141-services-in-scope/

Amazon Web Services (AWS) is pleased to announce the issuance of the new Cloud Computing Compliance Controls Catalogue (C5) Type 2 attestation report. We added 18 additional services and service features to the scope of the 2021 report.

Germany’s national cybersecurity authority, Bundesamt für Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik (BSI), established C5 to define a reference standard for German cloud security requirements. The C5 Type 2 report covers the time period from October 1, 2020, through September 30, 2021. It was issued by an independent third-party attestation organization, and assesses the design and the operational effectiveness of AWS’s controls against the new version C5:2020’s basic and additional criteria.

Customers in Germany and other European countries can use AWS’s attestation report to confirm that AWS meets the security requirements of the C5:2020 framework, and to review the details of the tested controls. This attestation demonstrates our commitment to meet and exceed the security expectations for cloud service providers set by the BSI.

AWS has added the following 18 services and service features to the new C5 scope:

You can see a current list of the services in scope for C5 on the AWS Services in Scope by Compliance Program page.

AWS strives to continuously bring services into scope of its compliance programs to help you meet your architectural and regulatory needs. Please reach out to your AWS account team if you have questions or feedback about the C5 report.

The C5 report and Continuing Operations Letter is available to AWS customers through AWS Artifact. For more information, see Cloud Computing Compliance Controls Catalogue (C5).

 
If you have feedback about this post, submit comments in the Comments section below. If you have questions about this post, start a new thread on the Security Hub forum. To start your 30-day free trial of Security Hub, visit AWS Security Hub.

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Mercy Kanengoni

Mercy Kanengoni

Mercy is a Security Audit Program Manager at AWS based in Manchester, UK. She leads security audits across Europe, and she has previously worked in security assurance and technology risk management.

Author

Karthik Amrutesh

Karthik is a Senior Manager, Security Assurance at AWS based in New York, U.S. His team is responsible for audits, attestations, certifications, and assessments globally. Karthik has previously worked in risk management, security assurance, and technology audits for the past 18 years.

AWS achieves GSMA Security Certification for Europe (Paris) Region

Post Syndicated from Janice Leung original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-achieves-gsma-security-certification-for-europe-paris-region/

We continue to expand the scope of our assurance programs at Amazon Web Services (AWS) and are pleased to announce that our Europe (Paris) Region is now certified by the GSM Association (GSMA) under its Security Accreditation Scheme Subscription Management (SAS-SM) with scope Data Center Operations and Management (DCOM). This is an addition to our US East (Ohio) Region, which received certification in September 2021. This alignment with GSMA requirements demonstrates our continuous commitment to adhere to the heightened expectations for cloud service providers. AWS customers who provide embedded Universal Integrated Circuit Card (eUICC) for mobile devices can run their remote provisioning applications with confidence in the AWS Cloud in the GSMA-certified Regions.

As of this writing, 72 services offered in the Europe (Paris) Region and 128 services offered in the US East (Ohio) Region are in scope of this certification. For up-to-date information, including when additional services are added, see the AWS Services in Scope by Compliance Program and choose GSMA.

AWS was evaluated by independent third-party auditors chosen by GSMA. The Certificate of Compliance that shows that AWS achieved GSMA compliance status is available on the GSMA Website and through AWS Artifact. AWS Artifact is a self-service portal for on-demand access to AWS compliance reports. Sign in to AWS Artifact in the AWS Management Console, or learn more at Getting Started with AWS Artifact.

To learn more about our compliance and security programs, see AWS Compliance Programs. As always, we value your feedback and questions; reach out to the AWS Compliance team through the Contact Us page. Or if you have feedback about this post, submit comments in the Comments section below.

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Author

Janice Leung

Janice is a security audit program manager at AWS, based in New York. She leads security audits across Europe and has previously worked in security assurance and technology risk management in the financial industry for 10 years.

Author

Karthik Amrutesh

Karthik is a senior manager, security assurance at AWS based in New York, U.S. His team is responsible for audits, attestations, certifications, and assessments across the European Union. Karthik has previously worked in risk management, security assurance, and technology audits for the past 18 years.

AWS achieves GSMA security certification for US East (Ohio) Region

Post Syndicated from Janice Leung original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-achieves-gsma-security-certification-for-us-east-ohio-region/

We continue to expand the scope of our assurance programs at Amazon Web Services (AWS) and are pleased to announce that our US East (Ohio) Region (us-east-2) is now certified by the GSM Association (GSMA) under its Security Accreditation Scheme Subscription Management (SAS-SM) with scope Data Center Operations and Management (DCOM). This alignment with GSMA requirements demonstrates our continuous commitment to adhere to the heightened expectations for cloud service providers. AWS customers who provide embedded Universal Integrated Circuit Card (eUICC) for mobile devices can run their remote provisioning applications with confidence in the AWS Cloud in the GSMA-certified US East (Ohio) Region.

As of this writing, 128 services offered in the US East (Ohio) Region are in scope of this certification. For up-to-date information, including when additional services are added, see the AWS Services in Scope by Compliance Program and choose GSMA.

AWS was evaluated by independent third-party auditors chosen by GSMA. The Certificate of Compliance illustrating the AWS GSMA compliance status is available on the GSMA website and through AWS Artifact. AWS Artifact is a self-service portal for on-demand access to AWS compliance reports. Sign in to AWS Artifact in the AWS Management Console, or learn more at Getting Started with AWS Artifact.

To learn more about our compliance and security programs, see AWS Compliance Programs. As always, we value your feedback and questions; reach out to the AWS Compliance team through the Contact Us page.

If you have feedback about this post, submit comments in the Comments section below.

Want more AWS Security how-to content, news, and feature announcements? Follow us on Twitter.

Author

Janice Leung

Janice is a Security Audit Program Manager at AWS, based in New York. She leads various security audit programs across Europe. She previously worked in security assurance and technology risk management in the financial industry for 10 years.

Author

Karthik Amrutesh

Karthik is a Senior Manager, Security Assurance at AWS, based in New York. He leads a team responsible for audits, attestations, and certifications across the European Union. Karthik has previously worked in risk management, security assurance, and technology audits for over 18 years.

C5 Type 2 attestation report now available with one new Region and 123 services in scope

Post Syndicated from Mercy Kanengoni original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/c5-type-2-attestation-report-available-one-new-region-123-services-in-scope/

Amazon Web Services (AWS) is pleased to announce the issuance of the 2020 Cloud Computing Compliance Controls Catalogue (C5) Type 2 attestation report. We added one new AWS Region (Europe-Milan) and 21 additional services and service features to the scope of the 2020 report.

Germany’s national cybersecurity authority, Bundesamt für Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik (BSI), established C5 to define a reference standard for German cloud security requirements. Customers in Germany and other European countries can use AWS’s attestation report to help them meet local security requirements of the C5 framework.

The C5 Type 2 report covers the time period October 1, 2019, through September 30, 2020. It was issued by an independent third-party attestation organization and assesses the design and the operational effectiveness of AWS’s controls against C5’s basic and additional criteria. This attestation demonstrates our commitment to meet the security expectations for cloud service providers set by the BSI in Germany.

We continue to add new Regions and services to the C5 compliance scope so that you have more services to choose from that meet regulatory and compliance requirements. AWS has added the Europe (Milan) Region and the following 21 services and service features to this year’s C5 scope:

You can see a current list of the services in scope for C5 on the AWS Services in Scope by Compliance Program page. The C5 report and Continuing Operations Letter is available to AWS customers through AWS Artifact. For more information, see Cloud Computing Compliance Controls Catalogue (C5).

If you have feedback about this post, submit comments in the Comments section below.

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Author

Mercy Kanengoni

Mercy is a Security Audit Program Manager at AWS. She leads security audits across Europe, and she has previously worked in security assurance and technology risk management.

AWS is the first global cloud service provider to comply with the new K-ISMS-P standard

Post Syndicated from Seulun Sung original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-is-the-first-global-cloud-service-provider-to-comply-with-the-new-k-isms-p-standard/

We’re excited to announce that Amazon Web Services (AWS) has achieved certification under the Korea-Personal Information & Information Security Management System (K-ISMS-P) standard (effective from December 16, 2020 to December 15, 2023). The assessment by the Korea Internet & Security Agency (KISA) covered the operation of infrastructure (including compute, storage, networking, databases, and security) in the AWS Asia Pacific (Seoul) Region. AWS was the first global cloud service provider (CSP) to obtain K-ISMS certification (the previous version of K-ISMS-P) back in 2017. Now AWS is the first global CSP to achieve compliance with the K-ISMS portion of the new K-ISMS-P standard.

Sponsored by KISA and affiliated with the Korean Ministry of Science and ICT (MSIT), K-ISMS-P serves as a standard for evaluating whether enterprises and organizations operate and manage their information security management systems consistently and securely, such that they thoroughly protect their information assets. The new K-ISMS-P standard combined the K-ISMS and K-PIMS (Personal Information Management System) standards with updated control items. Accordingly, the new K-ISMS certification and K-ISMS-P certification (personal information–focused) are introduced under the updated standard.

In this year’s audit, 110 services running in the Asia Pacific (Seoul) Region are included. The newly launched Availability Zone in 2020 is also added to the certification scope.

This certification helps enterprises and organizations across South Korea, regardless of industry, meet KISA compliance requirements more efficiently. Achieving this certification demonstrates the proactive approach AWS has taken to meet compliance set by the South Korean government and to deliver secure AWS services to customers. In addition, we’ve launched Quick Start and Operational Best Practices (conformance pack) pages to provide customers with a compliance framework that they can utilize for their K-ISMS-P compliance needs. Enterprises and organizations can use these toolkits and AWS certification to reduce the effort and cost of getting their own K-ISMS-P certification. You can download the AWS K-ISMS certification under the K-ISMS-P standard from AWS Artifact. To learn more about the AWS K-ISMS certification, see the AWS K-ISMS page. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact your AWS Account Manager.

If you have feedback about this post, submit comments in the Comments section below.

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Author

Seulun Sung

Seulun is a Security Audit Program Manager at AWS, leading security certification programs, with a focus on the K-ISMS-P program in South Korea. She has a decade of experience in deploying global policies and processes to local Regions and helping customers adopt regulations. She is passionate about helping to build customers’ trust and provide them assurance on cloud security.

Announcing Cloud Audit Academy AWS-specific for audit and compliance teams

Post Syndicated from Chad Woolf original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/announcing-cloud-audit-academy-aws-specific-for-audit-and-compliance-teams/

Today, I’m pleased to announce the launch of Cloud Audit Academy AWS-specific (CAA AWS-specific). This is a new, accelerated training program for auditing AWS Cloud implementations, and is designed for auditors, regulators, or anyone working within a control framework.

Over the past few years, auditing security in the cloud has become one of the fastest growing questions among Amazon Web Services (AWS) customers, across multiple industries and all around the world. Here are the two pain points that I hear about most often:

  • Engineering teams want to move regulatory frameworks compliant workloads to AWS to take advantage of its innovation capabilities, but security and risk teams are uncertain how AWS can help them meet their compliance requirements through audits.
  • Compliance teams want to effectively audit the cloud environments and take advantage of the available security control options that are built into the cloud, but the legacy audit processes and control frameworks are built for an on-premises environment. The differences require some reconciliation and improvement work to be done on compliance programs, audit processes, and auditor training.

To help address these issues for not only AWS customers but for any auditor or compliance team facing cloud migration, we announced Cloud Audit Academy Cloud Agnostic (CAA Cloud Agnostic) at re:Inforce 2019. This foundational, first-of-its-kind, course provides baseline knowledge on auditing in the cloud and in understanding the differences in control operation, design, and auditing. It is cloud agnostic and can benefit security and compliance professionals in any industry—including independent third-party auditors. Since its launch in June 2019, 1,400 students have followed this cloud audit learning path, with 91 percent of participants saying that they would recommend the workshop to others.

So today we’re releasing the next phase of that education program, Cloud Audit Academy AWS-specific. Offered virtually or in-person, CAA AWS-specific is an instructor-led workshop on addressing risks and auditing security in the AWS Cloud, with a focus on the security and audit tools provided by AWS. All instructors have professional audit industry experience, current audit credentials, and maintain AWS Solutions Architect credentials.

Here are four things to know about CAA AWS-specific and what it has to offer audit and compliance teams:

  1. Content was created with PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC)
    PricewaterhouseCoopers worked with us to develop the curriculum content, bringing their expertise in independent risk and control auditing.
     
    “With so many of our customers already in the cloud—or ready to be—we’ve seen a huge increase in the need to meet regulatory and compliance requirements. We’re excited to have combined our risk and controls experience with the power of AWS to create a curriculum in which customers can not only [leverage AWS to help them] meet their compliance needs, but unlock the total value of their cloud investment.” – Paige Hayes, Global Account Leader at PwC

  2. Attendees earn continuing professional education credits
    Based on feedback from CAA Cloud Agnostic, we now offer continuing professional education (CPE) credits to attendees. Completion of CAA AWS-specific will allow attendees to earn 28 CPE credits towards any of the International Information System Security Certification Consortium, or (ISC)², certifications, and 18 CPE credits towards any Global Information Assurance Certification (GIAC).

  3. Training helps boost confidence when auditing the AWS cloud
    Our customers have proven repeatedly that running sensitive workloads in AWS can be more secure than in on-premises environments. However, a lack of knowledge and updated processes for implementing, monitoring, and proving compliance in the cloud has caused some difficulty. Through CAA AWS-specific, you will get critical training to become more comfortable and confident knowing how to audit the AWS environment with precision.

    “Our FSI customer conversations are often focused on security and compliance controls. Leveraging the Cloud Audit Academy enables our team to educate the internal and external auditors of our customers. CAA provides them the necessary tools and knowledge to evaluate and gain comfort with their AWS control environment firsthand. The varying depth and levels focus on everything from basic cloud auditing to diving deeper into the domains which align with our governance and control domains. We reference key AWS services that customers can utilize to create an effective control environment that [helps to meet their] regulatory and audit expectations.” – Jeff (Axe) Axelrad, Compliance Manager, AWS Financial Services

  4. Training enables the governance, risk, and compliance professional
    In four days of CAA AWS-specific, you’ll become more comfortable with topics like control domains, network management, vulnerability management, logging and monitoring, incident response, and general knowledge about compliance controls in the cloud.

    “In addition to [using AWS to help support and maintain their compliance], our customers need to be able to clearly communicate with their external auditors and regulators HOW compliance is achieved. CAA doesn’t teach auditors how to audit, but rather accelerates the learning necessary to understand specifically how the control landscape changes.” – Jesse Skibbe, Sr. Practice Manager, AWS Professional Services

CAA Cloud Agnostic provides some foundational concepts and is a prerequisite to CAA AWS-specific. It is available for free online at our AWS Training and Certification learning library, or you can contact your account manager to have a one-day instructor-led training session in person.

If it sounds like Cloud Audit Academy training would benefit you and your team, contact our AWS Security Assurance Services team or contact your AWS account manager. For more information, check out the newly updated Security Audit Learning Path.

If you have feedback about this post, submit comments in the Comments section below.

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Author

Chad Woolf

Chad joined Amazon in 2010 and built the AWS compliance functions from the ground up, including audit and certifications, privacy, contract compliance, control automation engineering and security process monitoring. Chad’s work also includes enabling public sector and regulated industry adoption of the AWS Cloud, compliance with complex privacy regulations such as GDPR and operating a trade and product compliance team in conjunction with global region expansion. Prior to joining AWS, Chad spent 12 years with Ernst & Young as a Senior Manager working directly with Fortune 100 companies consulting on IT process, security, risk, and vendor management advisory work, as well as designing and deploying global security and assurance software solutions. Chad holds a Masters of Information Systems Management and a Bachelors of Accounting from Brigham Young University, Utah. Follow Chad on Twitter

How to use the AWS Security Hub PCI DSS v3.2.1 standard

Post Syndicated from Rima Tanash original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-use-the-aws-security-hub-pci-dss-v3-2-1-standard/

On February 13, 2020, AWS added partial support for the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) version 3.2.1 requirements to AWS Security Hub.

This update enables you to validate a subset of PCI DSS’s requirements and helps with ongoing PCI DSS security activities by conducting continuous and automated checks. The new Security Hub standard also makes it easier to proactively monitor AWS resources, which is critical for any company involved with the storage, processing, or transmission of cardholder data. There’s also a Security score feature for the Security Hub standard, which can help support preparations for PCI DSS assessment.

Use this post to learn how to:

  • Enable the AWS Security Hub PCI DSS v3.2.1 standard and navigating results
  • Interpret your security score
  • Remediate failed security checks
  • Understand requirements related to findings

Enable Security Hub’s PCI DSS v3.2.1 standard and navigate results

Note: This section assumes that you have Security Hub enabled in one or more accounts. To learn how to enable Security Hub, follow these instructions. If you don’t have Security Hub enabled, the first time you enable Security Hub you will be given the option to enable PCI DSS v3.2.1.

To enable the PCI DSS v3.2.1 security standard in Security Hub:

  1. Open Security Hub and enable PCI DSS v3.2.1 Security standards.
    (Once enabled, Security Hub will begin evaluating related resources in the current AWS account and region against the AWS controls within the standard. The scope of the assessment is the current AWS account).
  2. When the evaluation completes, select View results.
  3. Now you are on the PCI DSS v3.2.1 page (Figure 1). You can see all 32 currently-implemented security controls in this standard, their severities, and their status for this account and region. Use search and filters to narrow down the controls by status, severity, title, or related requirement.

    Figure 1: PCI DSS v3.2.1 standard results page

    Figure 1: PCI DSS v3.2.1 standard results page

  4. Select the name of the control to review detailed information about it. This action will take you to the control’s detail page (Figure 2), which gives you related findings.

    Figure 2: Detailed control information

    Figure 2: Detailed control information

  5. If a specific control is not relevant for you, you can disable the control by selecting Disable and providing a Reason for disabling. (See Disabling Individual Compliance Controls for instructions).

How to interpret and improve your “Security score”

After enabling the PCI DSS v3.2.1 standard in Security Hub, you will notice a Security score appear for the standard itself, and for your account overall. These scores range between 0% and 100%.

Figure 3: Security score for PCI DSS standard (left) and overall (right)

Figure 3: Security score for PCI DSS standard (left) and overall (right)

The PCI DSS standard’s Security score represents the proportion of passed PCI DSS controls over enabled PCI DSS controls. The score is displayed as a percentage. Similarly, the overall Security score represents the proportion of passed controls over enabled controls, including controls from every enabled Security Hub standard, displayed as a percentage.

Your aim should be to pass all enabled security checks to reach a score of 100%. Reaching a 100% security score for the AWS Security Hub PCI DSS standard will help you prepare for a PCI DSS assessment. The PCI DSS Compliance Standard in Security Hub is designed to help you with your ongoing PCI DSS security activities.

An important note, the controls cannot verify whether your systems are compliant with the PCI DSS standard. They can neither replace internal efforts nor guarantee that you will pass a PCI DSS assessment.

Remediating failed security checks

To remediate a failed control, you need to remediate every failed finding for that control.

  1. To prioritize remediation, we recommend filtering by Failed controls and then remediating issues starting with critical– and ending with low severity controls.
  2. Identify a control you want to remediate and visit the control detail page.
  3. Follow the Remediation instructions link, and then follow the step-by-step remediation instructions, applying them for every failed finding.

    Figure 4: The control detail page, with a link to the remediation instructions

    Figure 4: The control detail page, with a link to the remediation instructions

How to interpret “Related requirements”

Every control displays Related requirements in the control card and in the control’s detail page. For PCI DSS, the Related requirements show which PCI DSS requirements are related to the Security Hub PCI DSS control. A single AWS control might relate to multiple PCI DSS requirements.

Figure 5: Related requirements in the control detail page

Figure 5: Related requirements in the control detail page

The user guide lists the related PCI DSS requirements and explains how the specific Security Hub PCI DSS control is related to the requirement.

For example, the AWS Config rule cmk-backing-key-rotation-enabled checks that key rotation is enabled for each customer master key (CMK), but it doesn’t check for CMKs that are using key material imported with the AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) BYOK mechanism. The related PCI DSS requirement that is mapped to this rule is PCI DSS 3.6.4 – “Cryptographic keys should be changed once they have reached the end of their cryptoperiod.” Although PCI DSS doesn’t specify the time frame for cryptoperiods, this rule is mapped because, if key rotation is enabled, rotation occurs annually by default with a customer-managed CMK.

Conclusion

The new AWS Security Hub PCI DSS v3.2.1 standard is fundamental for any company involved with storing, processing, or transmitting cardholder data. In this post, you learned how to enable the standard to begin proactively monitoring your AWS resources against the Security Hub PCI DSS controls. You also learned how to navigate the PCI DSS results within Security Hub. By frequently reviewing failed security checks, prioritizing their remediation, and aiming to achieve a 100% security score for PCI DSS within Security Hub, you’ll be better prepared for a PCI DSS assessment.

Further reading

If you have feedback about this post, submit comments in the Comments section below. If you have questions, please start a new thread on the Security Hub forums.

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Author

Rima Tanash

Rima Tanash is the Lead Security Engineer on the Amazon Security Hub service team. At Amazon Web Services, she applies automated technologies to audit various access and security configurations. She has a research background in data privacy using graph properties and machine learning.

Author

Michael Guzman

Michael is a Security Assurance Consultant with AWS Security Assurance Services. He is a current Qualified Security Assessor (QSA), certified by the PCI SSC. Michael has 20+ years of experience in IT in the financial, professional services, and retail industry. He helps customers on their cloud journey of critical workloads to the AWS cloud in a PCI DSS compliant manner.

Author

Logan Culotta

Logan Culotta is a Security Assurance Consultant on the AWS Security Assurance team. He is also a current Qualified Security Assessor (QSA), certified by the PCI SSC. Logan enjoys finding ways to automate compliance and security in the AWS cloud. In his free time, you can find him spending time with family, road cycling, and cooking.

Author

Avik Mukherjee

Avik is a Security Architect with over a decade of experience in IT governance, security, risk, and compliance. He’s been a Qualified Security Assessor for PCI DSS and Point-to-Point-Encryption and has deep knowledge of security advisory and assessment work in various industries, including retail, financial, and technology. He loves spending time with family and working on his culinary skills.

Smartphone Election in Washington State

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/01/smartphone_elec.html

This year:

King County voters will be able to use their name and birthdate to log in to a Web portal through the Internet browser on their phones, says Bryan Finney, the CEO of Democracy Live, the Seattle-based voting company providing the technology.

Once voters have completed their ballots, they must verify their submissions and then submit a signature on the touch screen of their device.

Finney says election officials in Washington are adept at signature verification because the state votes entirely by mail. That will be the way people are caught if they log in to the system under false pretenses and try to vote as someone else.

The King County elections office plans to print out the ballots submitted electronically by voters whose signatures match and count the papers alongside the votes submitted through traditional routes.

While advocates say this creates an auditable paper trail, many security experts say that because the ballots cross the Internet before they are printed, any subsequent audits on them would be moot. If a cyberattack occurred, an audit could essentially require double-checking ballots that may already have been altered, says Buell.

Of course it’s not an auditable paper trail. There’s a reason why security experts use the phrase “voter-verifiable paper ballots.” A centralized printout of a received Internet message is not voter verifiable.

Another news article.

On Financial Fraud

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/07/on_financial_fr.html

There are some good lessons in this article on financial fraud:

That’s how we got it so wrong. We were looking for incidental breaches of technical regulations, not systematic crime. And the thing is, that’s normal. The nature of fraud is that it works outside your field of vision, subverting the normal checks and balances so that the world changes while the picture stays the same. People in financial markets have been missing the wood for the trees for as long as there have been markets.

[..]

Trust — particularly between complete strangers, with no interactions beside relatively anonymous market transactions — is the basis of the modern industrial economy. And the story of the development of the modern economy is in large part the story of the invention and improvement of technologies and institutions for managing that trust.

And as industrial society develops, it becomes easier to be a victim. In The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith described how prosperity derived from the division of labour — the 18 distinct operations that went into the manufacture of a pin, for example. While this was going on, the modern world also saw a growing division of trust. The more a society benefits from the division of labour in checking up on things, the further you can go into a con game before you realise that you’re in one.

[…]

Libor teaches us a valuable lesson about commercial fraud — that unlike other crimes, it has a problem of denial as well as one of detection. There are very few other criminal acts where the victim not only consents to the criminal act, but voluntarily transfers the money or valuable goods to the criminal. And the hierarchies, status distinctions and networks that make up a modern economy also create powerful psychological barriers against seeing fraud when it is happening. White-collar crime is partly defined by the kind of person who commits it: a person of high status in the community, the kind of person who is always given the benefit of the doubt.

[…]

Fraudsters don’t play on moral weaknesses, greed or fear; they play on weaknesses in the system of checks and balances — the audit processes that are meant to supplement an overall environment of trust. One point that comes up again and again when looking at famous and large-scale frauds is that, in many cases, everything could have been brought to a halt at a very early stage if anyone had taken care to confirm all the facts. But nobody does confirm all the facts. There are just too bloody many of them. Even after the financial rubble has settled and the arrests been made, this is a huge problem.

Securing Elections

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/04/securing_electi_1.html

Elections serve two purposes. The first, and obvious, purpose is to accurately choose the winner. But the second is equally important: to convince the loser. To the extent that an election system is not transparently and auditably accurate, it fails in that second purpose. Our election systems are failing, and we need to fix them.

Today, we conduct our elections on computers. Our registration lists are in computer databases. We vote on computerized voting machines. And our tabulation and reporting is done on computers. We do this for a lot of good reasons, but a side effect is that elections now have all the insecurities inherent in computers. The only way to reliably protect elections from both malice and accident is to use something that is not hackable or unreliable at scale; the best way to do that is to back up as much of the system as possible with paper.

Recently, there have been two graphic demonstrations of how bad our computerized voting system is. In 2007, the states of California and Ohio conducted audits of their electronic voting machines. Expert review teams found exploitable vulnerabilities in almost every component they examined. The researchers were able to undetectably alter vote tallies, erase audit logs, and load malware on to the systems. Some of their attacks could be implemented by a single individual with no greater access than a normal poll worker; others could be done remotely.

Last year, the Defcon hackers’ conference sponsored a Voting Village. Organizers collected 25 pieces of voting equipment, including voting machines and electronic poll books. By the end of the weekend, conference attendees had found ways to compromise every piece of test equipment: to load malicious software, compromise vote tallies and audit logs, or cause equipment to fail.

It’s important to understand that these were not well-funded nation-state attackers. These were not even academics who had been studying the problem for weeks. These were bored hackers, with no experience with voting machines, playing around between parties one weekend.

It shouldn’t be any surprise that voting equipment, including voting machines, voter registration databases, and vote tabulation systems, are that hackable. They’re computers — often ancient computers running operating systems no longer supported by the manufacturers — and they don’t have any magical security technology that the rest of the industry isn’t privy to. If anything, they’re less secure than the computers we generally use, because their manufacturers hide any flaws behind the proprietary nature of their equipment.

We’re not just worried about altering the vote. Sometimes causing widespread failures, or even just sowing mistrust in the system, is enough. And an election whose results are not trusted or believed is a failed election.

Voting systems have another requirement that makes security even harder to achieve: the requirement for a secret ballot. Because we have to securely separate the election-roll system that determines who can vote from the system that collects and tabulates the votes, we can’t use the security systems available to banking and other high-value applications.

We can securely bank online, but can’t securely vote online. If we could do away with anonymity — if everyone could check that their vote was counted correctly — then it would be easy to secure the vote. But that would lead to other problems. Before the US had the secret ballot, voter coercion and vote-buying were widespread.

We can’t, so we need to accept that our voting systems are insecure. We need an election system that is resilient to the threats. And for many parts of the system, that means paper.

Let’s start with the voter rolls. We know they’ve already been targeted. In 2016, someone changed the party affiliation of hundreds of voters before the Republican primary. That’s just one possibility. A well-executed attack that deletes, for example, one in five voters at random — or changes their addresses — would cause chaos on election day.

Yes, we need to shore up the security of these systems. We need better computer, network, and database security for the various state voter organizations. We also need to better secure the voter registration websites, with better design and better internet security. We need better security for the companies that build and sell all this equipment.

Multiple, unchangeable backups are essential. A record of every addition, deletion, and change needs to be stored on a separate system, on write-only media like a DVD. Copies of that DVD, or — even better — a paper printout of the voter rolls, should be available at every polling place on election day. We need to be ready for anything.

Next, the voting machines themselves. Security researchers agree that the gold standard is a voter-verified paper ballot. The easiest (and cheapest) way to achieve this is through optical-scan voting. Voters mark paper ballots by hand; they are fed into a machine and counted automatically. That paper ballot is saved, and serves as a final true record in a recount in case of problems. Touch-screen machines that print a paper ballot to drop in a ballot box can also work for voters with disabilities, as long as the ballot can be easily read and verified by the voter.

Finally, the tabulation and reporting systems. Here again we need more security in the process, but we must always use those paper ballots as checks on the computers. A manual, post-election, risk-limiting audit varies the number of ballots examined according to the margin of victory. Conducting this audit after every election, before the results are certified, gives us confidence that the election outcome is correct, even if the voting machines and tabulation computers have been tampered with. Additionally, we need better coordination and communications when incidents occur.

It’s vital to agree on these procedures and policies before an election. Before the fact, when anyone can win and no one knows whose votes might be changed, it’s easy to agree on strong security. But after the vote, someone is the presumptive winner — and then everything changes. Half of the country wants the result to stand, and half wants it reversed. At that point, it’s too late to agree on anything.

The politicians running in the election shouldn’t have to argue their challenges in court. Getting elections right is in the interest of all citizens. Many countries have independent election commissions that are charged with conducting elections and ensuring their security. We don’t do that in the US.

Instead, we have representatives from each of our two parties in the room, keeping an eye on each other. That provided acceptable security against 20th-century threats, but is totally inadequate to secure our elections in the 21st century. And the belief that the diversity of voting systems in the US provides a measure of security is a dangerous myth, because few districts can be decisive and there are so few voting-machine vendors.

We can do better. In 2017, the Department of Homeland Security declared elections to be critical infrastructure, allowing the department to focus on securing them. On 23 March, Congress allocated $380m to states to upgrade election security.

These are good starts, but don’t go nearly far enough. The constitution delegates elections to the states but allows Congress to “make or alter such Regulations”. In 1845, Congress set a nationwide election day. Today, we need it to set uniform and strict election standards.

This essay originally appeared in the Guardian.

Amazon Relational Database Service – Looking Back at 2017

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-relational-database-service-looking-back-at-2017/

The Amazon RDS team launched nearly 80 features in 2017. Some of them were covered in this blog, others on the AWS Database Blog, and the rest in What’s New or Forum posts. To wrap up my week, I thought it would be worthwhile to give you an organized recap. So here we go!

Certification & Security

Features

Engine Versions & Features

Regional Support

Instance Support

Price Reductions

And That’s a Wrap
I’m pretty sure that’s everything. As you can see, 2017 was quite the year! I can’t wait to see what the team delivers in 2018.

Jeff;

 

Announcing our new beta for the AWS Certified Security – Specialty exam

Post Syndicated from Janna Pellegrino original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/announcing-our-new-beta-for-the-aws-certified-security-specialty-exam/

Take the AWS Certified Security – Specialty beta exam for the chance to be among the first to hold this new AWS Certification. This beta exam allows experienced cloud security professionals to demonstrate and validate their expertise. Register today – this beta exam will only be available from January 15 to March 2!

About the exam

This beta exam validates that the successful candidate can effectively demonstrate knowledge of how to secure the AWS platform. The exam covers incident response, logging and monitoring, infrastructure security, identity and access management, and data protection.

The exam validates:

  • Familiarity with regional- and country-specific security and compliance regulations and meta issues that these regulations embody.
  • An understanding of specialized data classifications and AWS data protection mechanisms.
  • An understanding of data encryption methods and AWS mechanisms to implement them.
  • An understanding of secure Internet protocols and AWS mechanisms to implement them.
  • A working knowledge of AWS security services and features of services to provide a secure production environment.
  • Competency gained from two or more years of production deployment experience using AWS security services and features.
  • Ability to make tradeoff decisions with regard to cost, security, and deployment complexity given a set of application requirements.
  • An understanding of security operations and risk.

Learn more and register >>

Who is eligible

The beta is open to anyone who currently holds an Associate or Cloud Practitioner certification. We recommend candidates have five years of IT security experience designing and implementing security solutions, and at least two years of hands-on experience securing AWS workloads.

How to prepare

We have training and other resources to help you prepare for the beta exam:

AWS Security Fundamentals Digital| 3 Hours
This course introduces you to fundamental cloud computing and AWS security concepts, including AWS access control and management, governance, logging, and encryption methods. It also covers security-related compliance protocols and risk management strategies, as well as procedures related to auditing your AWS security infrastructure.

Security Operations on AWS Classroom | 3 Days
This course demonstrates how to efficiently use AWS security services to stay secure and compliant in the AWS Cloud. The course focuses on the AWS-recommended security best practices that you can implement to enhance the security of your data and systems in the cloud. The course highlights the security features of AWS key services including compute, storage, networking, and database services.

Online resources for Cloud Security and Compliance

Review documentation, whitepapers, and articles & tutorials related to cloud security and compliance.

Learn more and register >>

Please contact us if you have questions about exam registration.

Good luck!

Validate Your IT Security Expertise with the New AWS Certified Security – Specialty Beta Exam

Post Syndicated from Sara Snedeker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/validate-your-it-security-expertise-with-the-new-aws-certified-security-specialty-beta-exam/

AWS Training and Certification image

If you are an experienced cloud security professional, you can demonstrate and validate your expertise with the new AWS Certified Security – Specialty beta exam. This exam allows you to demonstrate your knowledge of incident response, logging and monitoring, infrastructure security, identity and access management, and data protection. Register today – this beta exam will be available only from January 15 to March 2, 2018.

By taking this exam, you can validate your:

  • Familiarity with region-specific and country-specific security and compliance regulations and meta issues that these regulations include.
  • Understanding of data encryption methods and secure internet protocols, and the AWS mechanisms to implement them.
  • Working knowledge of AWS security services to provide a secure production environment.
  • Ability to make trade-off decisions with regard to cost, security, and deployment complexity when given a set of application requirements.

See the full list of security knowledge you can validate by taking this beta exam.

Who is eligible?

The beta exam is open to anyone who currently holds an AWS Associate or Cloud Practitioner certification. We recommend candidates have five years of IT security experience designing and implementing security solutions, and at least two years of hands-on experience securing AWS workloads.

How to prepare

You can take the following courses and use AWS cloud security resources and compliance resources to prepare for this exam.

AWS Security Fundamentals (digital, 3 hours)
This digital course introduces you to fundamental cloud computing and AWS security concepts, including AWS access control and management, governance, logging, and encryption methods. It also covers security-related compliance protocols and risk management strategies, as well as procedures related to auditing your AWS security infrastructure.

Security Operations on AWS (classroom, 3 days)
This instructor-led course demonstrates how to efficiently use AWS security services to help stay secure and compliant in the AWS Cloud. The course focuses on the AWS-recommended security best practices that you can implement to enhance the security of your AWS resources. The course highlights the security features of AWS compute, storage, networking, and database services.

If you have questions about this new beta exam, contact us.

Good luck with the exam!

– Sara