Tag Archives: CloudWatch

How to Query Personally Identifiable Information with Amazon Macie

Post Syndicated from Chad Woolf original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-query-personally-identifiable-information-with-amazon-macie/

Amazon Macie logo

In August 2017 at the AWS Summit New York, AWS launched a new security and compliance service called Amazon Macie. Macie uses machine learning to automatically discover, classify, and protect sensitive data in AWS. In this blog post, I demonstrate how you can use Macie to help enable compliance with applicable regulations, starting with data retention.

How to query retained PII with Macie

Data retention and mandatory data deletion are common topics across compliance frameworks, so knowing what is stored and how long it has been or needs to be stored is of critical importance. For example, you can use Macie for Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) 3.2, requirement 3, “Protect stored cardholder data,” which mandates a “quarterly process for identifying and securely deleting stored cardholder data that exceeds defined retention.” You also can use Macie for ISO 27017 requirement 12.3.1, which calls for “retention periods for backup data.” In each of these cases, you can use Macie’s built-in queries to identify the age of data in your Amazon S3 buckets and to help meet your compliance needs.

To get started with Macie and run your first queries of personally identifiable information (PII) and sensitive data, follow the initial setup as described in the launch post on the AWS Blog. After you have set up Macie, walk through the following steps to start running queries. Start by focusing on the S3 buckets that you want to inventory and capture important compliance related activity and data.

To start running Macie queries:

  1. In the AWS Management Console, launch the Macie console (you can type macie to find the console).
  2. Click Dashboard in the navigation pane. This shows you an overview of the risk level and data classification type of all inventoried S3 buckets, categorized by date and type.
    Screenshot of "Dashboard" in the navigation pane
  3. Choose S3 objects by PII priority. This dashboard lets you sort by PII priority and PII types.
    Screenshot of "S3 objects by PII priority"
  4. In this case, I want to find information about credit card numbers. I choose the magnifying glass for the type cc_number (note that PII types can be used for custom queries). This view shows the events where PII classified data has been uploaded to S3. When I scroll down, I see the individual files that have been identified.
    Screenshot showing the events where PII classified data has been uploaded to S3
  5. Before looking at the files, I want to continue to build the query by only showing items with high priority. To do so, I choose the row called Object PII Priority and then the magnifying glass icon next to High.
    Screenshot of refining the query for high priority events
  6. To view the results matching these queries, I scroll down and choose any file listed. This shows vital information such as creation date, location, and object access control list (ACL).
  7. The piece I am most interested in this case is the Object PII details line to understand more about what was found in the file. In this case, I see name and credit card information, which is what caused the high priority. Scrolling up again, I also see that the query fields have updated as I interacted with the UI.
    Screenshot showing "Object PII details"

Let’s say that I want to get an alert every time Macie finds new data matching this query. This alert can be used to automate response actions by using AWS Lambda and Amazon CloudWatch Events.

  1. I choose the left green icon called Save query as alert.
    Screenshot of "Save query as alert" button
  2. I can customize the alert and change things like category or severity to fit my needs based on the alert data.
  3. Another way to find the information I am looking for is to run custom queries. To start using custom queries, I choose Research in the navigation pane.
    1. To learn more about custom Macie queries and what you can do on the Research tab, see Using the Macie Research Tab.
  4. I change the type of query I want to run from CloudTrail data to S3 objects in the drop-down list menu.
    Screenshot of choosing "S3 objects" from the drop-down list menu
  5. Because I want PII data, I start typing in the query box, which has an autocomplete feature. I choose the pii_types: query. I can now type the data I want to look for. In this case, I want to see all files matching the credit card filter so I type cc_number and press Enter. The query box now says, pii_types:cc_number. I press Enter again to enable autocomplete, and then I type AND pii_types:email to require both a credit card number and email address in a single object.
    The query looks for all files matching the credit card filter ("cc_number")
  6. I choose the magnifying glass to search and Macie shows me all S3 objects that are tagged as PII of type Credit Cards. I can further specify that I only want to see PII of type Credit Card that are classified as High priority by adding AND and pii_impact:high to the query.
    Screenshot showing narrowing the query results furtherAs before, I can save this new query as an alert by clicking Save query as alert, which will be triggered by data matching the query going forward.

Advanced tip

Try the following advanced queries using Lucene query syntax and save the queries as alerts in Macie.

  • Use a regular-expression based query to search for a minimum of 10 credit card numbers and 10 email addresses in a single object:
    • pii_explain.cc_number:/([1-9][0-9]|[0-9]{3,}) distinct Credit Card Numbers.*/ AND pii_explain.email:/([1-9][0-9]|[0-9]{3,}) distinct Email Addresses.*/
  • Search for objects containing at least one credit card, name, and email address that have an object policy enabling global access (searching for S3 AllUsers or AuthenticatedUsers permissions):
    • (object_acl.Grants.Grantee.URI:”http\://acs.amazonaws.com/groups/global/AllUsers” OR  object_acl.Grants.Grantee.URI:”http\://acs.amazonaws.com/groups/global/AllUsers”) AND (pii_types.cc_number AND pii_types.email AND pii_types.name)

These are two ways to identify and be alerted about PII by using Macie. In a similar way, you can create custom alerts for various AWS CloudTrail events by choosing a different data set on which to run the queries again. In the examples in this post, I identified credit cards stored in plain text (all data in this post is example data only), determined how long they had been stored in S3 by viewing the result details, and set up alerts to notify or trigger actions on new sensitive data being stored. With queries like these, you can build a reliable data validation program.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about how to use Macie, start a new thread on the Macie forum or contact AWS Support.

-Chad

Automating Amazon EBS Snapshot Management with AWS Step Functions and Amazon CloudWatch Events

Post Syndicated from Andy Katz original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/automating-amazon-ebs-snapshot-management-with-aws-step-functions-and-amazon-cloudwatch-events/

Brittany Doncaster, Solutions Architect

Business continuity is important for building mission-critical workloads on AWS. As an AWS customer, you might define recovery point objectives (RPO) and recovery time objectives (RTO) for different tier applications in your business. After the RPO and RTO requirements are defined, it is up to your architects to determine how to meet those requirements.

You probably store persistent data in Amazon EBS volumes, which live within a single Availability Zone. And, following best practices, you take snapshots of your EBS volumes to back up the data on Amazon S3, which provides 11 9’s of durability. If you are following these best practices, then you’ve probably recognized the need to manage the number of snapshots you keep for a particular EBS volume and delete older, unneeded snapshots. Doing this cleanup helps save on storage costs.

Some customers also have policies stating that backups need to be stored a certain number of miles away as part of a disaster recovery (DR) plan. To meet these requirements, customers copy their EBS snapshots to the DR region. Then, the same snapshot management and cleanup has to also be done in the DR region.

All of this snapshot management logic consists of different components. You would first tag your snapshots so you could manage them. Then, determine how many snapshots you currently have for a particular EBS volume and assess that value against a retention rule. If the number of snapshots was greater than your retention value, then you would clean up old snapshots. And finally, you might copy the latest snapshot to your DR region. All these steps are just an example of a simple snapshot management workflow. But how do you automate something like this in AWS? How do you do it without servers?

One of the most powerful AWS services released in 2016 was Amazon CloudWatch Events. It enables you to build event-driven IT automation, based on events happening within your AWS infrastructure. CloudWatch Events integrates with AWS Lambda to let you execute your custom code when one of those events occurs. However, the actions to take based on those events aren’t always composed of a single Lambda function. Instead, your business logic may consist of multiple steps (like in the case of the example snapshot management flow described earlier). And you may want to run those steps in sequence or in parallel. You may also want to have retry logic or exception handling for each step.

AWS Step Functions serves just this purpose―to help you coordinate your functions and microservices. Step Functions enables you to simplify your effort and pull the error handling, retry logic, and workflow logic out of your Lambda code. Step Functions integrates with Lambda to provide a mechanism for building complex serverless applications. Now, you can kick off a Step Functions state machine based on a CloudWatch event.

In this post, I discuss how you can target Step Functions in a CloudWatch Events rule. This allows you to have event-driven snapshot management based on snapshot completion events firing in CloudWatch Event rules.

As an example of what you could do with Step Functions and CloudWatch Events, we’ve developed a reference architecture that performs management of your EBS snapshots.

Automating EBS Snapshot Management with Step Functions

This architecture assumes that you have already set up CloudWatch Events to create the snapshots on a schedule or that you are using some other means of creating snapshots according to your needs.

This architecture covers the pieces of the workflow that need to happen after a snapshot has been created.

  • It creates a CloudWatch Events rule to invoke a Step Functions state machine execution when an EBS snapshot is created.
  • The state machine then tags the snapshot, cleans up the oldest snapshots if the number of snapshots is greater than the defined number to retain, and copies the snapshot to a DR region.
  • When the DR region snapshot copy is completed, another state machine kicks off in the DR region. The new state machine has a similar flow and uses some of the same Lambda code to clean up the oldest snapshots that are greater than the defined number to retain.
  • Also, both state machines demonstrate how you can use Step Functions to handle errors within your workflow. Any errors that are caught during execution result in the execution of a Lambda function that writes a message to an SNS topic. Therefore, if any errors occur, you can subscribe to the SNS topic and get notified.

The following is an architecture diagram of the reference architecture:

Creating the Lambda functions and Step Functions state machines

First, pull the code from GitHub and use the AWS CLI to create S3 buckets for the Lambda code in the primary and DR regions. For this example, assume that the primary region is us-west-2 and the DR region is us-east-2. Run the following commands, replacing the italicized text in <> with your own unique bucket names.

git clone https://github.com/awslabs/aws-step-functions-ebs-snapshot-mgmt.git

cd aws-step-functions-ebs-snapshot-mgmt/

aws s3 mb s3://<primary region bucket name> --region us-west-2

aws s3 mb s3://<DR region bucket name> --region us-east-2

Next, use the Serverless Application Model (SAM), which uses AWS CloudFormation to deploy the Lambda functions and Step Functions state machines in the primary and DR regions. Replace the italicized text in <> with the S3 bucket names that you created earlier.

aws cloudformation package --template-file PrimaryRegionTemplate.yaml --s3-bucket <primary region bucket name>  --output-template-file tempPrimary.yaml --region us-west-2

aws cloudformation deploy --template-file tempPrimary.yaml --stack-name ebsSnapshotMgmtPrimary --capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM --region us-west-2

aws cloudformation package --template-file DR_RegionTemplate.yaml --s3-bucket <DR region bucket name> --output-template-file tempDR.yaml  --region us-east-2

aws cloudformation deploy --template-file tempDR.yaml --stack-name ebsSnapshotMgmtDR --capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM --region us-east-2

CloudWatch event rule verification

The CloudFormation templates deploy the following resources:

  • The Lambda functions that are coordinated by Step Functions
  • The Step Functions state machine
  • The SNS topic
  • The CloudWatch Events rules that trigger the state machine execution

So, all of the CloudWatch event rules have been created for you by performing the preceding commands. The next section demonstrates how you could create the CloudWatch event rule manually. To jump straight to testing the workflow, see the “Testing in your Account” section. Otherwise, you begin by setting up the CloudWatch event rule in the primary region for the createSnapshot event and also the CloudWatch event rule in the DR region for the copySnapshot command.

First, open the CloudWatch console in the primary region.

Choose Create Rule and create a rule for the createSnapshot command, with your newly created Step Function state machine as the target.

For Event Source, choose Event Pattern and specify the following values:

  • Service Name: EC2
  • Event Type: EBS Snapshot Notification
  • Specific Event: createSnapshot

For Target, choose Step Functions state machine, then choose the state machine created by the CloudFormation commands. Choose Create a new role for this specific resource. Your completed rule should look like the following:

Choose Configure Details and give the rule a name and description.

Choose Create Rule. You now have a CloudWatch Events rule that triggers a Step Functions state machine execution when the EBS snapshot creation is complete.

Now, set up the CloudWatch Events rule in the DR region as well. This looks almost same, but is based off the copySnapshot event instead of createSnapshot.

In the upper right corner in the console, switch to your DR region. Choose CloudWatch, Create Rule.

For Event Source, choose Event Pattern and specify the following values:

  • Service Name: EC2
  • Event Type: EBS Snapshot Notification
  • Specific Event: copySnapshot

For Target, choose Step Functions state machine, then select the state machine created by the CloudFormation commands. Choose Create a new role for this specific resource. Your completed rule should look like in the following:

As in the primary region, choose Configure Details and then give this rule a name and description. Complete the creation of the rule.

Testing in your account

To test this setup, open the EC2 console and choose Volumes. Select a volume to snapshot. Choose Actions, Create Snapshot, and then create a snapshot.

This results in a new execution of your state machine in the primary and DR regions. You can view these executions by going to the Step Functions console and selecting your state machine.

From there, you can see the execution of the state machine.

Primary region state machine:

DR region state machine:

I’ve also provided CloudFormation templates that perform all the earlier setup without using git clone and running the CloudFormation commands. Choose the Launch Stack buttons below to launch the primary and DR region stacks in Dublin and Ohio, respectively. From there, you can pick up at the Testing in Your Account section above to finish the example. All of the code for this example architecture is located in the aws-step-functions-ebs-snapshot-mgmt AWSLabs repo.

Launch EBS Snapshot Management into Ireland with CloudFormation
Primary Region eu-west-1 (Ireland)

Launch EBS Snapshot Management into Ohio with CloudFormation
DR Region us-east-2 (Ohio)

Summary

This reference architecture is just an example of how you can use Step Functions and CloudWatch Events to build event-driven IT automation. The possibilities are endless:

  • Use this pattern to perform other common cleanup type jobs such as managing Amazon RDS snapshots, old versions of Lambda functions, or old Amazon ECR images—all triggered by scheduled events.
  • Use Trusted Advisor events to identify unused EC2 instances or EBS volumes, then coordinate actions on them, such as alerting owners, stopping, or snapshotting.

Happy coding and please let me know what useful state machines you build!

Simplify Your Jenkins Builds with AWS CodeBuild

Post Syndicated from Paul Roberts original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/simplify-your-jenkins-builds-with-aws-codebuild/

Jeff Bezos famously said, “There’s a lot of undifferentiated heavy lifting that stands between your idea and that success.” He went on to say, “…70% of your time, energy, and dollars go into the undifferentiated heavy lifting and only 30% of your energy, time, and dollars gets to go into the core kernel of your idea.”

If you subscribe to this maxim, you should not be spending valuable time focusing on operational issues related to maintaining the Jenkins build infrastructure. Companies such as Riot Games have over 1.25 million builds per year and have written several lengthy blog posts about their experiences designing a complex, custom Docker-powered Jenkins build farm. Dealing with Jenkins slaves at scale is a job in itself and Riot has engineers focused on managing the build infrastructure.

Typical Jenkins Build Farm

 

As with all technology, the Jenkins build farm architectures have evolved. Today, instead of manually building your own container infrastructure, there are Jenkins Docker plugins available to help reduce the operational burden of maintaining these environments. There is also a community-contributed Amazon EC2 Container Service (Amazon ECS) plugin that helps remove some of the overhead, but you still need to configure and manage the overall Amazon ECS environment.

There are various ways to create and manage your Jenkins build farm, but there has to be a way that significantly reduces your operational overhead.

Introducing AWS CodeBuild

AWS CodeBuild is a fully managed build service that removes the undifferentiated heavy lifting of provisioning, managing, and scaling your own build servers. With CodeBuild, there is no software to install, patch, or update. CodeBuild scales up automatically to meet the needs of your development teams. In addition, CodeBuild is an on-demand service where you pay as you go. You are charged based only on the number of minutes it takes to complete your build.

One AWS customer, Recruiterbox, helps companies hire simply and predictably through their software platform. Two years ago, they began feeling the operational pain of maintaining their own Jenkins build farms. They briefly considered moving to Amazon ECS, but chose an even easier path forward instead. Recuiterbox transitioned to using Jenkins with CodeBuild and are very happy with the results. You can read more about their journey here.

Solution Overview: Jenkins and CodeBuild

To remove the heavy lifting from managing your Jenkins build farm, AWS has developed a Jenkins AWS CodeBuild plugin. After the plugin has been enabled, a developer can configure a Jenkins project to pick up new commits from their chosen source code repository and automatically run the associated builds. After the build is successful, it will create an artifact that is stored inside an S3 bucket that you have configured. If an error is detected somewhere, CodeBuild will capture the output and send it to Amazon CloudWatch logs. In addition to storing the logs on CloudWatch, Jenkins also captures the error so you do not have to go hunting for log files for your build.

 

AWS CodeBuild with Jenkins Plugin

 

The following example uses AWS CodeCommit (Git) as the source control management (SCM) and Amazon S3 for build artifact storage. Logs are stored in CloudWatch. A development pipeline that uses Jenkins with CodeBuild plugin architecture looks something like this:

 

AWS CodeBuild Diagram

Initial Solution Setup

To keep this blog post succinct, I assume that you are using the following components on AWS already and have applied the appropriate IAM policies:

·         AWS CodeCommit repo.

·         Amazon S3 bucket for CodeBuild artifacts.

·         SNS notification for text messaging of the Jenkins admin password.

·         IAM user’s key and secret.

·         A role that has a policy with these permissions. Be sure to edit the ARNs with your region, account, and resource name. Use this role in the AWS CloudFormation template referred to later in this post.

 

Jenkins Installation with CodeBuild Plugin Enabled

To make the integration with Jenkins as frictionless as possible, I have created an AWS CloudFormation template here: https://s3.amazonaws.com/proberts-public/jenkins.yaml. Download the template, sign in the AWS CloudFormation console, and then use the template to create a stack.

 

CloudFormation Inputs

Jenkins Project Configuration

After the stack is complete, log in to the Jenkins EC2 instance using the user name “admin” and the password sent to your mobile device. Now that you have logged in to Jenkins, you need to create your first project. Start with a Freestyle project and configure the parameters based on your CodeBuild and CodeCommit settings.

 

AWS CodeBuild Plugin Configuration in Jenkins

 

Additional Jenkins AWS CodeBuild Plugin Configuration

 

After you have configured the Jenkins project appropriately you should be able to check your build status on the Jenkins polling log under your project settings:

 

Jenkins Polling Log

 

Now that Jenkins is polling CodeCommit, you can check the CodeBuild dashboard under your Jenkins project to confirm your build was successful:

Jenkins AWS CodeBuild Dashboard

Wrapping Up

In a matter of minutes, you have been able to provision Jenkins with the AWS CodeBuild plugin. This will greatly simplify your build infrastructure management. Now kick back and relax while CodeBuild does all the heavy lifting!


About the Author

Paul Roberts is a Strategic Solutions Architect for Amazon Web Services. When he is not working on Serverless, DevOps, or Artificial Intelligence, he is often found in Lake Tahoe exploring the various mountain ranges with his family.

Automate Your IT Operations Using AWS Step Functions and Amazon CloudWatch Events

Post Syndicated from Andy Katz original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/automate-your-it-operations-using-aws-step-functions-and-amazon-cloudwatch-events/


Rob Percival, Associate Solutions Architect

Are you interested in reducing the operational overhead of your AWS Cloud infrastructure? One way to achieve this is to automate the response to operational events for resources in your AWS account.

Amazon CloudWatch Events provides a near real-time stream of system events that describe the changes and notifications for your AWS resources. From this stream, you can create rules to route specific events to AWS Step Functions, AWS Lambda, and other AWS services for further processing and automated actions.

In this post, learn how you can use Step Functions to orchestrate serverless IT automation workflows in response to CloudWatch events sourced from AWS Health, a service that monitors and generates events for your AWS resources. As a real-world example, I show automating the response to a scenario where an IAM user access key has been exposed.

Serverless workflows with Step Functions and Lambda

Step Functions makes it easy to develop and orchestrate components of operational response automation using visual workflows. Building automation workflows from individual Lambda functions that perform discrete tasks lets you develop, test, and modify the components of your workflow quickly and seamlessly. As serverless services, Step Functions and Lambda also provide the benefits of more productive development, reduced operational overhead, and no costs incurred outside of when the workflows are actively executing.

Example workflow

As an example, this post focuses on automating the response to an event generated by AWS Health when an IAM access key has been publicly exposed on GitHub. This is a diagram of the automation workflow:

AWS proactively monitors popular code repository sites for IAM access keys that have been publicly exposed. Upon detection of an exposed IAM access key, AWS Health generates an AWS_RISK_CREDENTIALS_EXPOSED event in the AWS account related to the exposed key. A configured CloudWatch Events rule detects this event and invokes a Step Functions state machine. The state machine then orchestrates the automated workflow that deletes the exposed IAM access key, summarizes the recent API activity for the exposed key, and sends the summary message to an Amazon SNS topic to notify the subscribers―in that order.

The corresponding Step Functions state machine diagram of this automation workflow can be seen below:

While this particular example focuses on IT automation workflows in response to the AWS_RISK_CREDENTIALS_EXPOSEDevent sourced from AWS Health, it can be generalized to integrate with other events from these services, other event-generating AWS services, and even run on a time-based schedule.

Walkthrough

To follow along, use the code and resources found in the aws-health-tools GitHub repo. The code and resources include an AWS CloudFormation template, in addition to instructions on how to use it.

Launch Stack into N. Virginia with CloudFormation

The Step Functions state machine execution starts with the exposed keys event details in JSON, a sanitized example of which is provided below:

{
    "version": "0",
    "id": "121345678-1234-1234-1234-123456789012",
    "detail-type": "AWS Health Event",
    "source": "aws.health",
    "account": "123456789012",
    "time": "2016-06-05T06:27:57Z",
    "region": "us-east-1",
    "resources": [],
    "detail": {
        "eventArn": "arn:aws:health:us-east-1::event/AWS_RISK_CREDENTIALS_EXPOSED_XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX",
        "service": "RISK",
        "eventTypeCode": "AWS_RISK_CREDENTIALS_EXPOSED",
        "eventTypeCategory": "issue",
        "startTime": "Sat, 05 Jun 2016 15:10:09 GMT",
        "eventDescription": [
            {
                "language": "en_US",
                "latestDescription": "A description of the event is provided here"
            }
        ],
        "affectedEntities": [
            {
                "entityValue": "ACCESS_KEY_ID_HERE"
            }
        ]
    }
}

After it’s invoked, the state machine execution proceeds as follows.

Step 1: Delete the exposed IAM access key pair

The first thing you want to do when you determine that an IAM access key has been exposed is to delete the key pair so that it can no longer be used to make API calls. This Step Functions task state deletes the exposed access key pair detailed in the incoming event, and retrieves the IAM user associated with the key to look up API activity for the user in the next step. The user name, access key, and other details about the event are passed to the next step as JSON.

This state contains a powerful error-handling feature offered by Step Functions task states called a catch configuration. Catch configurations allow you to reroute and continue state machine invocation at new states depending on potential errors that occur in your task function. In this case, the catch configuration skips to Step 3. It immediately notifies your security team that errors were raised in the task function of this step (Step 1), when attempting to look up the corresponding IAM user for a key or delete the user’s access key.

Note: Step Functions also offers a retry configuration for when you would rather retry a task function that failed due to error, with the option to specify an increasing time interval between attempts and a maximum number of attempts.

Step 2: Summarize recent API activity for key

After you have deleted the access key pair, you’ll want to have some immediate insight into whether it was used for malicious activity in your account. Another task state, this step uses AWS CloudTrail to look up and summarize the most recent API activity for the IAM user associated with the exposed key. The summary is in the form of counts for each API call made and resource type and name affected. This summary information is then passed to the next step as JSON. This step requires information that you obtained in Step 1. Step Functions ensures the successful completion of Step 1 before moving to Step 2.

Step 3: Notify security

The summary information gathered in the last step can provide immediate insight into any malicious activity on your account made by the exposed key. To determine this and further secure your account if necessary, you must notify your security team with the gathered summary information.

This final task state generates an email message providing in-depth detail about the event using the API activity summary, and publishes the message to an SNS topic subscribed to by the members of your security team.

If the catch configuration of the task state in Step 1 was triggered, then the security notification email instead directs your security team to log in to the console and navigate to the Personal Health Dashboard to view more details on the incident.

Lessons learned

When implementing this use case with Step Functions and Lambda, consider the following:

  • One of the most important parts of implementing automation in response to operational events is to ensure visibility into the response and resolution actions is retained. Step Functions and Lambda enable you to orchestrate your granular response and resolution actions that provides direct visibility into the state of the automation workflow.
  • This basic workflow currently executes these steps serially with a catch configuration for error handling. More sophisticated workflows can leverage the parallel execution, branching logic, and time delay functionality provided by Step Functions.
  • Catch and retry configurations for task states allow for orchestrating reliable workflows while maintaining the granularity of each Lambda function. Without leveraging a catch configuration in Step 1, you would have had to duplicate code from the function in Step 3 to ensure that your security team was notified on failure to delete the access key.
  • Step Functions and Lambda are serverless services, so there is no cost for these services when they are not running. Because this IT automation workflow only runs when an IAM access key is exposed for this account (which is hopefully rare!), the total monthly cost for this workflow is essentially $0.

Conclusion

Automating the response to operational events for resources in your AWS account can free up the valuable time of your engineers. Step Functions and Lambda enable granular IT automation workflows to achieve this result while gaining direct visibility into the orchestration and state of the automation.

For more examples of how to use Step Functions to automate the operations of your AWS resources, or if you’d like to see how Step Functions can be used to build and orchestrate serverless applications, visit Getting Started on the Step Functions website.

New Network Load Balancer – Effortless Scaling to Millions of Requests per Second

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-network-load-balancer-effortless-scaling-to-millions-of-requests-per-second/

Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)) has been an important part of AWS since 2009, when it was launched as part of a three-pack that also included Auto Scaling and Amazon CloudWatch. Since that time we have added many features, and also introduced the Application Load Balancer. Designed to support application-level, content-based routing to applications that run in containers, Application Load Balancers pair well with microservices, streaming, and real-time workloads.

Over the years, our customers have used ELB to support web sites and applications that run at almost any scale — from simple sites running on a T2 instance or two, all the way up to complex applications that run on large fleets of higher-end instances and handle massive amounts of traffic. Behind the scenes, ELB monitors traffic and automatically scales to meet demand. This process, which includes a generous buffer of headroom, has become quicker and more responsive over the years and works well even for our customers who use ELB to support live broadcasts, “flash” sales, and holidays. However, in some situations such as instantaneous fail-over between regions, or extremely spiky workloads, we have worked with our customers to pre-provision ELBs in anticipation of a traffic surge.

New Network Load Balancer
Today we are introducing the new Network Load Balancer (NLB). It is designed to handle tens of millions of requests per second while maintaining high throughput at ultra low latency, with no effort on your part. The Network Load Balancer is API-compatible with the Application Load Balancer, including full programmatic control of Target Groups and Targets. Here are some of the most important features:

Static IP Addresses – Each Network Load Balancer provides a single IP address for each VPC subnet in its purview. If you have targets in a subnet in us-west-2a and other targets in a subnet in us-west-2c, NLB will create and manage two IP addresses (one per subnet); connections to that IP address will spread traffic across the instances in the subnet. You can also specify an existing Elastic IP for each subnet for even greater control. With full control over your IP addresses, Network Load Balancer can be used in situations where IP addresses need to be hard-coded into DNS records, customer firewall rules, and so forth.

Zonality – The IP-per-subnet feature reduces latency with improved performance, improves availability through isolation and fault tolerance and makes the use of Network Load Balancers transparent to your client applications. Network Load Balancers also attempt to route a series of requests from a particular source to targets in a single subnet while still allowing automatic failover.

Source Address Preservation – With Network Load Balancer, the original source IP address and source ports for the incoming connections remain unmodified, so application software need not support X-Forwarded-For, proxy protocol, or other workarounds. This also means that normal firewall rules, including VPC Security Groups, can be used on targets.

Long-running Connections – NLB handles connections with built-in fault tolerance, and can handle connections that are open for months or years, making them a great fit for IoT, gaming, and messaging applications.

Failover – Powered by Route 53 health checks, NLB supports failover between IP addresses within and across regions.

Creating a Network Load Balancer
I can create a Network Load Balancer opening up the EC2 Console, selecting Load Balancers, and clicking on Create Load Balancer:

I choose Network Load Balancer and click on Create, then enter the details. I can choose an Elastic IP address for each subnet in the target VPC and I can tag the Network Load Balancer:

Then I click on Configure Routing and create a new target group. I enter a name, and then choose the protocol and port. I can also set up health checks that go to the traffic port or to the alternate of my choice:

Then I click on Register Targets and the EC2 instances that will receive traffic, and click on Add to registered:

I make sure that everything looks good and then click on Create:

The state of my new Load Balancer is provisioning, switching to active within a minute or so:

For testing purposes, I simply grab the DNS name of the Load Balancer from the console (in practice I would use Amazon Route 53 and a more friendly name):

Then I sent it a ton of traffic (I intended to let it run for just a second or two but got distracted and it created a huge number of processes, so this was a happy accident):

$ while true;
> do
>   wget http://nlb-1-6386cc6bf24701af.elb.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/phpinfo2.php &
> done

A more disciplined test would use a tool like Bees with Machine Guns, of course!

I took a quick break to let some traffic flow and then checked the CloudWatch metrics for my Load Balancer, finding that it was able to handle the sudden onslaught of traffic with ease:

I also looked at my EC2 instances to see how they were faring under the load (really well, it turns out):

It turns out that my colleagues did run a more disciplined test than I did. They set up a Network Load Balancer and backed it with an Auto Scaled fleet of EC2 instances. They set up a second fleet composed of hundreds of EC2 instances, each running Bees with Machine Guns and configured to generate traffic with highly variable request and response sizes. Beginning at 1.5 million requests per second, they quickly turned the dial all the way up, reaching over 3 million requests per second and 30 Gbps of aggregate bandwidth before maxing out their test resources.

Choosing a Load Balancer
As always, you should consider the needs of your application when you choose a load balancer. Here are some guidelines:

Network Load Balancer (NLB) – Ideal for load balancing of TCP traffic, NLB is capable of handling millions of requests per second while maintaining ultra-low latencies. NLB is optimized to handle sudden and volatile traffic patterns while using a single static IP address per Availability Zone.

Application Load Balancer (ALB) – Ideal for advanced load balancing of HTTP and HTTPS traffic, ALB provides advanced request routing that supports modern application architectures, including microservices and container-based applications.

Classic Load Balancer (CLB) – Ideal for applications that were built within the EC2-Classic network.

For a side-by-side feature comparison, see the Elastic Load Balancer Details table.

If you are currently using a Classic Load Balancer and would like to migrate to a Network Load Balancer, take a look at our new Load Balancer Copy Utility. This Python tool will help you to create a Network Load Balancer with the same configuration as an existing Classic Load Balancer. It can also register your existing EC2 instances with the new load balancer.

Pricing & Availability
Like the Application Load Balancer, pricing is based on Load Balancer Capacity Units, or LCUs. Billing is $0.006 per LCU, based on the highest value seen across the following dimensions:

  • Bandwidth – 1 GB per LCU.
  • New Connections – 800 per LCU.
  • Active Connections – 100,000 per LCU.

Most applications are bandwidth-bound and should see a cost reduction (for load balancing) of about 25% when compared to Application or Classic Load Balancers.

Network Load Balancers are available today in all AWS commercial regions except China (Beijing), supported by AWS CloudFormation, Auto Scaling, and Amazon ECS.

Jeff;

 

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 11

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/09/01/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-11/

September is here and summer is officially drawing to a close, but the Grafana team has stayed busy. We’re prepping for an upcoming Grafana 4.5 release, had some new and updated plugins, and would like to thank two contributors for fixing a non-obvious bug. Also – The CFP for GrafanaCon EU is open, and we’d like you to speak!


GrafanaCon EU CFP is Open

Have a big idea to share? Have a shorter talk or a demo you’d like to show off?
We’re looking for 40-minute detailed talks, 20-minute general talks and 10-minute lightning talks. We have a perfect slot for any type of content.

I’d Like to Speak at GrafanaCon

Grafana Labs is Hiring!

Do you believe in open source software? Build the future with us, and ship code.

Check out our open positions

From the Blogosphere

Zabbix, Grafana and Python, a Match Made in Heaven: David’s article, published earlier this year, hits on some great points about open source software and how you don’t have to spend much (or any) money to get valuable monitoring for your infrastructure.

The Business of Democratizing Metrics: Our friends over at Packet stopped by the office recently to sit down and chat with the Grafana Labs co-founders. They discussed how Grafana started, how monitoring has evolved, and democratizing metrics.

Visualizing CloudWatch with Grafana: Yuzo put together an article outlining his first experience adding a CloudWatch data source in Grafana, importing his first dashboard, then comparing the graphs between Grafana and CloudWatch.

Monitoring Linux performance with Grafana: Jim wanted to monitor his CentOS home router to get network traffic and disk usage stats, but wanted to try something different than his previous cacti monitoring. This walkthrough shows how he set things up to collect, store and visualize the data.

Visualizing Jenkins Pipeline Results in Grafana: Piotr provides a walkthrough of his setup and configuration to view Jenkins build results for his continuous delivery environment in Grafana.


Grafana Plugins

This week we’ve added a plugin for the new time series database Sidewinder, and updates to the Carpet Plot graph panel. If you haven’t installed a plugin, it’s easy. For on-premises installations, the Grafana-cli will do the work for you. If you’re using Hosted Grafana, you can install any plugin with one click.

NEW PLUGIN

Sidewinder Data Source – This is a data source plugin for the new Sidewinder database. Sidewinder is an open source, fast time series database designed for real-time analytics. It can be used for a variety of use cases that need storage of metrics data like APM and IoT.

Install Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

Carpet Plot Panel – This plugin received an update, which includes the following features and fixes:

  • New aggregate functions: Min, Max, First, Last
  • Possibility to invert color scheme
  • Possibility to change X axis label format
  • Possibility to hide X and Y axis labels

Update Now


This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

This week we want to thank two contributors who worked together to fix a non-obvious bug in the new MySQL data source (a bug with sorting values in the legend).

robinsonjj
Thank you Joe, for tackling this issue and submitting a PR with an initial fix.

pdoan017
pdoan017 took robinsonjj’s contribution and added a new PR to retain the order in which keys are added.

Thank you both for taking the time to both troubleshoot and fix the issue. Much appreciated!


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

Nice! Combining different panel types on a dashboard can add more context to your data – Looks like a very functional dashboard.


What do you think?

Let us know how we’re doing! Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Help us make these roundups better and better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

New – Application Load Balancing via IP Address to AWS & On-Premises Resources

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-application-load-balancing-via-ip-address-to-aws-on-premises-resources/

I told you about the new AWS Application Load Balancer last year and showed you how to use it to do implement Layer 7 (application) routing to EC2 instances and to microservices running in containers.

Some of our customers are building hybrid applications as part of a longer-term move to AWS. These customers have told us that they would like to use a single Application Load Balancer to spread traffic across a combination of existing on-premises resources and new resources running in the AWS Cloud. Other customers would like to spread traffic to web or database servers that are scattered across two or more Virtual Private Clouds (VPCs), host multiple services on the same instance with distinct IP addresses but a common port number, and to offer support for IP-based virtual hosting for clients that do not support Server Name Indication (SNI). Another group of customers would like to host multiple instances of a service on the same instance (perhaps within containers), while using multiple interfaces and security groups to implement fine-grained access control.

These situations arise within a broad set of hybrid, migration, disaster recovery, and on-premises use cases and scenarios.

Route to IP Addresses
In order to address these use cases, Application Load Balancers can now route traffic directly to IP addresses. These addresses can be in the same VPC as the ALB, a peer VPC in the same region, on an EC2 instance connected to a VPC by way of ClassicLink, or on on-premises resources at the other end of a VPN connection or AWS Direct Connect connection.

Application Load Balancers already group targets in to target groups. As part of today’s launch, each target group now has a target type attribute:

instance – Targets are registered by way of EC2 instance IDs, as before.

ip – Targets are registered as IP addresses. You can use any IPv4 address from the load balancer’s VPC CIDR for targets within load balancer’s VPC and any IPv4 address from the RFC 1918 ranges (10.0.0.0/8, 172.16.0.0/12, and 192.168.0.0/16) or the RFC 6598 range (100.64.0.0/10) for targets located outside the load balancer’s VPC (this includes Peered VPC, EC2-Classic, and on-premises targets reachable over Direct Connect or VPN).

Each target group has a load balancer and health check configuration, and publishes metrics to CloudWatch, as has always been the case.

Let’s say that you are in the transition phase of an application migration to AWS or want to use AWS to augment on-premises resources with EC2 instances and you need to distribute application traffic across both your AWS and on-premises resources. You can achieve this by registering all the resources (AWS and on-premises) to the same target group and associate the target group with a load balancer. Alternatively, you can use DNS based weighted load balancing across AWS and on-premises resources using two load balancers i.e. one load balancer for AWS and other for on-premises resources. In the scenario where application-A back-ends are in VPC and application-B back-ends are in on-premises locations then you can put back-ends for each application in different target groups and use content based routing to route traffic to each target group.

Creating a Target Group
Here’s how I create a target group that sends traffic to some IP addresses as part of the process of creating an Application Load Balancer. I enter a name (ip-target-1) and select ip as the Target type:

Then I enter IP address targets. These can be from the VPC that hosts the load balancer:

Or they can be other private IP addresses within one of the private ranges listed above, for targets outside of the VPC that hosts the load balancer:

After I review the settings and create the load balancer, traffic will be sent to the designated IP addresses as soon as they pass the health checks. Each load balancer can accommodate up to 1000 targets.

I can examine my target group and edit the set of targets at any time:

As you can see, one of my targets was not healthy when I took this screen shot (this was by design). Metrics are published to CloudWatch for each target group; I can see them in the Console and I can create CloudWatch Alarms:

Available Now
This feature is available now and you can start using it today in all AWS Regions.

Jeff;

 

New – Amazon EC2 Elastic GPUs for Windows

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-ec2-elastic-gpus-for-windows/

Today we’re excited to announce the general availability of Amazon EC2 Elastic GPUs for Windows. An Elastic GPU is a GPU resource that you can attach to your Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instance to accelerate the graphics performance of your applications. Elastic GPUs come in medium (1GB), large (2GB), xlarge (4GB), and 2xlarge (8GB) sizes and are lower cost alternatives to using GPU instance types like G3 or G2 (for OpenGL 3.3 applications). You can use Elastic GPUs with many instance types allowing you the flexibility to choose the right compute, memory, and storage balance for your application. Today you can provision elastic GPUs in us-east-1 and us-east-2.

Elastic GPUs start at just $0.05 per hour for an eg1.medium. A nickel an hour. If we attach that Elastic GPU to a t2.medium ($0.065/hour) we pay a total of less than 12 cents per hour for an instance with a GPU. Previously, the cheapest graphical workstation (G2/3 class) cost 76 cents per hour. That’s over an 80% reduction in the price for running certain graphical workloads.

When should I use Elastic GPUs?

Elastic GPUs are best suited for applications that require a small or intermittent amount of additional GPU power for graphics acceleration and support OpenGL. Elastic GPUs support up to and including the OpenGL 3.3 API standards with expanded API support coming soon.

Elastic GPUs are not part of the hardware of your instance. Instead they’re attached through an elastic GPU network interface in your subnet which is created when you launch an instance with an Elastic GPU. The image below shows how Elastic GPUs are attached.

Since Elastic GPUs are network attached it’s important to provision an instance with adequate network bandwidth to support your application. It’s also important to make sure your instance security group allows traffic on port 2007.

Any application that can use the OpenGL APIs can take advantage of Elastic GPUs so Blender, Google Earth, SIEMENS SolidEdge, and more could all run with Elastic GPUs. Even Kerbal Space Program!

Ok, now that we know when to use Elastic GPUs and how they work, let’s launch an instance and use one.

Using Elastic GPUs

First, we’ll navigate to the EC2 console and click Launch Instance. Next we’ll select a Windows AMI like: “Microsoft Windows Server 2016 Base”. Then we’ll select an instance type. Then we’ll make sure we select the “Elastic GPU” section and allocate an eg1.medium (1GB) Elastic GPU.

We’ll also include some userdata in the advanced details section. We’ll write a quick PowerShell script to download and install our Elastic GPU software.


<powershell>
Start-Transcript -Path "C:\egpu_install.log" -Append
(new-object net.webclient).DownloadFile('http://ec2-elasticgpus.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/latest', 'C:\egpu.msi')
Start-Process "msiexec.exe" -Wait -ArgumentList "/i C:\egpu.msi /qn /L*v C:\egpu_msi_install.log"
[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("Path", $env:Path + ";C:\Program Files\Amazon\EC2ElasticGPUs\manager\", [EnvironmentVariableTarget]::Machine)
Restart-Computer -Force
</powershell>

This software sends all OpenGL API calls to the attached Elastic GPU.

Next, we’ll double check to make sure my security group has TCP port 2007 exposed to my VPC so my Elastic GPU can connect to my instance. Finally, we’ll click launch and wait for my instance and Elastic GPU to provision. The best way to do this is to create a separate SG that you can attach to the instance.

You can see an animation of the launch procedure below.

Alternatively we could have launched on the AWS CLI with a quick call like this:

$aws ec2 run-instances --elastic-gpu-specification Type=eg1.2xlarge \
--image-id ami-1a2b3c4d \
--subnet subnet-11223344 \
--instance-type r4.large \
--security-groups "default" "elasticgpu-sg"

then we could have followed the Elastic GPU software installation instructions here.

We can now see our Elastic GPU is humming along and attached by checking out the Elastic GPU status in the taskbar.

We welcome any feedback on the service and you can click on the Feedback link in the bottom left corner of the GPU Status Box to let us know about your experience with Elastic GPUs.

Elastic GPU Demonstration

Ok, so we have our instance provisioned and our Elastic GPU attached. My teammates here at AWS wanted me to talk about the amazingly wonderful 3D applications you can run, but when I learned about Elastic GPUs the first thing that came to mind was Kerbal Space Program (KSP), so I’m going to run a quick test with that. After all, if you can’t launch Jebediah Kerman into space then what was the point of all of that software? I’ve downloaded KSP and added the launch parameter of -force-opengl to make sure we’re using OpenGL to do our rendering. Below you can see my poor attempt at building a spaceship – I used to build better ones. It looks pretty smooth considering we’re going over a network with a lossy remote desktop protocol.

I’d show a picture of the rocket launch but I didn’t even make it off the ground before I experienced a rapid unscheduled disassembly of the rocket. Back to the drawing board for me.

In the mean time I can check my Amazon CloudWatch metrics and see how much GPU memory I used during my brief game.

Partners, Pricing, and Documentation

To continue to build out great experiences for our customers, our 3D software partners like ANSYS and Siemens are looking to take advantage of the OpenGL APIs on Elastic GPUs, and are currently certifying Elastic GPUs for their software. You can learn more about our partnerships here.

You can find information on Elastic GPU pricing here. You can find additional documentation here.

Now, if you’ll excuse me I have some virtual rockets to build.

Randall

Announcing the Reputation Dashboard

Post Syndicated from Brent Meyer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/ses/announcing-the-reputation-dashboard/

The Amazon SES team is pleased to announce the addition of a reputation dashboard to the Amazon SES console. This new feature helps you track issues that could impact the sender reputation of your Amazon SES account.

What information does the reputation dashboard provide?

Amazon SES users must maintain bounce and complaint rates below a certain threshold. We put these rules in place to protect the sender reputations of all Amazon SES users, and to prevent Amazon SES from being used to deliver spam or malicious content. Users with very high rates of bounces or complaints may be put on probation. If the bounce or complaint rates are not within acceptable limits by the end of the probation period, these accounts may be shut down completely.

Previous versions of Amazon SES provided basic sending metrics, including information about bounces and complaints. However, the bounce and complaint metrics in this dashboard only included information for the past few days of email sent from your account, as opposed to an overall rate.

The new reputation dashboard provides overall bounce and complaint rates for your entire account. This enables you to more closely monitor the health of your account and adjust your email sending practices as needed.

Can’t I just calculate these values myself?

Because each Amazon SES account sends different volumes of email at different rates, we do not calculate bounce and complaint rates based on a fixed time period. Instead, we use a representative volume of email. This representative volume is the basis for the bounce and complaint rate calculations.

Why do we use representative volume in our calculations? Let’s imagine that you sent 1,000 emails one week, and 5 of them bounced. If we only considered a week of email sending, your metrics look good. Now imagine that the next week you only sent 5 emails, and one of them bounced. Suddenly, your bounce rate jumps from half a percent to 20%, and your account is automatically placed on probation. This example may be an extreme case, but it illustrates the reason that we don’t use fixed time periods when calculating bounce and complaint rates.

When you open the new reputation dashboard, you will see bounce and complaint rates calculated using the representative volume for your account. We automatically recalculate these rates every time you send email through Amazon SES.

What else can I do with these metrics?

The Bounce and Complaint Rate metrics in the reputation dashboard are automatically sent to Amazon CloudWatch. You can use CloudWatch to create dashboards that track your bounce and complaint rates over time, and to create alarms that send you notifications when these metrics cross certain thresholds. To learn more, see Creating Reputation Monitoring Alarms Using CloudWatch in the Amazon SES Developer Guide.

How can I see the reputation dashboard?

The reputation dashboard is now available to all Amazon SES users. To view the reputation dashboard, sign in to the Amazon SES console. On the left navigation menu, choose Reputation Dashboard. For more information, see Monitoring Your Sender Reputation in the Amazon SES Developer Guide.

We hope you find the information in the reputation dashboard to be useful in managing your email sending programs and campaigns. If you have any questions or comments, please leave a comment on this post, or let us know in the Amazon SES forum.

Announcing the Winners of the AWS Chatbot Challenge – Conversational, Intelligent Chatbots using Amazon Lex and AWS Lambda

Post Syndicated from Tara Walker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/announcing-the-winners-of-the-aws-chatbot-challenge-conversational-intelligent-chatbots-using-amazon-lex-and-aws-lambda/

A couple of months ago on the blog, I announced the AWS Chatbot Challenge in conjunction with Slack. The AWS Chatbot Challenge was an opportunity to build a unique chatbot that helped to solve a problem or that would add value for its prospective users. The mission was to build a conversational, natural language chatbot using Amazon Lex and leverage Lex’s integration with AWS Lambda to execute logic or data processing on the backend.

I know that you all have been anxiously waiting to hear announcements of who were the winners of the AWS Chatbot Challenge as much as I was. Well wait no longer, the winners of the AWS Chatbot Challenge have been decided.

May I have the Envelope Please? (The Trumpets sound)

The winners of the AWS Chatbot Challenge are:

  • First Place: BuildFax Counts by Joe Emison
  • Second Place: Hubsy by Andrew Riess, Andrew Puch, and John Wetzel
  • Third Place: PFMBot by Benny Leong and his team from MoneyLion.
  • Large Organization Winner: ADP Payroll Innovation Bot by Eric Liu, Jiaxing Yan, and Fan Yang

 

Diving into the Winning Chatbot Projects

Let’s take a walkthrough of the details for each of the winning projects to get a view of what made these chatbots distinctive, as well as, learn more about the technologies used to implement the chatbot solution.

 

BuildFax Counts by Joe Emison

The BuildFax Counts bot was created as a real solution for the BuildFax company to decrease the amount the time that sales and marketing teams can get answers on permits or properties with permits meet certain criteria.

BuildFax, a company co-founded by bot developer Joe Emison, has the only national database of building permits, which updates data from approximately half of the United States on a monthly basis. In order to accommodate the many requests that come in from the sales and marketing team regarding permit information, BuildFax has a technical sales support team that fulfills these requests sent to a ticketing system by manually writing SQL queries that run across the shards of the BuildFax databases. Since there are a large number of requests received by the internal sales support team and due to the manual nature of setting up the queries, it may take several days for getting the sales and marketing teams to receive an answer.

The BuildFax Counts chatbot solves this problem by taking the permit inquiry that would normally be sent into a ticket from the sales and marketing team, as input from Slack to the chatbot. Once the inquiry is submitted into Slack, a query executes and the inquiry results are returned immediately.

Joe built this solution by first creating a nightly export of the data in their BuildFax MySQL RDS database to CSV files that are stored in Amazon S3. From the exported CSV files, an Amazon Athena table was created in order to run quick and efficient queries on the data. He then used Amazon Lex to create a bot to handle the common questions and criteria that may be asked by the sales and marketing teams when seeking data from the BuildFax database by modeling the language used from the BuildFax ticketing system. He added several different sample utterances and slot types; both custom and Lex provided, in order to correctly parse every question and criteria combination that could be received from an inquiry.  Using Lambda, Joe created a Javascript Lambda function that receives information from the Lex intent and used it to build a SQL statement that runs against the aforementioned Athena database using the AWS SDK for JavaScript in Node.js library to return inquiry count result and SQL statement used.

The BuildFax Counts bot is used today for the BuildFax sales and marketing team to get back data on inquiries immediately that previously took up to a week to receive results.

Not only is BuildFax Counts bot our 1st place winner and wonderful solution, but its creator, Joe Emison, is a great guy.  Joe has opted to donate his prize; the $5,000 cash, the $2,500 in AWS Credits, and one re:Invent ticket to the Black Girls Code organization. I must say, you rock Joe for helping these kids get access and exposure to technology.

 

Hubsy by Andrew Riess, Andrew Puch, and John Wetzel

Hubsy bot was created to redefine and personalize the way users traditionally manage their HubSpot account. HubSpot is a SaaS system providing marketing, sales, and CRM software. Hubsy allows users of HubSpot to create engagements and log engagements with customers, provide sales teams with deals status, and retrieves client contact information quickly. Hubsy uses Amazon Lex’s conversational interface to execute commands from the HubSpot API so that users can gain insights, store and retrieve data, and manage tasks directly from Facebook, Slack, or Alexa.

In order to implement the Hubsy chatbot, Andrew and the team members used AWS Lambda to create a Lambda function with Node.js to parse the users request and call the HubSpot API, which will fulfill the initial request or return back to the user asking for more information. Terraform was used to automatically setup and update Lambda, CloudWatch logs, as well as, IAM profiles. Amazon Lex was used to build the conversational piece of the bot, which creates the utterances that a person on a sales team would likely say when seeking information from HubSpot. To integrate with Alexa, the Amazon Alexa skill builder was used to create an Alexa skill which was tested on an Echo Dot. Cloudwatch Logs are used to log the Lambda function information to CloudWatch in order to debug different parts of the Lex intents. In order to validate the code before the Terraform deployment, ESLint was additionally used to ensure the code was linted and proper development standards were followed.

 

PFMBot by Benny Leong and his team from MoneyLion

PFMBot, Personal Finance Management Bot,  is a bot to be used with the MoneyLion finance group which offers customers online financial products; loans, credit monitoring, and free credit score service to improve the financial health of their customers. Once a user signs up an account on the MoneyLion app or website, the user has the option to link their bank accounts with the MoneyLion APIs. Once the bank account is linked to the APIs, the user will be able to login to their MoneyLion account and start having a conversation with the PFMBot based on their bank account information.

The PFMBot UI has a web interface built with using Javascript integration. The chatbot was created using Amazon Lex to build utterances based on the possible inquiries about the user’s MoneyLion bank account. PFMBot uses the Lex built-in AMAZON slots and parsed and converted the values from the built-in slots to pass to AWS Lambda. The AWS Lambda functions interacting with Amazon Lex are Java-based Lambda functions which call the MoneyLion Java-based internal APIs running on Spring Boot. These APIs obtain account data and related bank account information from the MoneyLion MySQL Database.

 

ADP Payroll Innovation Bot by Eric Liu, Jiaxing Yan, and Fan Yang

ADP PI (Payroll Innovation) bot is designed to help employees of ADP customers easily review their own payroll details and compare different payroll data by just asking the bot for results. The ADP PI Bot additionally offers issue reporting functionality for employees to report payroll issues and aids HR managers in quickly receiving and organizing any reported payroll issues.

The ADP Payroll Innovation bot is an ecosystem for the ADP payroll consisting of two chatbots, which includes ADP PI Bot for external clients (employees and HR managers), and ADP PI DevOps Bot for internal ADP DevOps team.


The architecture for the ADP PI DevOps bot is different architecture from the ADP PI bot shown above as it is deployed internally to ADP. The ADP PI DevOps bot allows input from both Slack and Alexa. When input comes into Slack, Slack sends the request to Lex for it to process the utterance. Lex then calls the Lambda backend, which obtains ADP data sitting in the ADP VPC running within an Amazon VPC. When input comes in from Alexa, a Lambda function is called that also obtains data from the ADP VPC running on AWS.

The architecture for the ADP PI bot consists of users entering in requests and/or entering issues via Slack. When requests/issues are entered via Slack, the Slack APIs communicate via Amazon API Gateway to AWS Lambda. The Lambda function either writes data into one of the Amazon DynamoDB databases for recording issues and/or sending issues or it sends the request to Lex. When sending issues, DynamoDB integrates with Trello to keep HR Managers abreast of the escalated issues. Once the request data is sent from Lambda to Lex, Lex processes the utterance and calls another Lambda function that integrates with the ADP API and it calls ADP data from within the ADP VPC, which runs on Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC).

Python and Node.js were the chosen languages for the development of the bots.

The ADP PI bot ecosystem has the following functional groupings:

Employee Functionality

  • Summarize Payrolls
  • Compare Payrolls
  • Escalate Issues
  • Evolve PI Bot

HR Manager Functionality

  • Bot Management
  • Audit and Feedback

DevOps Functionality

  • Reduce call volume in service centers (ADP PI Bot).
  • Track issues and generate reports (ADP PI Bot).
  • Monitor jobs for various environment (ADP PI DevOps Bot)
  • View job dashboards (ADP PI DevOps Bot)
  • Query job details (ADP PI DevOps Bot)

 

Summary

Let’s all wish all the winners of the AWS Chatbot Challenge hearty congratulations on their excellent projects.

You can review more details on the winning projects, as well as, all of the submissions to the AWS Chatbot Challenge at: https://awschatbot2017.devpost.com/submissions. If you are curious on the details of Chatbot challenge contest including resources, rules, prizes, and judges, you can review the original challenge website here:  https://awschatbot2017.devpost.com/.

Hopefully, you are just as inspired as I am to build your own chatbot using Lex and Lambda. For more information, take a look at the Amazon Lex developer guide or the AWS AI blog on Building Better Bots Using Amazon Lex (Part 1)

Chat with you soon!

Tara

AWS Summit New York – Summary of Announcements

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-summit-new-york-summary-of-announcements/

Whew – what a week! Tara, Randall, Ana, and I have been working around the clock to create blog posts for the announcements that we made at the AWS Summit in New York. Here’s a summary to help you to get started:

Amazon Macie – This new service helps you to discover, classify, and secure content at scale. Powered by machine learning and making use of Natural Language Processing (NLP), Macie looks for patterns and alerts you to suspicious behavior, and can help you with governance, compliance, and auditing. You can read Tara’s post to see how to put Macie to work; you select the buckets of interest, customize the classification settings, and review the results in the Macie Dashboard.

AWS GlueRandall’s post (with deluxe animated GIFs) introduces you to this new extract, transform, and load (ETL) service. Glue is serverless and fully managed, As you can see from the post, Glue crawls your data, infers schemas, and generates ETL scripts in Python. You define jobs that move data from place to place, with a wide selection of transforms, each expressed as code and stored in human-readable form. Glue uses Development Endpoints and notebooks to provide you with a testing environment for the scripts you build. We also announced that Amazon Athena now integrates with Amazon Glue, as does Apache Spark and Hive on Amazon EMR.

AWS Migration Hub – This new service will help you to migrate your application portfolio to AWS. My post outlines the major steps and shows you how the Migration Hub accelerates, tracks,and simplifies your migration effort. You can begin with a discovery step, or you can jump right in and migrate directly. Migration Hub integrates with tools from our migration partners and builds upon the Server Migration Service and the Database Migration Service.

CloudHSM Update – We made a major upgrade to AWS CloudHSM, making the benefits of hardware-based key management available to a wider audience. The service is offered on a pay-as-you-go basis, and is fully managed. It is open and standards compliant, with support for multiple APIs, programming languages, and cryptography extensions. CloudHSM is an integral part of AWS and can be accessed from the AWS Management Console, AWS Command Line Interface (CLI), and through API calls. Read my post to learn more and to see how to set up a CloudHSM cluster.

Managed Rules to Secure S3 Buckets – We added two new rules to AWS Config that will help you to secure your S3 buckets. The s3-bucket-public-write-prohibited rule identifies buckets that have public write access and the s3-bucket-public-read-prohibited rule identifies buckets that have global read access. As I noted in my post, you can run these rules in response to configuration changes or on a schedule. The rules make use of some leading-edge constraint solving techniques, as part of a larger effort to use automated formal reasoning about AWS.

CloudTrail for All Customers – Tara’s post revealed that AWS CloudTrail is now available and enabled by default for all AWS customers. As a bonus, Tara reviewed the principal benefits of CloudTrail and showed you how to review your event history and to deep-dive on a single event. She also showed you how to create a second trail, for use with CloudWatch CloudWatch Events.

Encryption of Data at Rest for EFS – When you create a new file system, you now have the option to select a key that will be used to encrypt the contents of the files on the file system. The encryption is done using an industry-standard AES-256 algorithm. My post shows you how to select a key and to verify that it is being used.

Watch the Keynote
My colleagues Adrian Cockcroft and Matt Wood talked about these services and others on the stage, and also invited some AWS customers to share their stories. Here’s the video:

Jeff;

 

Automating Blue/Green Deployments of Infrastructure and Application Code using AMIs, AWS Developer Tools, & Amazon EC2 Systems Manager

Post Syndicated from Ramesh Adabala original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/bluegreen-infrastructure-application-deployment-blog/

Previous DevOps blog posts have covered the following use cases for infrastructure and application deployment automation:

An AMI provides the information required to launch an instance, which is a virtual server in the cloud. You can use one AMI to launch as many instances as you need. It is security best practice to customize and harden your base AMI with required operating system updates and, if you are using AWS native services for continuous security monitoring and operations, you are strongly encouraged to bake into the base AMI agents such as those for Amazon EC2 Systems Manager (SSM), Amazon Inspector, CodeDeploy, and CloudWatch Logs. A customized and hardened AMI is often referred to as a “golden AMI.” The use of golden AMIs to create EC2 instances in your AWS environment allows for fast and stable application deployment and scaling, secure application stack upgrades, and versioning.

In this post, using the DevOps automation capabilities of Systems Manager, AWS developer tools (CodePipeLine, CodeDeploy, CodeCommit, CodeBuild), I will show you how to use AWS CodePipeline to orchestrate the end-to-end blue/green deployments of a golden AMI and application code. Systems Manager Automation is a powerful security feature for enterprises that want to mature their DevSecOps practices.

Here are the high-level phases and primary services covered in this use case:

 

You can access the source code for the sample used in this post here: https://github.com/awslabs/automating-governance-sample/tree/master/Bluegreen-AMI-Application-Deployment-blog.

This sample will create a pipeline in AWS CodePipeline with the building blocks to support the blue/green deployments of infrastructure and application. The sample includes a custom Lambda step in the pipeline to execute Systems Manager Automation to build a golden AMI and update the Auto Scaling group with the golden AMI ID for every rollout of new application code. This guarantees that every new application deployment is on a fully patched and customized AMI in a continuous integration and deployment model. This enables the automation of hardened AMI deployment with every new version of application deployment.

 

 

We will build and run this sample in three parts.

Part 1: Setting up the AWS developer tools and deploying a base web application

Part 1 of the AWS CloudFormation template creates the initial Java-based web application environment in a VPC. It also creates all the required components of Systems Manager Automation, CodeCommit, CodeBuild, and CodeDeploy to support the blue/green deployments of the infrastructure and application resulting from ongoing code releases.

Part 1 of the AWS CloudFormation stack creates these resources:

After Part 1 of the AWS CloudFormation stack creation is complete, go to the Outputs tab and click the Elastic Load Balancing link. You will see the following home page for the base web application:

Make sure you have all the outputs from the Part 1 stack handy. You need to supply them as parameters in Part 3 of the stack.

Part 2: Setting up your CodeCommit repository

In this part, you will commit and push your sample application code into the CodeCommit repository created in Part 1. To access the initial git commands to clone the empty repository to your local machine, click Connect to go to the AWS CodeCommit console. Make sure you have the IAM permissions required to access AWS CodeCommit from command line interface (CLI).

After you’ve cloned the repository locally, download the sample application files from the part2 folder of the Git repository and place the files directly into your local repository. Do not include the aws-codedeploy-sample-tomcat folder. Go to the local directory and type the following commands to commit and push the files to the CodeCommit repository:

git add .
git commit -a -m "add all files from the AWS Java Tomcat CodeDeploy application"
git push

After all the files are pushed successfully, the repository should look like this:

 

Part 3: Setting up CodePipeline to enable blue/green deployments     

Part 3 of the AWS CloudFormation template creates the pipeline in AWS CodePipeline and all the required components.

a) Source: The pipeline is triggered by any change to the CodeCommit repository.

b) BuildGoldenAMI: This Lambda step executes the Systems Manager Automation document to build the golden AMI. After the golden AMI is successfully created, a new launch configuration with the new AMI details will be updated into the Auto Scaling group of the application deployment group. You can watch the progress of the automation in the EC2 console from the Systems Manager –> Automations menu.

c) Build: This step uses the application build spec file to build the application build artifact. Here are the CodeBuild execution steps and their status:

d) Deploy: This step clones the Auto Scaling group, launches the new instances with the new AMI, deploys the application changes, reroutes the traffic from the elastic load balancer to the new instances and terminates the old Auto Scaling group. You can see the execution steps and their status in the CodeDeploy console.

After the CodePipeline execution is complete, you can access the application by clicking the Elastic Load Balancing link. You can find it in the output of Part 1 of the AWS CloudFormation template. Any consecutive commits to the application code in the CodeCommit repository trigger the pipelines and deploy the infrastructure and code with an updated AMI and code.

 

If you have feedback about this post, add it to the Comments section below. If you have questions about implementing the example used in this post, open a thread on the Developer Tools forum.


About the author

 

Ramesh Adabala is a Solutions Architect in Southeast Enterprise Solution Architecture team at Amazon Web Services.

Create Multiple Builds from the Same Source Using Different AWS CodeBuild Build Specification Files

Post Syndicated from Prakash Palanisamy original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/create-multiple-builds-from-the-same-source-using-different-aws-codebuild-build-specification-files/

In June 2017, AWS CodeBuild announced you can now specify an alternate build specification file name or location in an AWS CodeBuild project.

In this post, I’ll show you how to use different build specification files in the same repository to create different builds. You’ll find the source code for this post in our GitHub repo.

Requirements

The AWS CLI must be installed and configured.

Solution Overview

I have created a C program (cbsamplelib.c) that will be used to create a shared library and another utility program (cbsampleutil.c) to use that library. I’ll use a Makefile to compile these files.

I need to put this sample application in RPM and DEB packages so end users can easily deploy them. I have created a build specification file for RPM. It will use make to compile this code and the RPM specification file (cbsample.rpmspec) configured in the build specification to create the RPM package. Similarly, I have created a build specification file for DEB. It will create the DEB package based on the control specification file (cbsample.control) configured in this build specification.

RPM Build Project:

The following build specification file (buildspec-rpm.yml) uses build specification version 0.2. As described in the documentation, this version has different syntax for environment variables. This build specification includes multiple phases:

  • As part of the install phase, the required packages is installed using yum.
  • During the pre_build phase, the required directories are created and the required files, including the RPM build specification file, are copied to the appropriate location.
  • During the build phase, the code is compiled, and then the RPM package is created based on the RPM specification.

As defined in the artifact section, the RPM file will be uploaded as a build artifact.

version: 0.2

env:
  variables:
    build_version: "0.1"

phases:
  install:
    commands:
      - yum install rpm-build make gcc glibc -y
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - curr_working_dir=`pwd`
      - mkdir -p ./{RPMS,SRPMS,BUILD,SOURCES,SPECS,tmp}
      - filename="cbsample-$build_version"
      - echo $filename
      - mkdir -p $filename
      - cp ./*.c ./*.h Makefile $filename
      - tar -zcvf /root/$filename.tar.gz $filename
      - cp /root/$filename.tar.gz ./SOURCES/
      - cp cbsample.rpmspec ./SPECS/
  build:
    commands:
      - echo "Triggering RPM build"
      - rpmbuild --define "_topdir `pwd`" -ba SPECS/cbsample.rpmspec
      - cd $curr_working_dir

artifacts:
  files:
    - RPMS/x86_64/cbsample*.rpm
  discard-paths: yes

Using cb-centos-project.json as a reference, create the input JSON file for the CLI command. This project uses an AWS CodeCommit repository named codebuild-multispec and a file named buildspec-rpm.yml as the build specification file. To create the RPM package, we need to specify a custom image name. I’m using the latest CentOS 7 image available in the Docker Hub. I’m using a role named CodeBuildServiceRole. It contains permissions similar to those defined in CodeBuildServiceRole.json. (You need to change the resource fields in the policy, as appropriate.)

{
    "name": "rpm-build-project",
    "description": "Project which will build RPM from the source.",
    "source": {
        "type": "CODECOMMIT",
        "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec",
        "buildspec": "buildspec-rpm.yml"
    },
    "artifacts": {
        "type": "S3",
        "location": "codebuild-demo-artifact-repository"
    },
    "environment": {
        "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER",
        "image": "centos:7",
        "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL"
    },
    "serviceRole": "arn:aws:iam::012345678912:role/service-role/CodeBuildServiceRole",
    "timeoutInMinutes": 15,
    "encryptionKey": "arn:aws:kms:eu-west-1:012345678912:alias/aws/s3",
    "tags": [
        {
            "key": "Name",
            "value": "RPM Demo Build"
        }
    ]
}

After the cli-input-json file is ready, execute the following command to create the build project.

$ aws codebuild create-project --name CodeBuild-RPM-Demo --cli-input-json file://cb-centos-project.json

{
    "project": {
        "name": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
        "serviceRole": "arn:aws:iam::012345678912:role/service-role/CodeBuildServiceRole", 
        "tags": [
            {
                "value": "RPM Demo Build", 
                "key": "Name"
            }
        ], 
        "artifacts": {
            "namespaceType": "NONE", 
            "packaging": "NONE", 
            "type": "S3", 
            "location": "codebuild-demo-artifact-repository", 
            "name": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo"
        }, 
        "lastModified": 1500559811.13, 
        "timeoutInMinutes": 15, 
        "created": 1500559811.13, 
        "environment": {
            "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL", 
            "privilegedMode": false, 
            "image": "centos:7", 
            "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER", 
            "environmentVariables": []
        }, 
        "source": {
            "buildspec": "buildspec-rpm.yml", 
            "type": "CODECOMMIT", 
            "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec"
        }, 
        "encryptionKey": "arn:aws:kms:eu-west-1:012345678912:alias/aws/s3", 
        "arn": "arn:aws:codebuild:eu-west-1:012345678912:project/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
        "description": "Project which will build RPM from the source."
    }
}

When the project is created, run the following command to start the build. After the build has started, get the build ID. You can use the build ID to get the status of the build.

$ aws codebuild start-build --project-name CodeBuild-RPM-Demo
{
    "build": {
        "buildComplete": false, 
        "initiator": "prakash", 
        "artifacts": {
            "location": "arn:aws:s3:::codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo"
        }, 
        "projectName": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
        "timeoutInMinutes": 15, 
        "buildStatus": "IN_PROGRESS", 
        "environment": {
            "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL", 
            "privilegedMode": false, 
            "image": "centos:7", 
            "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER", 
            "environmentVariables": []
        }, 
        "source": {
            "buildspec": "buildspec-rpm.yml", 
            "type": "CODECOMMIT", 
            "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec"
        }, 
        "currentPhase": "SUBMITTED", 
        "startTime": 1500560156.761, 
        "id": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc", 
        "arn": "arn:aws:codebuild:eu-west-1: 012345678912:build/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc"
    }
}

$ aws codebuild list-builds-for-project --project-name CodeBuild-RPM-Demo
{
    "ids": [
        "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc"
    ]
}

$ aws codebuild batch-get-builds --ids CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc
{
    "buildsNotFound": [], 
    "builds": [
        {
            "buildComplete": true, 
            "phases": [
                {
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "endTime": 1500560157.164, 
                    "phaseType": "SUBMITTED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560156.761
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "PROVISIONING", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 24, 
                    "startTime": 1500560157.164, 
                    "endTime": 1500560182.066
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "DOWNLOAD_SOURCE", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 15, 
                    "startTime": 1500560182.066, 
                    "endTime": 1500560197.906
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "INSTALL", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 19, 
                    "startTime": 1500560197.906, 
                    "endTime": 1500560217.515
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "PRE_BUILD", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560217.515, 
                    "endTime": 1500560217.662
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "BUILD", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560217.662, 
                    "endTime": 1500560217.995
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "POST_BUILD", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560217.995, 
                    "endTime": 1500560218.074
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "UPLOAD_ARTIFACTS", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 0, 
                    "startTime": 1500560218.074, 
                    "endTime": 1500560218.542
                }, 
                {
                    "contexts": [], 
                    "phaseType": "FINALIZING", 
                    "phaseStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
                    "durationInSeconds": 4, 
                    "startTime": 1500560218.542, 
                    "endTime": 1500560223.128
                }, 
                {
                    "phaseType": "COMPLETED", 
                    "startTime": 1500560223.128
                }
            ], 
            "logs": {
                "groupName": "/aws/codebuild/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
                "deepLink": "https://console.aws.amazon.com/cloudwatch/home?region=eu-west-1#logEvent:group=/aws/codebuild/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo;stream=57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc", 
                "streamName": "57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc"
            }, 
            "artifacts": {
                "location": "arn:aws:s3:::codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo"
            }, 
            "projectName": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
            "timeoutInMinutes": 15, 
            "initiator": "prakash", 
            "buildStatus": "SUCCEEDED", 
            "environment": {
                "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL", 
                "privilegedMode": false, 
                "image": "centos:7", 
                "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER", 
                "environmentVariables": []
            }, 
            "source": {
                "buildspec": "buildspec-rpm.yml", 
                "type": "CODECOMMIT", 
                "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec"
            }, 
            "currentPhase": "COMPLETED", 
            "startTime": 1500560156.761, 
            "endTime": 1500560223.128, 
            "id": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc", 
            "arn": "arn:aws:codebuild:eu-west-1:012345678912:build/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:57a36755-4d37-4b08-9c11-1468e1682abc"
        }
    ]
}

DEB Build Project:

In this project, we will use the build specification file named buildspec-deb.yml. Like the RPM build project, this specification includes multiple phases. Here I use a Debian control file to create the package in DEB format. After a successful build, the DEB package will be uploaded as build artifact.

version: 0.2

env:
  variables:
    build_version: "0.1"

phases:
  install:
    commands:
      - apt-get install gcc make -y
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - mkdir -p ./cbsample-$build_version/DEBIAN
      - mkdir -p ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/lib
      - mkdir -p ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/include
      - mkdir -p ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/bin
      - cp -f cbsample.control ./cbsample-$build_version/DEBIAN/control
  build:
    commands:
      - echo "Building the application"
      - make
      - cp libcbsamplelib.so ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/lib
      - cp cbsamplelib.h ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/include
      - cp cbsampleutil ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/bin
      - chmod +x ./cbsample-$build_version/usr/bin/cbsampleutil
      - dpkg-deb --build ./cbsample-$build_version

artifacts:
  files:
    - cbsample-*.deb

Here we use cb-ubuntu-project.json as a reference to create the CLI input JSON file. This project uses the same AWS CodeCommit repository (codebuild-multispec) but a different buildspec file in the same repository (buildspec-deb.yml). We use the default CodeBuild image to create the DEB package. We use the same IAM role (CodeBuildServiceRole).

{
    "name": "deb-build-project",
    "description": "Project which will build DEB from the source.",
    "source": {
        "type": "CODECOMMIT",
        "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec",
        "buildspec": "buildspec-deb.yml"
    },
    "artifacts": {
        "type": "S3",
        "location": "codebuild-demo-artifact-repository"
    },
    "environment": {
        "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER",
        "image": "aws/codebuild/ubuntu-base:14.04",
        "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL"
    },
    "serviceRole": "arn:aws:iam::012345678912:role/service-role/CodeBuildServiceRole",
    "timeoutInMinutes": 15,
    "encryptionKey": "arn:aws:kms:eu-west-1:012345678912:alias/aws/s3",
    "tags": [
        {
            "key": "Name",
            "value": "Debian Demo Build"
        }
    ]
}

Using the CLI input JSON file, create the project, start the build, and check the status of the project.

$ aws codebuild create-project --name CodeBuild-DEB-Demo --cli-input-json file://cb-ubuntu-project.json

$ aws codebuild list-builds-for-project --project-name CodeBuild-DEB-Demo

$ aws codebuild batch-get-builds --ids CodeBuild-DEB-Demo:e535c4b0-7067-4fbe-8060-9bb9de203789

After successful completion of the RPM and DEB builds, check the S3 bucket configured in the artifacts section for the build packages. Build projects will create a directory in the name of the build project and copy the artifacts inside it.

$ aws s3 ls s3://codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo/
2017-07-20 16:16:59       8108 cbsample-0.1-1.el7.centos.x86_64.rpm

$ aws s3 ls s3://codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-DEB-Demo/
2017-07-20 16:37:22       5420 cbsample-0.1.deb

Override Buildspec During Build Start:

It’s also possible to override the build specification file of an existing project when starting a build. If we want to create the libs RPM package instead of the whole RPM, we will use the build specification file named buildspec-libs-rpm.yml. This build specification file is similar to the earlier RPM build. The only difference is that it uses a different RPM specification file to create libs RPM.

version: 0.2

env:
  variables:
    build_version: "0.1"

phases:
  install:
    commands:
      - yum install rpm-build make gcc glibc -y
  pre_build:
    commands:
      - curr_working_dir=`pwd`
      - mkdir -p ./{RPMS,SRPMS,BUILD,SOURCES,SPECS,tmp}
      - filename="cbsample-libs-$build_version"
      - echo $filename
      - mkdir -p $filename
      - cp ./*.c ./*.h Makefile $filename
      - tar -zcvf /root/$filename.tar.gz $filename
      - cp /root/$filename.tar.gz ./SOURCES/
      - cp cbsample-libs.rpmspec ./SPECS/
  build:
    commands:
      - echo "Triggering RPM build"
      - rpmbuild --define "_topdir `pwd`" -ba SPECS/cbsample-libs.rpmspec
      - cd $curr_working_dir

artifacts:
  files:
    - RPMS/x86_64/cbsample-libs*.rpm
  discard-paths: yes

Using the same RPM build project that we created earlier, start a new build and set the value of the `–buildspec-override` parameter to buildspec-libs-rpm.yml .

$ aws codebuild start-build --project-name CodeBuild-RPM-Demo --buildspec-override buildspec-libs-rpm.yml
{
    "build": {
        "buildComplete": false, 
        "initiator": "prakash", 
        "artifacts": {
            "location": "arn:aws:s3:::codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo"
        }, 
        "projectName": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo", 
        "timeoutInMinutes": 15, 
        "buildStatus": "IN_PROGRESS", 
        "environment": {
            "computeType": "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL", 
            "privilegedMode": false, 
            "image": "centos:7", 
            "type": "LINUX_CONTAINER", 
            "environmentVariables": []
        }, 
        "source": {
            "buildspec": "buildspec-libs-rpm.yml", 
            "type": "CODECOMMIT", 
            "location": "https://git-codecommit.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/v1/repos/codebuild-multispec"
        }, 
        "currentPhase": "SUBMITTED", 
        "startTime": 1500562366.239, 
        "id": "CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:82d05f8a-b161-401c-82f0-83cb41eba567", 
        "arn": "arn:aws:codebuild:eu-west-1:012345678912:build/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo:82d05f8a-b161-401c-82f0-83cb41eba567"
    }
}

After the build is completed successfully, check to see if the package appears in the artifact S3 bucket under the CodeBuild-RPM-Demo build project folder.

$ aws s3 ls s3://codebuild-demo-artifact-repository/CodeBuild-RPM-Demo/
2017-07-20 16:16:59       8108 cbsample-0.1-1.el7.centos.x86_64.rpm
2017-07-20 16:53:54       5320 cbsample-libs-0.1-1.el7.centos.x86_64.rpm

Conclusion

In this post, I have shown you how multiple buildspec files in the same source repository can be used to run multiple AWS CodeBuild build projects. I have also shown you how to provide a different buildspec file when starting the build.

For more information about AWS CodeBuild, see the AWS CodeBuild documentation. You can get started with AWS CodeBuild by using this step by step guide.


About the author

Prakash Palanisamy is a Solutions Architect for Amazon Web Services. When he is not working on Serverless, DevOps or Alexa, he will be solving problems in Project Euler. He also enjoys watching educational documentaries.

Introducing the GameDay Essentials Show on AWS Twitch Channel

Post Syndicated from Tara Walker original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/game-day-essentials-show-on-twitch/

Imagine if you will, you have obtained a new position at Unicorn.Rentals, a company that specializes in LARM, Legendary Animal Rental Market. Given the chance, what child wouldn’t happily exchange anything for the temporary use of a unicorn? What parent could refuse the opportunity to make their children happy? Let’s estimate the year to be 2017 and Unicorn.Rentals continues to dominate in the animal rental market.

You are about to enter another dimension, a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and lies at the beginning of man’s cloud knowledge. This is a journey into a wondrous land of imagination, a land of both shadow and substance. You are crossing over into the GameDay Essentials Zone.

Well, maybe not another dimension but almost as cool. Maybe, kinda? Either way, I am very excited to introduce the newest show on the AWS Twitch Channel named GameDay Essentials. The GameDay Essentials show is a  “new hire training program” for the aforementioned Unicorn.Rentals company scenario. You will step into the shoes of a new employee being ramped up and trained on cloud computing in order to work successfully for a company using Amazon Web Services.

 

With the GameDay Essentials show, you will get hands-on computing experience to help with the growth of the Unicorn.Rentals startup. The first episode, Recon, premiered on July 25th and provided information on logging services with CloudTrail and Cloudwatch, as well as, how to assess the configuration and identify existing inventory resources in an AWS Account. You can check out the recording of Episode 1–Recon here. The rest of season one for this six-part series airs on Tuesdays at 11:30 AM PT, the next three episodes discussing the following topics:

  • Episode 2 – Scaling: Learn how to scale your application infrastructure by diving into the how to of implementing scaling techniques and auto scaling groups. Airing on August 1 
  • Episode 3 – Changes: Winston Churchill is quoted saying “To improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often”. This GameDay episode is all about managing change as a key component to success. You will learn how to use native AWS security and deployment tools to track and manage change and discuss how to handle changes in team dynamics. Airing on August 8th
  • Episode 4 – Decoupling: Most people in the technology industry understand that you should avoid creating tightly coupled systems. Therefore, you will discover how loosely coupled systems operate and gain knowledge on how to diagnose any failures that may occur with these systems. Airing on August 15th 

Summary

Our latest show, GameDay Essentials is designed to help you “get into the game” and learn more about cloud computing and the AWS Platform. GameDay Essentials joins our other live coding shows already featured each week on the AWS Twitch Channel: Live Coding with AWS and AWS Maker Studio.

Tune in each week to the AWS Twitch channel to visit another dimension: a dimension of sound, a dimension of sight, a dimension of cloud. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area, which we call the GameDay Essentials Zone. Get it, like the Twilight Zone, still no? Oh well, check out the GameDay Essentials show on Twitch on the AWS Channel, it is a great resource for interactive learning about cloud computing with AWS, so enjoy the ride.

Tara

AWS CloudFormation Supports Amazon Kinesis Analytics Applications

Post Syndicated from Ryan Nienhuis original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/aws-cloudformation-supports-amazon-kinesis-analytics-applications/

You can now provision and manage resources for Amazon Kinesis Analytics applications using AWS CloudFormation.  Kinesis Analytics is the easiest way to process streaming data in real time with standard SQL, without having to learn new programming languages or processing frameworks. Kinesis Analytics enables you to query streaming data or build entire streaming applications using SQL. Using the service, you gain actionable insights and can respond to your business and customer needs promptly.

Customers can create CloudFormation templates that easily create or update Kinesis Analytics applications. Typically, a template is used as a way to manage code across different environments, or to prototype a new streaming data solution quickly.

We have created two sample templates using past AWS Big Data Blog posts that referenced Kinesis Analytics.

For more information about the new feature, see the AWS Cloudformation User Guide.