Tag Archives: Features

Getting started with Git and GitHub is easier than ever with GitHub Desktop 2.2

Post Syndicated from Amanda Pinsker original https://github.blog/2019-10-02-get-started-easier-with-github-desktop-2-2/

Anyone who uses Git knows that it has a steep learning curve. We’ve learned from developers that most people tend to learn from a buddy, whether that’s a coworker, a professor, a friend, or even a YouTube video. In GitHub Desktop 2.2, we’re releasing the first version of an interactive Git and GitHub tutorial that can be your buddy and help you get started. If you’re new to Desktop, you can download and try out the tutorial at desktop.github.com.

Get set up

To get set up, we help you through two major pieces: creating a repository and connecting an editor. When you first open Desktop, a welcome page appears with a new option to “Create a Tutorial Repository”. Starting with this option creates a tutorial repository that guides you through the core concepts of working with Git using GitHub Desktop.

There are a lot of tools you need to get started with Git and GitHub. The most important of these is your code editor. In the first step of the tutorial, you’re prompted to install an editor if you don’t have one already.

Learn the GitHub flow

Next, we guide you through how to use GitHub Desktop to make changes to code locally and get your work on GitHub. You’ll create a new branch, make a change to a file, commit it, push it to GitHub, and open your first pull request.

We’ve also heard that new users initially experience confusion between Git, GitHub, and GitHub Desktop. We cover these differences in the tutorial and make sure to reinforce the explanations.

Keep going with your own project

In GitHub Desktop 1.6, we introduced suggested next steps based on the state of your repository. Now when you complete the tutorial, we similarly suggest next steps: exploring projects on GitHub that you might want to contribute to, creating a new project, or adding an existing project to Desktop. We always want GitHub Desktop to be the tool that makes your next steps clear, whether you’re in the flow of your work, or you’re a new developer just getting started.

What’s next?

With GitHub Desktop 2.2, we’re making the product our users love more approachable to newcomers. We’ll be iterating on the tutorial based on your feedback, and we’ll continue to build on the connection between GitHub and your local machine. If you want to start building something but don’t know how, think of GitHub Desktop as your buddy to help you get started.

Learn more about GitHub Desktop

The post Getting started with Git and GitHub is easier than ever with GitHub Desktop 2.2 appeared first on The GitHub Blog.

New workflow editor for GitHub Actions

Post Syndicated from Chris Patterson original https://github.blog/2019-10-01-new-workflow-editor-for-github-actions/

It’s now even easier to create and edit a GitHub Actions workflow with the updated editor. We’ve provided inline auto-complete and lint as you type so you can say goodbye to YAML indentation issues and explore the full workflow syntax without going to the docs.

Get through code faster with auto-complete

Auto-complete can be triggered with Ctrl+Space almost anywhere, and in some cases, automatically. It suggests keys or values depending on the current position of the cursor, and displays brief contextual documentation so you can discover and understand all the available options without losing the focus. Auto-complete works even inside expressions.

Explore context options without losing focus

Additionally, the editor will insert a new line with the right indentation when you press enter. It will also either suggest the next key to insert or insert code snippets that you can navigate through using the tab key.

Snippets also work when using functions inside expressions, allowing you to easily write and navigate through the required arguments.

Minimize mistakes

There are many updates to help you write workflow files, but if you make a mistake, we’ve got you covered too.

The editor now highlights structural errors in your file, unexpected values, or even conflicting values, such as an invalid shell value for the chosen operating system.

Understand cron expressions quickly

Finally, the editor will also help you edit your scheduled jobs by describing the cron expressions you have used with natural language:

Tell us what you think

These are just a few features we’ve made to help you edit workflows with fewer errors. We’d love to hear any feedback you have—share your questions and comments with us in the GitHub Actions Community Forum.

Learn more about GitHub Actions

The post New workflow editor for GitHub Actions appeared first on The GitHub Blog.

Track your work easily with the latest changes to project boards

Post Syndicated from Lauren Brose original https://github.blog/2019-09-25-project-board-improvements/

We want to make it easy for you to track your work with GitHub Projects, but noticed a few issues get in the way of a seamless experience. Project automation helps keep your issues in sync with your development process but created a problem with your column prioritization by placing moved issues at the top of the list. We also updated the issue sidebar to help show you where an item was in your project board flow but required you to navigate away to make any changes.

Issue sidebar updates

The projects section of the issue sidebar was updated to better convey related project information. Closed projects are now collapsed in the sidebar by default so you can focus on the most relevant information. Additionally, you can change the issue’s project column directly from the issue page without needing to navigate away.

Automation placement

Now, any issues moved via automation or the inline sidebar will move to the bottom of the destination column. However, any “Done” automation triggers will continue to move issues to the top of the column so that your team can always see what was recently finished.

Let us know what you think

We hope this change makes your workflow smoother, but we can always make changes to improve. Let us know how the issue sidebar changes are working for you, and if there’s anything we can do to help.

Learn more about project boards

The post Track your work easily with the latest changes to project boards appeared first on The GitHub Blog.