Tag Archives: FFmpeg

Security updates for Wednesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/736063/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (lame, salt, and xorg-server), Debian (ffmpeg, imagemagick, libxfont, wordpress, and xen), Fedora (ImageMagick, rubygem-rmagick, and tor), Oracle (kernel), SUSE (kernel, SLES 12 Docker image, SLES 12-SP1 Docker image, and SLES 12-SP2 Docker image), and Ubuntu (curl, glance, horizon, kernel, keystone, libxfont, libxfont1, libxfont2, libxml2, linux, linux-aws, linux-gke, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-raspi2, linux-gcp, linux-hwe, linux-lts-xenial, nova, openvswitch, swift, and thunderbird).

Security updates for Friday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/735121/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (ffmpeg2.8, nvidia, and openvpn), Fedora (git, mercurial, moodle, php-horde-Horde-Image, poppler, and pure-ftpd), openSUSE (fmpeg and vlc), Oracle (firefox, kernel, and nss), Red Hat (firefox and nss), Slackware (mozilla), and SUSE (firefox).

Security updates for Thursday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/734500/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (tomcat7), Debian (kernel and perl), Fedora (libwmf and mpg123), Mageia (bluez, ffmpeg, gstreamer0.10-plugins-good, gstreamer1.0-plugins-good, libwmf, tomcat, and tor), openSUSE (emacs, fossil, freexl, php5, and xen), Red Hat (augeas, rh-mysql56-mysql, samba, and samba4), Scientific Linux (augeas, samba, and samba4), Slackware (samba), SUSE (emacs and kernel), and Ubuntu (qemu).

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/734015/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (ffmpeg, lib32-libgcrypt, libgcrypt, linux-zen, and newsbeuter), Debian (emacs25, freexl, and tomcat8), Fedora (cyrus-imapd, FlightGear, freexl, gdm, kernel, LibRaw, ruby, and xen), Gentoo (binutils, chkrootkit, curl, gdk-pixbuf, gimps, git, kpathsea, mod_gnutls, perl, squirrelmail, subversion, supervisor, and webkit-gtk), Mageia (389-ds-base, kernel, kernel-linus, kernel-tmb, and mpg123), openSUSE (ffmpeg, ffmpeg2, qemu, and xen), Slackware (kernel), SUSE (xen), and Ubuntu (gdk-pixbuf).

Digitising film reels with Pi Film Capture

Post Syndicated from Janina Ander original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/digitising-reels-pi-film-capture/

Joe Herman’s Pi Film Capture project combines old projectors and a stepper motor with a Raspberry Pi and a Raspberry Pi Camera Module, to transform his grandfather’s 8- and 16-mm home movies into glorious digital films.

We chatted to him about his Pi Film Capture build at Maker Faire New York 2016:

Film to Digital Conversion at Maker Faire New York 2016

Uploaded by Raspberry Pi on 2017-08-25.

What inspired Pi Film Capture?

Joe’s grandfather, Leo Willmott, loved recording home movies of his family of eight children and their grandchildren. He passed away when Joe was five, but in 2013 Joe found a way to connect with his legacy: while moving house, a family member uncovered a box of more than a hundred of Leo’s film reels. These covered decades of family history, and some dated back as far as 1939.

Super 8 film reels

Kodachrome film reels of the type Leo used

This provided an unexpected opportunity for Leo’s family to restore some of their shared history. Joe immediately made plans to digitise the material, knowing that the members of his extensive family tree would provide an eager audience.

Building Pi Film Capture

After a failed attempt with a DSLR camera, Joe realised he couldn’t simply re-film the movies — instead, he would have to capture each frame individually. He combined a Raspberry Pi with an old Super 8 projector, and set about rigging up something to do just that.

He went through numerous stages of prototyping, and his final hardware setup works very well. A NEMA 17 stepper motor  moves the film reel forward in the projector. A magnetic reed switch triggers the Camera Module each time the reel moves on to the next frame. Joe hacked the Camera Module so that it has a different focal distance, and he also added a magnifying lens. Moreover, he realised it would be useful to have a diffuser to ‘smooth’ some of the faults in the aged film reel material. To do this, he mounted “a bit of translucent white plastic from an old ceiling fixture” parallel with the film.

Pi Film Capture device by Joe Herman

Joe’s 16-mm projector, with embedded Raspberry Pi hardware

Software solutions

In addition to capturing every single frame (sometimes with multiple exposure settings), Joe found that he needed intensive post-processing to restore some of the films. He settled on sending the images from the Pi to a more powerful Linux machine. To enable processing of the raw data, he had to write Python scripts implementing several open-source software packages. For example, to deal with the varying quality of the film reels more easily, Joe implemented a GUI (written with the help of PyQt), which he uses to change the capture parameters. This was a demanding job, as he was relatively new to using these tools.

Top half of GUI for Pi Film Capture Joe Herman

The top half of Joe’s GUI, because the whole thing is really long and really thin and would have looked weird on the blog…

If a frame is particularly damaged, Joe can capture multiple instances of the image at different settings. These are then merged to achieve a good-quality image using OpenCV functionality. Joe uses FFmpeg to stitch the captured images back together into a film. Some of his grandfather’s reels were badly degraded, but luckily Joe found scripts written by other people to perform advanced digital restoration of film with AviSynth. He provides code he has written for the project on his GitHub account.

For an account of the project in his own words, check out Joe’s guest post on the IEEE Spectrum website. He also described some of the issues he encountered, and how he resolved them, in The MagPi.

What does Pi Film Capture deliver?

Joe provides videos related to Pi Film Capture on two sites: on his YouTube channel, you’ll find videos in which he has documented the build process of his digitising project. Final results of the project live on Joe’s Vimeo channel, where so far he has uploaded 55 digitised home videos.

m093a: Tom Herman Wedding, Detroit 8/10/63

Shot on 8mm by Leo Willmott, captured and restored by Joe Herman (Not a Wozniak film, but placed in that folder b/c it may be of interest to Hermans)

We’re beyond pleased that our tech is part of this amazing project, helping to reconnect the entire Herman/Willmott clan with their past. And it was great to be able to catch up with Joe, and talk about his build at Maker Faire last year!

Maker Faire New York 2017

We’ll be at Maker Faire New York again on the 23-24 September, and we can’t wait to see the amazing makes the Raspberry Pi community will be presenting there!

Are you going to be at MFNY to show off your awesome Pi-powered project? Tweet us, so we can meet up, check it out and share your achievements!

The post Digitising film reels with Pi Film Capture appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

pgmproxy

Post Syndicated from Vasil Kolev original https://vasil.ludost.net/blog/?p=3364

На FOSDEM 2016 видео потоците в локалната мрежа бяха носени през UDP, което при загуби по мрежата водеше до разни неприятни прекъсвания и обърквания на ffmpeg-а.

След разговори по темата за мрежа без загуби, пакети, пренасяни от еднорози и изграждане на infiniband мрежа в ULB, бях стигнал до идеята да търся или нещо с forward error correction, или някакъв reliable multicast. За FEC се оказа, че има някаква реализация от едно време за ffmpeg за PRO-MPEG, която не е била приета по някакви причини, за reliable multicast открих два протокола – PGM и NORM.

За PGM се оказа, че има хубава реализация, която 1) я има в Debian, 2) има прилични примери и 3) може да има средно ужасна документация, но source е сравнително четим и става за дебъгване. Измъкнах си старото ttee, разчистих кода от разни ненужни неща и си направих едно тривиално proxy, което да разнася пакети между UDP и PGM (и stdin/stdout за дебъгване). Може да се намери на https://github.com/krokodilerian/pgmproxy, като в момента е в proof-of-concept състояние и единственото, което мога да кажа е, че успявам да прекарам през него един FLAC през мрежата и да го слушам 🙂 Следват тестове в мрежа със загуби (щото в моя локален wifi са доста малко) и доизчистване, че да го ползваме на FOSDEM.

Security updates for Tuesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/732264/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (ffmpeg, fontforge, and openjdk-7), Fedora (cvs, java-1.8.0-openjdk-aarch32, krb5, and mercurial), Mageia (chromium and libgxps), Red Hat (rh-nginx110-nginx), SUSE (java-1_7_1-ibm), and Ubuntu (ghostscript, kernel, linux, linux-aws, linux-gke, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-raspi2, linux-hwe, linux-lts-xenial, and python-crypto).

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/730910/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (botan1.10, cvs, firefox-esr, iortcw, libgd2, libgxps, supervisor, and zabbix), Fedora (curl, firefox, git, jackson-databind, libgxps, libsoup, openjpeg2, potrace, python-dbusmock, spatialite-tools, and sqlite), Mageia (cacti, ffmpeg, git, heimdal, jackson-databind, kernel-linus, kernel-tmb, krb5, php-phpmailer, ruby-rubyzip, and supervisor), openSUSE (firefox, librsvg, libsoup, ncurses, and tcmu-runner), Oracle (firefox), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-ibm), Slackware (git, libsoup, mercurial, and subversion), and SUSE (kernel).

Security updates for US Independence Day

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/727108/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (bind, qt5-webengine, and systemd), Debian (puppet and sudo), Fedora (drupal7, globus-ftp-client, globus-gass-cache-program, globus-gass-copy, globus-gram-job-manager, globus-gridftp-server, globus-gssapi-gsi, globus-io, globus-net-manager, globus-xio, globus-xio-gsi-driver, globus-xio-pipe-driver, globus-xio-udt-driver, libgcrypt, and myproxy), openSUSE (ffmpeg), Slackware (kernel), SUSE (unrar), and Ubuntu (libgcrypt11, libgcrypt20).

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/725087/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (irssi, lib32-libtasn1, and wireshark-cli), Debian (libmwaw, otrs2, and tor), Fedora (ansible, freeradius, gnutls, mingw-poppler, mosquitto, oniguruma, perltidy, picocom, systemd, and wget), Mageia (ansible, dropbear, gajim, libsndfile, libxslt, lxc, zoneminder, and zziplib), openSUSE (ffmpeg, libnettle, mysql-connector-cpp, mysql-workbench, and wireshark), and Ubuntu (irssi).

Security updates for Tuesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/724150/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (lib32-nss), Debian (bind9, exiv2, fop, imagemagick, libical, libonig, libsndfile, mosquitto, openjdk-7, rzip, strongswan, and tnef), Fedora (git, kernel, lynis, moodle, mupdf, samba, systemd, and webkitgtk4), Mageia (perl-Image-Info and vlc), openSUSE (ffmpeg2, git, java-1_7_0-openjdk, libplist, libsndfile, and samba), Oracle (kernel and samba3x), Red Hat (nss), Scientific Linux (nss), and Ubuntu (imagemagick, juju-core, libtiff, strongswan, and webkit2gtk).

YouTube live-streaming made easy

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/youtube-live-streaming-docker/

Looking to share your day, event, or the observations of your nature box live on the internet via a Raspberry Pi? Then look no further, for Alex Ellis has all you need to get started with YouTube live-streaming from your Pi.

YouTube live-streaming Docker Raspberry Pi

The YouTube live dashboard. Image c/o Alex Ellis

If you spend any time on social media, be it Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, or Twitter, chances are you’ve been notified of someone ‘going live’.

Live-streaming video on social platforms has become almost ubiquitous, whether it’s content by brands, celebrities, or your cousin or nan – everyone is doing it.

Even us!

Live from Pi Towers – Welcome

Carrie Anne and Alex offer up a quick tour of the Pi Towers lobby while trying to figure out how Facebook Live video works.

YouTube live-streaming with Alex Ellis and Docker

In his tutorial, Alex demonstrates an easy, straightforward approach to live-streaming via a Raspberry Pi with the help of a Docker image of FFmpeg he has built. He says that with the image, instead of “having to go through lots of manual steps, we can type in a handful of commands and get started immediately.”

Why is the Docker image so helpful?

As Alex explains on his blog, if you want to manually configure your Raspberry Pi Zero for YouTube live-streaming, you need to dedicate more than a few hours of your day.

Normally this would have involved typing in many manual CLI commands and waiting up to 9 hours for some video encoding software (ffmpeg) to compile itself.

Get anything wrong (like Alex did the first time) and you have to face another nine hours of compilation time before you’re ready to start streaming – not ideal if your project is time-sensitive.

Alex Ellis on Twitter

See you in 8-12 hours? Building ffmpeg on a my @Raspberry_Pi #pizero with @docker

Using the Docker image

In his tutorial, Alex uses a Raspberry Pi Zero and advises that the project will work with either Raspbian Jessie Lite or PIXEL. Once you’ve installed Docker, you can pull the FFmpeg image he has created directly to your Pi from the Docker Hub. (We advise that while doing so, you should feel grateful to Alex for making the image available and saving you so much time.)

It goes without saying that you’ll need a YouTube account in order to live-stream to YouTube; go to the YouTube live streaming dashboard to obtain a streaming key.

Alex Ellis on Twitter

Get live streaming to @YouTube with this new weekend project and guide using your @Raspberry_Pi and @docker. https://t.co/soqZ9D9jbS

For a comprehensive breakdown of how to stream to YouTube via a Raspberry Pi, head to Alex’s blog. You’ll also find plenty of other Raspberry Pi projects there to try out.

Why live-stream from a Raspberry Pi?

We see more and more of our community members build Raspberry Pi projects that involve video capture. The minute dimensions of the Raspberry Pi Zero and Zero W make them ideal for fitting into robots, nature boxes, dash cams, and more. What better way to get people excited about your video than to share it with them live?

If you have used a Raspberry Pi to capture or stream footage, make sure to link to your project in the comments below. And if you give Alex’s Docker image a go, do let us know how you get on.

The post YouTube live-streaming made easy appeared first on Raspberry Pi.