Tag Archives: Hayaatun Sillem

Celebrating future engineers

Post Syndicated from Katie Gouskos original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/celebrating-future-engineers-this-is-engineering/

We’re proud to show our support for This is Engineering Day, an annual campaign from the Royal Academy of Engineering to bring engineering to life for young people by showcasing its variety and creativity. This year’s #BeTheDifference theme focuses on the positive impact engineering can have on everyday life and on the world we live in. So what better way for us to celebrate than to highlight our community’s young digital makers — future engineers — and their projects created for social good!

A Coolest Projects participant, a future engineer we're celebrating on today's This is Engineering Day
So many Coolest Projects participants present tech projects they’ve created for social good.

We’re also delighted to have special guest Dr Lucy Rogers on our This Is Engineering–themed Digital Making at Home live stream today at 5.30pm GMT, where she will share insights into her work as a creative inventor.

Dr Lucy Rogers, here shown with soap bubbles, will be our guest our This is Engineering Day–themed live stream for young people. Photo credit: Karla Gowlett
Your young people can ask inventor Dr Lucy Rogers their questions live today! Photo credit: Karla Gowlett

Future engineers creating projects for social good

In July, we were lucky enough to have Dr Hayaatun Sillem, CEO of the Royal Academy of Engineering (RAEng), as a judge for Coolest Projects, our technology fair for young creators. Dr Hayaatun Sillem says, “Engineering is a fantastic career if you want to make a difference, improve people’s lives, and shape the future.”

A Coolest Projects participant, a future engineer we're celebrating on today's This is Engineering Day
Our community’s young digital makers want to #BeTheDifference

In total, the young people taking part in Coolest Projects 2020 online presented 560 projects, of which over 300 projects were made specifically for social good. Here’s a small sample from some future engineers across the world:

Carlos, Blanca & Mario from Spain created El ojo que te observa (The all-seeing eye)

“Our project is a virtual big eye doorman that detects if you wear a mask […] we chose this project because we like artificial intelligence and robotics and we wanted to help against the coronavirus.”

Momoka from Japan created AI trash can

“I want people to put trash in the correct place so I made this AI trash can. This AI trash can separates the trash. I used ML2 Scratch. I used a camera to help the computer learn what type of trash it is.”

Abhiy from the UK created Burglar Buster

“As we know, burglary cases are very frequent and it is upsetting for the families whose houses are burglarised and [can] make them feel fearful, sad and helpless. Therefore, I tried to build a system which will help everyone to secure their houses.”

Tune in today: This is Engineering-themed live stream with special guest Dr Lucy Rogers

Professor Lucy Rogers PhD is an inventor with a sense of fun! She is a Fellow of the RAEng, and RAEng Visiting Professor of Engineering:Creativity and Communication at Brunel University, London. She’s also a Fellow of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Adept at bringing ideas to life, from robot dinosaurs to mini mannequins — and even a fartometer for IBM! — she has developed her creativity and communication skills and shares her tricks and tools with others. 

Here Dr Lucy Rogers shares her advice for young people who want to get involved in engineering:

1. Create your own goal 

A goal or a useful problem will help you get over the steep learning curve that is inevitable in learning about new pieces of technology. Your goal does not have to be big: my first Internet of Things project was making a LED shine when the International Space Station was overhead.

2. Make your world a little better

To me “engineering” is really “problem-solving”. Find problems to solve. You may have to make something, program something, or do something. How can you make your own world a little better? 

3. Learn how to fail safely 

Learn how to fail safely: break projects into smaller pieces, and try each piece. If it doesn’t work, you can try again. It’s only at the end of a project that you should put all the “working” pieces together (and even then, they may not work nicely together!)

Dr Lucy Rogers will be joining our Digital Making at Home educators on our This is Engineering-themed live stream today at 5.30pm GMT.

This is your young people’s chance to be inspired by this amazing inventor! And we will take live questions via YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Twitch, so make sure your young people are able to get Dr Lucy’s live answers to their own questions about digital making, creativity, and all things engineering!

Engineering at home, right now

To get inspired about engineering right now, your young people can follow along step by step with Electricity generation, our brand-new, free digital making project on the impact of non-renewable energy on our planet!

Try out coding a Scratch project about electricity generation on  today's This is Engineering Day

While coding this Scratch project, learners input real data about the type and amount of natural resources that countries across the world use to generate electricity, and they then compare the results using an animated data visualisation.

The data we’ve made part of this project was compiled by the International Energy Agency, and we were also kindly given guidance by the Renewable Energy Foundation.

To find out more about This is Engineering Day, please visit  www.ThisisEngineering.org.uk.

The post Celebrating future engineers appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Super cool favourites picked by fabulous judges

Post Syndicated from Helen Drury original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/coolest-projects-results-are-in/

We’re delighted to announce that our special judges — Eben Upton, Hayaatun Sillem, Limor Fried, Mitch Resnick, and Tim Peake — have chosen their favourite projects from the Coolest Projects online showcase! 

Young tech creators from 39 countries are part of the showcase, including from Ireland, Australia, Palestine, UK, USA, India, and Indonesia. In total, you’ll find an incredible 560 projects from 775 young creators in the showcase gallery.

Our judges have been amazed and inspired by all the young creators’ projects, and they want to highlight a few as their favourites!

Eben Upton’s favourites

Eben Upton is a founder of our organisation, one of the inventors of the Raspberry Pi computer, and CEO of Raspberry Pi Trading. Watch Eben’s favourites.

  • Haya: Bobby ‘A Platformer’
  • Kaushal: Diabetic Retinopathy Detector
  • Zaahra, Eesa: Easy Sylheti
  • Mahmoud: Fighting Against Coronavirus
  • Oisín: MiniGolf In Python
  • Fiona: TeenBeo
  • Artash, Arushi: The Masked Scales: The Sonification of the Impact

Hayaatun Sillem’s favourites projects

Dr Hayaatun Sillem is the CEO of the Royal Academy of Engineering, which brings together the UK’s leading engineers and technologists to promote engineering excellence for the benefit of society. Watch Hayaatun’s favourites.

  • Radu Matei: Agartha Lore. Rebellion
  • Momoka: AI Trash Can
  • Kian: Cellular Ecosystem: Life in a Petri Dish
  • Sama, Sam, Taima, Nouran, Rama: Five Feet Apart
  • Tucker: Rivers.run
  • Cyrus: School Student ePortal

Limor ‘Ladyada’ Fried’s favourites

Limor Fried is an MIT-trained engineer and the founder and owner of Adafruit Industries. Watch Limor’s favourites.

  • Sara, Batool, Rahaf, Nancy: Children Body Language
  • Lars: Colourbird PicoBello
  • Alisa, Michelle: Green Coins
  • Niamh: MineBlower
  • Marah: My School Website
  • Raluca: Protect the Planet!
  • Rhea: The Amazing Photo Filter
A girl presenting a digital making project

Mitch Resnick’s favourites

Mitch Resnick is Professor of Learning Research at the MIT Media Lab, and his Lifelong Kindergarten research group develops and supports the Scratch programming software and online community! Watch Mitch’s favourites.

  • Oisín, Naoise: AUTISTICALLY AWESOME
  • Elana, Saibh: Exploring Schools
  • Mark: Mark’s Coronavirus Game
  • Ardash: Raspberry Pi–Based, Low-Cost Contactless Vital Signs Monitor
  • Matteo, Massimo, Jacopo: Sheetcheat.xyz
  • Cathal: Ukelectric
A Coolest Projects participant

Tim Peake’s favourites

Tim Peake is a British ESA astronaut who spent 186 days in space on the International Space Station. He’s also a passionate advocate for STEM education. Watch Tim’s favourites.

  • Abhiy: Burglar Buster
  • Carlos, Blanca, Mario: El ojo que te observa (The All-seeing Eye)
  • Zoe: Find It
  • Oluwadabera Jedidiah: Galaxy
  • Patrick: Pear Pad – Have Fun with Apps
  • Hala, Ranwa: Help Me to Learn

Discover over 500 projects

You can explore all the young tech creators’ projects — games, hardware builds, Scratch projects, mobile apps, and more — in our showcase gallery now.

This year’s Coolest Projects online showcase wouldn’t be possible without the support of our Coolest Projects sponsors — thank you!

The post Super cool favourites picked by fabulous judges appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Tim Peake is among our fabulous Coolest Projects judges

Post Syndicated from Helen Drury original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/tim-peake-coolest-projects-judges/

We are thrilled that five fantastic people will contribute to the Coolest Projects online showcase: Tim Peake, Limor Fried, Mitch Resnick, Hayaatun Sillem, and Eben Upton are going to be our special judges and choose their favourite projects from among all the entries from young tech creators in our global community.

Meet the coolest judges!

Tim Peake is a British ESA astronaut and a passionate advocate for STEM education. Tim played a huge part in the first Astro Pi Challenge in 2015, and he has helped us spread the word about the work of the Raspberry Pi Foundation ever since.

“By taking part in Coolest Projects, young creators get to share their ideas with the world, and their peers. Whether it’s creating something for home, the planet, or for their school or community — it’s a great opportunity to share their hopes and dreams for the future!” — Tim Peake

Limor ‘Ladyada’ Fried is an MIT engineer and the founder and owner of Adafruit, a company that creates hardware and educational resources for anyone interested in digital making. Limor personally selects, tests, and approves all the tools, equipment, and electronics on offer by Adafruit.

Limor Fried at Adafruit Industries

“Coolest Projects is a fantastic opportunity for young people to take part in the world’s leading technology showcase and to celebrate all the hard work and ideas from the community — all from home!” – Limor Fried

Mitch Resnick is Professor of Learning Research at the MIT Media Lab, and his Lifelong Kindergarten research group develops the Scratch programming software and online community! His life’s passion is developing new technologies and activities to engage young people in creative learning experiences.

Mitch Resnick,

Hayaatun Sillem is the CEO of the Royal Academy of Engineering, which brings together the UK’s leading engineers and technologists to promote engineering excellence for the benefit of society. She also has a PhD in cancer research!Hayaatun Sillem, CEO Royal Academy of Engineering

Eben Upton is a founder of the Raspberry Pi Foundation and one of the inventors of the Raspberry Pi computer. As the CEO of Raspberry Pi Trading Ltd, he oversees the company, including the development of all our hardware.

Register a project today!

If a young person you know is making anything with technology — and we mean anything, from robot to smartphone app to video game to Scratch animation to web page about their pet — then we invite them to take part in the Coolest Projects online showcase.

We welcome all works-in-progress and finished projects from anyone aged up to 18!

To find out more and register a project by the 28 June deadline, visit coolestproject.org.

The post Tim Peake is among our fabulous Coolest Projects judges appeared first on Raspberry Pi.