Tag Archives: education

Raspberry Pi and CoderDojo join forces

Post Syndicated from Philip Colligan original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-and-coderdojo-join-forces/

We’ve got some great news to share today: the Raspberry Pi Foundation is joining forces with the CoderDojo Foundation, in a merger that will give many more young people all over the world new opportunities to learn how to be creative with technology.

CoderDojo is a global network of coding clubs for kids from seven to 17. The first CoderDojo took place in July 2011 when James Whelton and Bill Liao decided to share their passion for computing by setting up a club at the National Software Centre in Cork. The idea was simple: provide a safe and social place for young people to acquire programming skills, learning from each other and supported by mentors.

Photo: a mentor helps a child at a CoderDojo

Since then, James and Bill have helped turn that idea into a movement that reaches across the whole world, with over 1,250 CoderDojos in 69 countries, regularly attended by over 35,000 young Ninjas.

Raspberry Pi and CoderDojo have each accomplished amazing things over the last six years. Now, we see an opportunity to do even more by joining forces. Bringing together Raspberry Pi, Code Club, and CoderDojo will create the largest global effort to get young people involved in computing and digital making. We have set ourselves an ambitious goal: to quadruple the number of CoderDojos worldwide, to 5,000, by the end of 2020.

Photo: children and teenagers work on laptops at a CoderDojo, while adults help

The enormous impact that CoderDojo has had so far is down to the CoderDojo Foundation team, and to the community of volunteers, businesses, and foundations who have contributed expertise, time, venues, and financial resources. We want to deepen those relationships and grow that community as we bring CoderDojo to more young people in future.

The CoderDojo Foundation will continue as an independent charity, based in Ireland. Nothing about CoderDojo’s brand or ethos is changing as a result of this merger. CoderDojos will continue to be platform-neutral, using whatever kit they need to help young people learn.

Photo: children concentrate intently on coding activities at a CoderDojo event

In technical terms, the Raspberry Pi Foundation is becoming a corporate member of the CoderDojo Foundation (which is a bit like being a shareholder, but without any financial interest). I will also join the board of the CoderDojo Foundation as a director. The merger is subject to approval by Irish regulators.

How will this work in practice? The two organisations will work together to advance our shared goals, using our respective assets and capabilities to get many more adults and young people involved in the CoderDojo movement. The Raspberry Pi Foundation will also provide practical, financial, and back-office support to the CoderDojo Foundation.

Last June, I attended the CoderDojo Coolest Projects event in Dublin, and was blown away by the amazing projects made by CoderDojo Ninjas from all over the world. From eight-year-olds who had written their first programs in Scratch to the teenagers who built a Raspberry Pi-powered hovercraft, it was clear that CoderDojo is already making a huge difference.

Photo: two girls wearing CoderDojo t-shirts present their Raspberry Pi-based hovercraft at CoderDojo Coolest Projects 2016

I am thrilled that we’re going to be working closely with the brilliant CoderDojo team, and I can’t wait to visit Coolest Projects again next month to meet all of the Ninjas and mentors who make CoderDojo possible.

If you want to find out more about CoderDojo and how you can get involved in helping the movement grow, go here.

The post Raspberry Pi and CoderDojo join forces appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Hello World issue 2: celebrating ten years of Scratch

Post Syndicated from Carrie Anne Philbin original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hello-world-issue-2/

We are very excited to announce that issue 2 of Hello World is out today! Hello World is our magazine about computing and digital making, written by educators, for educators. It  is a collaboration between the Raspberry Pi Foundation and Computing at School, part of the British Computing Society.

We’ve been extremely fortunate to be granted an exclusive interview with Mitch Resnick, Leader of the Scratch Team at MIT, and it’s in the latest issue. All around the world, educators and enthusiasts are celebrating ten years of Scratch, MIT’s block-based programming language. Scratch has helped millions of people to learn the building blocks of computer programming through play, and is our go-to tool at Code Clubs everywhere.

Cover of issue 2 of hello world magazine

A magazine by educators, for educators.

This packed edition of Hello World also includes news, features, lesson activities, research and opinions from Computing At School Master Teachers, Raspberry Pi Certified Educators, academics, informal learning leaders and brilliant classroom teachers. Highlights (for me) include:

  • A round-up of digital making research from Oliver Quinlan
  • Safeguarding children online by Penny Patterson
  • Embracing chaos inside and outside the classroom with Code Club’s Rik Cross, Raspberry Jam-maker-in-chief Ben Nuttall, Raspberry Pi Certified Educator Sway Grantham, and CPD trainer Alan O’Donohoe
  • How MicroPython on the Micro:bit is inspiring a generation, by Nicholas Tollervey
  • Incredibly useful lesson activities on programming graphical user interfaces (GUI) with guizero, simulating logic gates in Minecraft, and introducing variables through story telling.
  • Exploring computing and gender through Girls Who Code, Cyber First Girls, the BCSLovelace Colloqium, and Computing At School’s #include initiative
  • A review of browser based IDEs

Get your copy

Hello World is available as a free Creative Commons download for anyone around the world who is interested in Computer Science and digital making education. Grab the latest issue straight from the Hello World website.

Thanks to the very generous support of our sponsors BT, we are able to offer a free printed version of the magazine to serving educators in the UK. It’s for teachers, Code Club volunteers, teaching assistants, teacher trainers, and others who help children and young people learn about computing and digital making. Remember to subscribe to receive your free copy, posted directly to your home.

Get involved

Are you an educator? Then Hello World needs you! As a magazine for educators by educators, we want to hear about your experiences in teaching technology. If you hear a little niggling voice in your head say “I’m just a teacher, why would my contributions be useful to anyone else?” stop immediately. We want to hear from you, because you are amazing!

Get in touch: contact@helloworld.cc with your ideas, and we can help get them published.

 

The post Hello World issue 2: celebrating ten years of Scratch appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Top 10 Most Pirated Movies of The Week on BitTorrent – 05/22/17

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/top-10-pirated-movies-week-bittorrent-052217/

This week we have three newcomers in our chart.

Logan, which came out as DVDRip last week, is the most downloaded movie for the second week in a row.

The data for our weekly download chart is estimated by TorrentFreak, and is for informational and educational reference only. All the movies in the list are Web-DL/Webrip/HDRip/BDrip/DVDrip unless stated otherwise.

RSS feed for the weekly movie download chart.

This week’s most downloaded movies are:
Movie Rank Rank last week Movie name IMDb Rating / Trailer
Most downloaded movies via torrents
1 (1) Logan 8.6 / trailer
2 (8) The Fate of the Furious (subbed HDRip) 6.7 / trailer
3 (…) The Boss Baby 6.5 / trailer
4 (2) Ghost in The Shell (Subbed HDRip) 6.9 / trailer
5 (3) First Fight 5.7 / trailer
6 (4) Kong: Skull Island (Subbed HDRip) 7.0 / trailer
7 (…) T2 Trainspotting 7.7 / trailer
8 (…) Beauty and the Beast 7.6 / trailer
9 (7) Split 7.0 / trailer
10 (5) The Great Wall 6.9 / trailer

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Crash Course Computer Science with Carrie Anne Philbin

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/crash-course-carrie-anne-philbin/

Get your teeth into the history of computer science with our Director of Education, Carrie Anne Philbin, and the team at YouTube’s incredible Crash Course channel.

Crash Course Computer Science Preview

Starting February 22nd, Carrie Anne Philbin will be hosting Crash Course Computer Science! In this series, we’re going to trace the origins of our modern computers, take a closer look at the ideas that gave us our current hardware and software, discuss how and why our smart devices just keep getting smarter, and even look towards the future!

The brainchild of Hank and John Green (the latter of whom is responsible for books such as The Fault in Our Stars and all of my resultant heartbroken tears), Crash Course is an educational YouTube channel specialising in courses for school-age tuition support.

As part of the YouTube Orginal Channel Initiative, and with their partners PBS Digital Studios, the team has completed courses in subjects such as physics, hosted by Dr. Shini Somara, astronomy with Phil Plait, and sociology with Nicole Sweeney.

Raspberry Pi Carrie Anne Philbin Crash Course

Oh, and they’ve recently released a new series on computer science with Carrie Anne Philbin , whom you may know as Raspberry Pi’s Director of Education and the host of YouTube’s Geek Gurl Diaries.

Computer Science with Carrie Anne

Covering topics such as RAM, Boolean logic, CPU design , and binary, the course is currently up to episode twelve of its run. Episodes are released every Tuesday, and there are lots more to come.

Crash Course Carrie Anne Philbin Raspberry Pi

Following the fast-paced, visual style of the Crash Course brand, Carrie Anne takes her viewers on a journey from early computing with Lovelace and Babbage through to the modern-day electronics that power our favourite gadgets such as tablets, mobile phones, and small single-board microcomputers…

The response so far

A few members of the Raspberry Pi team recently attended VidCon Europe in Amsterdam to learn more about making video content for our community – and also so I could exist in the same space as the Holy Trinity, albeit briefly.

At VidCon, Carrie Anne took part in an engaging and successful Women in Science panel with Sally Le Page, Viviane Lalande, Hana Shoib, Maddie Moate, and fellow Crash Course presenter Dr. Shini Somara. I could see that Crash Course Computer Science was going down well from the number of people who approached Carrie Anne to thank her for the course, from those who were learning for the first time to people who were rediscovering the subject.

Crash Course Carrie Anne Philbin Raspberry Pi

Take part in the conversation

Join in the conversation! Head over to YouTube, watch Crash Course Computer Science, and join the discussion in the comments.

Crash Course Carrie Anne Philbin Raspberry Pi

You can also follow Crash Course on Twitter for release updates, and subscribe on YouTube to get notifications of new content.

Oh, and who can spot the sneaky Raspberry Pi in the video introduction?

“Cheers!”

Crash Course Computer Science Outtakes

In which Carrie Anne presents a new sing-a-long format and faces her greatest challenge yet – signing off an episode. Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter – http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr – http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV We’ve got merch!

The post Crash Course Computer Science with Carrie Anne Philbin appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

OpenHatch: Celebrating our successes and winding down as an organization

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/722782/rss

OpenHatch is a project that has been running education events and maintaining
free learning tools to help people get involved in collaborative software
development since 2009. Now Asheesh Laroia, President of the organization,
has announced
that the organization is winding down. “OpenHatch was one part of a
broader movement around improving diversity and inclusion in free software
and software generally. As Mike [Linksvayer], Deb [Nicholson], and I wind
down this one organization, we’re heartened by those who push the movement
forward.
” Donations have been canceled and the remaining money will
be used to gracefully shut down the organization. Anything left after that
will be donated to Outreachy. OpenHatch software
and websites will be moved to static website hosting.

Top 10 Most Pirated Movies of The Week on BitTorrent – 05/15/17

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/top-10-pirated-movies-week-bittorrent-051517/

This week we have three newcomers in our chart.

Logan, which came out as DVDRip last week, is the most downloaded movie.

The data for our weekly download chart is estimated by TorrentFreak, and is for informational and educational reference only. All the movies in the list are Web-DL/Webrip/HDRip/BDrip/DVDrip unless stated otherwise.

RSS feed for the weekly movie download chart.

This week’s most downloaded movies are:
Movie Rank Rank last week Movie name IMDb Rating / Trailer
Most downloaded movies via torrents
1 (3) Logan 8.6 / trailer
2 (1) Ghost in The Shell (Subbed HDRip) 6.9 / trailer
3 (…) First Fight 5.7 / trailer
4 (4) Kong: Skull Island (Subbed HDRip) 7.0 / trailer
5 (…) The Great Wall 6.9 / trailer
6 (2) xXx: Return of Xander Cage 5.3 / trailer
7 (6) Split 7.0 / trailer
8 (8) The Fate of the Furious 6.7 / trailer
9 (…) Get Out 7.9 / trailer
10 (5) Gifted 7.0 / trailer

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Hold ISPs Responsible For Piracy After Brexit, Music Biz Says

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/hold-isps-responsible-for-piracy-after-brexit-music-biz-says-170512/

UK Music is an umbrella organization representing music interests in the UK, from artists and composers, through to studios, recording labels and collecting societies.

The group counts many influential bodies as members, including the BPI, PRS for Music, and licensing outfit PPL. No surprise then that it has a keen anti-piracy agenda, much in tune with its member groups.

Yesterday, UK Music published its 2017 manifesto, covering a wide range of topics from regional development, skills and education, to finance and investment. Needless to say, anti-piracy measures feature prominently, with the group urging vigilance during the Brexit process to ensure music gets a good deal.

“Copyright and its enforcement should be a key part of the trade negotiations, ensuring that our trading partners protect not only their respective creative industries but also the interests of the UK music industry,” the group says.

“Maintaining and strengthening the copyright framework is of great importance to the music industry during the Brexit negotiations and beyond.”

When the UK leaves the EU mid-2019, the government proposes to convert all EU law into UK law. According to David Davis, the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, the so-called Great Repeal Bill will provide “clarity and certainty” for businesses and citizens alike.

However, the Bill will also grant power for MPs to change these laws once the UK has left the EU. For UK Music, this should be a time for stability for the music business.

“Withdrawal from the EU does not require substantial changes to the UK copyright framework. This continuity is critical to ensuring confidence amongst music businesses,” the group says.

“There is no evidence of the need for new exceptions to copyright. If this is not accepted by the Government then it would only serve to take away rights and undermine the potential for growth.”

But while stressing the importance of post-Brexit stability for the music industry, UK Music sees no problem with changing the law to impose additional responsibilities on others.

“There were 7.2 billion visits to copyright-infringing stream-ripping websites in 2016, representing a 60% increase in the previous year. Withdrawal from the EU provides an opportunity for the UK to strengthen the enforcement of copyright,” the group says.

That toughening-up of the law should be focused on tech companies, UK Music insists.

“Initiatives should be developed to place responsibility on internet service providers and require them to have a duty of care for copyright protected music,” the group says.

While UK Music has a clear mandate to look after its own interests, it’s likely that service providers would also like the opportunity to enjoy both continuity and stability after the Brexit negotiations are complete. Being held responsible for piracy is unlikely to help them reach that goal.

Nevertheless, UK Musicwill require further support from ISPs, if it is to meet another of its manifesto goals. Currently, several of the UK’s largest providers are cooperating with the industry to send piracy notices to their subscribers. UK Music would like to expand the scheme.

“The Get It Right From A Genuine Site campaign, designed to promote greater copyright understanding online, is also showing evidence of success. With further support it has the potential to broaden its reach,” the organization says.

Finally, UK Music says that Brexit will give the UK an opportunity to put forward “a coherent definition of hyperlinking under copyright law.”

The group doesn’t go into specifics, but it could be argued that the recent GS Media case handled by the European Court of Justice offers all the clarity the UK needs to transfer the decision into local law.

The full manifesto can be downloaded here (pdf)

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Growing Code Club

Post Syndicated from Philip Colligan original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/growing-code-club/

In November 2015 we announced that the Raspberry Pi Foundation was joining forces with Code Club to give more young people the opportunity to learn how to make things with computers. In the 18 months since we made that announcement, we have more than doubled the number of Code Clubs. Over 10,000 clubs are now active, in communities all over the world.

Photo of a Code Club in a classroom: six or seven children focus intently on Scratch programs and other tasks, and adults are helping and supervising in the background

Children at a Code Club in Australia

The UK is where the movement started, and there are now an amazing 5750 Code Clubs engaging over 85,000 young people in the UK each week. The rest of the world is catching up rapidly. With the help of our regional partners, there are over 4000 clubs outside the UK, and fast-growing Code Club communities in Australia, Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, Croatia, France, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and Ukraine. This year we have already launched new partnerships in Spain and South Korea, with more to come.

It’s fantastic to see the movement growing so quickly, and it’s all due to the amazing community of volunteers, teachers, parents, and young people who make everything possible. Thank you all!

Today, we are announcing the next stage of Code Club’s evolution. Drum roll, please…

Starting in September, we are extending Code Club to 9- to 13-year-olds.

Three girls, all concentrating, one smiling, work together at a computer at Code Club

Students at a Code Club in Brazil

Those in the know will remember that Code Club has, until now, been focused on 9- to 11-year-olds. So why the change?

Put simply: demand. There is a huge demand from young people for more opportunities to learn about computing generally, and for Code Club specifically. The first generations of Code Club graduates have moved on to more senior schools, and they’re telling us that they just don’t have the opportunities they need to learn more about digital making. We’ve decided to take up the challenge.

For the UK, this means that schools will be supported to set up Code Clubs for Years 7 and 8. Non-school venues, like libraries, will be able to offer their clubs to a wider age group.

Growing Code Club International

Code Club is a global movement, and we will be working with our regional partners to make sure that it is available to 9- to 13-year-olds in every community in the world. That includes accelerating the work to translate club materials into even more languages.

Two boys and a woman wearing a Code Club T-shirt sit and pose for the camera in a classroom

A Code Club volunteer and students in Brazil

As part of the change, we will be expanding our curriculum and free educational resources to cater for older children and more experienced coders. Like all our educational resources, the new materials will be created by qualified and experienced educators. They will be designed to help young people build a wide range of skills and competencies, including teamwork, problem-solving, and creativity.

Our first step towards supporting a wider age range is a pilot programme, launching today, with 50 secondary schools in the UK. Over the next few months, we will be working closely with them to find out the best ways to make the programme work for older kids.

Supporting Code Club

For now, you can help us spread the word. If you know a school, youth club, library, or similar venue that could host a club for young people aged 9 to 13, then encourage them to get involved.

Lastly, I want to say a massive “thank you!” to all the organisations and individuals that support Code Club financially. We care passionately about Code Club being free for every child to attend. That’s only possible because of the generous donations and grants that we receive from so many companies, foundations, and people who share our mission to put the power of digital making into the hands of people all over the world.

The post Growing Code Club appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

AWS Big Data Blog Month in Review: April 2017

Post Syndicated from Derek Young original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/aws-big-data-blog-month-in-review-april-2017/

Another month of big data solutions on the Big Data Blog. Please take a look at our summaries below and learn, comment, and share. Thank you for reading!

NEW POSTS

Amazon QuickSight Spring Announcement: KPI Charts, Export to CSV, AD Connector, and More! 
In this blog post, we share a number of new features and enhancements in Amazon Quicksight. You can now create key performance indicator (KPI) charts, define custom ranges when importing Microsoft Excel spreadsheets, export data to comma separated value (CSV) format, and create aggregate filters for SPICE data sets. In the Enterprise Edition, we added an additional option to connect to your on-premises Active Directory using AD Connector. 

Securely Analyze Data from Another AWS Account with EMRFS
Sometimes, data to be analyzed is spread across buckets owned by different accounts. In order to ensure data security, appropriate credentials management needs to be in place. This is especially true for large enterprises storing data in different Amazon S3 buckets for different departments. This post shows how you can use a custom credentials provider to access S3 objects that cannot be accessed by the default credentials provider of EMRFS.

Querying OpenStreetMap with Amazon Athena
This post explains how anyone can use Amazon Athena to quickly query publicly available OSM data stored in Amazon S3 (updated weekly) as an AWS Public Dataset. Imagine that you work for an NGO interested in improving knowledge of and access to health centers in Africa. You might want to know what’s already been mapped, to facilitate the production of maps of surrounding villages, and to determine where infrastructure investments are likely to be most effective.

Build a Real-time Stream Processing Pipeline with Apache Flink on AWS
This post outlines a reference architecture for a consistent, scalable, and reliable stream processing pipeline that is based on Apache Flink using Amazon EMR, Amazon Kinesis, and Amazon Elasticsearch Service. An AWSLabs GitHub repository provides the artifacts that are required to explore the reference architecture in action. Resources include a producer application that ingests sample data into an Amazon Kinesis stream and a Flink program that analyses the data in real time and sends the result to Amazon ES for visualization.

Manage Query Workloads with Query Monitoring Rules in Amazon Redshift
Amazon Redshift is a powerful, fully managed data warehouse that can offer significantly increased performance and lower cost in the cloud. However, queries which hog cluster resources (rogue queries) can affect your experience. In this post, you learn how query monitoring rules can help spot and act against such queries. This, in turn, can help you to perform smooth business operations in supporting mixed workloads to maximize cluster performance and throughput.

Amazon QuickSight Now Supports Audit Logging with AWS CloudTrail
In this post, we announce support for AWS CloudTrail in Amazon QuickSight, which allows logging of QuickSight events across an AWS account. Whether you have an enterprise setting or a small team scenario, this integration will allow QuickSight administrators to accurately answer questions such as who last changed an analysis, or who has connected to sensitive data. With CloudTrail, administrators have better governance, auditing and risk management of their QuickSight usage.

Near Zero Downtime Migration from MySQL to DynamoDB
This post introduces two methods of seamlessly migrating data from MySQL to DynamoDB, minimizing downtime and converting the MySQL key design into one more suitable for NoSQL.


Want to learn more about Big Data or Streaming Data? Check out our Big Data and Streaming data educational pages.

Leave a comment below to let us know what big data topics you’d like to see next on the AWS Big Data Blog.

Top 10 Most Pirated Movies of The Week on BitTorrent – 05/08/17

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/top-10-pirated-movies-week-bittorrent-050817/

This week we have two newcomers in our chart.

Ghost in The Shell, which came out as subbed HDRipo last week, is the most downloaded movie.

The data for our weekly download chart is estimated by TorrentFreak, and is for informational and educational reference only. All the movies in the list are Web-DL/Webrip/HDRip/BDrip/DVDrip unless stated otherwise.

RSS feed for the weekly movie download chart.

This week’s most downloaded movies are:
Movie Rank Rank last week Movie name IMDb Rating / Trailer
Most downloaded movies via torrents
1 (10) Ghost in The Shell (Subbed HDRip) 6.9 / trailer
2 (…) xXx: Return of Xander Cage 5.3 / trailer
3 (1) Logan (Subbed HDRip) 8.6 / trailer
4 (3) Kong: Skull Island (Subbed HDRip) 7.0 / trailer
5 (…) Gifted 7.0 / trailer
6 (5) Split 7.0 / trailer
7 (2) Fifty Shades Darker 4.7 / trailer
8 (5) The Fate of the Furious 6.7 / trailer
9 (8) The Boss Baby (HD-TS) 6.5 / trailer
10 (7) Get Out (Subbed HDRip) 8.1 / trailer

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Devcic: Have You Heard? KDE Applications 17.04 and Plasma 5.9.5 Now Available

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/721580/rss

Ivana Isadora Devcic takes
a look
at the recently released KDE Applications 17.04 and Plasma
5.9.5. In file management there have been improvements to the Dolphin file
manager, the Okular PDF viewer, and the archiving tool Ark. The video
editor Kdenlive has seen the biggest improvements among multimedia
applications. Several educational applications have also seen
some changes. “The most obvious changes introduced in Plasma 5.9.5 are related to window decorations and other visual tweaks. Themes in the System Settings module are now sorted, Plastik window decoration supports the global menu, and Aurorae window decorations support the global menu button. KWin will respect theme colors in buttons, and you will be able to edit the default color scheme of your Plasma Desktop.

Canada and Switzerland Remain on US ‘Pirate Watchlist’ Under President Trump

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/canada-and-switzerland-remain-on-us-pirate-watchlist-under-president-trump-170501/

ustrEvery year the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) publishes its Special 301 Report highlighting countries that aren’t doing enough to protect U.S. intellectual property rights.

The format remains the same as in previous years and lists roughly two dozen countries that, for different reasons, threaten the intellectual property rights of US companies.

The latest report, which just came out, is the first under the administration of President Trump and continues where Obama left off. China, Russia, Ukraine, and India are listed among the priority threats, and Canada and Switzerland remain on the general Watch List.

“One of the top trade priorities for the Trump Administration is to use all possible sources of leverage to encourage other countries to open their markets to U.S. exports of goods and services, and provide adequate and effective protection and enforcement of U.S. intellectual property (IP) rights,” the USTR writes.

One of the main problems the US has with Canada is that it doesn’t allow border protection officials to seize or destroy pirated and counterfeit goods that are passing through.

In addition, the US is fiercely against Canada’s fair dealing rules, which adds educational use to the list of copyright infringement exceptions. According to the US, the language used in the law is too broad, damaging the rights of educational publishers.

“The United States also remains deeply troubled by the broad interpretation of an ambiguous education-related exception to copyright that has significantly damaged the market for educational publishers and authors.”

In the past, Canada has also been called out for offering a safe haven to pirate sites, but there is no mention of this in the 2017 report (pdf).

That said, pirate site hosting remains a problem in many other countries including Switzerland, with the USTR noting that the country has become an “increasingly popular host country for websites offering infringing content” since 2010.

While the Swiss Government is taking steps to address these concerns, another enforcement problem also requires attention. One of the key issues the United States has with Switzerland originates from the so-called ‘Logistep Decision.‘

In 2010 the Swiss Federal Supreme Court barred anti-piracy outfit Logistep from harvesting the IP addresses of file-sharers. The Court ruled that IP addresses amount to private data, and outlawed the tracking of file-sharers in Switzerland.

According to the US, this ruling prevents copyright holders from enforcing their rights, and they call on the Swiss Government to address this concern.

“Switzerland remains on the Watch List this year due to U.S. concerns regarding specific difficulties in Switzerland’s system of online copyright protection and enforcement,” the USTR writes.

“Seven years have elapsed since the issuance of a decision by the Swiss Federal Supreme Court, which has been implemented to essentially deprive copyright holders in Switzerland of the means to enforce their rights against online infringers. Enforcement is a critical element of providing meaningful IP protection.”

The above points are merely a selection of the many complaints the United States has about a variety of countries. As is often the case, the allegations are in large part based on reports from copyright-heavy industries, in some cases demanding measures that are not even in effect in the US itself.

By calling out foreign governments, the USTR hopes to elicit change. However, not all countries are receptive to this kind of diplomatic pressure. Canada, for one, said it does’t recognize the Special 301 Report and plans to follow its own path.

“Canada does not recognize the validity of the Special 301 and considers the process and the Report to be flawed,” the Government wrote in a previous memo regarding last year’s report.

“The Report fails to employ a clear methodology and the findings tend to rely on industry allegations rather than empirical evidence and objective analysis,” it added.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Top 10 Most Pirated Movies of The Week on BitTorrent – 05/01/17

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/top-10-pirated-movies-week-bittorrent-050117/

This week we have two newcomers in our chart.

Logan is the most downloaded movie for the third week in a row.

The data for our weekly download chart is estimated by TorrentFreak, and is for informational and educational reference only. All the movies in the list are Web-DL/Webrip/HDRip/BDrip/DVDrip unless stated otherwise.

RSS feed for the weekly movie download chart.

This week’s most downloaded movies are:
Movie Rank Rank last week Movie name IMDb Rating / Trailer
Most downloaded movies via torrents
1 (1) Logan (Subbed HDRip) 8.6 / trailer
2 (…) Fifty Shades Darker 4.7 / trailer
3 (3) Kong: Skull Island (Subbed HDRip) 7.0 / trailer
4 (5) Split 7.0 / trailer
5 (2) The Fate of the Furious 6.7 / trailer
6 (…) Colossal 7.4 / trailer
7 (4) Get Out (Subbed HDRip) 8.1 / trailer
8 (8) The Boss Baby (HD-TS) 6.5 / trailer
9 (7) La La Land 8.4 / trailer
10 (10) Ghost in The Shell (HDTS) 6.9 / trailer

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Why GPL Compliance Education Materials Should Be Free as in Freedom

Post Syndicated from Bradley M. Kuhn original http://ebb.org/bkuhn/blog/2017/04/25/liberate-compliance-tutorials.html

[ This blog was crossposted
on Software Freedom Conservancy’s website
. ]

I am honored to be a co-author and editor-in-chief of the most
comprehensive, detailed, and complete guide on matters related to compliance
of copyleft software licenses such as the GPL.
This book, Copyleft and the GNU
General Public License: A Comprehensive Tutorial and Guide
(which we
often call the Copyleft Guide for short)
is 155 pages filled
with useful material to help everyone understand copyleft licenses for
software, how they work, and how to comply with them properly. It is the
only document to fully incorporate esoteric material such as the FSF’s famous
GPLv3 rationale documents directly alongside practical advice, such as
the pristine example,
which is the only freely published compliance analysis of a real product on
the market. The document explains in great detail how that product
manufacturer made good choices to comply with the GPL. The reader learns by
both real-world example as well as abstract explanation.

However, the most important fact about the Copyleft Guide is not its
useful and engaging content. More importantly, the license of this book
gives freedom to its readers in the same way the license of the copylefted
software does. Specifically, we chose
the Creative
Commons Attribution Share-Alike 4.0 license

(CC BY-SA)
for this work. We believe that not just software, but any generally useful
technical information that teaches people should be freely sharable and
modifiable by the general public.

The reasons these freedoms are necessary seem so obvious that I’m
surprised I need to state them. Companies who want to build internal
training courses on copyleft compliance for their employees need to modify
the materials for that purpose. They then need to be able to freely
distribute them to employees and contractors for maximum effect.
Furthermore, like all documents and software alike, there are always
“bugs”, which (in the case of written prose) usually means
there are sections that are fail to communicate to maximum effect. Those
who find better ways to express the ideas need the ability to propose
patches and write improvements. Perhaps most importantly, everyone who
teaches should avoid
NIH syndrome. Education and
science work best when we borrow and share (with proper license-compliant
attribution, of course!) the best material that others develop, and augment
our works by incorporating them.

These reasons are akin to those that led Richard M. Stallman to write his
seminal
essay, Why
Software Should Be Free
. Indeed, if you reread that essay now
— as I just did — you’ll see that much of damage and many of
the same problems to the advancement of software that RMS documents in that
essay also occur in the world of tutorial documentation about FLOSS
licensing. As too often happens in the Open Source community, though,
folks seek ways to proprietarize, for profit, any copyrighted work that
doesn’t already have a copyleft license attached. In the field of copyleft
compliance education, we see the same behavior: organizations who wish to
control the dialogue and profit from selling compliance education seek to
proprietarize the meta-material of compliance education, rather than
sharing freely like the software itself. This yields an ironic
exploitation, since the copyleft license documented therein exists as a
strategy to assure the freedom to share knowledge. These educators tell
their audiences with a straight face: Sure, the software is
free as in freedom, but if you want to learn how its license
works, you have to license our proprietary materials!
This behavior
uses legal controls to curtail the sharing of knowledge, limits the
advancement and improvement of those tutorials, and emboldens silos of
know-how that only wealthy corporations have the resources to access and
afford. The educational dystopia that these organizations create is
precisely what I sought to prevent by advocating for software freedom for
so long.

While Conservancy’s primary job
provides non-profit infrastructure for Free
Software projects
, we also do a bit
of license compliance work as well.
But we practice what we preach: we release all the educational materials
that we produce as part of
the Copyleft Guide project
under CC BY-SA. Other Open Source organizations are currently hypocrites
on this point; they tout the values of openness and sharing of knowledge
through software, but they take their tutorial materials and lock them up
under proprietary licenses. I hereby publicly call on such organizations
(including but not limited to the Linux Foundation) to license
materials such
as
those under CC BY-SA.

I did not make this public call for liberation of such materials without
first trying friendly diplomacy first. Conservancy has been in talks with
individuals and staff who produce these materials for some time. We urged
them to join the Free Software community and share their materials under
free licenses. We even offered volunteer time to help them improve those
materials if they would simply license them freely. After two years of
that effort, it’s now abundantly clear that public pressure is the only
force that might work0. Ultimately, like all
proprietary businesses, the training divisions of Linux Foundation and
other entities in the compliance industrial complex (such
as Black Duck)
realize they can make much more revenue by making materials proprietary and
choosing legal restrictions that forbid their students from sharing and
improving the materials after they complete the course. While the reality
of this impasse regarding freely licensing these materials is probably an
obvious outcome, multiple sources inside these organizations have also
confirmed for me that liberation of the materials for the good of general
public won’t happen without a major paradigm shift — specifically
because such educational freedom will reduce the revenue stream around
those materials.

Of course, I can attest first-hand that freely liberating tutorial
materials curtails revenue. Karen Sandler and I have regularly taught
courses on copyleft licensing based
on the freely available materials
for a few years — most
recently in
January 2017 at LinuxConf Australia
and at
at
OSCON in a few weeks
. These conferences do kindly cover our travel
expenses to attend and teach the tutorial, but compliance education is not
a revenue stream for Conservancy. While, in an ideal world, we’d get
revenue from education to fund our other important activities, we believe
that there is value in doing this education as currently funded by
our individual Supporters; these education
efforts fit withour charitable mission to promote the public good. We
furthermore don’t believe that locking up the materials and refusing to
share them with others fits a mission of software freedom, so we never
considered such as a viable option. Finally, given the
institutionally-backed
FUD that we’ve
continue to witness, we seek to draw specific attention to the fundamental
difference in approach that Conservancy (as a charity) take toward this
compliance education work. (My
my recent talk on compliance
covered on LWN
includes some points on that matter, if you’d like
further reading).


0One notable exception to
these efforts was the success of my colleague, Karen Sandler (and others)
in convincing the OpenChain
project
to choose CC-0 licensing. However, OpenChain is not officially
part of the LF training curriculum to my knowledge, and if it is, it can of
course be proprietarized therein, since CC-0 is not a copyleft license.

Top 10 Most Pirated Movies of The Week on BitTorrent – 04/24/17

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/top-10-pirated-movies-week-bittorrent-042417/

This week we have three newcomers in our chart.

Logan, which was released as a HDrip with hardcoded Korean subtitles last week, is the most downloaded movie again.

The data for our weekly download chart is estimated by TorrentFreak, and is for informational and educational reference only. All the movies in the list are Web-DL/Webrip/HDRip/BDrip/DVDrip unless stated otherwise.

RSS feed for the weekly movie download chart.

This week’s most downloaded movies are:
Movie Rank Rank last week Movie name IMDb Rating / Trailer
Most downloaded movies via torrents
1 (1) Logan (Subbed HDRip) 8.6 / trailer
2 (6) The Fate of the Furious 7.4 / trailer
3 (2) Kong: Skull Island (Subbed HDRip) 7.0 / trailer
4 (…) Get Out (Subbed HDRip) 8.1 / trailer
5 (3) Split 7.0 / trailer
6 (…) Rings 4.5 / trailer
7 (4) La La Land 8.4 / trailer
8 (…) The Boss Baby (HD-TS) 6.5 / trailer
9 (5) Rogue One 8.0 / trailer
10 (8) Ghost in The Shell (HDTS) 6.9 / trailer

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Top 10 Most Pirated Movies of The Week on BitTorrent – 04/17/17

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/top-10-pirated-movies-week-bittorrent-041717/

This week we have three newcomers in our chart.

Logan, which was released as a HDrip with hardcoded Korean subtitles this week, is the most downloaded movie.

The data for our weekly download chart is estimated by TorrentFreak, and is for informational and educational reference only. All the movies in the list are Web-DL/Webrip/HDRip/BDrip/DVDrip unless stated otherwise.

RSS feed for the weekly movie download chart.

This week’s most downloaded movies are:
Movie Rank Rank last week Movie name IMDb Rating / Trailer
Most downloaded movies via torrents
1 (4) Logan (Subbed HDRip) 8.6 / trailer
2 (1) Kong: Skull Island (Subbed HDRip) 7.0 / trailer
3 (2) Split 7.0 / trailer
4 (…) La La Land 8.4 / trailer
5 (3) Rogue One 8.0 / trailer
6 (…) The Fate of the Furious 7.4 / trailer
7 (7) Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them 7.6 / trailer
8 (10) Ghost in The Shell 6.9 / trailer
9 (…) The Great Wall 7.6 / trailer
10 (8) Boyka: Undisputed 8.3 / trailer

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Court Sentences Movie Downloaders to 45 Days in Jail

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/court-sentences-movie-downloaders-to-45-days-in-jail-170416/

What’s the appropriate way to deal with online piracy? Education? Fines? Jail sentences? All of these things are possible in today’s world, depending on scale of offending and location.

In the United States, for example, educational warnings formed part of the Copyright Alerts program, but with that having fallen by the wayside, fines (aka settlement demands) are the most common form of punishment. People can still be taken to court though, and with statutory damages of $150,000 per title on the table, things can get hairy pretty quickly.

On the whole, jail sentences are uncommon and are usually saved for the more serious offenders, such as site operators and release groups. On the rare occasions, a custodial is handed out, they tend to be measured in months and years, not days and weeks. Over in Nigeria, it appears things are done a little differently.

Following a complaint from the local Hausa Film Makers Association, 18 people were arrested under suspicion of online piracy of so-called Kannywood films, movies produced by the Hausa-language film industry based in the north of the country.

The Nigerian Security and Civil Defense Corps (NSCDC), a paramilitary agency of the Nigerian government, took care of the prosecution. The accused appeared in court last week charged with unlawfully downloading and sharing the movies. According to a report from The Nation, things escalated quickly.

“When the one-count charge of piracy was read to them, they all pleaded guilty,” said Ibrahim Idris of the NSCDC.

“The Chief Magistrate, Sanusi Usman, thereafter sentenced them to 45 days imprisonment or to pay a fine of N12,000 each.”

While the $40 fine might be an option for some, any period in jail for sharing a movie seems particularly harsh, particularly in Nigeria, a country that places no priority on burglary offenses and chooses not to enforce its own traffic laws.

The United States classifies the country as having a “critical” crime rate so why piracy receives any attention isn’t clear, despite the country’s reported “zero tolerance” stance. There might, however, be a little clue in the way the Internet pirates were charged.

“The convicts were accused of downloading and sending of Hausa films, an act that contravenes a section of Kano State Censorship Board laws 2001,” Idris says.

Nigeria’s Censorship Board takes its responsibilities seriously, and while it appears to have responded to complaints of Internet piracy from an industry group, other areas of law may have come into play.

“The primary responsibility of the board is to filter any viewable, audible, or readable material produced by the mass media, or via the internet or performed on the stage,” the Board says in its mission statement.

“It is the duty of the board to censor such materials before they are released for public consumption; educate the stakeholders and the general public; and to prosecute the defaulters.”

When one begins to grasp the level of control commanded by the Board, it becomes clear that file-sharing networks are almost completely incompatible with its mission. It regularly bans songs and forbids their downloading so little surprise that when it suits the authorities, the big guns can be brought out to deal with the information-spreading public.

“The cheapest way of corrupting our cultural base is through the use of tools of mass media namely, the internet, television, adverts, movies, other cinematographs and through assorted literary works,” the Board explains.

“These tools of mass mind control and corruption are targeted on the youths of our developing countries on whose shoulders lie the future of this generation and yet unborn ones.”

The claims that pirates in the United States are merely destroying the film industry clearly pale in comparison…..

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Querying OpenStreetMap with Amazon Athena

Post Syndicated from Seth Fitzsimmons original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/querying-openstreetmap-with-amazon-athena/

This is a guest post by Seth Fitzsimmons, member of the 2017 OpenStreetMap US board of directors. Seth works with clients including the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team, Mapzen, the American Red Cross, and World Bank to craft innovative geospatial solutions.

OpenStreetMap (OSM) is a free, editable map of the world, created and maintained by volunteers and available for use under an open license. Companies and non-profits like Mapbox, Foursquare, Mapzen, the World Bank, the American Red Cross and others use OSM to provide maps, directions, and geographic context to users around the world.

In the 12 years of OSM’s existence, editors have created and modified several billion features (physical things on the ground like roads or buildings). The main PostgreSQL database that powers the OSM editing interface is now over 2TB and includes historical data going back to 2007. As new users join the open mapping community, more and more valuable data is being added to OpenStreetMap, requiring increasingly powerful tools, interfaces, and approaches to explore its vastness.

This post explains how anyone can use Amazon Athena to quickly query publicly available OSM data stored in Amazon S3 (updated weekly) as an AWS Public Dataset. Imagine that you work for an NGO interested in improving knowledge of and access to health centers in Africa. You might want to know what’s already been mapped, to facilitate the production of maps of surrounding villages, and to determine where infrastructure investments are likely to be most effective.

Note: If you run all the queries in this post, you will be charged approximately $1 based on the number of bytes scanned. All queries used in this post can be found in this GitHub gist.

What is OpenStreetMap?

As an open content project, regular OSM data archives are made available to the public via planet.openstreetmap.org in a few different formats (XML, PBF). This includes both snapshots of the current state of data in OSM as well as historical archives.

Working with “the planet” (as the data archives are referred to) can be unwieldy. Because it contains data spanning the entire world, the size of a single archive is on the order of 50 GB. The format is bespoke and extremely specific to OSM. The data is incredibly rich, interesting, and useful, but the size, format, and tooling can often make it very difficult to even start the process of asking complex questions.

Heavy users of OSM data typically download the raw data and import it into their own systems, tailored for their individual use cases, such as map rendering, driving directions, or general analysis. Now that OSM data is available in the Apache ORC format on Amazon S3, it’s possible to query the data using Athena without even downloading it.

How does Athena help?

You can use Athena along with data made publicly available via OSM on AWS. You don’t have to learn how to install, configure, and populate your own server instances and go through multiple steps to download and transform the data into a queryable form. Thanks to AWS and partners, a regularly updated copy of the planet file (available within hours of OSM’s weekly publishing schedule) is hosted on S3 and made available in a format that lends itself to efficient querying using Athena.

Asking questions with Athena involves registering the OSM planet file as a table and making SQL queries. That’s it. Nothing to download, nothing to configure, nothing to ingest. Athena distributes your queries and returns answers within seconds, even while querying over 9 years and billions of OSM elements.

You’re in control. S3 provides high availability for the data and Athena charges you per TB of data scanned. Plus, we’ve gone through the trouble of keeping scanning charges as small as possible by transcoding OSM’s bespoke format as ORC. All the hard work of transforming the data into something highly queryable and making it publicly available is done; you just need to bring some questions.

Registering Tables

The OSM Public Datasets consist of three tables:

  • planet
    Contains the current versions of all elements present in OSM.
  • planet_history
    Contains a historical record of all versions of all elements (even those that have been deleted).
  • changesets
    Contains information about changesets in which elements were modified (and which have a foreign key relationship to both the planet and planet_history tables).

To register the OSM Public Datasets within your AWS account so you can query them, open the Athena console (make sure you are using the us-east-1 region) to paste and execute the following table definitions:

planet

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE planet (
  id BIGINT,
  type STRING,
  tags MAP<STRING,STRING>,
  lat DECIMAL(9,7),
  lon DECIMAL(10,7),
  nds ARRAY<STRUCT<ref: BIGINT>>,
  members ARRAY<STRUCT<type: STRING, ref: BIGINT, role: STRING>>,
  changeset BIGINT,
  timestamp TIMESTAMP,
  uid BIGINT,
  user STRING,
  version BIGINT
)
STORED AS ORCFILE
LOCATION 's3://osm-pds/planet/';

planet_history

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE planet_history (
    id BIGINT,
    type STRING,
    tags MAP<STRING,STRING>,
    lat DECIMAL(9,7),
    lon DECIMAL(10,7),
    nds ARRAY<STRUCT<ref: BIGINT>>,
    members ARRAY<STRUCT<type: STRING, ref: BIGINT, role: STRING>>,
    changeset BIGINT,
    timestamp TIMESTAMP,
    uid BIGINT,
    user STRING,
    version BIGINT,
    visible BOOLEAN
)
STORED AS ORCFILE
LOCATION 's3://osm-pds/planet-history/';

changesets

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE changesets (
    id BIGINT,
    tags MAP<STRING,STRING>,
    created_at TIMESTAMP,
    open BOOLEAN,
    closed_at TIMESTAMP,
    comments_count BIGINT,
    min_lat DECIMAL(9,7),
    max_lat DECIMAL(9,7),
    min_lon DECIMAL(10,7),
    max_lon DECIMAL(10,7),
    num_changes BIGINT,
    uid BIGINT,
    user STRING
)
STORED AS ORCFILE
LOCATION 's3://osm-pds/changesets/';

 

Under the Hood: Extract, Transform, Load

So, what happens behind the scenes to make this easier for you? In a nutshell, the data is transcoded from the OSM PBF format into Apache ORC.

There’s an AWS Lambda function (running every 15 minutes, triggered by CloudWatch Events) that watches planet.openstreetmap.org for the presence of weekly updates (using rsync). If that function detects that a new version has become available, it submits a set of AWS Batch jobs to mirror, transcode, and place it as the “latest” version. Code for this is available at osm-pds-pipelines GitHub repo.

To facilitate the transcoding into a format appropriate for Athena, we have produced an open source tool, OSM2ORC. The tool also includes an Osmosis plugin that can be used with complex filtering pipelines and outputs an ORC file that can be uploaded to S3 for use with Athena, or used locally with other tools from the Hadoop ecosystem.

What types of questions can OpenStreetMap answer?

There are many uses for OpenStreetMap data; here are three major ones and how they may be addressed using Athena.

Case Study 1: Finding Local Health Centers in West Africa

When the American Red Cross mapped more than 7,000 communities in West Africa in areas affected by the Ebola epidemic as part of the Missing Maps effort, they found themselves in a position where collecting a wide variety of data was both important and incredibly beneficial for others. Accurate maps play a critical role in understanding human communities, especially for populations at risk. The lack of detailed maps for West Africa posed a problem during the 2014 Ebola crisis, so collecting and producing data around the world has the potential to improve disaster responses in the future.

As part of the data collection, volunteers collected locations and information about local health centers, something that will facilitate treatment in future crises (and, more importantly, on a day-to-day basis). Combined with information about access to markets and clean drinking water and historical experiences with natural disasters, this data was used to create a vulnerability index to select communities for detailed mapping.

For this example, you find all health centers in West Africa (many of which were mapped as part of Missing Maps efforts). This is something that healthsites.io does for the public (worldwide and editable, based on OSM data), but you’re working with the raw data.

Here’s a query to fetch information about all health centers, tagged as nodes (points), in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia:

SELECT * from planet
WHERE type = 'node'
  AND tags['amenity'] IN ('hospital', 'clinic', 'doctors')
  AND lon BETWEEN -15.0863 AND -7.3651
  AND lat BETWEEN 4.3531 AND 12.6762;

Buildings, as “ways” (polygons, in this case) assembled from constituent nodes (points), can also be tagged as medical facilities. In order to find those, you need to reassemble geometries. Here you’re taking the average of all nodes that make up a building (which will be the approximate center point, which is close enough for this purpose). Here is a query that finds both buildings and points that are tagged as medical facilities:

-- select out nodes and relevant columns
WITH nodes AS (
  SELECT
    type,
    id,
    tags,
    lat,
    lon
  FROM planet
  WHERE type = 'node'
),
-- select out ways and relevant columns
ways AS (
  SELECT
    type,
    id,
    tags,
    nds
  FROM planet
  WHERE type = 'way'
    AND tags['amenity'] IN ('hospital', 'clinic', 'doctors')
),
-- filter nodes to only contain those present within a bounding box
nodes_in_bbox AS (
  SELECT *
  FROM nodes
  WHERE lon BETWEEN -15.0863 AND -7.3651
    AND lat BETWEEN 4.3531 AND 12.6762
)
-- find ways intersecting the bounding box
SELECT
  ways.type,
  ways.id,
  ways.tags,
  AVG(nodes.lat) lat,
  AVG(nodes.lon) lon
FROM ways
CROSS JOIN UNNEST(nds) AS t (nd)
JOIN nodes_in_bbox nodes ON nodes.id = nd.ref
GROUP BY (ways.type, ways.id, ways.tags)
UNION ALL
SELECT
  type,
  id,
  tags,
  lat,
  lon
FROM nodes_in_bbox
WHERE tags['amenity'] IN ('hospital', 'clinic', 'doctors');

You could go a step further and query for additional tags included with these (for example, opening_hours) and use that as a metric for measuring “completeness” of the dataset and to focus on additional data to collect (and locations to fill out).

Case Study 2: Generating statistics about mapathons

OSM has a history of holding mapping parties. Mapping parties are events where interested people get together and wander around outside, gathering and improving information about sites (and sights) that they pass. Another form of mapping party is the mapathon, which brings together armchair and desk mappers to focus on improving data in another part of the world.

Mapathons are a popular way of enlisting volunteers for Missing Maps, a collaboration between many NGOs, education institutions, and civil society groups that aims to map the most vulnerable places in the developing world to support international and local NGOs and individuals. One common way that volunteers participate is to trace buildings and roads from aerial imagery, providing baseline data that can later be verified by Missing Maps staff and volunteers working in the areas being mapped.

(Image and data from the American Red Cross)

Data collected during these events lends itself to a couple different types of questions. People like competition, so Missing Maps has developed a set of leaderboards that allow people to see where they stand relative to other mappers and how different groups compare. To facilitate this, hashtags (such as #missingmaps) are included in OSM changeset comments. To do similar ad hoc analysis, you need to query the list of changesets, filter by the presence of certain hashtags in the comments, and group things by username.

Now, find changes made during Missing Maps mapathons at George Mason University (using the #gmu hashtag):

SELECT *
FROM changesets
WHERE regexp_like(tags['comment'], '(?i)#gmu');

This includes all tags associated with a changeset, which typically include a mapper-provided comment about the changes made (often with additional hashtags corresponding to OSM Tasking Manager projects) as well as information about the editor used, imagery referenced, etc.

If you’re interested in the number of individual users who have mapped as part of the Missing Maps project, you can write a query such as:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT uid)
FROM changesets
WHERE regexp_like(tags['comment'], '(?i)#missingmaps');

25,610 people (as of this writing)!

Back at GMU, you’d like to know who the most prolific mappers are:

SELECT user, count(*) AS edits
FROM changesets
WHERE regexp_like(tags['comment'], '(?i)#gmu')
GROUP BY user
ORDER BY count(*) DESC;

Nice job, BrokenString!

It’s also interesting to see what types of features were added or changed. You can do that by using a JOIN between the changesets and planet tables:

SELECT planet.*, changesets.tags
FROM planet
JOIN changesets ON planet.changeset = changesets.id
WHERE regexp_like(changesets.tags['comment'], '(?i)#gmu');


Using this as a starting point, you could break down the types of features, highlight popular parts of the world, or do something entirely different.

Case Study 3: Building Condition

With building outlines having been produced by mappers around (and across) the world, local Missing Maps volunteers (often from local Red Cross / Red Crescent societies) go around with Android phones running OpenDataKit  and OpenMapKit to verify that the buildings in question actually exist and to add additional information about them, such as the number of stories, use (residential, commercial, etc.), material, and condition.

This data can be used in many ways: it can provide local geographic context (by being included in map source data) as well as facilitate investment by development agencies such as the World Bank.

Here are a collection of buildings mapped in Dhaka, Bangladesh:

(Map and data © OpenStreetMap contributors)

For NGO staff to determine resource allocation, it can be helpful to enumerate and show buildings in varying conditions. Building conditions within an area can be a means of understanding where to focus future investments.

Querying for buildings is a bit more complicated than working with points or changesets. Of the three core OSM element types—node, way, and relation, only nodes (points) have geographic information associated with them. Ways (lines or polygons) are composed of nodes and inherit vertices from them. This means that ways must be reconstituted in order to effectively query by bounding box.

This results in a fairly complex query. You’ll notice that this is similar to the query used to find buildings tagged as medical facilities above. Here you’re counting buildings in Dhaka according to building condition:

-- select out nodes and relevant columns
WITH nodes AS (
  SELECT
    id,
    tags,
    lat,
    lon
  FROM planet
  WHERE type = 'node'
),
-- select out ways and relevant columns
ways AS (
  SELECT
    id,
    tags,
    nds
  FROM planet
  WHERE type = 'way'
),
-- filter nodes to only contain those present within a bounding box
nodes_in_bbox AS (
  SELECT *
  FROM nodes
  WHERE lon BETWEEN 90.3907 AND 90.4235
    AND lat BETWEEN 23.6948 AND 23.7248
),
-- fetch and expand referenced ways
referenced_ways AS (
  SELECT
    ways.*,
    t.*
  FROM ways
  CROSS JOIN UNNEST(nds) WITH ORDINALITY AS t (nd, idx)
  JOIN nodes_in_bbox nodes ON nodes.id = nd.ref
),
-- fetch *all* referenced nodes (even those outside the queried bounding box)
exploded_ways AS (
  SELECT
    ways.id,
    ways.tags,
    idx,
    nd.ref,
    nodes.id node_id,
    ARRAY[nodes.lat, nodes.lon] coordinates
  FROM referenced_ways ways
  JOIN nodes ON nodes.id = nd.ref
  ORDER BY ways.id, idx
)
-- query ways matching the bounding box
SELECT
  count(*),
  tags['building:condition']
FROM exploded_ways
GROUP BY tags['building:condition']
ORDER BY count(*) DESC;


Most buildings are unsurveyed (125,000 is a lot!), but of those that have been, most are average (as you’d expect). If you were to further group these buildings geographically, you’d have a starting point to determine which areas of Dhaka might benefit the most.

Conclusion

OSM data, while incredibly rich and valuable, can be difficult to work with, due to both its size and its data model. In addition to the time spent downloading large files to work with locally, time is spent installing and configuring tools and converting the data into more queryable formats. We think Amazon Athena combined with the ORC version of the planet file, updated on a weekly basis, is an extremely powerful and cost-effective combination. This allows anyone to start querying billions of records with simple SQL in no time, giving you the chance to focus on the analysis, not the infrastructure.

To download the data and experiment with it using other tools, the latest OSM ORC-formatted file is available via OSM on AWS at s3://osm-pds/planet/planet-latest.orcs3://osm-pds/planet-history/history-latest.orc, and s3://osm-pds/changesets/changesets-latest.orc.

We look forward to hearing what you find out!

Processing: making art with code

Post Syndicated from Matt Richardson original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/processing-making-art-code/

This column is from The MagPi issue 56. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free, or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

One way we achieve our mission at the Raspberry Pi Foundation is to find an intersection between someone’s passion and computing. For example, if you’re a young person interested in space, our Astro Pi programme is all about getting your code running on the International Space Station. If you like music, you can use Sonic Pi to compose songs with code. This month, I’d like to introduce you to some interesting work happening at the intersection between computing and the visual arts.

Image of Dead Presidents by Mike Brondbjerg art made with Processing

Mike Brondbjerg’s Dead Presidents uses Processing to generate portraits.

Processing is a programming language and development environment that sits perfectly at that intersection. It enables you to use code to generate still graphics, animations, or interactive applications such as games. It’s based on the Java programming language, and it runs on multiple platforms and operating systems. Thanks to the work of the Processing Foundation, and in particular the efforts of contributor Gottfried Haider, Processing runs like a champ on the Raspberry Pi.

Screenshot of Processing environment

When I want to communicate how cool Processing is while speaking to members of the Raspberry Pi community, I usually make this analogy: with Sonic Pi, you can use one line of code to make one note; with Processing, you can use one line of code to draw one stroke. Once you’ve figured that out, you can use computational tools such as loops, conditions, and variables to make some beautiful art.

And even though Processing is intended for use in the realm of visual arts, its capabilities can go beyond that. You can make applications that interact with the user through keyboard or mouse input. Processing also has libraries for working with network connections, files, and cameras. This means that you don’t just have to create artwork with Processing. You can also use it for almost anything you need to code.

Physical process

Processing is especially cool on the Raspberry Pi because there’s a library for working with the Pi’s GPIO pins. You can therefore have on-screen graphics interacting with buttons, switches, LEDs, relays, and sensors wired up to your Pi. With Processing, you could build a game that uses a custom controller that you’ve built yourself. Or you could create a piece of artwork that interacts with the user by sensing their proximity to it.

Processing screenshot

Best of all, Processing was created with learning to code in mind. It comes with lots of built-in examples, and you can use these to learn about many different programming and drawing concepts. The documentation on Processing’s website is very thorough and – as with Raspberry Pi – there’s a very supportive community around it if you run into any trouble. Additionally, the Processing development environment is powerful but also very simplified. For these reasons, it’s perfect for someone who is just getting started.

To get going with Processing on Raspberry Pi, there’s a one-line install command. You can also go to Processing.org and download pre-built Raspbian images with Processing already installed. To help you on your journey, there’s a resource for getting started with Processing. It includes a walkthrough on how to access the GPIO pins to combine physical computing and visual arts.

When you launch Processing, you will see a blank file where you can start keying in your code. Don’t let that intimidate you! All of the world’s greatest pieces of art started off as a raw slab of marble, a blob of clay, or a blank canvas. It just takes one line of code at a time to generate your own masterpiece.

Become a supporter

After this article appeared in The MagPi, the Processing Foundation put out a call for support:

We want you to be a part of this. Our work is almost entirely supported by individual one-time donations from the community. Right now we are outspending what we earn, and we have bigger plans! We want to continue all the work we’re doing and make it more accessible, more inclusive, and more responsive to the community needs.

To create lasting support for these new directions we’re starting a Membership Program. A membership is an annual donation that supports all this work and signifies your belief in it. You can do this as an individual, a studio, an educational institution, or a corporate partner. We will list your name on our members page along with all the others that help make this mission possible.

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Research on Tech-Support Scams

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/04/research_on_tec.html

Interesting paper: “Dial One for Scam: A Large-Scale Analysis of Technical Support Scams“:

Abstract: In technical support scams, cybercriminals attempt to convince users that their machines are infected with malware and are in need of their technical support. In this process, the victims are asked to provide scammers with remote access to their machines, who will then “diagnose the problem”, before offering their support services which typically cost hundreds of dollars. Despite their conceptual simplicity, technical support scams are responsible for yearly losses of tens of millions of dollars from everyday users of the web.

In this paper, we report on the first systematic study of technical support scams and the call centers hidden behind them. We identify malvertising as a major culprit for exposing users to technical support scams and use it to build an automated system capable of discovering, on a weekly basis, hundreds of phone numbers and domains operated by scammers. By allowing our system to run for more than 8 months we collect a large corpus of technical support scams and use it to provide insights on their prevalence, the abused infrastructure, the illicit profits, and the current evasion attempts of scammers. Finally, by setting up a controlled, IRB-approved, experiment where we interact with 60 different scammers, we experience first-hand their social engineering tactics, while collecting detailed statistics of the entire process. We explain how our findings can be used by law-enforcing agencies and propose technical and educational countermeasures for helping users avoid being victimized by
technical support scams.

BoingBoing post.