Tag Archives: education

Welcome to the Newest AWS Community Heroes (Fall 2016)

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/welcome-to-the-newest-aws-community-heroes-fall-2016/

I would like to extend a very warm welcome to the newest AWS Community Heroes:

  • Cyrus Wong
  • Paul Duvall
  • Vit Niennattrakul
  • Habeeb Rahman
  • Francisco Edilton
  • Jeevan Dongre

The Heroes share their knowledge and demonstrate their enthusiasm for AWS via social media, blog posts, user groups, and workshops. Let’s take a look at their bios to learn more.

Cyrus Wong
Based in Hong Kong, Cyrus is a Data Scientist in the IT Department of the Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Education. He actively promotes the use of AWS at live events and via social media, and has received multiple awards for his AWS-powered Data Science and Machine Learning Projects.

Cyrus provides professional AWS training to students in Hong Kong, with an eye toward certification. One of his most popular blog posts is How to get all AWS Certifications in Asia, where he recommends watching the entire set of re:Invent videos at a 2.0 to 2.5x speedup!

You can connect with Cyrus on LinkedIn or at a meeting of the AWS Hong Kong User Group.

Paul Duvall
As co-founder and CTO of Stelligent (an AWS Advanced Consulting Partner), Paul has been using AWS to implement Continuous Delivery Systems since 2009.

Based in Northern Virginia, he’s an AWS Certified SysOps Administrator and and AWS Certified Solutions Architect, and has been designing, implementing, and managing software and systems for over 20 years. Paul has written over 30 articles on AWS, automation, and DevOps and is currently writing a book on Enterprise DevOps in AWS.

You can connect with Paul on LinkedIn, follow him on Twitter, or read his posts on the Stelligent Blog.

Vit Niennattrakul
Armed with a Ph.D. in time series data mining and passionate about machine learning, artificial intelligence, and natural language processing, Vit is a consummate entrepreneur who has already founded four companies including Dailitech, an AWS Consulting Partner. They focus on cloud migration and cloud-native applications, and have also created cloud-native solutions for their customers.

Shortly after starting to use AWS in 2013, Vit decided that it could help to drive innovation in Thailand. In order to make this happen, he founded the AWS User Group Thailand and has built it up to over 2,000 members.

 

Habeeb Rahman
Based in India, Habeeb is interested in cognitive science and leadership, and works on application delivery automation at Citrix. Before that, he helped to build AWS-powered SaaS infrastructure at Apigee, and held several engineering roles at Cable & Wireless.

After presenting at AWS community meetups and conferences, Habeen helped to organize the AWS User Group in Bangalore and is actively pursuing his goal of making it the best user group in India for peer learning.

You can connect with Habeeb on LinkedIn or follow him on Twitter.

Francisco Edilton
As a self-described “full-time geek,” Francisco likes to study topics related to cloud computing, and is also interested in the stock market, travel, and food. He brings over 15 years of network security and Linux server experience to the table, and is currently deepening his knowledge of AW by learning about serverless computing, and data science.

Francisco works for TDSIS, a Brazilian company that specializes in cloud architecture, software development, and network security, and helps customers of all sizes to make the move to the cloud. On the AWS side, Francisco organizes regular AWS Meetups in São Paulo, Brazil, writes blog posts, and posts code to his GitHub repo.

Jeevan Dongre
As a DevOps Engineer based in India, Jeevan has built his career around application development, e-commerce, and product development. His passions include automation, cloud computing, and the management of large-scale web applications.

Back in 2011, Jeevan and several other like-minded people formed the Bengaluru AWS User Group in order to share and develop AWS knowledge and skills. The group is still going strong and Jeevan expects it to become the premier group for peer-to-peer learning.

You can connect with Jeevan on LinkedIn or follow him on Twitter.

Welcome
Please join me in offering a warm welcome to our newest AWS Community Heroes!


Jeff;

UK IP Crime Report 2016 Reveals IPTV/Kodi Piracy as Growing Threat

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/uk-ip-crime-report-2016-reveals-iptvkodi-piracy-as-growing-threat-160929/

For more than a decade the IP Crime Group and the Intellectual Property Office have collaborated to produce an assessment of the level of IP crime in the UK. Their annual IP Crime Report details the responses of businesses, anti-piracy groups, and government agencies.

As usual, this year’s report covers all areas of IP crime, both in the physical realm and online. However, it is the latter area that appears to be causing the most concern to participating anti-piracy groups.

“Perhaps the area where IP crime statistics most often reach jaw-dropping levels is in relation to the industries providing digital content,” the report reads.

“During a sample three-month period last year, 28% of those questioned admitted their music downloads in the UK came from illegal sources. Similarly, 23% of films, 22% of software, 16% of TV and 15% of games were downloaded in breach of copyright.”

While noting that illicit music downloads have actually reduced in recent years, the report highlights areas that aren’t doing so well, TV show consumption for example.

“The reasons for the spike in TV copyright infringement appear to be, in part, technological, with ‘unofficial services’ such as uTorrent, BitTorrent, TV catch up apps and established sources such as YouTube offering content without legal certainty,” it adds.

But while several methods of obtaining free TV content online are highlighted in the report, none achieve as much attention as IPTV – commonly known as Kodi with illicit third-party addons.

In her report preamble, Minister for Intellectual Property Baroness Neville-Rolfe describes anti-IPTV collaboration between the Federation Against Copyright Theft, Trading Standards, and the Police, as one of the year’s operational successes. Indeed, FACT say anti-IPTV work is now their top priority.

Federation Against Copyright Theft

“We have prioritised an emerging threat to the audiovisual industry, internet protocol TV (IPTV) boxes,” FACT write.

“In their original form, these boxes are legitimate. However, with the use of apps and add-ons, they allow users to access copyright infringing material, from live TV and sports, to premium pay-for channels and newly released films. Once configured these boxes are illegal.”

FACT say they are concentrating on two areas – raising awareness in the industry and elsewhere while carrying out enforcement and disruption operations.

“In the last year FACT has worked with a wide range of partners and law enforcement bodies to tackle individuals and disrupt businesses selling illegal IPTV boxes. Enforcement action has been widespread across the UK with numerous ongoing investigations,” FACT note.

Overall, FACT say that 70% of the public complaints they receive relate to online copyright infringement. More than a quarter of all complaints now relate to IPTV and 50% of the anti-piracy group’s current investigations involve IPTV boxes.

fact-ipcrime

British Phonographic Industry (BPI)

In their submission to the report, the BPI cite three key areas of concern – online piracy, physical counterfeiting, and Internet-enabled sales of infringing physical content. The former is their top priority.

“The main online piracy threats to the UK recorded music industry at present come from BitTorrent networks, MP3 aggregator sites, cyberlockers, unauthorised streaming sites, stream ripping sites and pirate sites accessed via mobile devices,” the BPI writes.

“Search engines – predominantly Google – also continue to provide millions of links to infringing content and websites that are hosted by non-compliant operators and hosts that cannot be closed down have needed to be blocked in the UK under s.97A court orders (website blocking).”

The BPI notes that between January 2015 and March 2016, it submitted more than 100 million URL takedowns to Google and Bing. Counting all notices since 2011 when the BPI began the practice, the tally now sits at 200 million URLs.

“These astronomic numbers demonstrate the large quantity of infringing content that is available online and which is easily accessible to search engine users,” the BPI says.

On the web-blocking front, the BPI says it now has court orders in place to block 63 pirate sites and more than 700 related URLs, IP addresses and proxies.

“Site blocking is proving a successful strategy, and the longer the blocks are in place, the more effective they tend to be. The latest data available shows that traffic to sites blocked for over one year has reduced by an average of around 80%; with traffic to sites blocked for less than a year reduced by an average of around 50%,” the BPI adds.

Infringement warnings for Internet subscibers

The Get it Right campaign is an educational effort to advise the public on how to avoid pirate sites and spend money on genuine products. The campaign has been somewhat lukewarm thus far, but the sting in the tail has always been the threat of copyright holders sending warnings to Internet pirates.

To date, nothing has materialized on that front but hidden away on page 51 of the report is a hint that something might happen soon.

“A further component of the ‘Get it Right’ campaign is a subscriber alert programme that will, starting by the end of 2016, advise ISPs’ residential subscribers when their accounts are believed to have been used to infringe copyright,” the report reads.

“Account holders will receive an Alert from their ISP, advising them that unlawful uploading of a copyright content file may have taken place on their internet connection and offering advice on where to find legitimate sources of content.”

Overall, the tone of the report suggests a huge threat from IP crime but one that’s being effectively tackled by groups such as FACT, BPI, the Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit, and various educational initiatives. Only time will tell if next year’s report will retain the optimism.

The full report can be downloaded here (pdf)

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Introducing PIXEL

Post Syndicated from Simon Long original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/introducing-pixel/

It was just over two years ago when I walked into Pi Towers for the first time. I only had the vaguest idea of what I was going to be doing, but on the first day Eben and I sat down and played with the Raspbian desktop for half an hour, then he asked me “do you think you can make it better?”

origdesk

Bear in mind that at this point I’d barely ever used Linux or Xwindows, never mind made any changes to them, so when I answered “hmmm – I think so”, it was with rather more confidence than I actually felt. It was obvious that there was a lot that could be done in terms of making it a better experience for the user, and I spent many years working in user interface design in previous jobs. But I had no idea where to start in terms of changing Raspbian. I clearly had a bit of a learning curve in front of me…

Well, that was two years ago, and I’ve learnt an awful lot since then. It’s actually surprisingly easy to hack about with the LXDE desktop once you get your head around what all the bits do, and since then I’ve been slowly chipping away at the bits that I felt would most benefit from tweaking. Stuff has slowly been becoming more and more like my original concept for the desktop; with the latest changes, I think the desktop has reached the point where it’s a complete product in its own right and should have its own name. So today, we’re announcing the release of the PIXEL desktop, which will ship with the Foundation’s Raspbian image from now on.

newdesk

PIXEL?

One of the things I said (at least partly in jest) to my colleagues in those first few weeks was that I’d quite like to rename the desktop environment once it was a bit more Pi-specific, and I had the name “pixel” in my mind about two weeks in. It was a nice reminder of my days learning to program in BASIC on the Sinclair ZX81; nowadays, everything from your TV to your phone has pixels on it, but back then it was a uniquely “computer-y” word and concept. I also like crosswords and word games, and once it occurred to me that “pixel” could be made up from the initials of words like Pi and Xwindows, the name stuck in my head and never quite went away. So PIXEL it is, which now officially stands for “Pi Improved Xwindows Environment, Lightweight”.

What’s new?

The latest set of changes are almost entirely to do with the appearance of the desktop; there are some functional changes and a few new applications, about which more below, but this is mostly about making things look nicer.

The first thing you’ll notice on rebooting is that the trail of cryptic boot messages has (mostly) gone, replaced by a splash screen. One feature which has frequently been requested is an obvious version number for our Raspbian image, and this can now be seen at the bottom-right of the splash image. We’ll update this whenever we release a new version of the image, so it should hopefully be slightly easier to know exactly what version you’re running in future.

splash

I should mention that the code for the splash screen has been carefully written and tested, and should not slow down the Pi’s boot process; the time to go from powering on to the desktop appearing is identical, whether the splash is shown or not.

Desktop pictures

Once the desktop appears, the first thing you’ll notice is the rather stunning background image. We’re very fortunate in that Greg Annandale, one of the Foundation’s developers, is also a very talented (and very well-travelled) photographer, and he has kindly allowed us to use some of his work as desktop pictures for PIXEL. There are 16 images to choose from; you can find them in /usr/share/pixel-wallpaper/, and you can use the Appearance Settings application to choose which one you prefer. Do have a look through them, as Greg’s work is well worth seeing! If you’re curious, the EXIF data in each image will tell you where it was taken.

desk2

desk3

desk1

Icons

You’ll also notice that the icons on the taskbar, menu, and file manager have had a makeover. Sam Alder and Alex Carter, the guys responsible for all the cartoons and graphics you see on our website, have been sweating blood over these for the last few months, with Eben providing a watchful eye to make sure every pixel was exactly the right colour! We wanted something that looked businesslike enough to be appropriate for those people who use the Pi desktop for serious work, but with just a touch of playfulness, and Sam and Alex did a great job. (Some of the icons you don’t see immediately are even nicer; it’s almost worth installing some education or engineering applications just so those categories appear in the menu…)

menu

Speaking of icons, the default is now not to show icons in individual application menus. These always made menus look a bit crowded, and didn’t really offer any improvement in usability, not least because it wasn’t always that obvious what the icon was supposed to represent… The menus look cleaner and more readable as a result, since the lack of visual clutter now makes them easier to use.

Finally on the subject of icons, in the past if your Pi was working particularly hard, you might have noticed some yellow and red squares appearing in the top-right corner of the screen, which were indications of overtemperature or undervoltage. These have now been replaced with some new symbols that make it a bit more obvious what’s actually happening; there’s a lightning bolt for undervoltage, and a thermometer for overtemperature.

Windows

If you open a window, you’ll see that the window frame design has now changed significantly. The old window design always looked a bit dated compared to what Apple and Microsoft are now shipping, so I was keen to update it. Windows now have a subtle curve on the corners, a cleaner title bar with new close / minimise / maximise icons, and a much thinner frame. One reason the frame was quite thick on the old windows was so that the grab handles for resizing were big enough to find with the mouse. To avoid this problem, the grab handles now extend slightly outside the window; if you hold the mouse pointer just outside the window which has focus, you’ll see the pointer change to show the handle.

window

Fonts

Steve Jobs said that one thing he was insistent on about the Macintosh was that its typography was good, and it’s true that using the right fonts makes a big difference. We’ve been using the Roboto font in the desktop for the last couple of years; it’s a nice-looking modern font, and it hasn’t changed for this release. However, we have made it look better in PIXEL by including the Infinality font rendering package. This is a library of tweaks and customisations that optimises how fonts are mapped to pixels on the screen; the effect is quite subtle, but it does give a noticeable improvement in some places.

Login

Most people have their Pi set up to automatically log in when the desktop starts, as this is the default setting for a new install. For those who prefer to log in manually each time, the login screen has been redesigned to visually match the rest of the desktop; you now see the login box (known as the “greeter”) over your chosen desktop design, with a seamless transition from greeter to desktop.

login

Wireless power switching

One request we have had in the past is to be able to shut off WiFi and/or Bluetooth completely, particularly on Pi 3. There are now options in the WiFi and Bluetooth menus to turn off the relevant devices. These work on the Pi 3’s onboard wireless hardware; they should also work on most external WiFi and Bluetooth dongles.

You can also now disconnect from an associated wireless access point by clicking on its entry in the WiFi menu.

New applications

There are a couple of new applications now included in the image.

RealVNC have ported their VNC server and viewer applications to Pi, and they are now integrated with the system. To enable the server, select the option on the Interfaces tab in Raspberry Pi Configuration; you’ll see the VNC menu appear on the taskbar, and you can then log in to your Pi and control it remotely from a VNC viewer.

The RealVNC viewer is also included – you can find it from the Internet section of the Applications menu – and it allows you to control other RealVNC clients, including other Pis. Have a look here on RealVNC’s site for more information.

vnc

Please note that if you already use xrdp to remotely access your Pi, this conflicts with the RealVNC server, so you shouldn’t install both at once. If you’re updating an existing image, don’t run the sudo apt-get install realvnc-vnc-server line in the instructions below. If you want to use xrdp on a clean image, first uninstall the RealVNC server with sudo apt-get purge realvnc-vnc-server before installing xrdp. (If the above paragraph means nothing to you, then you probably aren’t using xrdp, so you don’t have to worry about any of it!)

Also included is the new SenseHAT emulator, which was described in a blog post a couple of weeks ago; have a look here for all the details.

sensehat

Updates

There are updates for a number of the built-in applications; these are mostly tweaks and bug fixes, but there have been improvements made to Scratch and Node-RED.

One more thing…

We’ve been shipping the Epiphany web browser for the last couple of years, but it’s now starting to show its age. So for this release (and with many thanks to Gustav Hansen from the forums for his invaluable help with this), we’re including an initial release of Chromium for the Pi. This uses the Pi’s hardware to accelerate playback of streaming video content.

chromium

We’ve preinstalled a couple of extensions; the uBlock Origin adblocker should hopefully keep intrusive adverts from slowing down your browsing experience, and the h264ify extension forces YouTube to serve videos in a format which can be accelerated by the Pi’s hardware.

Chromium is a much more demanding piece of software than Epiphany, but it runs well on Pi 2 and Pi 3; it can struggle slightly on the Pi 1 and Pi Zero, but it’s still usable. (Epiphany is still installed in case you find it useful; launch it from the command line by typing “epiphany-browser”.)

How do I get it?

The Raspbian + PIXEL image is available from the Downloads page on our website now.

To update an existing Jessie image, type the following at the command line:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
sudo apt-get install -y rpi-chromium-mods
sudo apt-get install -y python-sense-emu python3-sense-emu
sudo apt-get install -y python-sense-emu-doc realvnc-vnc-viewer

and then reboot.

If you don’t use xrdp and would like to use the RealVNC server to remotely access your Pi, type the following:

sudo apt-get install -y realvnc-vnc-server

As always, your feedback on the new release is very welcome; feel free to let us know what you think in the comments or on the forums.

The post Introducing PIXEL appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

AWS Week in Review – September 19, 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-week-in-review-september-19-2016/

Eighteen (18) external and internal contributors worked together to create this edition of the AWS Week in Review. If you would like to join the party (with the possibility of a free lunch at re:Invent), please visit the AWS Week in Review on GitHub.

Monday

September 19

Tuesday

September 20

Wednesday

September 21

Thursday

September 22

Friday

September 23

Saturday

September 24

Sunday

September 25

New & Notable Open Source

  • ecs-refarch-cloudformation is reference architecture for deploying Microservices with Amazon ECS, AWS CloudFormation (YAML), and an Application Load Balancer.
  • rclone syncs files and directories to and from S3 and many other cloud storage providers.
  • Syncany is an open source cloud storage and filesharing application.
  • chalice-transmogrify is an AWS Lambda Python Microservice that transforms arbitrary XML/RSS to JSON.
  • amp-validator is a serverless AMP HTML Validator Microservice for AWS Lambda.
  • ecs-pilot is a simple tool for managing AWS ECS.
  • vman is an object version manager for AWS S3 buckets.
  • aws-codedeploy-linux is a demo of how to use CodeDeploy and CodePipeline with AWS.
  • autospotting is a tool for automatically replacing EC2 instances in AWS AutoScaling groups with compatible instances requested on the EC2 Spot Market.
  • shep is a framework for building APIs using AWS API Gateway and Lambda.

New SlideShare Presentations

New Customer Success Stories

  • NetSeer significantly reduces costs, improves the reliability of its real-time ad-bidding cluster, and delivers 100-millisecond response times using AWS. The company offers online solutions that help advertisers and publishers match search queries and web content to relevant ads. NetSeer runs its bidding cluster on AWS, taking advantage of Amazon EC2 Spot Fleet Instances.
  • New York Public Library revamped its fractured IT environment—which had older technology and legacy computing—to a modernized platform on AWS. The New York Public Library has been a provider of free books, information, ideas, and education for more than 17 million patrons a year. Using Amazon EC2, Elastic Load Balancer, Amazon RDS and Auto Scaling, NYPL is able to build scalable, repeatable systems quickly at a fraction of the cost.
  • MakerBot uses AWS to understand what its customers need, and to go to market faster with new and innovative products. MakerBot is a desktop 3-D printing company with more than 100 thousand customers using its 3-D printers. MakerBot uses Matillion ETL for Amazon Redshift to process data from a variety of sources in a fast and cost-effective way.
  • University of Maryland, College Park uses the AWS cloud to create a stable, secure and modern technical environment for its students and staff while ensuring compliance. The University of Maryland is a public research university located in the city of College Park, Maryland, and is the flagship institution of the University System of Maryland. The university uses AWS to migrate all of their datacenters to the cloud, as well as Amazon WorkSpaces to give students access to software anytime, anywhere and with any device.

Upcoming Events

Help Wanted

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

AWS Pop-up Loft and Innovation Lab in Munich

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-pop-up-loft-and-innovation-lab-in-munich/

I’m happy to be able to announce that an AWS Pop-up Loft is opening in Munich on October 26th, with a full calendar of events and a brand-new AWS Innovation Lab, all created with the help of our friends at Intel and Nordcloud. Developers, entrepreneurs, students come to AWS Lofts around the world to learn, code, collaborate, and to ask questions. The Loft will provide developers and architects in Munich with access to local technical resources and expertise that will help them to build robust and successful cloud-powered applications.

Near Munich Königsplatz Station
This loft is located at Brienner Str 49, 80333 in Munich, close to Königsplatz Station and convenient to Stiglmaierplatz. Hours are 10 AM to 6 PM Monday through Friday, with special events in the evening.

During the day, you will have access to the Ask an Architect Bar, daily education sessions, Wi-Fi, a co-working space, coffee, and snacks, all at no charge. There will also be resources to help you to create, run, and grow your startup including educational sessions from local AWS partners, accelerators, and incubators.

Ask an Architect
Step up to the Ask an Architect Bar with your code, architecture diagrams, and your AWS questions at the ready! Simply walk in. You will have access to deep technical expertise and will be able to get guidance on AWS architecture, usage of specific AWS services and features, cost optimization, and more.

AWS Education Sessions
During the day, AWS Solution Architects, Product Managers, and Evangelists will be leading 60-minute educational sessions designed to help you to learn more about specific AWS services and use cases. You can attend these sessions to learn about Serverless Architectures, Mobile & Gaming, Databases, Big Data, Compute & Networking, Architecture, Operations, Security, Machine Learning, and more, all at no charge.

Startup Education Sessions
AWS startup community representatives, incubators, accelerators, startup scene influencers, and hot startup customers running on AWS will share best-practices, entrepreneurial know-how, and lessons learned. Pop in to learn the art of pitching, customer validation & profiling, PR for startups & corporations, and more.

Innovation Lab
The new AWS Innovation Lab is adjacent to the Munich Loft. With over 350 square meters of space, the Lab is Designed to be a resource for mid-market and enterprise companies that are ready to grow their business. It will feature interactive demos, videos, and other materials designed to explain the benefits of digital transformation and cloud-powered innovation, with a focus on Big Data, mobile applications, and the fourth industrial revolution (Industry 4.0).

Come in and Say Hello
We look forward to using the Loft to meet and to connect with our customers, and expect that it will be a place that they visit on a regular basis. Please feel free to stop in and say hello to my colleagues at the Munich Loft if you happen to find yourself in the city!

Jeff;

Top 10 Most Pirated Movies of The Week – 09/26/16

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/top-10-pirated-movies-week-092616/

ghostbThis week we have three newcomers in our chart.

Ghostbusters is the most downloaded movie.

The data for our weekly download chart is estimated by TorrentFreak, and is for informational and educational reference only. All the movies in the list are Web-DL/Webrip/HDRip/BDrip/DVDrip unless stated otherwise.

RSS feed for the weekly movie download chart.

Ranking (last week) Movie IMDb Rating / Trailer
torrentfreak.com
1 (…) Ghostbusters 5.5 / trailer
2 (1) Captain America: Civil War 8.1 / trailer
3 (…) I.T. 5.4 / trailer
4 (2) X-Men: Apocalypse 6=7.8=3 / trailer
5 (…) Swiss Army Man 7.6 / trailer
6 (8) The Legend of Tarzan 6.4 / trailer
7 (4) Now You See Me 2 6.8 / trailer
8 (5) Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows 6.2 / trailer
9 (3) Alice Through The Looking Glass 6.4 / trailer
10 (6) The Shallows 6.6 / trailer

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Despite Adobe Efforts, Photoshop Still Most Popular Software on Pirate Bay

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/despite-adobe-efforts-photoshop-still-most-popular-software-on-pirate-bay-160922/

Ever since their official release, Adobe software products have been popular with pirates. Editing studio Photoshop has been the most enduring, appearing on pirates’ machines since 1990.

In order to innovate, in 2013 Adobe said it would move away from boxed ‘retail’ products and switch to a cloud-subscription model. This meant that the large initial outlay associated with its products could be exchanged for a more affordable monthly fee.

In July 2014, Adobe said the strategy was working, declaring that piracy had fallen. Just over a year later, Adobe was celebrating again, noting that casual pirates had been converted by the lower price of entry.

This week Adobe had more good news for shareholders. In the third quarter, the company generated more than $1.46 billion in revenue, up from $1.22 billion year-on-year. Creative Cloud, the company’s replacement for the old disc-based Creative Suite, accounted for $803 million in revenue, up 39% year-on-year.

In a Q3 2016 earnings conference call the discussion somewhat inevitably turned to piracy, with Adobe Executive Vice President Mark Garrett noting that mitigation is one of the company’s key aims.

“Our focus with Creative Cloud continues to be in three key areas; growing our core base of users, including migrating the legacy user base of Creative Suite users, addressing piracy and growing our installed base in the education market, driving new customer adoption in adjacent markets,” Garrett said.

Heather Bellini from Goldman Sachs wanted to know whether Adobe sees potential for additional revenue boosts as piracy is further eroded.

“Is there kind of a framework that we could think about in terms of the impact on top line growth that you can get from piracy reduction and are there things that you are doing that you are changing even more than you were kind of a couple of years ago to stay ahead of the pirates?” Bellini asked.

Adobe President and Chief Executive Officer Shantanu Narayen responded, indicating that a large proportion of recent growth can be apportioned to pirates jumping ship to become part of Creative Cloud.

“If you look at the macro level we used to sell approximately three million units of Creative Suite a year and if you look at the numbers right now of where we are with Creative Cloud, it’s clear that we have seen significant acceleration,” Narayen said.

“Without a doubt, a large part of that acceleration is people who want Creative Cloud and are no longer pirating Creative products, but are actually as a result of the low price and the value that we are delivering using the entire subscription-based offerings.”

Additionally, Adobe says it has taken other measures to clamp down on pirates, including action against people attempting to abuse trials and sites offering pirated copies.

“Once the trial expires [we’ve ensured] that they don’t have access to the products. And as you know, we have also shutdown places, online websites where people could buy a repackaged box,” Narayen said.

But while Adobe hasn’t been shy to detail its subscription revenues, the company has again refused to say how many subscriptions it has sold. This makes it difficult to compare, one for one, pirated instances of its software in use versus new subscriptions being taken up. During the call, Narayen offered no additional clarity.

“In terms of the installed base of pirates, I think the numbers for that are all over the map. But I think you can go back and look at the last numbers that we gave in terms of the addressable market and you would see that there is still significant headroom,” he said.

“Let’s get the markets that are most developed, let’s address casual pirates, let’s hit the enterprise and then let’s now expand that into emerging markets where there was more piracy and now we have the ability to counter that, both through pricing as well as through technology.”

Exactly one year ago, Adobe products occupied four of the top eight slots in The Pirate Bay’s most popular software download list, with Photoshop Creative Suite 6 taking the top position. In 2016, things haven’t changed that much.

adobe-tpb

As shown in the image above, Adobe products still share half of the top eight positions with Microsoft, but this time around Photoshop Creative Cloud has taken over at the top from CS6.

Not exactly the transition to the cloud Adobe had in mind of course, but maybe more pirates will subscribe properly next year.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

32 Security and Compliance Sessions Now Live in the re:Invent 2016 Session Catalog

Post Syndicated from Craig Liebendorfer original https://blogs.aws.amazon.com/security/post/Tx3UX2WK7G84E5J/32-Security-and-Compliance-Sessions-Now-Live-in-the-re-Invent-2016-Session-Catal

AWS re:Invent 2016 begins November 28, and now, the live session catalog includes 32 security and compliance sessions. 19 of these sessions are in the Security & Compliance track and 13 are in the re:Source Mini Con for Security Services. All 32 titles and abstracts are included below.

Security & Compliance Track sessions

As in past years, the sessions in the Security & Compliance track will take place in The Venetian | Palazzo in Las Vegas. Here’s what you have to look forward to!

SAC201 – Lessons from a Chief Security Officer: Achieving Continuous Compliance in Elastic Environments

Does meeting stringent compliance requirements keep you up at night? Do you worry about having the right audit trails in place as proof? 
 
Cengage Learning’s Chief Security Officer, Robert Hotaling, shares his organization’s journey to AWS, and how they enabled continuous compliance for their dynamic environment with automation. When Cengage shifted from publishing to digital education and online learning, they needed a secure elastic infrastructure for their data intensive and cyclical business, and workload layer security tools that would help them meet compliance requirements (e.g., PCI).
 
In this session, you will learn why building security in from the beginning saves you time (and painful retrofits) later, how to gather and retain audit evidence for instances that are only up for minutes or hours, and how Cengage used Trend Micro Deep Security to meet many compliance requirements and ensured instances were instantly protected as they came online in a hybrid cloud architecture. Session sponsored by Trend Micro, Inc.
  

SAC302 – Automating Security Event Response, from Idea to Code to Execution

With security-relevant services such as AWS Config, VPC Flow Logs, Amazon CloudWatch Events, and AWS Lambda, you now have the ability to programmatically wrangle security events that may occur within your AWS environment, including prevention, detection, response, and remediation. This session covers the process of automating security event response with various AWS building blocks, taking several ideas from drawing board to code, and gaining confidence in your coverage by proactively testing security monitoring and response effectiveness before anyone else does.
 
 

SAC303 – Become an AWS IAM Policy Ninja in 60 Minutes or Less

Are you interested in learning how to control access to your AWS resources? Have you ever wondered how to best scope down permissions to achieve least privilege permissions access control? If your answer to these questions is "yes," this session is for you. We take an in-depth look at the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policy language. We start with the basics of the policy language and how to create and attach policies to IAM users, groups, and roles. As we dive deeper, we explore policy variables, conditions, and other tools to help you author least privilege policies. Throughout the session, we cover some common use cases, such as granting a user secure access to an Amazon S3 bucket or to launch an Amazon EC2 instance of a specific type. 
 

SAC304 – Predictive Security: Using Big Data to Fortify Your Defenses

In a rapidly changing IT environment, detecting and responding to new threats is more important than ever. This session shows you how to build a predictive analytics stack on AWS, which harnesses the power of Amazon Machine Learning in conjunction with Amazon Elasticsearch Service, AWS CloudTrail, and VPC Flow Logs to perform tasks such as anomaly detection and log analysis. We also demonstrate how you can use AWS Lambda to act on this information in an automated fashion, such as performing updates to AWS WAF and security groups, leading to an improved security posture and alleviating operational burden on your security teams.
 

SAC305 – Auditing a Cloud Environment in 2016: What Tools Can Internal and External Auditors Leverage to Maintain Compliance?

With the rapid increase of complexity in managing security for distributed IT and cloud computing, security and compliance managers can innovate to ensure a high level of security when managing AWS resources. In this session, Chad Woolf, director of compliance for AWS, discusses which AWS service features to leverage to achieve a high level of security assurance over AWS resources, giving you more control of the security of your data and preparing you for a wide range of audits. You can now implement point-in-time audits and continuous monitoring in system architecture. Internal and external auditors can learn about emerging tools for monitoring environments in real time. Follow use case examples and demonstrations of services like Amazon Inspector, Amazon CloudWatch Logs, AWS CloudTrail, and AWS Config. Learn firsthand what some AWS customers have accomplished by leveraging AWS features to meet specific industry compliance requirements.
 

SAC306 – Encryption: It Was the Best of Controls, It Was the Worst of Controls

Encryption is a favorite of security and compliance professionals everywhere. Many compliance frameworks actually mandate encryption. Though encryption is important, it is also treacherous. Cryptographic protocols are subtle, and researchers are constantly finding new and creative flaws in them. Using encryption correctly, especially over time, also is expensive because you have to stay up to date.
 
AWS wants to encrypt data. And our customers, including Amazon, want to encrypt data. In this talk, we look at some of the challenges with using encryption, how AWS thinks internally about encryption, and how that thinking has informed the services we have built, the features we have vended, and our own usage of AWS.
 

SAC307 – The Psychology of Security Automation

Historically, relationships between developers and security teams have been challenging. Security teams sometimes see developers as careless and ignorant of risk, while developers might see security teams as dogmatic barriers to productivity. Can technologies and approaches such as the cloud, APIs, and automation lead to happier developers and more secure systems? Netflix has had success pursuing this approach, by leaning into the fundamental cloud concept of self-service, the Netflix cultural value of transparency in decision making, and the engineering efficiency principle of facilitating a “paved road.”
 
This session explores how security teams can use thoughtful tools and automation to improve relationships with development teams while creating a more secure and manageable environment. Topics include Netflix’s approach to IAM entity management, Elastic Load Balancing and certificate management, and general security configuration monitoring.
 

SAC308 – Hackproof Your Cloud: Responding to 2016 Threats

In this session, CloudCheckr CTO Aaron Newman highlights effective strategies and tools that AWS users can employ to improve their security posture. Specific emphasis is placed upon leveraging native AWS services. He covers how to include concrete steps that users can begin employing immediately.  Session sponsored by CloudCheckr.
 

SAC309 – You Can’t Protect What You Can’t See: AWS Security Monitoring & Compliance Validation from Adobe

Ensuring security and compliance across a globally distributed, large-scale AWS deployment requires a scalable process and a comprehensive set of technologies. In this session, Adobe will deep-dive into the AWS native monitoring and security services and some Splunk technologies leveraged globally to perform security monitoring across a large number of AWS accounts. You will learn about Adobe’s collection plumbing including components of S3, Kinesis, CloudWatch, SNS, Dynamo DB and Lambda, as well as the tooling and processes used at Adobe to deliver scalable monitoring without managing an unwieldy number of API keys and input stanzas.  Session sponsored by Splunk.
 

SAC310 – Securing Serverless Architectures, and API Filtering at Layer 7

AWS serverless architecture components such as Amazon S3, Amazon SQS, Amazon SNS, CloudWatch Logs, DynamoDB, Amazon Kinesis, and Lambda can be tightly constrained in their operation. However, it may still be possible to use some of them to propagate payloads that could be used to exploit vulnerabilities in some consuming endpoints or user-generated code. This session explores techniques for enhancing the security of these services, from assessing and tightening permissions in IAM to integrating tools and mechanisms for inline and out-of-band payload analysis that are more typically applied to traditional server-based architectures.
 

SAC311 – Evolving an Enterprise-level Compliance Framework with Amazon CloudWatch Events and AWS Lambda

Johnson & Johnson is in the process of doing a proof of concept to rewrite the compliance framework that they presented at re:Invent 2014. This framework leverages the newest AWS services and abandons the need for continual describes and master rules servers. Instead, Johnson & Johnson plans to use a distributed, event-based architecture that not only reduces costs but also assigns costs to the appropriate projects rather than central IT.
 

SAC312 – Architecting for End-to-End Security in the Enterprise

This session tells how our most mature, security-minded Fortune 500 customers adopt AWS while improving end-to-end protection of their sensitive data. Learn about the enterprise security architecture decisions made during actual sensitive workload deployments as told by the AWS professional services and the solution architecture team members who lived them. In this very prescriptive, technical walkthrough, we share lessons learned from the development of enterprise security strategy, security use-case development, security configuration decisions, and the creation of AWS security operations playbooks to support customer architectures.
 

SAC313 – Enterprise Patterns for Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS)

Professional services has completed five deep PCI engagements with enterprise customers over the last year. Common patterns were identified and codified in various artifacts. This session introduces the patterns that help customers address PCI requirements in a standard manner that also meets AWS best practices. Hear customers speak about their side of the journey and the solutions that they used to deploy a PCI compliance workload.
 

SAC314 – GxP Compliance in the Cloud

GxP is an acronym that refers to the regulations and guidelines applicable to life sciences organizations that make food and medical products such as drugs, medical devices, and medical software applications. The overall intent of GxP requirements is to ensure that food and medical products are safe for consumers and to ensure the integrity of data used to make product-related safety decisions.
 
The term GxP encompasses a broad range of compliance-related activities such as Good Laboratory Practices (GLP), Good Clinical Practices (GCP), Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), and others, each of which has product-specific requirements that life sciences organizations must implement based on the 1) type of products they make and 2) country in which their products are sold. When life sciences organizations use computerized systems to perform certain GxP activities, they must ensure that the computerized GxP system is developed, validated, and operated appropriately for the intended use of the system.
 
For this session, co-presented with Merck, services such as Amazon EC2, Amazon CloudWatch Logs, AWS CloudTrail, AWS CodeCommit, Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), and AWS CodePipeline will be discussed with an emphasis on implementing GxP-compliant systems in the AWS Cloud.
 

SAC315 – Scaling Security Operations: Using AWS Services to Automate Governance of Security Controls and Remediate Violations

This session enables security operators to use data provided by AWS services such as AWS CloudTrail, AWS Config, Amazon CloudWatch Events, and VPC Flow Fogs to reduce vulnerabilities, and when required, execute timely security actions that fix the violation or gather more information about the vulnerability and attacker. We look at security practices for compliance with PCI, CIS Security Controls,and HIPAA. We dive deep into an example from an AWS customer, Siemens AG, which has automated governance and implemented automated remediation using CloudTrail, AWS Config Rules, and AWS Lambda. A prerequisite for this session is knowledge of software development with Java, Python, or Node.
 

SAC316 – Security Automation: Spend Less Time Securing Your Applications

As attackers become more sophisticated, web application developers need to constantly update their security configurations. Static firewall rules are no longer good enough. Developers need a way to deploy automated security that can learn from the application behavior and identify bad traffic patterns to detect bad bots or bad actors on the Internet. This session showcases some of the real-world customer use cases that use machine learning and AWS WAF (a web application firewall) to automatically identify bad actors affecting multiplayer gaming applications. We also present tutorials and code samples that show how customers can analyze traffic patterns and deploy new AWS WAF rules on the fly.
 

SAC317 – IAM Best Practices to Live By

This session covers AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) best practices that can help improve your security posture. We cover how to manage users and their security credentials. We also explain why you should delete your root access keys—or at the very least, rotate them regularly. Using common use cases, we demonstrate when to choose between using IAM users and IAM roles. Finally, we explore how to set permissions to grant least privilege access control in one or more of your AWS accounts.
 

SAC318 – Life Without SSH: Immutable Infrastructure in Production

This session covers what a real-world production deployment of a fully automated deployment pipeline looks like with instances that are deployed without SSH keys. By leveraging AWS CodeDeploy and Docker, we will show how we achieved semi-immutable and fully immutable infrastructures, and what the challenges and remediations were.
 

SAC401 – 5 Security Automation Improvements You Can Make by Using Amazon CloudWatch Events and AWS Config Rules

This session demonstrates 5 different security and compliance validation actions that you can perform using Amazon CloudWatch Events and AWS Config rules. This session focuses on the actual code for the various controls, actions, and remediation features, and how to use various AWS services and features to build them. The demos in this session include CIS Amazon Web Services Foundations validation; host-based AWS Config rules validation using AWS Lambda, SSH, and VPC-E; automatic creation and assigning of MFA tokens when new users are created; and automatic instance isolation based on SSH logons or VPC Flow Logs deny logs. This session focuses on code and live demos.
 
 
 

re:Source Mini Con for Security Services sessions

The re:Source Mini Con for Security Services offers you an opportunity to dive even deeper into security and compliance topics. Think of it as a one-day, fully immersive mini-conference. The Mini Con will take place in The Mirage in Las Vegas.

SEC301 – Audit Your AWS Account Against Industry Best Practices: The CIS AWS Benchmarks

Audit teams can consistently evaluate the security of an AWS account. Best practices greatly reduce complexity when managing risk and auditing the use of AWS for critical, audited, and regulated systems. You can integrate these security checks into your security and audit ecosystem. Center for Internet Security (CIS) benchmarks are incorporated into products developed by 20 security vendors, are referenced by PCI 3.1 and FedRAMP, and are included in the National Vulnerability Database (NVD) National Checklist Program (NCP). This session shows you how to implement foundational security measures in your AWS account. The prescribed best practices help make implementation of core AWS security measures more straightforward for security teams and AWS account owners.
 

SEC302 – WORKSHOP: Working with AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) Policies and Configuring Network Security Using VPCs and Security Groups

In this 2.5-hour workshop, we will show you how to manage permissions by drafting AWS IAM policies that adhere to the principle of least privilege–granting the least permissions required to achieve a task. You will learn all the ins and outs of drafting and applying IAM policies appropriately to help secure your AWS resources.
 
In addition, we will show you how to configure network security using VPCs and security groups. 
 

SEC303 – Get the Most from AWS KMS: Architecting Applications for High Security

AWS Key Management Service provides an easy and cost-effective way to secure your data in AWS. In this session, you learn about leveraging the latest features of the service to minimize risk for your data. We also review the recently released Import Key feature that gives you more control over the encryption process by letting you bring your own keys to AWS.
 

SEC304 – Reduce Your Blast Radius by Using Multiple AWS Accounts Per Region and Service

This session shows you how to reduce your blast radius by using multiple AWS accounts per region and service, which helps limit the impact of a critical event such as a security breach. Using multiple accounts helps you define boundaries and provides blast-radius isolation.
 

SEC305 – Scaling Security Resources for Your First 10 Million Customers

Cloud computing offers many advantages, such as the ability to scale your web applications or website on demand. But how do you scale your security and compliance infrastructure along with the business? Join this session to understand best practices for scaling your security resources as you grow from zero to millions of users. Specifically, you learn the following:
  • How to scale your security and compliance infrastructure to keep up with a rapidly expanding threat base.
  • The security implications of scaling for numbers of users and numbers of applications, and how to satisfy both needs.
  • How agile development with integrated security testing and validation leads to a secure environment.
  • Best practices and design patterns of a continuous delivery pipeline and the appropriate security-focused testing for each.
  • The necessity of treating your security as code, just as you would do with infrastructure.
The services covered in this session include AWS IAM, Auto Scaling, Amazon Inspector, AWS WAF, and Amazon Cognito.
 

SEC306 – WORKSHOP: How to Implement a General Solution for Federated API/CLI Access Using SAML 2.0

AWS supports identity federation using SAML (Security Assertion Markup Language) 2.0. Using SAML, you can configure your AWS accounts to integrate with your identity provider (IdP). Once configured, your federated users are authenticated and authorized by your organization’s IdP, and then can use single sign-on (SSO) to sign in to the AWS Management Console. This not only obviates the need for your users to remember yet another user name and password, but it also streamlines identity management for your administrators. This is great if your federated users want to access the AWS Management Console, but what if they want to use the AWS CLI or programmatically call AWS APIs?
 
In this 2.5-hour workshop, we will show you how you can implement federated API and CLI access for your users. The examples provided use the AWS Python SDK and some additional client-side integration code. If you have federated users that require this type of access, implementing this solution should earn you more than one high five on your next trip to the water cooler. 
 

SEC307 – Microservices, Macro Security Needs: How Nike Uses a Multi-Layer, End-to-End Security Approach to Protect Microservice-Based Solutions at Scale

Microservice architectures provide numerous benefits but also have significant security challenges. This session presents how Nike uses layers of security to protect consumers and business. We show how network topology, network security primitives, identity and access management, traffic routing, secure network traffic, secrets management, and host-level security (antivirus, intrusion prevention system, intrusion detection system, file integrity monitoring) all combine to create a multilayer, end-to-end security solution for our microservice-based premium consumer experiences. Technologies to be covered include Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, access control lists, security groups, IAM roles and profiles, AWS KMS, NAT gateways, ELB load balancers, and Cerberus (our cloud-native secrets management solution).
 

SEC308 – Securing Enterprise Big Data Workloads on AWS

Security of big data workloads in a hybrid IT environment often comes as an afterthought. This session discusses how enterprises can architect securing big data workloads on AWS. We cover the application of authentication, authorization, encryption, and additional security principles and mechanisms to workloads leveraging Amazon Elastic MapReduce and Amazon Redshift.
 

SEC309 – Proactive Security Testing in AWS: From Early Implementation to Deployment Security Testing

Attend this session to learn about security testing your applications in AWS. Effective security testing is challenging, but multiple features and services within AWS make security testing easier. This session covers common approaches to testing, including how we think about testing within AWS, how to apply AWS services to your test setup, remediating findings, and automation.
 

SEC310 – Mitigating DDoS Attacks on AWS: Five Vectors and Four Use Cases

Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack mitigation has traditionally been a challenge for those hosting on fixed infrastructure. In the cloud, users can build applications on elastic infrastructure that is capable of mitigating and absorbing DDoS attacks. What once required overprovisioning, additional infrastructure, or third-party services is now an inherent capability of many cloud-based applications. This session explains common DDoS attack vectors and how AWS customers with different use cases are addressing these challenges. As part of the session, we show you how to build applications that are resilient to DDoS and demonstrate how they work in practice.
 

SEC311 – How to Automate Policy Validation

Managing permissions across a growing number of identities and resources can be time consuming and complex. Testing, validating, and understanding permissions before and after policy changes are deployed is critical to ensuring that your users and systems have the appropriate level of access. This session walks through the tools that are available to test, validate, and understand the permissions in your account. We demonstrate how to use these tools and how to automate them to continually validate the permissions in your accounts. The tools demonstrated in this session help you answer common questions such as:
  • How does a policy change affect the overall permissions for a user, group, or role?
  • Who has access to perform powerful actions?
  • Which services can this role access?
  • Can a user access a specific Amazon S3 bucket?

SEC312 – State of the Union for re:Source Mini Con for Security Services

AWS CISO Steve Schmidt presents the state of the union for re:Source Mini Con for Security Services. He addresses the state of the security and compliance ecosystem; large enterprise customer additions in key industries; the vertical view: maturing spaces for AWS security assurance (GxP, IoT, CIS foundations); and the international view: data privacy protections and data sovereignty. The state of the union also addresses a number of new identity, directory, and access services, and closes by looking at what’s on the horizon.
 

SEC401 – Automated Formal Reasoning About AWS Systems

Automatic and semiautomatic mechanical theorem provers are now being used within AWS to find proofs in mathematical logic that establish desired properties of key AWS components. In this session, we outline these efforts and discuss how mechanical theorem provers are used to replay found proofs of desired properties when software artifacts or networks are modified, thus helping provide security throughout the lifetime of the AWS system. We consider these use cases:
  • Using constraint solving to show that VPCs have desired safety properties, and maintaining this continuously at each change to the VPC.
  • Using automatic mechanical theorem provers to prove that s2n’s HMAC is correct and maintaining this continuously at each change to the s2n source code.
  • Using semiautomatic mechanical theorem provers to prove desired safety properties of Sassy protocol.
 
– Craig

Copyright Is Not an Inevitable or Divine Right, Court Rules

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/copyright-is-not-an-inevitable-or-divine-right-court-rules-160919/

copyright-bloodIn many countries it’s common for universities to print course packs, consisting of chapters of various educational books. This allows professors to use a tailored selection of literature they deem relevant for the course in question.

However, not all publishers like this practice. They often demand license fees if the number of copied pages exceeds a certain limit. This is also the nature of a long-running copyright case in India.

Rameshwari Photocopy Services, a small copyshop licensed by Delhi University, was sued by several large publishers including Oxford University Press and Cambridge University Press, because it failed to pay compensation for copied work.

The case was filed in 2012 and late last week the Delhi High Court issued its verdict, which had been highly anticipated by both academics and copyright lawyers.

The outcome, detailed in a 94-page decision (pdf), is a clear win for the copyshop. The Court held that copying parts of books is permitted, as long as it’s for educational use.

In his decision the Chief Justice recalls that during his study, copying was already very common. While suitable copying machines were not available then, students copied books manually, page for page.

The fact that the copyshop now saves students time and effort doesn’t mean that it should suddenly become an offense under Indian copyright law. Students are still copying parts of books, just not by hand.

“When the effect of the action is the same, the difference in the mode of action cannot make a difference so as to make one an offence,” the verdict reads.

In addition, the High Court clarifies that copyright is not an inevitable or divine right, which allows creators to maintain strict and total control over their works.

In the case of education, in particular, it is fair dealing when educators and students copy work to advance knowledge. Making partial copies of books that are available in the university library, certainly fits this description.

“Copyright, specially in literary works, is thus not an inevitable, divine, or natural right that confers on authors the absolute ownership of their creations,” the verdict reads.

“It is designed rather to stimulate activity and progress in the arts for the intellectual enrichment of the public. Copyright is intended to increase and not to impede the harvest of knowledge,” it adds.

The landmark ruling is being welcomed by students and academic scholars, who can now freely copy texts without having to worry about breaking the law.

“The judgment has immense consequences beyond India and is a bold articulation of the principles of equitable access to knowledge — and one that deserves to be emulated globally.” writes Lawrence Liang, law professor at Ambedkar University, currently teaching at Yale.

“Aggressively pushed by the copyright lobby, such as Hollywood, the music industry and the publishing cartels, copyright law had effectively been hijacked by narrow commercial interests,” he adds.

The publishers, however, responded with disappointment and fear that the verdict will limit the availability of educational content in India.

“It is unfortunate that the court’s decision today could undermine the availability of original content for the benefit of students and teachers,” they said.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Top 10 Most Pirated Movies of The Week – 09/19/16

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/top-10-pirated-movies-week-091916/

capt1This week we have three newcomers in our chart.

Captain America: Civil War: Out of the Shadows is the most downloaded movie for the second week in a row.

The data for our weekly download chart is estimated by TorrentFreak, and is for informational and educational reference only. All the movies in the list are Web-DL/Webrip/HDRip/BDrip/DVDrip unless stated otherwise.

RSS feed for the weekly movie download chart.

Ranking (last week) Movie IMDb Rating / Trailer
torrentfreak.com
1 (1) Captain America: Civil War 8.1 / trailer
2 (3) X-Men: Apocalypse 6=7.8=3 / trailer
3 (…) Alice Through The Looking Glass 6.4 / trailer
4 (4) Now You See Me 2 6.8 / trailer
5 (2) Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows 6.2 / trailer
6 (6) The Shallows 6.6 / trailer
7 (…) Sully (HDTS) 8.0 / trailer
8 (7) Jason Bourne (HDTC/Subbed HDRip) 7.4 / trailer
9 (8) Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates 6.4 / trailer
10 (…) 31 5.8 / trailer

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Beyond the bookcase

Post Syndicated from Matt Richardson original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/beyond-the-bookcase/

This column is from The MagPi issue 49. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

Seattle Central Library (photo by Bobak Ha'Eri)

Seattle Central Library (photo by Bobak Ha’Eri)

Before I became a part of the maker movement, my impression of a library was mostly formed by my childhood experiences there. Both my school and local public library were places for books, magazines, newspapers, and research. In short, it was a place for quiet reading. Libraries today look and sound a lot different than I remember. Many now include makerspaces, tools for connected learning, and spaces for community gathering.

But if you take a closer look at what these institutions set out to accomplish in the first place, then the reason they’ve transformed becomes clear. Take, for instance, the mission of the Seattle Public Library, which is to “[bring] people, information, and ideas together to enrich lives and build community.” The mission of the library isn’t directly related to reading, even though reading can be a big part of achieving that mission.

A few years ago, I had the opportunity to visit the central branch of the Seattle Public Library. The fifth floor is called ‘The Mixing Chamber’ and is a designated location where people, information, and ideas can come together. Of course, there’s plenty of material to read at the main branch of the Seattle Public Library, but this building in particular makes it very clear that they’re about more than just reading.

As another indication of this, we see a lot of interest in Raspberry Pi from librarians. A group of us recently visited the annual conference of the American Library Association in Orlando, and the reaction to our presence there was incredibly positive. Not only have many librarians heard of Raspberry Pi, but they also use it in so many ways.

Of course, library makerspaces use Raspberry Pi just like any other makerspace would: as a platform for DIY projects. There are even many libraries that create Raspberry Pi checkout kits so that their patrons can experiment with Raspberry Pi in their own time, either in the library or at home.

And just as Raspberry Pi is used in the classroom to learn about computing, it’s also being used in the library for the very same reason. We’ve had many librarians come to our Picademy educator professional development programme to learn about teaching people with digital making and computing. These librarians have gone on to share their knowledge and our learning resources with their patrons. Librarians especially love that our content, including The MagPi, is available online entirely for free, and is Creative Commons licensed.

Multitasking

What I particularly like about the librarians I’ve encountered is that they don’t just put Raspberry Pi in the hands of their patrons, but they use our computers as a tool for their own work. For instance, I recently met Richard Loomis from the Somerset County Library System in New Jersey. He uses Raspberry Pis for networked digital signage across a few different branches. And John Jakobsen from the Palos Verdes Library District recently shared how he set up Raspberry Pis as terminals for their public access catalogue, replacing old and expensive computers. So librarians don’t just talk the talk: they also walk the walk.

I’m optimistic that libraries will continue to thrive as technology changes. At the Raspberry Pi Foundation, we’re delighted to see that libraries all over the world use our computers for digital making, education, and utility. Our organisation’s connection with libraries will always be rich and meaningful, not only because of the way they use Raspberry Pi, but because we have something critical in common with them: we deeply value accessibility and community.

The post Beyond the bookcase appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

AWS Webinars – September 2016

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-webinars-september-2016/

At the beginning of the month I blogged about the value of continuing education and shared an infographic that ilustrated the link between continued education and increased pay, higher effectiveness, and decreased proclivity to seek other employment. The pace of AWS innovation means that there’s always something new to learn. One way to do this is to attend some of our webinars. We design these webinars with a focus on training and education, and strongly believe that you can walk away from them ready, willing, and able to use a new AWS service or to try a new aspect of an existing one.

To that end, we have another great selection of webinars on the schedule for September. As always they are free, but they do fill up and I strongly suggest that you register ahead of time. All times are PT, and each webinar runs for one hour:

September 20

September 21

September 22

September 26

September 27

September 28

September 29


Jeff;

 

PS – Check out the AWS Webinar Archive for more great content!

 

Picademy Expands in the United States

Post Syndicated from Matt Richardson original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/picademy-expands-in-the-united-states/

By all accounts, the pilot expansion of Picademy to the United States has been a huge success. In fact, we’ve already held three workshops and inducted 120 new Raspberry Pi Certified Educators on U.S. soil. So far we’ve had two workshops in Mountain View, CA and one in Baltimore, MD.

28885300572_acb19e2777_o

In December, we’ll wrap up our 2016 program with a workshop at the Texas Advanced Computing Center at the University of Texas in Austin. If you’re an educator and you’d like to join us for two days of mind-blowing professional development, please apply now.

And it gets even better. To build on the success of the pilot program, we are excited to announce that we will expand Picademy in the United States to over 300 educators and additional cities in 2017. In fact, we’re making this announcement as a commitment to President Obama to join the Computer Science For All initiative, a call to action to expand CS education in K-12 classrooms in the United States. And today, the White House hosts a summit to mark progress on the initiative:

The case for giving all students access to CS is straightforward. Nine in ten parents want CS taught at their child’s school and yet, by some estimates, only a quarter of K-12 schools offer a CS course with programming included. However, the need for such skills across industries continues to rapidly grow, with 51 percent of all science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) jobs projected to be in CS-related field by 2018.

If you’re a professional educator, we want you to join us at a Picademy workshop. We haven’t yet selected the cities for 2017’s program, but please fill out this form to receive an update when we announce new cities and when applications open.

The post Picademy Expands in the United States appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Top 10 Most Pirated Movies of The Week – 09/12/16

Post Syndicated from Ernesto original https://torrentfreak.com/top-10-pirated-movies-week-091216/

capt1This week we have three newcomers in our chart.

Captain America: Civil War: Out of the Shadows is the most downloaded movie.

The data for our weekly download chart is estimated by TorrentFreak, and is for informational and educational reference only. All the movies in the list are Web-DL/Webrip/HDRip/BDrip/DVDrip unless stated otherwise.

RSS feed for the weekly movie download chart.

Ranking (last week) Movie IMDb Rating / Trailer
torrentfreak.com
1 (4) Captain America: Civil War 8.1 / trailer
2 (1) Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows 6.2 / trailer
3 (…) X-Men: Apocalypse 6=7.8=3 / trailer
4 (2) Now You See Me 2 6.8 / trailer
5 (5) The Secret Life of Pets 6.8 / trailer
6 (…) The Shallows 6.6 / trailer
8 (3) Jason Bourne (HDTC/Subbed HDRip) 7.4 / trailer
8 (…) Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates 6.4 / trailer
9 (6) Independence Day: Resurgence (Subbed HDRip) 5.6 / trailer
10 (8) The Conjuring 2 7.8 / trailer

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Copyright Trolls Claim Student Pirates Could Lose Scholarships, Face Deportation

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/copyright-trolls-claim-student-pirates-lose-scholarships-face-deportation-160910/

trollAt the turn of the century when file-sharing was in its infancy, some of the earliest adopters of P2P technology were those in the student population.

Freely available Internet access for those in educational establishments meant unprecedented numbers of young people going online, and with that a large upswing in unauthorized downloading.

The RIAA was one of the first groups to take a stand, suing thousands of students across the United States in an effort to send a message that free music may very well come at a cost. Later, changes in legislation meant that schools and universities across the country could lose funding if they didn’t keep piracy under control.

Of course, students continue to download to this day and each time they do they risk receiving a warning letter or worse, as students in Canada are finding out.

According to the copyright office at the University of Manitoba, mainly US-based rightsholders are writing on a regular basis to students demanding cash settlements for alleged infringement.

Noting that the university forwards copyright infringement notices to students as they’re required to under the country’s ‘notice and notice‘ regime, the copyright office says some of the letters are “tantamount to extortion.”

In a piece published in official student newspaper The Manitoban, copyright office strategy manager Joel Guenette says that while many of the 8,000 notices received are legitimate (HBO is said to have sent many warnings in connection with Game of Thrones downloads), others sink to reprehensible lows.

In addition to cautioning over the potential for multi-million dollar lawsuits, some notice senders are stepping up their threats to suggest that students could lose their scholarships if fines aren’t paid. For visiting students, things become even more scary.

According to the university’s copyright office, some porn producers have told foreign students that they could face deportation if an immediate cash settlement of hundreds of dollars is not forthcoming.

“None of these are real consequences that could ever happen in the Canadian scheme of things, but we hear from students all the time – especially international students – who are really freaked out by this,” Guenette says.

While being scared is understandable in such situations, Guenette’s department is keen to educate students on what these notices really mean. Particularly, they’re keen to stress that notice senders have no idea who notices have been delivered to, so students shouldn’t believe that copyright holders already know who they are.

Day to day, there’s nothing in current law that compels the University to hand over their identities but students can still compromise themselves by negotiating directly with notice senders, so that isn’t advised.

“We can’t tell students ‘ignore these notices’ and we can’t tell students ‘never pay a claim’ but, personally, I want students to know what these are and I want them to know that most of these settlement claims are extortion,” Guenette says.

“When I’m talking to students directly, without giving them legal advice, I would say ‘if I were you, I would never pay this.’ In my opinion, I don’t think any student on campus should be paying this.”

The University of Manitoba certainly isn’t on its own as other educational establishments are reporting similar problems. According to a separate report, the University of Calgary also finds itself in a similar position.

The university says that it’s been receiving similar copyright notices since January 2015 and now wants to crackdown on unlawful file-sharing across campus. A meeting took place in August to discuss how the university intends to deal with unauthorized downloading but the problem isn’t straightforward.

“We can certainly track an IP address, but the difficulty is that the owner of that device is not necessarily the downloader of content. Someone can use someone else’s computer without that person’s knowledge,” says provost and vice-president Dru Marshall.

Complications aside, it’s likely that if the flood of notices to universities continue, they could be forced to take more robust action. How that will manifest itself is yet to be seen, but it’s unlikely that copyright trolls will benefit, despite being the main cause of the problem.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Month in Review: August 2016

Post Syndicated from Andy Werth original https://blogs.aws.amazon.com/bigdata/post/Tx3MEYSAQDQKHB4/Month-in-Review-August-2016

Another month of big data solutions on the Big Data Blog. Take a look at our summaries below and learn, comment, and share. Thanks for reading!

Readmission Prediction Through Patient Risk Stratification Using Amazon Machine Learning
With this post, learn how to apply advanced analytics concepts like pattern analysis and machine learning to do risk stratification for patient cohorts.

Building and Deploying Custom Applications with Apache Bigtop and Amazon EMR
When you launch a cluster, Amazon EMR lets you choose applications that will run on your cluster. But what if you want to deploy your own custom application? This post shows you how to build a custom application for EMR for Apache Bigtop-based releases 4.x and greater.

Writing SQL on Streaming Data with Amazon Kinesis Analytics – Part 1
This post introduces you to Amazon Kinesis Analytics, the fundamentals of writing ANSI-Standard SQL over streaming data, and works through a simple example application that continuously generates metrics over time windows.

Monitor Your Application for Processing DynamoDB Streams
Learn how to monitor the Amazon Kinesis Client Library (KCL) application you use to process DynamoDB Streams to quickly track and resolve issues or failures so you can avoid losing data. Dashboards, metrics, and application logs all play a part. This post may be most relevant to Java applications running on Amazon EC2 instances.

Data Lake Ingestion: Automatically Partition Hive External Tables with AWS
This post introduces a simple data ingestion and preparation framework based on AWS Lambda, Amazon DynamoDB, and Apache Hive on EMR for data from different sources landing in S3. This solution lets Hive pick up new partitions as data is loaded into S3 because Hive by itself cannot detect new partitions as data lands.

FROM THE ARCHIVE

Powering Gaming Applications with Amazon DynamoDB (July 2014)
Learn how to quickly build a reliable and scalable database tier for a mobile game. We’ll walk through a design example and show how to power a sizable game for less than the cost of a daily cup of coffee. We’ll also profile a fast-growing customer who has scaled to millions of players while saving time and money with Amazon DynamoDB.

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Want to learn more about Big Data or Streaming Data? Check out our Big Data and Streaming data educational pages.

Leave a comment below to let us know what big data topics you’d like to see next on the AWS Big Data Blog.

Desktop Sense HAT emulator

Post Syndicated from David Honess original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/desktop-sense-hat-emulator/

If this post gives you a sense of déjà-vu it’s because, last month, we announced a web-based Sense HAT emulator in partnership with US-based startup Trinket.

Today, we’re announcing another Sense HAT emulator designed to run natively on your Raspberry Pi desktop, instead of inside a browser. Developed by Dave Jones, it’s intended for people who own a Raspberry Pi but not a Sense HAT. In the picture below, the sliders are used to change the values reported by the sensors while your code is running.

sense-emu

So, why do we need two versions?

  • For offline use, possibly the most common way Raspberry Pis are used in the classroom.
  • To accommodate the oldest 256 MB models of Raspberry Pi which cannot run the web version.
  • To allow you to integrate your Sense HAT program with any available Python modules, or other Raspberry Pi features such as the Camera Module.

The emulator will come pre-installed in the next Raspbian release but, for now, you can just install it by typing the commands below into a terminal window:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install python-sense-emu python3-sense-emu python-sense-emu-doc sense-emu-tools -y

You can then access it from the Desktop menu, under Programming.

The emulator closely simulates the Sense HAT hardware being attached to your Pi. You can read from the sensors or write to the LED matrix using multiple Python processes, for example.

sense-idle

Write your code in IDLE as before; there are also a number of examples that can be opened from the emulator’s built-in menu. If you then want to port your code to a physical Sense HAT, you just need to change

sense_emu

to

sense_hat

at the top of your program. Reverse this if you’re porting a physical Sense HAT program to the emulator, perhaps from one of our educational resources; this step isn’t required in the web version of the emulator.

sense-emu-prefs

There are a number of preferences that you can adjust to change the behaviour of the emulator, most notably sensor simulation, otherwise known as jitter. This costs some CPU time, and is disabled by default on the low-end Raspberry Pis, but it provides a realistic experience of how the hardware sensors would behave. You’ll see that the values being returned in your code drift according to the known error tolerances of the physical sensors used on the Sense HAT.

This emulator will allow more Raspberry Pi users to participate in future Astro Pi competitions without having to buy a Sense HAT: ideal for the classroom where 15 Sense HATs may be beyond the budget.

So, where do you start? If you’re new to the Sense HAT, you can just copy and paste many of the code examples from our educational resources, like this one. You can also check out our e-book Sense HAT Essentials. For a complete list of all the functions you can use, have a look at the Sense HAT API reference here.

You can even install this emulator on other types of Linux desktop, such as Ubuntu! For more information on how to do this, please visit the emulator documentation pages here.

The post Desktop Sense HAT emulator appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Ten millionth Raspberry Pi, and a new kit

Post Syndicated from Eben Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/ten-millionth-raspberry-pi-new-kit/

When we started Raspberry Pi, we had a simple goal: to increase the number of people applying to study Computer Science at Cambridge. By putting cheap, programmable computers in the hands of the right young people, we hoped that we might revive some of the sense of excitement about computing that we had back in the 1980s with our Sinclair Spectrums, BBC Micros and Commodore 64s.

At the time, we thought our lifetime volumes might amount to ten thousand units – if we were lucky. There was was no expectation that adults would use Raspberry Pi, no expectation of commercial success, and certainly no expectation that four years later we would be manufacturing tens of thousands of units a day in the UK, and exporting Raspberry Pi all over the world.

Less than ten million Raspberry Pis

The first two thousand Raspberry Pis. Each Pi in this pallet now has 5000 siblings.

With this in mind, you can imagine how strange it feels to be able to announce that over the last four and a half years we’ve sold a grand total of ten million Raspberry Pis. Thanks to you, we’ve beaten our wildest dreams by three orders of magnitude, and we’re only just getting started. Every time you buy a Raspberry Pi, you help fund both our ongoing engineering work, and our educational outreach programs, including Code Club and Picademy.

Very early on, we decided that we would offer the bare-bones Raspberry Pi board without accessories: that way, cost-conscious customers get the lowest possible price, provided they can beg or borrow USB peripherals, a power supply and an SD card. Over the years, Raspberry Pi distributors have built on this, producing some fantastic bundles for people who would rather get everything they need from a single source.

To celebrate the ten millionth Raspberry Pi, for the first time we’ve put together our own idea of what the perfect bundle would look like, creating the official Raspberry Pi Starter Kit.

The starter kit, unboxed and ready to go

The starter kit, unboxed and ready to go

Inside the minimalist white box (like the official case, another beautiful Kinneir Dufort design), you’ll find:

  • A Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
  • An 8GB NOOBS SD card
  • An official case
  • An official 2.5A multi-region power supply
  • An official 1m HDMI cable
  • An optical mouse and a keyboard with high-quality scissor-switch action
  • A copy of Adventures in Raspberry Pi Foundation Edition

This is an unashamedly premium product: the latest Raspberry Pi, official accessories, the best USB peripherals we could find, and a copy of the highest-rated Raspberry Pi book. The kit is available to order online in the UK from our partners element14 and RS Components, priced at £99+VAT, and will be coming to the rest of the world, and to your favourite reseller, over the next few weeks.

The post Ten millionth Raspberry Pi, and a new kit appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Anti-Piracy Groups Petition Clinton & Trump for Tough Copyright Laws

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/anti-piracy-groups-petition-clinton-trump-for-tough-copyright-laws-160907/

trump-clintonAs the presidential election moves towards the home straight, millions of individuals and businesses in the United States are considering how the outcome might affect them.

Unsurprisingly, powerful groups in the entertainment industry are also weighing the implications and with billions at stake, who could blame them.

Of course, just like the rest of the population, neither Hollywood nor the major recording labels have a crystal ball, so in recent months their public lobbying efforts have been mindful of the possibility that either Clinton or Trump could get into power.

This week that trend continued, with the publication of a new open letter and the launch of a petition by two influential anti-piracy groups, the Copyright Alliance and CreativeFuture.

The Copyright Alliance is a true powerhouse which counts the MPAA, RIAA, Viacom, Oracle, Getty Images and many other corporations among its members. CreativeFuture is a huge coalition of some 450 companies in the film, television, music, and book publishing sectors.

In their letter addressed to “2016 Political Candidates”, the groups describe themselves as members of the creative community, who despite political differences are united in their goal of reducing piracy.

“While our political views are diverse, as creators, there are core principles on which we can all agree. And we appreciate the opportunity to share our views with our country’s current and future leaders,” the groups write.

What immediately becomes apparent in the letter are the glowing references to the Internet. With lessons learned from the SOPA debacle which was perceived by many as an attack on the world’s most important network, Copyright Alliance and CreativeFuture begin by cheerfully praising its positives.

“We embrace the internet as a powerful democratizing force for our world and for creative industries. We recognize its ability to inspire positive change and improve lives,” they write.

“In our creative industries, the internet has helped to advance creativity by removing barriers to entry for newcomers, fostering a dialogue with fans, audiences, and consumers, and providing numerous additional ways to reach them. The internet holds great potential to expand creativity and free expression.”

While one might have strongly expected a ‘but’ at this juncture, the groups are careful not to set up a clash of ideals. It’s not difficult to see that their aim is to quietly assure that the successful protection of copyrighted content does not have to come at the expense of the Internet.

“We embrace a strong copyright system that rewards creativity and promotes a healthy creative economy. The incredible cultural and economic value that the internet delivers to billions of users is based in very large part on the efforts of creative content makers whose livelihoods depend on being compensated for their efforts,” they add.

“Copyright should protect creators from those who would use the internet to undermine creativity. The internet can be a great tool for creators just as it can be a tool for science, education, health care, and many other disciplines. However, when misused, it can harm creativity and stifle freedom of expression.”

And if anyone missed the hints that Copyright Alliance and CreativeFuture are supporters of both creative content and the interests of the Internet, the groups quickly take the opportunity to underline that again. However, one gets the impression that their definition of online freedom might not be the same as that championed by Internet activists.

“Our current and future leaders recognize that a safe and secure internet benefits us all. And all parties recognize the importance of strong copyright protections in their technology policy platforms because protecting copyright and internet freedom are both critically important and complementary — they are not mutually exclusive,” they write.

“A truly free internet, like any truly free community, is one where people respect the rights of others and can engage in legitimate activities safely — and where those who do not are held accountable under law by their peers.”

Interestingly, the letter also warns 2016’s political candidates against “organizations and advocates” funded by “online platforms” that claim to be “pro-creators and pro-audience to mask their own self-serving agenda.”

These groups are not mentioned by name but the likes of EFF and Fight for the Future have been spoken of in similar terms and have appeared in negative articles published by the Copyright Alliance earlier this year.

“[The nameless groups] denigrate or block effective efforts to preserve and promote creative content, including enforcement of existing laws and voluntary industry initiatives,” Copyright Alliance and CreativeFuture warn, adding:

“The creative community is rightfully wary of any company or organization that claims to be ‘against piracy’ when their actions do not match their words.”

And of course, even if not mentioned by name, no appeal would be complete without a subtle reference to Google and/or YouTube. Trump and Clinton are left to fill in the gaps and asked to do the right thing.

“Internet platforms are making massive profits from creative contributions to the internet’s growth. It is not too much to ask that content creators should be able to share in the value they provide,” the groups write.

With the election likely to go to the wire, Copyright Alliance and CreativeFuture are keen to ensure that anti-piracy measures are seen as a universal concern, no matter where people reside on the political spectrum.

“There is no ‘left’ or ‘right’ when it comes to respecting copyright. The creative community stands united in support of a copyright system that will continue to make the United States the global leader in the creative arts and the global paradigm for free expression,” they note.

“Our copyright system is not perfect but, like democracy, it is better than the alternatives. It works. We urge our leaders to maintain America’s commitment to the right of creators to determine when and how they share their works in the global marketplace.”

In support of their open letter, Copyright Alliance and CreativeFuture have also launched a Change.org petition in an attempt to get 5,000 signatures supporting their cause.

“Whether you are a Democrat or Republican, liberal or conservative or libertarian, strong and effective copyright is not a partisan issue but rather one that benefits our entire country. We ask that you stand with us by adding your name to this letter – to show political candidates that we stand united, we stand creative,” they conclude.

Open Letter to 2016 Political Candidates

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.