Tag Archives: Olympics

Russians Hacked the Olympics

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/03/russians_hacked.html

Two weeks ago, I blogged about the myriad of hacking threats against the Olympics. Last week, the Washington Post reported that Russia hacked the Olympics network and tried to cast the blame on North Korea.

Of course, the evidence is classified, so there’s no way to verify this claim. And while the article speculates that the hacks were a retaliation for Russia being banned due to doping, that doesn’t ring true to me. If they tried to blame North Korea, it’s more likely that they’re trying to disrupt something between North Korea, South Korea, and the US. But I don’t know.

Internet Security Threats at the Olympics

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/02/internet_securi.html

There are a lot:

The cybersecurity company McAfee recently uncovered a cyber operation, dubbed Operation GoldDragon, attacking South Korean organizations related to the Winter Olympics. McAfee believes the attack came from a nation state that speaks Korean, although it has no definitive proof that this is a North Korean operation. The victim organizations include ice hockey teams, ski suppliers, ski resorts, tourist organizations in Pyeongchang, and departments organizing the Pyeongchang Olympics.

Meanwhile, a Russia-linked cyber attack has already stolen and leaked documents from other Olympic organizations. The so-called Fancy Bear group, or APT28, began its operations in late 2017 –­ according to Trend Micro and Threat Connect, two private cybersecurity firms­ — eventually publishing documents in 2018 outlining the political tensions between IOC officials and World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) officials who are policing Olympic athletes. It also released documents specifying exceptions to anti-doping regulations granted to specific athletes (for instance, one athlete was given an exception because of his asthma medication). The most recent Fancy Bear leak exposed details about a Canadian pole vaulter’s positive results for cocaine. This group has targeted WADA in the past, specifically during the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics. Assuming the attribution is right, the action appears to be Russian retaliation for the punitive steps against Russia.

A senior analyst at McAfee warned that the Olympics may experience more cyber attacks before closing ceremonies. A researcher at ThreatConnect asserted that organizations like Fancy Bear have no reason to stop operations just because they’ve already stolen and released documents. Even the United States Department of Homeland Security has issued a notice to those traveling to South Korea to remind them to protect themselves against cyber risks.

One presumes the Olympics network is sufficiently protected against the more pedestrian DDoS attacks and the like, but who knows?

EDITED TO ADD: There was already one attack.

Арнолд Шварценегер и малоумните

Post Syndicated from Григор original http://www.gatchev.info/blog/?p=2045

Преди нещо време Арнолд Шварценегер – надали е нужно да обяснявам кой е – се срещна с участниците в така наречените Специални Олимпийски игри. (Това е олимпиада за деца и възрастни с изоставане в умственото развитие. И пусна на страничката си видео от срещата.

Под видеото му обаче цъфна следният коментар:

The Special Olympics make no sense. The Olympics are for the best athletes in the entire world to compete against each other to determine who is the best. Having retards competing is doing the opposite!

(Специалните Олимпийски игри са глупост. Олимпийските игри са за най-добрите атлети на целия свят, да се състезават един с друг и да определят кой е най-добрият. Състезанието между малоумни върви в обратната посока!)

Отговорът на Арни ме възхити – този запис е заради него:

As stupid and evil this comment is, I am not going to delete it or ban you (yet) because it’s a teachable moment. You have two possible paths ahead. Right now, I guarantee you that these athletes have more courage, compassion, brains, skill – actually more of every possible human quality than you. So take their path – you could learn from them, and try to challenge yourself, to give back, to add something to the world. Or you can stay on your path, and keep being a sad, pitiful, jealous Internet troll who adds nothing to the world but mocks anyone who does out of small-minded jealousy. I know what you really want is attention, so let me be clear: if you choose to keep going this way, no one will ever remember you.

(Колкото и глупав и зъл да е този коментар, няма да го изтрия или да те банна (засега), понеже е повод да се научи нещо. Пред теб има два пътя. Към момента ти гарантирам, че тези атлети имат повече кураж, съчувствие, разум, умения – всъщност повече от всяко възможно човешко достойнство от теб. Така че поеми техния път – можеш да се учиш от тях, и пробвай да си поставиш предизвикателство, да дадеш нещо, да добавиш нещо към света. Или пък можеш да си останеш по сегашния си път и да продължиш да бъдеш тъжен, жалък и ревнив Интернет трол, който не прибавя към света нищо, а само се подиграва на тези които прибавят, движен от дребнодушие и ревност. Знам, че всъщност се бориш да ти обръщат внимание, така че ще бъда директен: избереш ли да продължиш по същия начин, никой няма да си спомни за теб.)

Мисля, че има защо да му викат Железния Арни. Или Терминатора.

Begin your journey with Raspberry Pi in The MagPi 49

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/begin-your-journey-with-raspberry-pi-in-the-magpi-49/

We’ve all seen the numbers. The Raspberry Pi is selling faster and faster every year, which means there are new people getting Raspberry Pis every day. With this in mind, we decided to make a brand new beginner’s guide in issue 49 of The MagPi, out now.

Get started with Raspberry Pi with The MagPi 49!

Get started with Raspberry Pi with The MagPi 49!

The Raspberry Pi beginner’s guide takes you from selecting your Raspberry Pi all the way through setting it up and getting to know the Raspbian OS that powers it. We’re also using it to jump-start a beginner’s tutorial that will be a monthly feature in The MagPi from now on.

#49 Apollo Pi

Set your Pi up so it can take you to the moon! (Moon rocket not included)

As well as the cover feature, we also have a feature on the recently released Apollo 11 source code and how you can emulate a virtual Apollo computer on your Raspberry Pi, along with some historical factoids about making and programming a computer to take people to the moon. There’s also our usual range of amazing tutorials, projects, and product reviews for you to read about as well, including Mike Cook’s rhythmic gymnastics project in the Pi Bakery.

Rhythmic Gymnastics Ribbons

Inspired by the Rio Olympics Gymnastic display of ribbon twirling. In the MagPi 49 – September 2016, https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/ twirl your own virtual ribbons.

You can grab the latest issue of The MagPi in stores today from WH Smith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda in the UK, and it will be in Micro Center and selected Barnes & Noble stores when it comes to America. It’s also available in print online from our store, and digitally on our Android and iOS app.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and start with issue 47 to get not only the Astro Pi poster and mission patch, but also a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 49.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

I also want to remind you that we’re running a poll to find out what you, the community, think are the top 20 Raspberry Pi projects to be included in our 50th issue spectacular. Get voting!

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Learn how to make with Windows 10 IoT Core in The MagPi 48

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/learn-make-windows-10-iot-core-magpi-48/

Rob here from The MagPi. It’s the last Thursday of the month, which can only mean one thing: a new issue is out!

Windows 10 is better than ever on Raspberry Pi

Windows 10 is better than ever on Raspberry Pi

Whenever a new piece of hardware comes out, there are always people trying to port or emulate different operating systems onto them. The Raspberry Pi was no different, with several attempts at porting differing operating systems when it was first launched. For over a year now though, Microsoft has officially supported Windows on the Raspberry Pi through Windows 10 IoT Core.

In The MagPi 48 we cover the latest developments in Windows 10 IoT Core that have come about since the Raspberry Pi 3 was launched, and how to make use of them in your own projects. We’ve also got exclusive news on an upcoming kit specifically for the Raspberry Pi 3 that lets you create amazing projects right out of the box.

Compete in the Scratch Olympics. You don't even have to leave your house

Compete in the Scratch Olympics. You don’t even have to leave your house.

As well as all the Windows talk, we invite you to take part in the Scratch Olympics, continue building the arcade machine of your dreams, learn about Twitch-controlled robots, and read a review of the long-awaited NatureBytes wildlife camera.

You can also learn how to make this swimming game from the legendary Mike Cook, which involves paddling your arms wildly in the air in the general direction of a home-built sensor board to control your character.

Raspberry Pi Olympic swimming

From the The MagPi 48 – August 2016 – an Olympic swimming simulator for the Raspberry Pi.

The MagPi 48 is out today in WH Smith, Tesco, Sainsburys, and Asda in the UK and will be in Micro Center and selected Barnes & Noble when it comes to America. You can also buy a copy online from our store, or get it digitally on our app that’s available for iOS and Android.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and start with issue 47 to not only get the poster and mission patch, but also a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 48.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy the issue! We’re off for a haircut.

The post Learn how to make with Windows 10 IoT Core in The MagPi 48 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

The Scratch Olympics

Post Syndicated from Rik Cross original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-scratch-olympics-2/

Since the Raspberry Pi Foundation merged with Code Club, the newly enlarged Education Team has been working hard to put the power of digital making into the hands of people all over the world.

Among the work we’ve been doing, we’ve created a set of Scratch projects to celebrate the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio.

The initial inspiration for these projects were the games that we used to love as children, commonly referred to as ‘button mashers’. There was little skill required in these games: all you needed was the ability to smash two keys as fast as humanly possible. Examples of this genre include such classics as Geoff Capes Strongman and Daley Thompson’s Decathlon.

With the 2016 Olympics fast approaching, we began to reminisce about these old sports-themed games, and realised what fun today’s kids are missing out on. With that, the Scratch Olympics were born!

There are two resources available on the resources section of this site, the first of which is the Olympic Weightlifter project. With graphics conceived by Sam Alder and produced by Alex Carter, the project helps you create of a button masher masterpiece, producing your very own 1980s-style keyboard-killer that’s guaranteed to strike fear into the hearts of parents all over the world. Physical buttons are an optional extra for the faint of heart.

A pixellated weightlifter blows steam from his ears as he lifts a barbell above his head in an animated gif

The second game in the series is Olympics Hurdles, where you will make a hurdling game which requires the player to hit the keyboard rapidly to make the hurdler run, and use expert timing to make them jump over the hurdles at the right time.

Pixellated athletes approach, leap and clear a hurdle on an athletics track

You’ll also find three new projects over on the Code Club projects website. The first of these is Synchronised Swimming, where you’ll learn how to code a synchronised swimming routine for Scratch the cat, by using loops and creating clones.

Six copies of the Scratch cat against an aqua blue background form a hexagonal synchronised swimming formation

There’s also an Archery project, where you must overcome an archer’s shaky arm to shoot arrows as close to the bullseye as you can, and Sprint!, which uses a 3D perspective to make the player feel as though they’re running towards a finish line. This project can even be coded to work with a homemade running mat! These two projects are only available to registered Code Clubs, and require an ID and PIN to access.

An archery target overlaid with a crosshair
A straight running track converges towards a flat horizon, with a "FINISH" ribbon and "TIME" and "DISTANCE" counters

Creating new Olympics projects is just one of the ways in which the Raspberry Pi Foundation and Code Club are working together to create awesome new resources, and there’s much more to come!

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