Tag Archives: on-premises

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 11

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/09/01/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-11/

September is here and summer is officially drawing to a close, but the Grafana team has stayed busy. We’re prepping for an upcoming Grafana 4.5 release, had some new and updated plugins, and would like to thank two contributors for fixing a non-obvious bug. Also – The CFP for GrafanaCon EU is open, and we’d like you to speak!


GrafanaCon EU CFP is Open

Have a big idea to share? Have a shorter talk or a demo you’d like to show off?
We’re looking for 40-minute detailed talks, 20-minute general talks and 10-minute lightning talks. We have a perfect slot for any type of content.

I’d Like to Speak at GrafanaCon

Grafana Labs is Hiring!

Do you believe in open source software? Build the future with us, and ship code.

Check out our open positions

From the Blogosphere

Zabbix, Grafana and Python, a Match Made in Heaven: David’s article, published earlier this year, hits on some great points about open source software and how you don’t have to spend much (or any) money to get valuable monitoring for your infrastructure.

The Business of Democratizing Metrics: Our friends over at Packet stopped by the office recently to sit down and chat with the Grafana Labs co-founders. They discussed how Grafana started, how monitoring has evolved, and democratizing metrics.

Visualizing CloudWatch with Grafana: Yuzo put together an article outlining his first experience adding a CloudWatch data source in Grafana, importing his first dashboard, then comparing the graphs between Grafana and CloudWatch.

Monitoring Linux performance with Grafana: Jim wanted to monitor his CentOS home router to get network traffic and disk usage stats, but wanted to try something different than his previous cacti monitoring. This walkthrough shows how he set things up to collect, store and visualize the data.

Visualizing Jenkins Pipeline Results in Grafana: Piotr provides a walkthrough of his setup and configuration to view Jenkins build results for his continuous delivery environment in Grafana.


Grafana Plugins

This week we’ve added a plugin for the new time series database Sidewinder, and updates to the Carpet Plot graph panel. If you haven’t installed a plugin, it’s easy. For on-premises installations, the Grafana-cli will do the work for you. If you’re using Hosted Grafana, you can install any plugin with one click.

NEW PLUGIN

Sidewinder Data Source – This is a data source plugin for the new Sidewinder database. Sidewinder is an open source, fast time series database designed for real-time analytics. It can be used for a variety of use cases that need storage of metrics data like APM and IoT.

Install Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

Carpet Plot Panel – This plugin received an update, which includes the following features and fixes:

  • New aggregate functions: Min, Max, First, Last
  • Possibility to invert color scheme
  • Possibility to change X axis label format
  • Possibility to hide X and Y axis labels

Update Now


This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

This week we want to thank two contributors who worked together to fix a non-obvious bug in the new MySQL data source (a bug with sorting values in the legend).

robinsonjj
Thank you Joe, for tackling this issue and submitting a PR with an initial fix.

pdoan017
pdoan017 took robinsonjj’s contribution and added a new PR to retain the order in which keys are added.

Thank you both for taking the time to both troubleshoot and fix the issue. Much appreciated!


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

Nice! Combining different panel types on a dashboard can add more context to your data – Looks like a very functional dashboard.


What do you think?

Let us know how we’re doing! Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Help us make these roundups better and better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

New – Application Load Balancing via IP Address to AWS & On-Premises Resources

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-application-load-balancing-via-ip-address-to-aws-on-premises-resources/

I told you about the new AWS Application Load Balancer last year and showed you how to use it to do implement Layer 7 (application) routing to EC2 instances and to microservices running in containers.

Some of our customers are building hybrid applications as part of a longer-term move to AWS. These customers have told us that they would like to use a single Application Load Balancer to spread traffic across a combination of existing on-premises resources and new resources running in the AWS Cloud. Other customers would like to spread traffic to web or database servers that are scattered across two or more Virtual Private Clouds (VPCs), host multiple services on the same instance with distinct IP addresses but a common port number, and to offer support for IP-based virtual hosting for clients that do not support Server Name Indication (SNI). Another group of customers would like to host multiple instances of a service on the same instance (perhaps within containers), while using multiple interfaces and security groups to implement fine-grained access control.

These situations arise within a broad set of hybrid, migration, disaster recovery, and on-premises use cases and scenarios.

Route to IP Addresses
In order to address these use cases, Application Load Balancers can now route traffic directly to IP addresses. These addresses can be in the same VPC as the ALB, a peer VPC in the same region, on an EC2 instance connected to a VPC by way of ClassicLink, or on on-premises resources at the other end of a VPN connection or AWS Direct Connect connection.

Application Load Balancers already group targets in to target groups. As part of today’s launch, each target group now has a target type attribute:

instance – Targets are registered by way of EC2 instance IDs, as before.

ip – Targets are registered as IP addresses. You can use any IPv4 address from the load balancer’s VPC CIDR for targets within load balancer’s VPC and any IPv4 address from the RFC 1918 ranges (10.0.0.0/8, 172.16.0.0/12, and 192.168.0.0/16) or the RFC 6598 range (100.64.0.0/10) for targets located outside the load balancer’s VPC (this includes Peered VPC, EC2-Classic, and on-premises targets reachable over Direct Connect or VPN).

Each target group has a load balancer and health check configuration, and publishes metrics to CloudWatch, as has always been the case.

Let’s say that you are in the transition phase of an application migration to AWS or want to use AWS to augment on-premises resources with EC2 instances and you need to distribute application traffic across both your AWS and on-premises resources. You can achieve this by registering all the resources (AWS and on-premises) to the same target group and associate the target group with a load balancer. Alternatively, you can use DNS based weighted load balancing across AWS and on-premises resources using two load balancers i.e. one load balancer for AWS and other for on-premises resources. In the scenario where application-A back-ends are in VPC and application-B back-ends are in on-premises locations then you can put back-ends for each application in different target groups and use content based routing to route traffic to each target group.

Creating a Target Group
Here’s how I create a target group that sends traffic to some IP addresses as part of the process of creating an Application Load Balancer. I enter a name (ip-target-1) and select ip as the Target type:

Then I enter IP address targets. These can be from the VPC that hosts the load balancer:

Or they can be other private IP addresses within one of the private ranges listed above, for targets outside of the VPC that hosts the load balancer:

After I review the settings and create the load balancer, traffic will be sent to the designated IP addresses as soon as they pass the health checks. Each load balancer can accommodate up to 1000 targets.

I can examine my target group and edit the set of targets at any time:

As you can see, one of my targets was not healthy when I took this screen shot (this was by design). Metrics are published to CloudWatch for each target group; I can see them in the Console and I can create CloudWatch Alarms:

Available Now
This feature is available now and you can start using it today in all AWS Regions.

Jeff;

 

Deadline 10 – Launch a Rendering Fleet in AWS

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/deadline-10-launch-a-rendering-fleet-in-aws/

Graphical rendering is a compute-intensive task that is, as they say, embarrassingly parallel. Looked at another way, this means that there’s a more or less linear relationship between the number of processors that are working on the problem and the overall wall-clock time that it takes to complete the task. In a creative endeavor such as movie-making, getting the results faster spurs creativity, improves the feedback loop, gives you time to make more iterations and trials, and leads to a better result. Even if you have a render farm in-house, you may still want to turn to the cloud in order to gain access to more compute power at peak times. Once you do this, the next challenge is to manage the combination of in-house resources, cloud resources, and the digital assets in a unified fashion.

Deadline 10
Earlier this week we launched Deadline 10, a powerful render management system. Building on technology that we brought on board with the acquisition of Thinkbox Software, Deadline 10 is designed to extend existing on-premises rendering into the AWS Cloud, giving you elasticity and flexibility while remaining simple and easy to use. You can set up and manage large-scale distributed jobs that span multiple AWS regions and benefit from elastic, usage-based AWS licensing for popular applications like Deadline for Autodesk 3ds Max, Maya, Arnold, and dozens more, all available from the Thinkbox Marketplace. You can purchase software licenses from the marketplace, use your existing licenses, or use them together.

Deadline 10 obtains cloud-based compute resources by managing bids for EC2 Spot Instances, providing you with access to enough low-cost compute capacity to let your imagination run wild! It uses your existing AWS account, tags EC2 instances for tracking, and synchronizes your local assets to the cloud before rendering begins.

A Quick Tour
Let’s take a quick tour of Deadline 10 and see how it makes use of AWS. The AWS Portal is available from the View menu:

The first step is to log in to my AWS account:

Then I configure the connection server, license server, and the S3 bucket that will be used to store rendering assets:

Next, I set up my Spot fleet, establishing a maximum price per hour for each EC2 instance, setting target capacity, and choosing the desired rendering application:

I can also choose any desired combination of EC2 instance types:

When I am ready to render I click on Start Spot Fleet:

This will initiate the process of bidding for and managing Spot Instances. The running instances are visible from the Portal:

I can monitor the progress of my rendering pipeline:

I can stop my Spot fleet when I no longer need it:

Deadline 10 is now available for usage based license customers; a new license is needed for traditional floating license users. Pricing for yearly Deadline licenses has been reduced to $48 annually. If you are already using an earlier version of Deadline, feel free to contact us to learn more about licensing options.

Jeff;

VMware Cloud on AWS – Now Available

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/vmware-cloud-on-aws-now-available/

Last year I told you about the work that we are doing with our friends at VMware to build the VMware Cloud on AWS. As I shared at the time, this is a native, fully-managed offering that runs the VMware SDDC stack directly on bare-metal AWS infrastructure that maintains the elasticity and security customers have come to expect. This allows you to benefit from the scalability and resiliency of AWS, along with the networking and system-level hardware features that are fundamental parts of our security-first architecture.

VMware Cloud on AWS allows you take advantage of what you already know and own. Your existing skills, your investment in training, your operational practices, and your investment in software licenses remain relevant and applicable when you move to the public cloud. As part of that move you can forget about building & running data centers, modernizing hardware, and scaling to meet transient or short-term demand. You can also take advantage of a long list of AWS compute, database, analytics, IoT, AI, security, mobile, deployment and application services.

Initial Availability
After incorporating feedback from many customers and partners in our Early Access beta program, today at VMworld, VMware and Amazon announced the initial availability of VMware Cloud on AWS. This service is initially available in the US West (Oregon) region through VMware and members of the VMware Partner Network. It is designed to support popular use cases such as data center extension, application development & testing, and application migration.

This offering is sold, delivered, supported, and billed by VMware. It supports custom-sized VMs, runs any OS that is supported by VMware, and makes use of single-tenant bare-metal AWS infrastructure so that you can bring your Windows Server licenses to the cloud. Each SDDC (Software-Defined Data Center) consists of 4 to 16 instances, each with 36 cores, 512 GB of memory, and 15.2 TB of NVMe storage. Clusters currently run in a single AWS Availability Zone (AZ) with support in the works for clusters that span AZs. You can spin up an entire VMware SDDC in a couple of hours, and scale host capacity up and down in minutes.

The NSX networking platform (powered by the AWS Elastic Networking Adapter running at up to 25 Gbps) supports multicast traffic, separate networks for management and compute, and IPSec VPN tunnels to on-premises firewalls, routers, and so forth.

Here’s an overview to show you how all of the parts fit together:

The VMware and third-party management tools (vCenter Server, PowerCLI, the vRealize Suite, and code that calls the vSphere API) that you use today will work just fine when you build a hybrid VMware environment that combines your existing on-premises resources and those that you launch in AWS. This hybrid environment will use a new VMware Hybrid Linked Mode to create a single, unified view of your on-premises and cloud resources. You can use familiar VMware tools to manage your applications, without having to purchase any new or custom hardware, rewrite applications, or modify your operating model.

Your applications and your code can access the full range of AWS services (the database, analytical, and AI services are a good place to start). Use for these services is billed separately and you’ll need to create an AWS account.

Learn More at VMworld
If you are attending VMworld in Las Vegas, please be sure to check out some of the 90+ AWS sessions:

Also, be sure to stop by booth #300 and say hello to my colleagues from the AWS team.

In the Works
Our teams have come a long way since last year, but things are just getting revved up!

VMware and AWS are continuing to invest to enable support for new capabilities and use cases, such as application migration, data center expansion, and application test and development. Work is under way to add additional AWS regions, support more use cases such as disaster recovery and data center consolidation, add certifications, and enable even deeper integration with AWS services.

Jeff;

 

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 10

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/08/25/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-10/

This week, in addition to the articles we collected from around the web and a number of new Plugins and updates, we have a special announcement. GrafanaCon EU has been announced! Join us in Amsterdam March 1-2, 2018. The call for papers is officially open! We’ll keep you up to date as we fill in the details.


Grafana <3 Prometheus

Last week we mentioned that our colleague Carl Bergquist spoke at PromCon 2017 in Munich. His presentation is now available online. We will post the video once it’s available.


From the Blogosphere

Grafana-based GUI for mgstat, a system monitoring tool for InterSystems Caché, Ensemble or HealthShare: This is the second article in a series about Making Prometheus Monitoring for InterSystems Caché. Mikhail goes into great detail about setting this up on Docker, configuring the first dashboard, and adding templating.

Installation and Integration of Grafana in Zabbix 3.x: Daniel put together an installation guide to get Grafana to display metrics from Zabbix, which utilizes the Zabbix Plugin developed by Grafana Labs Developer Alex Zobnin.

Visualize with RRDtool x Grafana: Atfujiwara wanted to update his MRTG graphs from RRDtool. This post talks about the components needed and how he connected RRDtool to Grafana.

Huawei OceanStor metrics in Grafana: Dennis is using Grafana to display metrics for his storage devices. In this post he walks you through the setup and provides a comprehensive dashboard for all the metrics.

Grafana on a Raspberry Pi2: Pete discusses how he uses Grafana with his garden sensors, and walks you through how to get it up and running on a Pi2.


Grafana Plugins

This week was pretty active on the plugin front. Today we’re announcing two brand new plugins and updates to three others. Installing plugins in Grafana is easy – if you have Hosted Grafana, simply use the one-click install, if you’re using an on-prem instance you can use the Grafana-cli.

NEW PLUGIN

IBM APM Data Source – This plugin collects metrics from the IBM APM (Application Performance Management) products and allows you to visualize it on Grafana dashboards. The plugin supports:

  • IBM Tivoli Monitoring 6.x
  • IBM SmartCloud Application Performance Management 7.x
  • IBM Performance Management 8.x (only on-premises version)

Install Now

NEW PLUGIN

Skydive Data Source – This data source plugin collects metrics from Skydive, an open source real-time network topology and protocols analyzer. Using the Skydive Gremlin query language, you can fetch metrics for flows in your network.

Install now

UPDATED PLUGIN

Datatable Panel – Lots of changes in the latest update to the Datatable Panel Here are some highlights from the changelog:

  • NEW: Export options for Clipboard/CSV/PDF/Excel/Print
  • NEW: Column Aliasing – modify the name of a column as sent by the datasource
  • NEW: Added option for a cell or row to link to another page
  • NEW: Supports Clickable links inside table
  • BUGFIX: CSS files now load when Grafana has a subpath
  • NEW: Added multi-column sorting – sort by any number of columns ascending/descending
  • NEW: Column width hints – suggest a width for a named column
  • BUGFIX: Columns from datasources other than JSON can now be aliased

Update Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

D3 Gauge Panel – The D3 Gauge Panel has a new feature – Tick Mapping. Ticks on the gauge can now be mapped to text.

Update Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

PNP4Nagios Data Source – The most recent update to the PNP Data Source adds support for template variables in queries and as well as support for querying warning and critical thresholds.

Update Now


This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

Each week we highlight a contributor to Grafana or the surrounding ecosystem as a thank you for their participation in making open source software great.

Brian Gann
Brian is the maintainer of two Grafana Plugins and this week he submitted substantial updates to both of them (Datatable and D3 Gauge panel plugins); and he says there’s more to come! Thanks for all your hard work, Brian.


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

The Dark Knight popping up in graphs seems to be a recurring theme!
This is the graph Jakub deserves, but not the one he needs right now.



What do you think?

That’s it for the 10th issue of timeShift. Let us know how we’re doing! Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Help us make this better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

Analyzing AWS Cost and Usage Reports with Looker and Amazon Athena

Post Syndicated from Dillon Morrison original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/analyzing-aws-cost-and-usage-reports-with-looker-and-amazon-athena/

This is a guest post by Dillon Morrison at Looker. Looker is, in their own words, “a new kind of analytics platform–letting everyone in your business make better decisions by getting reliable answers from a tool they can use.” 

As the breadth of AWS products and services continues to grow, customers are able to more easily move their technology stack and core infrastructure to AWS. One of the attractive benefits of AWS is the cost savings. Rather than paying upfront capital expenses for large on-premises systems, customers can instead pay variables expenses for on-demand services. To further reduce expenses AWS users can reserve resources for specific periods of time, and automatically scale resources as needed.

The AWS Cost Explorer is great for aggregated reporting. However, conducting analysis on the raw data using the flexibility and power of SQL allows for much richer detail and insight, and can be the better choice for the long term. Thankfully, with the introduction of Amazon Athena, monitoring and managing these costs is now easier than ever.

In the post, I walk through setting up the data pipeline for cost and usage reports, Amazon S3, and Athena, and discuss some of the most common levers for cost savings. I surface tables through Looker, which comes with a host of pre-built data models and dashboards to make analysis of your cost and usage data simple and intuitive.

Analysis with Athena

With Athena, there’s no need to create hundreds of Excel reports, move data around, or deploy clusters to house and process data. Athena uses Apache Hive’s DDL to create tables, and the Presto querying engine to process queries. Analysis can be performed directly on raw data in S3. Conveniently, AWS exports raw cost and usage data directly into a user-specified S3 bucket, making it simple to start querying with Athena quickly. This makes continuous monitoring of costs virtually seamless, since there is no infrastructure to manage. Instead, users can leverage the power of the Athena SQL engine to easily perform ad-hoc analysis and data discovery without needing to set up a data warehouse.

After the data pipeline is established, cost and usage data (the recommended billing data, per AWS documentation) provides a plethora of comprehensive information around usage of AWS services and the associated costs. Whether you need the report segmented by product type, user identity, or region, this report can be cut-and-sliced any number of ways to properly allocate costs for any of your business needs. You can then drill into any specific line item to see even further detail, such as the selected operating system, tenancy, purchase option (on-demand, spot, or reserved), and so on.

Walkthrough

By default, the Cost and Usage report exports CSV files, which you can compress using gzip (recommended for performance). There are some additional configuration options for tuning performance further, which are discussed below.

Prerequisites

If you want to follow along, you need the following resources:

Enable the cost and usage reports

First, enable the Cost and Usage report. For Time unit, select Hourly. For Include, select Resource IDs. All options are prompted in the report-creation window.

The Cost and Usage report dumps CSV files into the specified S3 bucket. Please note that it can take up to 24 hours for the first file to be delivered after enabling the report.

Configure the S3 bucket and files for Athena querying

In addition to the CSV file, AWS also creates a JSON manifest file for each cost and usage report. Athena requires that all of the files in the S3 bucket are in the same format, so we need to get rid of all these manifest files. If you’re looking to get started with Athena quickly, you can simply go into your S3 bucket and delete the manifest file manually, skip the automation described below, and move on to the next section.

To automate the process of removing the manifest file each time a new report is dumped into S3, which I recommend as you scale, there are a few additional steps. The folks at Concurrency labs wrote a great overview and set of scripts for this, which you can find in their GitHub repo.

These scripts take the data from an input bucket, remove anything unnecessary, and dump it into a new output bucket. We can utilize AWS Lambda to trigger this process whenever new data is dropped into S3, or on a nightly basis, or whatever makes most sense for your use-case, depending on how often you’re querying the data. Please note that enabling the “hourly” report means that data is reported at the hour-level of granularity, not that a new file is generated every hour.

Following these scripts, you’ll notice that we’re adding a date partition field, which isn’t necessary but improves query performance. In addition, converting data from CSV to a columnar format like ORC or Parquet also improves performance. We can automate this process using Lambda whenever new data is dropped in our S3 bucket. Amazon Web Services discusses columnar conversion at length, and provides walkthrough examples, in their documentation.

As a long-term solution, best practice is to use compression, partitioning, and conversion. However, for purposes of this walkthrough, we’re not going to worry about them so we can get up-and-running quicker.

Set up the Athena query engine

In your AWS console, navigate to the Athena service, and click “Get Started”. Follow the tutorial and set up a new database (we’ve called ours “AWS Optimizer” in this example). Don’t worry about configuring your initial table, per the tutorial instructions. We’ll be creating a new table for cost and usage analysis. Once you walked through the tutorial steps, you’ll be able to access the Athena interface, and can begin running Hive DDL statements to create new tables.

One thing that’s important to note, is that the Cost and Usage CSVs also contain the column headers in their first row, meaning that the column headers would be included in the dataset and any queries. For testing and quick set-up, you can remove this line manually from your first few CSV files. Long-term, you’ll want to use a script to programmatically remove this row each time a new file is dropped in S3 (every few hours typically). We’ve drafted up a sample script for ease of reference, which we run on Lambda. We utilize Lambda’s native ability to invoke the script whenever a new object is dropped in S3.

For cost and usage, we recommend using the DDL statement below. Since our data is in CSV format, we don’t need to use a SerDe, we can simply specify the “separatorChar, quoteChar, and escapeChar”, and the structure of the files (“TEXTFILE”). Note that AWS does have an OpenCSV SerDe as well, if you prefer to use that.

 

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE IF NOT EXISTS cost_and_usage	 (
identity_LineItemId String,
identity_TimeInterval String,
bill_InvoiceId String,
bill_BillingEntity String,
bill_BillType String,
bill_PayerAccountId String,
bill_BillingPeriodStartDate String,
bill_BillingPeriodEndDate String,
lineItem_UsageAccountId String,
lineItem_LineItemType String,
lineItem_UsageStartDate String,
lineItem_UsageEndDate String,
lineItem_ProductCode String,
lineItem_UsageType String,
lineItem_Operation String,
lineItem_AvailabilityZone String,
lineItem_ResourceId String,
lineItem_UsageAmount String,
lineItem_NormalizationFactor String,
lineItem_NormalizedUsageAmount String,
lineItem_CurrencyCode String,
lineItem_UnblendedRate String,
lineItem_UnblendedCost String,
lineItem_BlendedRate String,
lineItem_BlendedCost String,
lineItem_LineItemDescription String,
lineItem_TaxType String,
product_ProductName String,
product_accountAssistance String,
product_architecturalReview String,
product_architectureSupport String,
product_availability String,
product_bestPractices String,
product_cacheEngine String,
product_caseSeverityresponseTimes String,
product_clockSpeed String,
product_currentGeneration String,
product_customerServiceAndCommunities String,
product_databaseEdition String,
product_databaseEngine String,
product_dedicatedEbsThroughput String,
product_deploymentOption String,
product_description String,
product_durability String,
product_ebsOptimized String,
product_ecu String,
product_endpointType String,
product_engineCode String,
product_enhancedNetworkingSupported String,
product_executionFrequency String,
product_executionLocation String,
product_feeCode String,
product_feeDescription String,
product_freeQueryTypes String,
product_freeTrial String,
product_frequencyMode String,
product_fromLocation String,
product_fromLocationType String,
product_group String,
product_groupDescription String,
product_includedServices String,
product_instanceFamily String,
product_instanceType String,
product_io String,
product_launchSupport String,
product_licenseModel String,
product_location String,
product_locationType String,
product_maxIopsBurstPerformance String,
product_maxIopsvolume String,
product_maxThroughputvolume String,
product_maxVolumeSize String,
product_maximumStorageVolume String,
product_memory String,
product_messageDeliveryFrequency String,
product_messageDeliveryOrder String,
product_minVolumeSize String,
product_minimumStorageVolume String,
product_networkPerformance String,
product_operatingSystem String,
product_operation String,
product_operationsSupport String,
product_physicalProcessor String,
product_preInstalledSw String,
product_proactiveGuidance String,
product_processorArchitecture String,
product_processorFeatures String,
product_productFamily String,
product_programmaticCaseManagement String,
product_provisioned String,
product_queueType String,
product_requestDescription String,
product_requestType String,
product_routingTarget String,
product_routingType String,
product_servicecode String,
product_sku String,
product_softwareType String,
product_storage String,
product_storageClass String,
product_storageMedia String,
product_technicalSupport String,
product_tenancy String,
product_thirdpartySoftwareSupport String,
product_toLocation String,
product_toLocationType String,
product_training String,
product_transferType String,
product_usageFamily String,
product_usagetype String,
product_vcpu String,
product_version String,
product_volumeType String,
product_whoCanOpenCases String,
pricing_LeaseContractLength String,
pricing_OfferingClass String,
pricing_PurchaseOption String,
pricing_publicOnDemandCost String,
pricing_publicOnDemandRate String,
pricing_term String,
pricing_unit String,
reservation_AvailabilityZone String,
reservation_NormalizedUnitsPerReservation String,
reservation_NumberOfReservations String,
reservation_ReservationARN String,
reservation_TotalReservedNormalizedUnits String,
reservation_TotalReservedUnits String,
reservation_UnitsPerReservation String,
resourceTags_userName String,
resourceTags_usercostcategory String  


)
    ROW FORMAT DELIMITED
      FIELDS TERMINATED BY ','
      ESCAPED BY '\\'
      LINES TERMINATED BY '\n'

STORED AS TEXTFILE
    LOCATION 's3://<<your bucket name>>';

Once you’ve successfully executed the command, you should see a new table named “cost_and_usage” with the below properties. Now we’re ready to start executing queries and running analysis!

Start with Looker and connect to Athena

Setting up Looker is a quick process, and you can try it out for free here (or download from Amazon Marketplace). It takes just a few seconds to connect Looker to your Athena database, and Looker comes with a host of pre-built data models and dashboards to make analysis of your cost and usage data simple and intuitive. After you’re connected, you can use the Looker UI to run whatever analysis you’d like. Looker translates this UI to optimized SQL, so any user can execute and visualize queries for true self-service analytics.

Major cost saving levers

Now that the data pipeline is configured, you can dive into the most popular use cases for cost savings. In this post, I focus on:

  • Purchasing Reserved Instances vs. On-Demand Instances
  • Data transfer costs
  • Allocating costs over users or other Attributes (denoted with resource tags)

On-Demand, Spot, and Reserved Instances

Purchasing Reserved Instances vs On-Demand Instances is arguably going to be the biggest cost lever for heavy AWS users (Reserved Instances run up to 75% cheaper!). AWS offers three options for purchasing instances:

  • On-Demand—Pay as you use.
  • Spot (variable cost)—Bid on spare Amazon EC2 computing capacity.
  • Reserved Instances—Pay for an instance for a specific, allotted period of time.

When purchasing a Reserved Instance, you can also choose to pay all-upfront, partial-upfront, or monthly. The more you pay upfront, the greater the discount.

If your company has been using AWS for some time now, you should have a good sense of your overall instance usage on a per-month or per-day basis. Rather than paying for these instances On-Demand, you should try to forecast the number of instances you’ll need, and reserve them with upfront payments.

The total amount of usage with Reserved Instances versus overall usage with all instances is called your coverage ratio. It’s important not to confuse your coverage ratio with your Reserved Instance utilization. Utilization represents the amount of reserved hours that were actually used. Don’t worry about exceeding capacity, you can still set up Auto Scaling preferences so that more instances get added whenever your coverage or utilization crosses a certain threshold (we often see a target of 80% for both coverage and utilization among savvy customers).

Calculating the reserved costs and coverage can be a bit tricky with the level of granularity provided by the cost and usage report. The following query shows your total cost over the last 6 months, broken out by Reserved Instance vs other instance usage. You can substitute the cost field for usage if you’d prefer. Please note that you should only have data for the time period after the cost and usage report has been enabled (though you can opt for up to 3 months of historical data by contacting your AWS Account Executive). If you’re just getting started, this query will only show a few days.

 

SELECT 
	DATE_FORMAT(from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate),'%Y-%m') AS "cost_and_usage.usage_start_month",
	COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost ), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_unblended_cost",
	COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN (CASE
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'DiscountedUsage' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'RIFee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'Fee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         ELSE 'Non RI Line Item'
        END = 'RI Line Item') THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_reserved_unblended_cost",
	1.0 * (COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN (CASE
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'DiscountedUsage' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'RIFee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'Fee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         ELSE 'Non RI Line Item'
        END = 'RI Line Item') THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0)) / NULLIF((COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost ), 0)),0)  AS "cost_and_usage.percent_spend_on_ris",
	COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN (CASE
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'DiscountedUsage' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'RIFee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'Fee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         ELSE 'Non RI Line Item'
        END = 'Non RI Line Item') THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_non_reserved_unblended_cost",
	1.0 * (COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN (CASE
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'DiscountedUsage' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'RIFee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'Fee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         ELSE 'Non RI Line Item'
        END = 'Non RI Line Item') THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0)) / NULLIF((COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost ), 0)),0)  AS "cost_and_usage.percent_spend_on_non_ris"
FROM aws_optimizer.cost_and_usage  AS cost_and_usage

WHERE 
	(((from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate)) >= ((DATE_ADD('month', -5, DATE_TRUNC('MONTH', CAST(NOW() AS DATE))))) AND (from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate)) < ((DATE_ADD('month', 6, DATE_ADD('month', -5, DATE_TRUNC('MONTH', CAST(NOW() AS DATE))))))))
GROUP BY 1
ORDER BY 2 DESC
LIMIT 500

The resulting table should look something like the image below (I’m surfacing tables through Looker, though the same table would result from querying via command line or any other interface).

With a BI tool, you can create dashboards for easy reference and monitoring. New data is dumped into S3 every few hours, so your dashboards can update several times per day.

It’s an iterative process to understand the appropriate number of Reserved Instances needed to meet your business needs. After you’ve properly integrated Reserved Instances into your purchasing patterns, the savings can be significant. If your coverage is consistently below 70%, you should seriously consider adjusting your purchase types and opting for more Reserved instances.

Data transfer costs

One of the great things about AWS data storage is that it’s incredibly cheap. Most charges often come from moving and processing that data. There are several different prices for transferring data, broken out largely by transfers between regions and availability zones. Transfers between regions are the most costly, followed by transfers between Availability Zones. Transfers within the same region and same availability zone are free unless using elastic or public IP addresses, in which case there is a cost. You can find more detailed information in the AWS Pricing Docs. With this in mind, there are several simple strategies for helping reduce costs.

First, since costs increase when transferring data between regions, it’s wise to ensure that as many services as possible reside within the same region. The more you can localize services to one specific region, the lower your costs will be.

Second, you should maximize the data you’re routing directly within AWS services and IP addresses. Transfers out to the open internet are the most costly and least performant mechanisms of data transfers, so it’s best to keep transfers within AWS services.

Lastly, data transfers between private IP addresses are cheaper than between elastic or public IP addresses, so utilizing private IP addresses as much as possible is the most cost-effective strategy.

The following query provides a table depicting the total costs for each AWS product, broken out transfer cost type. Substitute the “lineitem_productcode” field in the query to segment the costs by any other attribute. If you notice any unusually high spikes in cost, you’ll need to dig deeper to understand what’s driving that spike: location, volume, and so on. Drill down into specific costs by including “product_usagetype” and “product_transfertype” in your query to identify the types of transfer costs that are driving up your bill.

SELECT 
	cost_and_usage.lineitem_productcode  AS "cost_and_usage.product_code",
	COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_unblended_cost",
	COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN REGEXP_LIKE(cost_and_usage.product_usagetype, 'DataTransfer')    THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_data_transfer_cost",
	COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN REGEXP_LIKE(cost_and_usage.product_usagetype, 'DataTransfer-In')    THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_inbound_data_transfer_cost",
	COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN REGEXP_LIKE(cost_and_usage.product_usagetype, 'DataTransfer-Out')    THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_outbound_data_transfer_cost"
FROM aws_optimizer.cost_and_usage  AS cost_and_usage

WHERE 
	(((from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate)) >= ((DATE_ADD('month', -5, DATE_TRUNC('MONTH', CAST(NOW() AS DATE))))) AND (from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate)) < ((DATE_ADD('month', 6, DATE_ADD('month', -5, DATE_TRUNC('MONTH', CAST(NOW() AS DATE))))))))
GROUP BY 1
ORDER BY 2 DESC
LIMIT 500

When moving between regions or over the open web, many data transfer costs also include the origin and destination location of the data movement. Using a BI tool with mapping capabilities, you can get a nice visual of data flows. The point at the center of the map is used to represent external data flows over the open internet.

Analysis by tags

AWS provides the option to apply custom tags to individual resources, so you can allocate costs over whatever customized segment makes the most sense for your business. For a SaaS company that hosts software for customers on AWS, maybe you’d want to tag the size of each customer. The following query uses custom tags to display the reserved, data transfer, and total cost for each AWS service, broken out by tag categories, over the last 6 months. You’ll want to substitute the cost_and_usage.resourcetags_customersegment and cost_and_usage.customer_segment with the name of your customer field.

 

SELECT * FROM (
SELECT *, DENSE_RANK() OVER (ORDER BY z___min_rank) as z___pivot_row_rank, RANK() OVER (PARTITION BY z__pivot_col_rank ORDER BY z___min_rank) as z__pivot_col_ordering FROM (
SELECT *, MIN(z___rank) OVER (PARTITION BY "cost_and_usage.product_code") as z___min_rank FROM (
SELECT *, RANK() OVER (ORDER BY CASE WHEN z__pivot_col_rank=1 THEN (CASE WHEN "cost_and_usage.total_unblended_cost" IS NOT NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END) ELSE 2 END, CASE WHEN z__pivot_col_rank=1 THEN "cost_and_usage.total_unblended_cost" ELSE NULL END DESC, "cost_and_usage.total_unblended_cost" DESC, z__pivot_col_rank, "cost_and_usage.product_code") AS z___rank FROM (
SELECT *, DENSE_RANK() OVER (ORDER BY CASE WHEN "cost_and_usage.customer_segment" IS NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END, "cost_and_usage.customer_segment") AS z__pivot_col_rank FROM (
SELECT 
	cost_and_usage.lineitem_productcode  AS "cost_and_usage.product_code",
	cost_and_usage.resourcetags_customersegment  AS "cost_and_usage.customer_segment",
	COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost ), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_unblended_cost",
	1.0 * (COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN REGEXP_LIKE(cost_and_usage.product_usagetype, 'DataTransfer')    THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0)) / NULLIF((COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost ), 0)),0)  AS "cost_and_usage.percent_spend_data_transfers_unblended",
	1.0 * (COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN (CASE
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'DiscountedUsage' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'RIFee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'Fee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         ELSE 'Non RI Line Item'
        END = 'Non RI Line Item') THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0)) / NULLIF((COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost ), 0)),0)  AS "cost_and_usage.unblended_percent_spend_on_ris"
FROM aws_optimizer.cost_and_usage_raw  AS cost_and_usage

WHERE 
	(((from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate)) >= ((DATE_ADD('month', -5, DATE_TRUNC('MONTH', CAST(NOW() AS DATE))))) AND (from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate)) < ((DATE_ADD('month', 6, DATE_ADD('month', -5, DATE_TRUNC('MONTH', CAST(NOW() AS DATE))))))))
GROUP BY 1,2) ww
) bb WHERE z__pivot_col_rank <= 16384
) aa
) xx
) zz
 WHERE z___pivot_row_rank <= 500 OR z__pivot_col_ordering = 1 ORDER BY z___pivot_row_rank

The resulting table in this example looks like the results below. In this example, you can tell that we’re making poor use of Reserved Instances because they represent such a small portion of our overall costs.

Again, using a BI tool to visualize these costs and trends over time makes the analysis much easier to consume and take action on.

Summary

Saving costs on your AWS spend is always an iterative, ongoing process. Hopefully with these queries alone, you can start to understand your spending patterns and identify opportunities for savings. However, this is just a peek into the many opportunities available through analysis of the Cost and Usage report. Each company is different, with unique needs and usage patterns. To achieve maximum cost savings, we encourage you to set up an analytics environment that enables your team to explore all potential cuts and slices of your usage data, whenever it’s necessary. Exploring different trends and spikes across regions, services, user types, etc. helps you gain comprehensive understanding of your major cost levers and consistently implement new cost reduction strategies.

Note that all of the queries and analysis provided in this post were generated using the Looker data platform. If you’re already a Looker customer, you can get all of this analysis, additional pre-configured dashboards, and much more using Looker Blocks for AWS.


About the Author

Dillon Morrison leads the Platform Ecosystem at Looker. He enjoys exploring new technologies and architecting the most efficient data solutions for the business needs of his company and their customers. In his spare time, you’ll find Dillon rock climbing in the Bay Area or nose deep in the docs of the latest AWS product release at his favorite cafe (“Arlequin in SF is unbeatable!”).

 

 

 

AWS Migration Hub – Plan & Track Enterprise Application Migration

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-migration-hub-plan-track-enterprise-application-migration/

About once a week, I speak to current and potential AWS customers in our Seattle Executive Briefing Center. While I generally focus on our innovation process, we sometimes discuss other topics, including application migration. When enterprises decide to migrate their application portfolios they want to do it in a structured, orderly fashion. These portfolios typically consist of hundreds of complex Windows and Linux applications, relational databases, and more. Customers find themselves eager yet uncertain as to how to proceed. After spending time working with these customers, we have learned that their challenges generally fall in to three major categories:

Discovery – They want to make sure that they have a deep and complete understanding of all of the moving parts that power each application.

Server & Database Migration – They need to transfer on-premises workloads and database tables to the cloud.

Tracking / Management – With large application portfolios and multiple migrations happening in parallel, they need to track and manage progress in an application-centric fashion.

Over the last couple of years we have launched a set of tools that address the first two challenges. The AWS Application Discovery Service automates the process of discovering and collecting system information, the AWS Server Migration Service takes care of moving workloads to the cloud, and the AWS Database Migration Service moves relational databases, NoSQL databases, and data warehouses with minimal downtime. Partners like Racemi and CloudEndure also offer migration tools of their own.

New AWS Migration Hub
Today we are bringing this collection of AWS and partner migration tools together in the AWS Migration Hub. The hub provides access to the tools that I mentioned above, guides you through the migration process, and tracks the status of each migration, all in accord with the methodology and tenets described in our Migration Acceleration Program (MAP).

Here’s the main screen. It outlines the migration process (discovery, migration, and tracking):

Clicking on Start discovery reveals the flow of the migration process:

It is also possible to skip the Discovery step and begin the migration immediately:

The Servers list is populated using data from an AWS migration service (Server Migration Service or Database Migration Service), partner tools, or using data collected by the AWS Application Discovery Service:

I can on Group as application to create my first application:

Once I identify some applications to migrate, I can track them in the Migrations section of the Hub:

The migration tools, if authorized, automatically send status updates and results back to Migration Hub, for display on the migration status page for the application. Here you can see that Racemi DynaCenter and CloudEndure Migration have played their parts in the migration:

I can track the status of my migrations by checking the Migration Hub Dashboard:

Migration Hub works with migration tools from AWS and our Migration Partners; see the list of integrated partner tools to learn more:

Available Now
AWS Migration Hub can manage migrations in any AWS Region that has the necessary migration tools available; the hub itself runs in the US West (Oregon) Region. There is no charge for the Hub; you pay only for the AWS services that you consume in the course of the migration.

If you are ready to begin your migration to the cloud and are in need of some assistance, please take advantage of the services offered by our Migration Acceleration Partners. These organizations have earned their migration competency by repeatedly demonstrating their ability to deliver large-scale migration.

Jeff;

New – GPU-Powered Streaming Instances for Amazon AppStream 2.0

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-gpu-powered-streaming-instances-for-amazon-appstream-2-0/

We launched Amazon AppStream 2.0 at re:Invent 2016. This application streaming service allows you to deliver Windows applications to a desktop browser.

AppStream 2.0 is fully managed and provides consistent, scalable performance by running applications on general purpose, compute optimized, and memory optimized streaming instances, with delivery via NICE DCV – a secure, high-fidelity streaming protocol. Our enterprise and public sector customers have started using AppStream 2.0 in place of legacy application streaming environments that are installed on-premises. They use AppStream 2.0 to deliver both commercial and line of business applications to a desktop browser. Our ISV customers are using AppStream 2.0 to move their applications to the cloud as-is, with no changes to their code. These customers focus on demos, workshops, and commercial SaaS subscriptions.

We are getting great feedback on AppStream 2.0 and have been adding new features very quickly (even by AWS standards). So far this year we have added an image builder, federated access via SAML 2.0, CloudWatch monitoring, Fleet Auto Scaling, Simple Network Setup, persistent storage for user files (backed by Amazon S3), support for VPC security groups, and built-in user management including web portals for users.

New GPU-Powered Streaming Instances
Many of our customers have told us that they want to use AppStream 2.0 to deliver specialized design, engineering, HPC, and media applications to their users. These applications are generally graphically intensive and are designed to run on expensive, high-end PCs in conjunction with a GPU (Graphics Processing Unit). Due to the hardware requirements of these applications, cost considerations have traditionally kept them out of situations where part-time or occasional access would otherwise make sense. Recently, another requirement has come to the forefront. These applications almost always need shared, read-write access to large amounts of sensitive data that is best stored, processed, and secured in the cloud. In order to meet the needs of these users and applications, we are launching two new types of streaming instances today:

Graphics Desktop – Based on the G2 instance type, Graphics Desktop instances are designed for desktop applications that use the CUDA, DirectX, or OpenGL for rendering. These instances are equipped with 15 GiB of memory and 8 vCPUs. You can select this instance family when you build an AppStream image or configure an AppStream fleet:

Graphics Pro – Based on the brand-new G3 instance type, Graphics Pro instances are designed for high-end, high-performance applications that can use the NVIDIA APIs and/or need access to large amounts of memory. These instances are available in three sizes, with 122 to 488 GiB of memory and 16 to 64 vCPUs. Again, you can select this instance family when you configure an AppStream fleet:

To learn more about how to launch, run, and scale a streaming application environment, read Scaling Your Desktop Application Streams with Amazon AppStream 2.0.

As I noted earlier, you can use either of these two instance types to build an AppStream image. This will allow you to test and fine tune your applications and to see the instances in action.

Streaming Instances in Action
We’ve been working with several customers during a private beta program for the new instance types. Here are a few stories (and some cool screen shots) to show you some of the applications that they are streaming via AppStream 2.0:

AVEVA is a world leading provider of engineering design and information management software solutions for the marine, power, plant, offshore and oil & gas industries. As part of their work on massive capital projects, their customers need to bring many groups of specialist engineers together to collaborate on the creation of digital assets. In order to support this requirement, AVEVA is building SaaS solutions that combine the streamed delivery of engineering applications with access to a scalable project data environment that is shared between engineers across the globe. The new instances will allow AVEVA to deliver their engineering design software in SaaS form while maximizing quality and performance. Here’s a screen shot of their Everything 3D app being streamed from AppStream:

Nissan, a Japanese multinational automobile manufacturer, trains its automotive specialists using 3D simulation software running on expensive graphics workstations. The training software, developed by The DiSti Corporation, allows its specialists to simulate maintenance processes by interacting with realistic 3D models of the vehicles they work on. AppStream 2.0’s new graphics capability now allows Nissan to deliver these training tools in real time, with up to date content, to a desktop browser running on low-cost commodity PCs. Their specialists can now interact with highly realistic renderings of a vehicle that allows them to train for and plan maintenance operations with higher efficiency.

Cornell University is an American private Ivy League and land-grant doctoral university located in Ithaca, New York. They deliver advanced 3D tools such as AutoDesk AutoCAD and Inventor to students and faculty to support their course work, teaching, and research. Until now, these tools could only be used on GPU-powered workstations in a lab or classroom. AppStream 2.0 allows them to deliver the applications to a web browser running on any desktop, where they run as if they were on a local workstation. Their users are no longer limited by available workstations in labs and classrooms, and can bring their own devices and have access to their course software. This increased flexibility also means that faculty members no longer need to take lab availability into account when they build course schedules. Here’s a copy of Autodesk Inventor Professional running on AppStream at Cornell:

Now Available
Both of the graphics streaming instance families are available in the US East (Northern Virginia), US West (Oregon), EU (Ireland), and Asia Pacific (Tokyo) Regions and you can start streaming from them today. Your applications must run in a Windows 2012 R2 environment, and can make use of DirectX, OpenGL, CUDA, OpenCL, and Vulkan.

With prices in the US East (Northern Virginia) Region starting at $0.50 per hour for Graphics Desktop instances and $2.05 per hour for Graphics Pro instances, you can now run your simulation, visualization, and HPC workloads in the AWS Cloud on an economical, pay-by-the-hour basis. You can also take advantage of fast, low-latency access to Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), AWS Lambda, Amazon Redshift, and other AWS services to build processing workflows that handle pre- and post-processing of your data.

Jeff;

 

Hightail — Empowering Creative Collaboration in the Cloud

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/hightail-empowering-creative-collaboration-in-the-cloud/

Hightail – formerly YouSendIt – streamlines how creative work is reviewed, improved, and approved by helping more than 50 million professionals around the world get great content in front of their audiences faster. Since its debut in 2004 as a file sharing company, Hightail shifted its strategic direction to focus on delivering value-added creative collaboTagsration services and boasts a strong lineup of name-brand customers.

In today’s guest post, Hightail’s SVP of Technology Shiva Paranandi tells the company’s migration story, moving petabytes of data from on-premises to the cloud. He highlights their cloud vendor evaluation process and reasons for going all-in on AWS.


Hightail started as a way to help people easily share and store large files, but has since evolved into a creative collaboration tool. We became a place where users could not only control and share their digital assets, but also assemble their creative teams, connect with clients, develop creative workflows, and manage projects from start to finish. We now power collaboration services for major brands such as Lionsgate and Jimmy Kimmel Live!. With a growing list of domestic and international clients, we required more internal focus on product development and serving the users. We found that running our own data centers consumed more time, money, and manpower than we were willing to devote.

We needed an approach that would help us iterate more rapidly to meet customer needs and dramatically improve our time to market. We wanted to reduce data center costs and have the flexibility to scale up quickly in any given region around the globe. Setting up a data center in a new location took so long that it was limiting the pace of growth that we could achieve. In addition, we were tired of buying ahead of our needs, which meant we had storage capacity that we did not even use. We required a storage solution that was both tiered and highly scalable to reduce costs by allowing us to keep infrequently used data in inactive storage while also allowing us to resurface it quickly at the customer’s request. Our main drivers were agility and innovation, and the cloud enables these in a significant way. Given that, we decided to adopt a cloud-first policy that would enable us to spend time and money on initiatives that differentiate our business, instead of putting resources into managing our storage and computing infrastructure.

Comparing AWS Against Cloud Competitors

To kick off the migration, we did our due diligence by evaluating a variety of cloud vendors, including AWS, Google, IBM, and Microsoft. AWS stuck out as the clear winner for us. At one point, we considered combining services from multiple cloud providers to meet our needs, but decided the best route was to use AWS exclusively. When we factored in training, synchronization, support, and system availability along with other migration and management elements, it was just not practical to take a multi-cloud approach. With the best cost savings and an unmatched ecosystem of partner solutions, we did not need anyone else and chose to go all-in on AWS.

By migrating to AWS, we were able to secure the lowest cost-per-gigabyte pricing, gain access to a rich ecosystem, quickly develop in-house talent, and maintain SOC II compliance. The ecosystem was particularly important to us and set AWS apart from its competitors with its expansive list of partners. In fact, all the vendors we depend on for services such as previewing images, encoding videos, and serving up presentations were already a part of the network so we were easily able to leverage our existing investments and expertise. If we went with a different provider, it would have meant moving away from a platform that was already working so well for which was not the desired outcome for us. Also, the amount of talent we were able to build up in house on AWS technologies was astounding. Training our internal team to work with AWS was a simple process using available tools such as AWS conferences, training materials, and support.

Migrating Petabytes of Data

Going with AWS made things easier. In many instances, it gave us better functionality than what we were using in house. We moved multiple petabytes of data from on-premises storage to AWS with ease. AWS gave us great speeds with Direct Connect, so we were able to push all the data in a little more than three months with no user impact. We employed AWS Key Management Service to keep our data secure, which eased our minds through the move. We performed extensive QA testing before flipping users over to ensure low customer impact, using methods such as checksums between our data center and the data that got pushed to AWS.

Our new platform on AWS has greatly improved our user experience. We have seen huge improvement in reliability, performance, and uptime—all critical in our line of business. We are now able to achieve upload and download speeds up to 17 times faster than our previous data centers, and uptime has increased by orders of magnitude. Also, the time it takes us to deploy services to a new region has been cut by more than 90%. It used to take us at least six months to get a new region online, and now we can get a region up and running in less than three weeks. On AWS, we can even replicate data at the bucket level across regions for disaster recovery purposes.

To cut costs, we were successfully able to divide our storage infrastructure into frequently and infrequently accessed data. Tiered storage in Amazon S3 has been a huge advantage, allowing us to optimize our storage costs so we have more to invest in product development. We can now move data from inactive to active tiers instantly to meet customer needs and eliminated the need to overprovision our storage infrastructure. It is refreshing to see services automatically scale up or down during peak load times, and know that we are only paying for what we need.

Overall, we achieved our key strategic goal of focusing more on development and less on infrastructure. Our migration felt seamless, and the progress we were able to share is a true testament to how easy it has been for us to run our workloads on AWS. We attribute part of our successful migration to the dedicated support provided by the AWS team. They were pretty awesome. We had a couple of their technicians available 24/7 via chat, which proved to be essential during this large-scale migration.

-Shiva Paranandi, SVP of Technology at Hightail

Learning More

Learn more about cost-effective tiered data storage with Amazon S3, or dive deeper into our AWS Partner Ecosystem to see which solutions could best serve the needs of your company.

AWS HIPAA Eligibility Update (July 2017) – Eight Additional Services

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-hipaa-eligibility-update-july-2017-eight-additional-services/

It is time for an update on our on-going effort to make AWS a great host for healthcare and life sciences applications. As you can see from our Health Customer Stories page, Philips, VergeHealth, and Cambia (to choose a few) trust AWS with Protected Health Information (PHI) and Personally Identifying Information (PII) as part of their efforts to comply with HIPAA and HITECH.

In May we announced that we added Amazon API Gateway, AWS Direct Connect, AWS Database Migration Service, and Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS) to our list of HIPAA eligible services and discussed our how customers and partners are putting them to use.

Eight More Eligible Services
Today I am happy to share the news that we are adding another eight services to the list:

Amazon CloudFront can now be utilized to enhance the delivery and transfer of Protected Health Information data to applications on the Internet. By providing a completely secure and encryptable pathway, CloudFront can now be used as a part of applications that need to cache PHI. This includes applications for viewing lab results or imaging data, and those that transfer PHI from Healthcare Information Exchanges (HIEs).

AWS WAF can now be used to protect applications running on AWS which operate on PHI such as patient care portals, patient scheduling systems, and HIEs. Requests and responses containing encrypted PHI and PII can now pass through AWS WAF.

AWS Shield can now be used to protect web applications such as patient care portals and scheduling systems that operate on encrypted PHI from DDoS attacks.

Amazon S3 Transfer Acceleration can now be used to accelerate the bulk transfer of large amounts of research, genetics, informatics, insurance, or payer/payment data containing PHI/PII information. Transfers can take place between a pair of AWS Regions or from an on-premises system and an AWS Region.

Amazon WorkSpaces can now be used by researchers, informaticists, hospital administrators and other users to analyze, visualize or process PHI/PII data using on-demand Windows virtual desktops.

AWS Directory Service can now be used to connect the authentication and authorization systems of organizations that use or process PHI/PII to their resources in the AWS Cloud. For example, healthcare providers operating hybrid cloud environments can now use AWS Directory Services to allow their users to easily transition between cloud and on-premises resources.

Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) can now be used to send notifications containing encrypted PHI/PII as part of patient care, payment processing, and mobile applications.

Amazon Cognito can now be used to authenticate users into mobile patient portal and payment processing applications that use PHI/PII identifiers for accounts.

Additional HIPAA Resources
Here are some additional resources that will help you to build applications that comply with HIPAA and HITECH:

Keep in Touch
In order to make use of any AWS service in any manner that involves PHI, you must first enter into an AWS Business Associate Addendum (BAA). You can contact us to start the process.

Jeff;

DevOps Practices- Two New Webinars with Puppet and New Relic

Post Syndicated from Ana Visneski original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/devops-practices-two-new-webinars-with-puppet-and-new-relic/

This month we are hosting two joint AWS-Partner webinars about how executing DevOps practices on AWS can automate configuration management and leave time for innovation. Many organizations adopt DevOps practices to manage their cloud and on-premises environments for greater scalability, speed, and reliability and these webinars give you a chance to hear directly from the partners and customers on how they did it.

Puppet

Puppet helped ServiceChannel automate their cloud configuration management to take advantage of the scalability of AWS, achieve greater flexibility, and improve their customers’ ability to connect and collaborate more frequently.

Webinar Topic: How ServiceChannel Automated Their AWS Environment with Puppet
Customer Presenter: Brian Engler, CIO, ServiceChannel
AWS Presenter: Kevin Cochran, Partner Solutions Architect
Partner Presenter: Chris Barker, Principal Solutions Engineer, Puppet
Time: July 20th, 2017 10am – 11am PDT | 1pm – 2pm EDT

Register

New Relic

New Relic helped MLBAM utilize the scalability of AWS and the visibility provided by New Relic to create the “gold standard” for digital streaming video infrastructure.

Webinar Topic: MLB Advanced Media: Delivering a Digital Experience to 25 Million Fans with New Relic and AWS
Customer Presenter: Christian Villoslada, VP of Software Engineering, MLBAM & Brandon San Giovanni, Senior Operations Manager, Core Media Operations, MLBAM
AWS Presenter:
Kevin Cochran, Partner Solutions Architect
Partner Presenter: Lee Atchison, Senior Director of Strategic Architecture, New Relic
Time: July 25th, 2017 10am – 11am PDT | 1pm – 2pm EDT

Register

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 3

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/07/07/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-3/

Many in the US were on holiday for Independence Day earlier this week, but that didn’t slow us down: team Stockholm even shipped a new Grafana release. This issue of timeShift has plenty of great articles to highlight. If you know of a recent article about Grafana, or are writing one yourself, please get in touch, we’d be happy to feature it here.


Grafana 4.4 Released

Grafana v4.4 is now Available for download

Dashboard history and version control is here! A big thanks to Walmart Labs for their massive code contribution.

Check out what’s new in Grafana 4.4 in the release announcement.


From the Blogosphere

Plugins and Dashboards

We are excited that there have been over 100,000 plugin installations since we launched the new plugable architecture in Grafana v3. You can discover and install plugins in your own on-premises or Hosted Grafana instance from our website. Below are some recent additions and updates.

Zabbix Updated to v3.5.0 CHANGELOG.md

  • rate() function, which calculates per-second rate for growing counters.
  • Template query format. New format is {group}{host}{app}{item}. It allows to use names with dot.
  • Improved performance of groupBy() functions (at 6-10x faster than old).
  • lots of bug fixes and more

In addition to the plugins available for download, there are hundreds of pre-made dashboards ready for you to import into Grafana to get up and running quickly. Check out some of the popular dashboards.

Server Metrics (Collectd) Collectd/Graphite Server metrics dashboard (Load,CPU, Memory, Temp etc).

Data Source: Graphite | Collector: Collectd

Apache Overview System stats for uptime, cpu count, RAM, free memory %, and panels for load, I/O and network traffic. Apache workers and scoreboard panels and uptime and CPU load single stats.

Data Source: InfluxDB | Collector: Telegraf

Node Exporter Server Metrics A simple dashboard configured to be able to view multiple servers side by side.

Data Source: Prometheus | Collector: Nodeexporter

This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

Each week we’ll recognize a Grafana contributor and thank them for all of their PRs, bug reports and feedback. Many of the fixes and improvements come from our fantastic community!

ryantxu (Ryan McKinley)

Ryan has contributed PR’s to Grafana as well as being the author of 4 well-maintained plugins (Ajax Panel, Discrete Panel, Plotly Panel and Influx Admin plugins). Thank you for all your hard work!

What do you think?

Anything in particular you’d like to see in this series of posts? Too long? Too short? Boring? Let us know. Comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. With your help, we can make this a worthwhile resource.

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

AWS Price Reduction – SQL Server Standard Edition on EC2

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-price-reduction-sql-server-standard-edition-on-ec2/

I’m happy to be able to announce the 62nd AWS price reduction, this one for Microsoft SQL Server Standard Edition on EC2.

Many enterprise workloads run on Microsoft Windows, primarily on-premises or in corporate data centers. We believe that AWS is the best place to build, deploy, scale, and manage Windows applications due to the breadth of services that we provide, backed up by our global reach and our partner ecosystem. Customers like Adobe, Pitney Bowes, and DeVry University have all moved core production Windows Server workloads to AWS. Their applications run the gamut from SharePoint sites to custom .NET applications and SAP, and frequently use SQL Server.

Microsoft SQL Server on AWS runs on an EC2 Windows instance and can support your application development and migration efforts. It gives you control over every setting, just as you would have if you were running your relational database on-premises, with support for 32-bit and 64-bit versions.

Today we are reducing the On-Demand and Reserved Instance prices for Microsoft SQL Server Standard Edition on EC2 running on R4, M4, I3, and X1 instances by up to 52%, depending on instance type, size, and region. You can build and run enterprise-scale applications, massively scalable websites. and mobile applications even more cost-effectively than before.

Here are the largest price reductions for each region and instance type:

Region R4 M4 I3 X1
US East (Northern Virginia) -51% -29% -50% -52%
US East (Ohio) -51% -29% -50% -52%
US West (Oregon) -51% -29% -50% -52%
US West (Northern California) -51% -30% -50%
Canada (Central) -51% -51% -50% -44%
South America (São Paulo) -49% -30% -48%
EU (Ireland) -51% -29% -50% -51%
EU (Frankfurt) -51% -29% -50% -50%
EU (London) -51% -51% -50% -44%
Asia Pacific (Singapore) -51% -31% -50% -50%
Asia Pacific (Sydney) -51% -30% -50% -50%
Asia Pacific (Tokyo) -51% -29% -50% -50%
Asia Pacific (Seoul)  -51% -31% -50% -50%
Asia Pacific (Mumbai)  -51% -33% -50% -50%

The new, lower prices for On-Demand instances are in effect as of July 1, 2017. The new pricing for Reserved Instances is in effect today.

Jeff;

 

Blue/Green Deployments with Amazon EC2 Container Service

Post Syndicated from Nathan Taber original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/bluegreen-deployments-with-amazon-ecs/

This post and accompanying code was generously contributed by:

Jeremy Cowan
Solutions Architect
Anuj Sharma
DevOps Cloud Architect
Peter Dalbhanjan
Solutions Architect

Deploying software updates in traditional non-containerized environments is hard and fraught with risk. When you write your deployment package or script, you have to assume that the target machine is in a particular state. If your staging environment is not an exact mirror image of your production environment, your deployment could fail. These failures frequently cause outages that persist until you re-deploy the last known good version of your application. If you are an Operations Manager, this is what keeps you up at night.

Increasingly, customers want to do testing in production environments without exposing customers to the new version until the release has been vetted. Others want to expose a small percentage of their customers to the new release to gather feedback about a feature before it’s released to the broader population. This is often referred to as canary analysis or canary testing. In this post, I introduce patterns to implement blue/green and canary deployments using Application Load Balancers and target groups.

If you’d like to try this approach to blue/green deployments, we have open sourced the code and AWS CloudFormation templates in the ecs-blue-green-deployment GitHub repo. The workflow builds an automated CI/CD pipeline that deploys your service onto an ECS cluster and offers a controlled process to swap target groups when you’re ready to promote the latest version of your code to production. You can quickly set up the environment in three steps and see the blue/green swap in action. We’d love for you to try it and send us your feedback!

Benefits of blue/green

Blue/green deployments are a type of immutable deployment that help you deploy software updates with less risk. The risk is reduced by creating separate environments for the current running or “blue” version of your application, and the new or “green” version of your application.

This type of deployment gives you an opportunity to test features in the green environment without impacting the current running version of your application. When you’re satisfied that the green version is working properly, you can gradually reroute the traffic from the old blue environment to the new green environment by modifying DNS. By following this method, you can update and roll back features with near zero downtime.

A typical blue/green deployment involves shifting traffic between 2 distinct environments.

This ability to quickly roll traffic back to the still-operating blue environment is one of the key benefits of blue/green deployments. With blue/green, you should be able to roll back to the blue environment at any time during the deployment process. This limits downtime to the time it takes to realize there’s an issue in the green environment and shift the traffic back to the blue environment. Furthermore, the impact of the outage is limited to the portion of traffic going to the green environment, not all traffic. If the blast radius of deployment errors is reduced, so is the overall deployment risk.

Containers make it simpler

Historically, blue/green deployments were not often used to deploy software on-premises because of the cost and complexity associated with provisioning and managing multiple environments. Instead, applications were upgraded in place.

Although this approach worked, it had several flaws, including the ability to roll back quickly from failures. Rollbacks typically involved re-deploying a previous version of the application, which could affect the length of an outage caused by a bad release. Fixing the issue took precedence over the need to debug, so there were fewer opportunities to learn from your mistakes.

Containers can ease the adoption of blue/green deployments because they’re easily packaged and behave consistently as they’re moved between environments. This consistency comes partly from their immutability. To change the configuration of a container, update its Dockerfile and rebuild and re-deploy the container rather than updating the software in place.

Containers also provide process and namespace isolation for your applications, which allows you to run multiple versions of them side by side on the same Docker host without conflicts. Given their small sizes relative to virtual machines, you can binpack more containers per host than VMs. This lets you make more efficient use of your computing resources, reducing the cost of blue/green deployments.

Fully Managed Updates with Amazon ECS

Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) performs rolling updates when you update an existing Amazon ECS service. A rolling update involves replacing the current running version of the container with the latest version. The number of containers Amazon ECS adds or removes from service during a rolling update is controlled by adjusting the minimum and maximum number of healthy tasks allowed during service deployments.

When you update your service’s task definition with the latest version of your container image, Amazon ECS automatically starts replacing the old version of your container with the latest version. During a deployment, Amazon ECS drains connections from the current running version and registers your new containers with the Application Load Balancer as they come online.

Target groups

A target group is a logical construct that allows you to run multiple services behind the same Application Load Balancer. This is possible because each target group has its own listener.

When you create an Amazon ECS service that’s fronted by an Application Load Balancer, you have to designate a target group for your service. Ordinarily, you would create a target group for each of your Amazon ECS services. However, the approach we’re going to explore here involves creating two target groups: one for the blue version of your service, and one for the green version of your service. We’re also using a different listener port for each target group so that you can test the green version of your service using the same path as the blue service.

With this configuration, you can run both environments in parallel until you’re ready to cut over to the green version of your service. You can also do things such as restricting access to the green version to testers on your internal network, using security group rules and placement constraints. For example, you can target the green version of your service to only run on instances that are accessible from your corporate network.

Swapping Over

When you’re ready to replace the old blue service with the new green service, call the ModifyListener API operation to swap the listener’s rules for the target group rules. The change happens instantaneously. Afterward, the green service is running in the target group with the port 80 listener and the blue service is running in the target group with the port 8080 listener. The diagram below is an illustration of the approach described.

Scenario

Two services are defined, each with their own target group registered to the same Application Load Balancer but listening on different ports. Deployment is completed by swapping the listener rules between the two target groups.

The second service is deployed with a new target group listening on a different port but registered to the same Application Load Balancer.

By using 2 listeners, requests to blue services are directed to the target group with the port 80 listener, while requests to the green services are directed to target group with the port 8080 listener.

After automated or manual testing, the deployment can be completed by swapping the listener rules on the Application Load Balancer and sending traffic to the green service.

Caveats

There are a few caveats to be mindful of when using this approach. This method:

  • Assumes that your application code is completely stateless. Store state outside of the container.
  • Doesn’t gracefully drain connections. The swapping of target groups is sudden and abrupt. Therefore, be cautious about using this approach if your service has long-running transactions.
  • Doesn’t allow you to perform canary deployments. While the method gives you the ability to quickly switch between different versions of your service, it does not allow you to divert a portion of the production traffic to a canary or control the rate at which your service is deployed across the cluster.

Canary testing

While this type of deployment automates much of the heavy lifting associated with rolling deployments, it doesn’t allow you to interrupt the deployment if you discover an issue midstream. Rollbacks using the standard Amazon ECS deployment require updating the service’s task definition with the last known good version of the container. Then, you wait for Amazon ECS to schedule and deploy it across the cluster. If the latest version introduces a breaking change that went undiscovered during testing, this might be too slow.

With canary testing, if you discover the green environment is not operating as expected, there is no impact on the blue environment. You can route traffic back to it, minimizing impaired operation or downtime, and limiting the blast radius of impact.

This type of deployment is particularly useful for A/B testing where you want to expose a new feature to a subset of users to get their feedback before making it broadly available.

For canary style deployments, you can use a variation of the blue/green swap that involves deploying the blue and the green service to the same target group. Although this method is not as fast as the swap, it allows you to control the rate at which your containers are replaced by adjusting the task count for each service. Furthermore, it gives you the ability to roll back by adjusting the number of tasks for the blue and green services respectively. Unlike the swap approach described above, connections to your containers are drained gracefully. We plan to address canary style deployments for Amazon ECS in a future post.

Conclusion

With AWS, you can operationalize your blue/green deployments using Amazon ECS, an Application Load Balancer, and target groups. I encourage you to adapt the code published to the ecs-blue-green-deployment GitHub repo for your use cases and look forward to reading your feedback.

If you’re interested in learning more, I encourage you to read the Blue/Green Deployments on AWS and Practicing Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery on AWS whitepapers.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

Analysis of Top-N DynamoDB Objects using Amazon Athena and Amazon QuickSight

Post Syndicated from Rendy Oka original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/analysis-of-top-n-dynamodb-objects-using-amazon-athena-and-amazon-quicksight/

If you run an operation that continuously generates a large amount of data, you may want to know what kind of data is being inserted by your application. The ability to analyze data intake quickly can be very valuable for business units, such as operations and marketing. For many operations, it’s important to see what is driving the business at any particular moment. For retail companies, for example, understanding which products are currently popular can aid in planning for future growth. Similarly, for PR companies, understanding the impact of an advertising campaign can help them market their products more effectively.

This post covers an architecture that helps you analyze your streaming data. You’ll build a solution using Amazon DynamoDB Streams, AWS Lambda, Amazon Kinesis Firehose, and Amazon Athena to analyze data intake at a frequency that you choose. And because this is a serverless architecture, you can use all of the services here without the need to provision or manage servers.

The data source

You’ll collect a random sampling of tweets via Twitter’s API and store a variety of attributes in your DynamoDB table, such as: Twitter handle, tweet ID, hashtags, location, and Time-To-Live (TTL) value.

In DynamoDB, the primary key is used as an input to an internal hash function. The output from this function determines the partition in which the data will be stored. When using a combination of primary key and sort key as a DynamoDB schema, you need to make sure that no single partition key contains many more objects than the other partition keys because this can cause partition level throttling. For the demonstration in this blog, the Twitter handle will be the primary key and the tweet ID will be the sort key. This allows you to group and sort tweets from each user.

To help you get started, I have written a script that pulls a live Twitter stream that you can use to generate your data. All you need to do is provide your own Twitter Apps credentials, and it should generate the data immediately. Alternatively, I have also provided a script that you can use to generate random Tweets with little effort.

You can find both scripts in the Github repository:

https://github.com/awslabs/aws-blog-dynamodb-analysis

There are some modules that you may need to install to run these scripts. You can find them in Python’s module repository:

To get your own Twitter credentials, go to https://www.twitter.com/ and sign up for a free account, if you don’t already have one. After your account is set up, go to https://apps.twitter.com/. On the main landing page, choose the Create New App button. After the application is created, go to Keys and Access Tokens to get your credentials to use the Twitter API. You’ll need to generate Customer Tokens/Secret and Access Token/Secret. All four keys will be used to authenticate your request.

Architecture overview

Before we begin, let’s take a look at the overall flow of information will look like, from data ingestion into DynamoDB to visualization of results in Amazon QuickSight.

As illustrated in the architecture diagram above, any changes made to the items in DynamoDB will be captured and processed using DynamoDB Streams. Next, a Lambda function will be invoked by a trigger that is configured to respond to events in DynamoDB Streams. The Lambda function processes the data prior to pushing to Amazon Kinesis Firehose, which will output to Amazon S3. Finally, you use Amazon Athena to analyze the streaming data landing in Amazon S3. The result can be explored and visualized in Amazon QuickSight for your company’s business analytics.

You’ll need to implement your custom Lambda function to help transform the raw <key, value> data stored in DynamoDB to a JSON format for Athena to digest, but I can help you with a sample code that you are free to modify.

Implementation

In the following sections, I’ll walk through how you can set up the architecture discussed earlier.

Create your DynamoDB table

First, let’s create a DynamoDB table and enable DynamoDB Streams. This will enable data to be copied out of this table. From the console, use the user_id as the partition key and tweet_id as the sort key:

After the table is ready, you can enable DynamoDB Streams. This process operates asynchronously, so there is no performance impact on the table when you enable this feature. The easiest way to manage DynamoDB Streams is also through the DynamoDB console.

In the Overview tab of your newly created table, click Manage Stream. In the window, choose the information that will be written to the stream whenever data in the table is added or modified. In this example, you can choose either New image or New and old images.

For more details on this process, check out our documentation:

http://docs.aws.amazon.com/amazondynamodb/latest/developerguide/Streams.html

Configure Kinesis Firehose

Before creating the Lambda function, you need to configure Kinesis Firehose delivery stream so that it’s ready to accept data from Lambda. Open the Firehose console and choose Create Firehose Delivery Stream. From here, choose S3 as the destination and use the following to information to configure the resource. Note the Delivery stream name because you will use it in the next step.

For more details on this process, check out our documentation:

http://docs.aws.amazon.com/firehose/latest/dev/basic-create.html#console-to-s3

Create your Lambda function

Now that Kinesis Firehose is ready to accept data, you can create your Lambda function.

From the AWS Lambda console, choose the Create a Lambda function button and use the Blank Function. Enter a name and description, and choose Python 2.7 as the Runtime. Note your Lambda function name because you’ll need it in the next step.

In the Lambda function code field, you can paste the script that I have written for this purpose. All this function needs is the name of your Firehose stream name set as an environment variable.

import boto3
import json
import os

# Initiate Firehose client
firehose_client = boto3.client('firehose')

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    records = []
    batch   = []
    try :
        for record in event['Records']:
            tweet = {}
            t_stats = '{ "table_name":"%s", "user_id":"%s", "tweet_id":"%s", "approx_post_time":"%d" }\n' \
                      % ( record['eventSourceARN'].split('/')[1], \
                          record['dynamodb']['Keys']['user_id']['S'], \
                          record['dynamodb']['Keys']['tweet_id']['N'], \
                          int(record['dynamodb']['ApproximateCreationDateTime']) )
            tweet["Data"] = t_stats
            records.append(tweet)
        batch.append(records)
        res = firehose_client.put_record_batch(
            DeliveryStreamName = os.environ['firehose_stream_name'],
            Records = batch[0]
        )
        return 'Successfully processed {} records.'.format(len(event['Records']))
    except Exception :
        pass

The handler should be set to lambda_function.lambda_handler and you can use the existing lambda_dynamodb_streams role that’s been created by default.

Enable DynamoDB trigger and start collecting data

Everything is ready to go. Open your table using the DynamoDB console and go to the Triggers tab. Select the Create trigger drop down list and choose Existing Lambda function. In the pop-up window, select the function that you just created, and choose the Create button.

At this point, you can start collecting data with the Python script that I’ve provided. The first one will create a script that will pull public Twitter data and the other will generate fake tweets using Lorem Ipsum text.

Configure Amazon Athena to read the data

Next, you will configure Amazon Athena so that it can read the data Kinesis Firehose outputs to Amazon S3 and allow you to analyze the data as needed. You can connect to Athena directly from the Athena console, and you can establish a connection using JDBC or the Athena API. In this example, I’m going to demonstrate what this looks like on the Athena console.

First, create a new database and a new table. You can do this by running the following two queries. The first query creates a new database:

CREATE DATABASE IF NOT EXISTS ddbtablestats

And the second query creates a new table:

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE IF NOT EXISTS ddbtablestats.twitterfeed (
    `table_name` string,
    `user_id` string,
    `tweet_id` bigint,
    `approx_post_time` timestamp 
) PARTITIONED BY (
    year string,
    month string,
    day string,
    hour string 
)
ROW FORMAT SERDE 'org.openx.data.jsonserde.JsonSerDe'
WITH SERDEPROPERTIES ('serialization.format' = '1')
LOCATION 's3://myBucket/dynamodb/streams/transactions/'

Note that this table is created using partitions. Partitioning separates your data into logical parts based on certain criteria, such as date, location, language, etc. This allows Athena to selectively pull your data without needing to process the entire data set. This effectively minimizes the query execution time, and it also allows you to have greater control over the data that you want to query.

After the query has completed, you should be able to see the table in the left side pane of the Athena dashboard.

After the database and table have been created, execute the ALTER TABLE query to populate the partitions in your table. Replace the date with the current date when the script was executed.

ALTER TABLE ddbtablestats.TwitterFeed ADD IF NOT EXISTS
PARTITION (year='2017',month='05',day='17',hour='01') location 's3://myBucket/dynamodb/streams/transactions/2017/05/17/01/'

Using the Athena console, you’ll need to manually populate each partition for each additional partition that you’d like to analyze, however you can programmatically automate this process by using the JDBC driver or any AWS SDK of your choice.

For more information on partitioning in Athena, check out our documentation:

http://docs.aws.amazon.com/athena/latest/ug/partitions.html

Querying the data in Amazon Athena

This is it! Let’s run this query to see the top 10 most active Twitter users in the last 24 hours. You can do this from the Athena console:

SELECT user_id, COUNT(DISTINCT tweet_id) tweets FROM ddbTableStats.TwitterFeed
WHERE year='2017' AND month='05' AND day='17'
GROUP BY user_id
ORDER BY tweets DESC
LIMIT 10

The result should look similar to the following:

Linking Athena to Amazon QuickSight

Finally, to make this data available to a larger audience, let’s visualize this data in Amazon QuickSight. Amazon QuickSight provides native connectivity to AWS data sources such as Amazon Redshift, Amazon RDS, and Amazon Athena. Amazon QuickSight can also connect to on-premises databases, Excel, or CSV files, and it can connect to cloud data sources such as Salesforce.com. For this solution, we will connect Amazon QuickSight to the Athena table we just created.

Amazon QuickSight has a free tier that provides 1 user and 1GB of SPICE (Superfast Parallel In-memory Calculated Engine) capacity free. So you can sign up and use QuickSight free of charge.

When you are signing up for Amazon QuickSight, ensure that you grant permissions for QuickSight to connect to Athena and the S3 bucket where the data is stored.

After you’ve signed up, navigate to the new analysis button, and choose new data set, and then select the Athena data source option. Create a new name for your data source and proceed to the next prompt. At this point, you should see the Athena table you created earlier.

Choose the option to import the data to SPICE for a quicker analysis. SPICE is an in-memory optimized calculation engine that is designed for quick data visualization through parallel processing. SPICE also enables you to refresh your data sets at a regular interval or on-demand as you want.

In the dialog box, confirm this data set creation, and you’ll arrive on the landing page where you can start building your graph. The X-axis will represent the user_id and the Value will be used to represent the SUM total of the tweets from each user.

The Amazon QuickSight report looks like this:

Through this visualization, I can easily see that there are 3 users that tweeted over 20 times that day and that the majority of the users have fewer than 10 tweets that day. I can also set up a scheduled refresh of my SPICE dataset so that I have a dashboard that is regularly updated with the latest data.

Closing thoughts

Here are the benefits that you can gain from using this architecture:

  1. You can optimize the design of your DynamoDB schema that follows AWS best practice recommendations.
  1. You can run analysis and data intelligence in order to understand the current customer demands for your business.
  1. You can store incremental backup for future auditing.

The flexibility of our AWS services invites you to create and design the ideal workflow for your production at any scale, and, as always, if you ever need some guidance, don’t hesitate to reach out to us.I  hope this has been helpful to you! Please leave any questions and comments below.

 


Additional Reading

Learn how to analyze VPC Flow Logs with Amazon Kinesis Firehose, Amazon Athena, and Amazon QuickSight.


About the Author

Rendy Oka is a Big Data Support Engineer for Amazon Web Services. He provides consultations and architectural designs and partners with the TAMs, Solution Architects, and AWS product teams to help develop solutions for our customers. He is also a team lead for the big data support team in Seattle. Rendy has traveled to dozens of countries around the world and takes every opportunity to experience the local culture wherever he goes

 

 

 

 

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 2

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/06/30/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-2/

A big thank you to everyone for the likes, retweets, comments and questions from last week’s timeShift debut. We were delighted to learn that people found this new resource useful, and are excited to continue to publish weekly issues. If you know of a recent article about Grafana, or are writing one yourself, please get in touch, we’d be happy to feature it here.

From the Blogosphere

Plugins and Dashboards

We are excited that there have been over 100,000 plugin installations since we launched the new plugable architecture in Grafana v3. You can discover and install plugins in your own on-premises or Hosted Grafana instance from our website. Below are some recent additions and updates.

SimpleJson SimpleJson is a generic backend datasource that has been the foundation of a number of Grafana data source plugins. It’s also a mechanism by which any application can expose metrics over http directly to Grafana. The newest version adds basic auth.

NetXMS Grafana datasource for NetXMS open source monitoring system.

GoogleCalendar This plugin shows the event description as an annotation on your graphs.

Discrete Panel Show discrete values in a horizontal graph. This panel now supports results from the table format.

Alarm Box This panel shows the total count of values across all series. This update adds a new option to customize how the display and color values are calculated.

Status Dot This panel shows a colored dot for each series; useful to monitor latest values at a glance.

This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

Each week we’ll recognize a Grafana contributor and thank them for all of their PRs, bug reports and feedback. A majority of fixes and improvements come from our fantastic community!

mtanda (Mitsuhiro Tanda)

159 PR’s during the last 2 years and still going strong. Thank you for your contributions mtanda!

What do you think?

Anything in particular you’d like to see in this series of posts? Too long? Too short? Boring? Let us know. Comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. With your help, we can make this a worthwhile resource.

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 1

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/06/23/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-1/

Introducing timeShift

TimeShift is a new blog series we’ve created to provide a weekly curated list of links and articles centered around Grafana and the growing Grafana community. Each week we come across great articles from people who have written about how they are using Grafana, how to build effective dashboards, and a lot of discussion about the state of open source monitoring. We want to collect this information in one place and post an article every Friday afternoon highlighting some of this great content.

From the Blogosphere

We see a lot of articles covering the devops side of monitoring, but it’s interesting to see how people are using Grafana for different use cases.

Plugins and Dashboards

We are excited that there have been over 100,000 plugin installations since we launched the new plugable architecture in Grafana v3. You can discover and install plugins in your own on-premises or Hosted Grafana instance from our website. Below are some recent additions and updates.

Carpet plot A varient of the heatmap graph panel with additional display options.

DalmatinerDB No-fluff, purpose-built metric database.

Gnocchi This plugin was renamed. Users should uninstall the old version and install this new version.

This week’s MVC (Most Valuable Contributor)

Each week we’ll recognize a Grafana contributor and thank them for all of their PRs, bug reports and feedback. A majority of fixes and improvements come from our fantastic community!

thuck (Denis Doria)

Thank you for all of your PRs!

What do you think?

Anything in particular you’d like to see in this series of posts? Too long? Too short? Boring as shit? Let us know. Comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. With your help, we can make this a worthwhile resource.

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.