All posts by Ryan Sonshine

Publishing private npm packages with AWS CodeArtifact

Post Syndicated from Ryan Sonshine original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/publishing-private-npm-packages-aws-codeartifact/

This post demonstrates how to create, publish, and download private npm packages using AWS CodeArtifact, allowing you to share code across your organization without exposing your packages to the public.

The ability to control CodeArtifact repository access using AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) removes the need to manage additional credentials for a private npm repository when developers already have IAM roles configured.

You can use private npm packages for a variety of use cases, such as:

  • Reducing code duplication
  • Configuration such as code linting and styling
  • CLI tools for internal processes

This post shows how to easily create a sample project in which we publish an npm package and install the package from CodeArtifact. For more information about pipeline integration, see AWS CodeArtifact and your package management flow – Best Practices for Integration.

Solution overview

The following diagram illustrates this solution.

Diagram showing npm package publish and install with CodeArtifact

In this post, you create a private scoped npm package containing a sample function that can be used across your organization. You create a second project to download the npm package. You also learn how to structure your npm package to make logging in to CodeArtifact automatic when you want to build or publish the package.

The code covered in this post is available on GitHub:

Prerequisites

Before you begin, you need to complete the following:

  1. Create an AWS account.
  2. Install the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI). CodeArtifact is supported in these CLI versions:
    1. 18.83 or later: install the AWS CLI version 1
    2. 0.54 or later: install the AWS CLI version 2
  3. Create a CodeArtifact repository.
  4. Add required IAM permissions for CodeArtifact.

Creating your npm package

You can create your npm package in three easy steps: set up the project, create your npm script for authenticating with CodeArtifact, and publish the package.

Setting up your project

Create a directory for your new npm package. We name this directory my-package because it serves as the name of the package. We use an npm scope for this package, where @myorg represents the scope all of our organization’s packages are published under. This helps us distinguish our internal private package from external packages. See the following code:

npm init [email protected] -y

{
  "name": "@myorg/my-package",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "description": "A sample private scoped npm package",
  "main": "index.js",
  "scripts": {
    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"
  }
}

The package.json file specifies that the main file of the package is called index.js. Next, we create that file and add our package function to it:

module.exports.helloWorld = function() {
  console.log('Hello world!');
}

Creating an npm script

To create your npm script, complete the following steps:

  1. On the CodeArtifact console, choose the repository you created as part of the prerequisites.

If you haven’t created a repository, create one before proceeding.

CodeArtifact repository details console

  1. Select your CodeArtifact repository and choose Details to view the additional details for your repository.

We use two items from this page:

  • Repository name (my-repo)
  • Domain (my-domain)
  1. Create a script named co:login in our package.json. The package.json contains the following code:
{
  "name": "@myorg/my-package",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "description": "A sample private scoped npm package",
  "main": "index.js",
  "scripts": {
    "co:login": "aws codeartifact login --tool npm --repository my-repo --domain my-domain",
    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"
  }
}

Running this script updates your npm configuration to use your CodeArtifact repository and sets your authentication token, which expires after 12 hours.

  1. To test our new script, enter the following command:

npm run co:login

The following code is the output:

> aws codeartifact login --tool npm --repository my-repo --domain my-domain
Successfully configured npm to use AWS CodeArtifact repository https://my-domain-<ACCOUNT ID>.d.codeartifact.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/npm/my-repo/
Login expires in 12 hours at 2020-09-04 02:16:17-04:00
  1. Add a prepare script to our package.json to run our login command:
{
  "name": "@myorg/my-package",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "description": "A sample private scoped npm package",
  "main": "index.js",
  "scripts": {
    "prepare": "npm run co:login",
    "co:login": "aws codeartifact login --tool npm --repository my-repo --domain my-domain",
    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"
  }
}

This configures our project to automatically authenticate and generate an access token anytime npm install or npm publish run on the project.

If you see an error containing Invalid choice, valid choices are:, you need to update the AWS CLI according to the versions listed in the perquisites of this post.

Publishing your package

To publish our new package for the first time, run npm publish.

The following screenshot shows the output.

Terminal showing npm publish output

If we navigate to our CodeArtifact repository on the CodeArtifact console, we now see our new private npm package ready to be downloaded.

CodeArtifact console showing published npm package

Installing your private npm package

To install your private npm package, you first set up the project and add the CodeArtifact configs. After you install your package, it’s ready to use.

Setting up your project

Create a directory for a new application and name it my-app. This is a sample project to download our private npm package published in the previous step. You can apply this pattern to all repositories you intend on installing your organization’s npm packages in.

npm init -y

{
  "name": "my-app",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "description": "A sample application consuming a private scoped npm package",
  "main": "index.js",
  "scripts": {
    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"
  }
}

Adding CodeArtifact configs

Copy the npm scripts prepare and co:login created earlier to your new project:

{
  "name": "my-app",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "description": "A sample application consuming a private scoped npm package",
  "main": "index.js",
  "scripts": {
    "prepare": "npm run co:login",
    "co:login": "aws codeartifact login --tool npm --repository my-repo --domain my-domain",
    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"
  }
}

Installing your new private npm package

Enter the following command:

npm install @myorg/my-package

Your package.json should now list @myorg/my-package in your dependencies:

{
  "name": "my-app",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "description": "",
  "main": "index.js",
  "scripts": {
    "prepare": "npm run co:login",
    "co:login": "aws codeartifact login --tool npm --repository my-repo --domain my-domain",
    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"
  },
  "dependencies": {
    "@myorg/my-package": "^1.0.0"
  }
}

Using your new npm package

In our my-app application, create a file named index.js to run code from our package containing the following:

const { helloWorld } = require('@myorg/my-package');

helloWorld();

Run node index.js in your terminal to see the console print the message from our @myorg/my-package helloWorld function.

Cleaning Up

If you created a CodeArtifact repository for the purposes of this post, use one of the following methods to delete the repository:

Remove the changes made to your user profile’s npm configuration by running npm config delete registry, this will remove the CodeArtifact repository from being set as your default npm registry.

Conclusion

In this post, you successfully published a private scoped npm package stored in CodeArtifact, which you can reuse across multiple teams and projects within your organization. You can use npm scripts to streamline the authentication process and apply this pattern to save time.

About the Author

Ryan Sonshine

Ryan Sonshine is a Cloud Application Architect at Amazon Web Services. He works with customers to drive digital transformations while helping them architect, automate, and re-engineer solutions to fully leverage the AWS Cloud.