Tag Archives: humor

OMG The Stupid It Burns

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original https://blog.erratasec.com/2018/04/omg-stupid-it-burns.html

This article, pointed out by @TheGrugq, is stupid enough that it’s worth rebutting.

The article starts with the question “Why did the lessons of Stuxnet, Wannacry, Heartbleed and Shamoon go unheeded?“. It then proceeds to ignore the lessons of those things.
Some of the actual lessons should be things like how Stuxnet crossed air gaps, how Wannacry spread through flat Windows networking, how Heartbleed comes from technical debt, and how Shamoon furthers state aims by causing damage.
But this article doesn’t cover the technical lessons. Instead, it thinks the lesson should be the moral lesson, that we should take these things more seriously. But that’s stupid. It’s the sort of lesson people teach you that know nothing about the topic. When you have nothing of value to contribute to a topic you can always take the moral high road and criticize everyone for being morally weak for not taking it more seriously. Obviously, since doctors haven’t cured cancer yet, it’s because they don’t take the problem seriously.
The article continues to ignore the lesson of these cyber attacks and instead regales us with a list of military lessons from WW I and WW II. This makes the same flaw that many in the military make, trying to understand cyber through analogies with the real world. It’s not that such lessons could have no value, it’s that this article contains a poor list of them. It seems to consist of a random list of events that appeal to the author rather than events that have bearing on cybersecurity.
Then, in case we don’t get the point, the article bullies us with hyperbole, cliches, buzzwords, bombastic language, famous quotes, and citations. It’s hard to see how most of them actually apply to the text. Rather, it seems like they are included simply because he really really likes them.
The article invests much effort in discussing the buzzword “OODA loop”. Most attacks in cyberspace don’t have one. Instead, attackers flail around, trying lots of random things, overcoming defense with brute-force rather than an understanding of what’s going on. That’s obviously the case with Wannacry: it was an accident, with the perpetrator experimenting with what would happen if they added the ETERNALBLUE exploit to their existing ransomware code. The consequence was beyond anybody’s ability to predict.
You might claim that this is just the first stage, that they’ll loop around, observe Wannacry’s effects, orient themselves, decide, then act upon what they learned. Nope. Wannacry burned the exploit. It’s essentially removed any vulnerable systems from the public Internet, thereby making it impossible to use what they learned. It’s still active a year later, with infected systems behind firewalls busily scanning the Internet so that if you put a new system online that’s vulnerable, it’ll be taken offline within a few hours, before any other evildoer can take advantage of it.
See what I’m doing here? Learning the actual lessons of things like Wannacry? The thing the above article fails to do??
The article has a humorous paragraph on “defense in depth”, misunderstanding the term. To be fair, it’s the cybersecurity industry’s fault: they adopted then redefined the term. That’s why there’s two separate articles on Wikipedia: one for the old military term (as used in this article) and one for the new cybersecurity term.
As used in the cybersecurity industry, “defense in depth” means having multiple layers of security. Many organizations put all their defensive efforts on the perimeter, and none inside a network. The idea of “defense in depth” is to put more defenses inside the network. For example, instead of just one firewall at the edge of the network, put firewalls inside the network to segment different subnetworks from each other, so that a ransomware infection in the customer support computers doesn’t spread to sales and marketing computers.
The article talks about exploiting WiFi chips to bypass the defense in depth measures like browser sandboxes. This is conflating different types of attacks. A WiFi attack is usually considered a local attack, from somebody next to you in bar, rather than a remote attack from a server in Russia. Moreover, far from disproving “defense in depth” such WiFi attacks highlight the need for it. Namely, phones need to be designed so that successful exploitation of other microprocessors (namely, the WiFi, Bluetooth, and cellular baseband chips) can’t directly compromise the host system. In other words, once exploited with “Broadpwn”, a hacker would need to extend the exploit chain with another vulnerability in the hosts Broadcom WiFi driver rather than immediately exploiting a DMA attack across PCIe. This suggests that if PCIe is used to interface to peripherals in the phone that an IOMMU be used, for “defense in depth”.
Cybersecurity is a young field. There are lots of useful things that outsider non-techies can teach us. Lessons from military history would be well-received.
But that’s not this story. Instead, this story is by an outsider telling us we don’t know what we are doing, that they do, and then proceeds to prove they don’t know what they are doing. Their argument is based on a moral suasion and bullying us with what appears on the surface to be intellectual rigor, but which is in fact devoid of anything smart.
My fear, here, is that I’m going to be in a meeting where somebody has read this pretentious garbage, explaining to me why “defense in depth” is wrong and how we need to OODA faster. I’d rather nip this in the bud, pointing out if you found anything interesting from that article, you are wrong.

SUPER game night 3: GAMES MADE QUICK??? 2.0

Post Syndicated from Eevee original https://eev.ee/blog/2018/01/23/super-game-night-3-games-made-quick-2-0/

Game night continues with a smorgasbord of games from my recent game jam, GAMES MADE QUICK??? 2.0!

The idea was to make a game in only a week while watching AGDQ, as an alternative to doing absolutely nothing for a week while watching AGDQ. (I didn’t submit a game myself; I was chugging along on my Anise game, which isn’t finished yet.)

I can’t very well run a game jam and not play any of the games, so here’s some of them in no particular order! Enjoy!

These are impressions, not reviews. I try to avoid major/ending spoilers, but big plot points do tend to leave impressions.

Weather Quest, by timlmul

short · rpg · jan 2017 · (lin)/mac/win · free on itch · jam entry

Weather Quest is its author’s first shipped game, written completely from scratch (the only vendored code is a micro OO base). It’s very short, but as someone who has also written LÖVE games completely from scratch, I can attest that producing something this game-like in a week is a fucking miracle. Bravo!

For reference, a week into my first foray, I think I was probably still writing my own Tiled importer like an idiot.

Only Mac and Windows builds are on itch, but it’s a LÖVE game, so Linux folks can just grab a zip from GitHub and throw that at love.

FINAL SCORE: ⛅☔☀

Pancake Numbers Simulator, by AnorakThePrimordial

short · sim · jan 2017 · lin/mac/win · free on itch · jam entry

Given a stack of N pancakes (of all different sizes and in no particular order), the Nth pancake number is the most flips you could possibly need to sort the pancakes in order with the smallest on top. A “flip” is sticking a spatula under one of the pancakes and flipping the whole sub-stack over. There’s, ah, a video embedded on the game page with some visuals.

Anyway, this game lets you simulate sorting a stack via pancake flipping, which is surprisingly satisfying! I enjoy cleaning up little simulated messes, such as… incorrectly-sorted pancakes, I guess?

This probably doesn’t work too well as a simulator for solving the general problem — you’d have to find an optimal solution for every permutation of N pancakes to be sure you were right. But it’s a nice interactive illustration of the problem, and if you know the pancake number for your stack size of choice (which I wish the game told you — for seven pancakes, it’s 8), then trying to restore a stack in that many moves makes for a nice quick puzzle.

FINAL SCORE: \(\frac{18}{11}\)

Framed Animals, by chridd

short · metroidvania · jan 2017 · web/win · free on itch · jam entry

The concept here was to kill the frames, save the animals, which is a delightfully literal riff on a long-running AGDQ/SGDQ donation incentive — people vote with their dollars to decide whether Super Metroid speedrunners go out of their way to free the critters who show you how to walljump and shinespark. Super Metroid didn’t have a showing at this year’s AGDQ, and so we have this game instead.

It’s rough, but clever, and I got really into it pretty quickly — each animal you save gives you a new ability (in true Metroid style), and you get to test that ability out by playing as the animal, with only that ability and no others, to get yourself back to the most recent save point.

I did, tragically, manage to get myself stuck near what I think was about to be the end of the game, so some of the animals will remain framed forever. What an unsatisfying conclusion.

Gravity feels a little high given the size of the screen, and like most tile-less platformers, there’s not really any way to gauge how high or long your jump is before you leap. But I’m only even nitpicking because I think this is a great idea and I hope the author really does keep working on it.

FINAL SCORE: $136,596.69

Battle 4 Glory, by Storyteller Games

short · fighter · jan 2017 · win · free on itch · jam entry

This is a Smash Bros-style brawler, complete with the four players, the 2D play area in a 3D world, and the random stage obstacles showing up. I do like the Smash style, despite not otherwise being a fan of fighting games, so it’s nice to see another game chase that aesthetic.

Alas, that’s about as far as it got — which is pretty far for a week of work! I don’t know what more to say, though. The environments are neat, but unless I’m missing something, the only actions at your disposal are jumping and very weak melee attacks. I did have a good few minutes of fun fruitlessly mashing myself against the bumbling bots, as you can see.

FINAL SCORE: 300%

Icnaluferu Guild, Year Sixteen, by CHz

short · adventure · jan 2017 · web · free on itch · jam entry

Here we have the first of several games made with bitsy, a micro game making tool that basically only supports walking around, talking to people, and picking up items.

I tell you this because I think half of my appreciation for this game is in the ways it wriggled against those limits to emulate a Zelda-like dungeon crawler. Everything in here is totally fake, and you can’t really understand just how fake unless you’ve tried to make something complicated with bitsy.

It’s pretty good. The dialogue is entertaining (the rest of your party develops distinct personalities solely through oneliners, somehow), the riffs on standard dungeon fare are charming, and the Link’s Awakening-esque perspective walls around the edges of each room are fucking glorious.

FINAL SCORE: 2 bits

The Lonely Tapes, by JTHomeslice

short · rpg · jan 2017 · web · free on itch · jam entry

Another bitsy entry, this one sees you play as a Wal— sorry, a JogDawg, which has lost its cassette tapes and needs to go recover them!

(A cassette tape is like a VHS, but for music.)

(A VHS is—)

I have the sneaking suspicion that I missed out on some musical in-jokes, due to being uncultured swine. I still enjoyed the game — it’s always clear when someone is passionate about the thing they’re writing about, and I could tell I was awash in that aura even if some of it went over my head. You know you’ve done good if someone from way outside your sphere shows up and still has a good time.

FINAL SCORE: Nine… Inch Nails? They’re a band, right? God I don’t know write your own damn joke

Pirate Kitty-Quest, by TheKoolestKid

short · adventure · jan 2017 · win · free on itch · jam entry

I completely forgot I’d even given “my birthday” and “my cat” as mostly-joking jam themes until I stumbled upon this incredible gem. I don’t think — let me just check here and — yeah no this person doesn’t even follow me on Twitter. I have no idea who they are?

BUT THEY MADE A GAME ABOUT ANISE AS A PIRATE, LOOKING FOR TREASURE

PIRATE. ANISE

PIRATE ANISE!!!

This game wins the jam, hands down. 🏆

FINAL SCORE: Yarr, eight pieces o’ eight

CHIPS Mario, by NovaSquirrel

short · platformer · jan 2017 · (lin/mac)/win · free on itch · jam entry

You see this? This is fucking witchcraft.

This game is made with MegaZeux. MegaZeux games look like THIS. Text-mode, bound to a grid, with two colors per cell. That’s all you get.

Until now, apparently?? The game is a tech demo of “unbound” sprites, which can be drawn on top of the character grid without being aligned to it. And apparently have looser color restrictions.

The collision is a little glitchy, which isn’t surprising for a MegaZeux platformer; I had some fun interactions with platforms a couple times. But hey, goddamn, it’s free-moving Mario, in MegaZeux, what the hell.

(I’m looking at the most recently added games on DigitalMZX now, and I notice that not only is this game in the first slot, but NovaSquirrel’s MegaZeux entry for Strawberry Jam last February is still in the seventh slot. RIP, MegaZeux. I’m surprised a major feature like this was even added if the community has largely evaporated?)

FINAL SCORE: n/a, disqualified for being probably summoned from the depths of Hell

d!¢< pic, by 573 Games

short · story · jan 2017 · web · free on itch · jam entry

This is a short story about not sending dick pics. It’s very short, so I can’t say much without spoiling it, but: you are generally prompted to either text something reasonable, or send a dick pic. You should not send a dick pic.

It’s a fascinating artifact, not because of the work itself, but because it’s so terse that I genuinely can’t tell what the author was even going for. And this is the kind of subject where the author was, surely, going for something. Right? But was it genuinely intended to be educational, or was it tongue-in-cheek about how some dudes still don’t get it? Or is it side-eying the player who clicks the obviously wrong option just for kicks, which is the same reason people do it for real? Or is it commentary on how “send a dick pic” is a literal option for every response in a real conversation, too, and it’s not that hard to just not do it — unless you are one of the kinds of people who just feels a compulsion to try everything, anything, just because you can? Or is it just a quick Twine and I am way too deep in this? God, just play the thing, it’s shorter than this paragraph.

I’m also left wondering when it is appropriate to send a dick pic. Presumably there is a correct time? Hopefully the author will enter Strawberry Jam 2 to expound upon this.

FINAL SCORE: 3½” 😉

Marble maze, by Shtille

short · arcade · jan 2017 · win · free on itch · jam entry

Ah, hm. So this is a maze navigated by rolling a marble around. You use WASD to move the marble, and you can also turn the camera with the arrow keys.

The trouble is… the marble’s movement is always relative to the world, not the camera. That means if you turn the camera 30° and then try to move the marble, it’ll move at a 30° angle from your point of view.

That makes navigating a maze, er, difficult.

Camera-relative movement is the kind of thing I take so much for granted that I wouldn’t even think to do otherwise, and I think it’s valuable to look at surprising choices that violate fundamental conventions, so I’m trying to take this as a nudge out of my comfort zone. What could you design in an interesting way that used world-relative movement? Probably not the player, but maybe something else in the world, as long as you had strong landmarks? Hmm.

FINAL SCORE: ᘔ

Refactor: flight, by fluffy

short · arcade · jan 2017 · lin/mac/win · free on itch · jam entry

Refactor is a game album, which is rather a lot what it sounds like, and Flight is one of the tracks. Which makes this a single, I suppose.

It’s one of those games where you move down an oddly-shaped tunnel trying not to hit the walls, but with some cute twists. Coins and gems hop up from the bottom of the screen in time with the music, and collecting them gives you points. Hitting a wall costs you some points and kills your momentum, but I don’t think outright losing is possible, which is great for me!

Also, the monk cycles through several animal faces. I don’t know why, and it’s very good. One of those odd but memorable details that sits squarely on the intersection of abstract, mysterious, and a bit weird, and refuses to budge from that spot.

The music is great too? Really chill all around.

FINAL SCORE: 🎵🎵🎵🎵

The Adventures of Klyde

short · adventure · jan 2017 · web · free on itch · jam entry

Another bitsy game, this one starring a pig (humorously symbolized by a giant pig nose with ears) who must collect fruit and solve some puzzles.

This is charmingly nostalgic for me — it reminds me of some standard fare in engines like MegaZeux, where the obvious things to do when presented with tiles and pickups were to make mazes. I don’t mean that in a bad way; the maze is the fundamental environmental obstacle.

A couple places in here felt like invisible teleport mazes I had to brute-force, but I might have been missing a hint somewhere. I did make it through with only a little trouble, but alas — I stepped in a bad warp somewhere and got sent to the upper left corner of the starting screen, which is surrounded by walls. So Klyde’s new life is being trapped eternally in a nowhere space.

FINAL SCORE: 19/20 apples

And more

That was only a third of the games, and I don’t think even half of the ones I’ve played. I’ll have to do a second post covering the rest of them? Maybe a third?

Or maybe this is a ludicrous format for commenting on several dozen games and I should try to narrow it down to the ones that resonated the most for Strawberry Jam 2? Maybe??

Yarrrr! Dutch ISPs Block The Pirate Bay But It’s Bad Timing for Trolls

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/yarrrr-dutch-isps-block-the-pirate-bay-but-its-bad-timing-for-trolls-171005/

While many EU countries have millions of Internet pirates, few have given citizens the freedom to plunder like the Netherlands. For many years, Dutch Internet users actually went about their illegal downloading with government blessing.

Just over three years ago, downloading and copying movies and music for personal use was not punishable by law. Instead, the Dutch compensated rightsholders through a “piracy levy” on writable media, hard drives and electronic devices with storage capacity, including smartphones.

Following a ruling from the European Court of Justice in 2014, however, all that came to an end. Along with uploading (think BitTorrent sharing), downloading was also outlawed.

Around the same time, The Court of The Hague handed down a decision in a long-running case which had previously forced two Dutch ISPs, Ziggo and XS4ALL, to block The Pirate Bay.

Ruling against local anti-piracy outfit BREIN, it was decided that the ISPs wouldn’t have to block The Pirate Bay after all. After a long and tortuous battle, however, the ISPs learned last month that they would have to block the site, pending a decision from the Supreme Court.

On September 22, both ISPs were given 10 business days to prevent subscriber access to the notorious torrent site, or face fines of 2,000 euros per day, up to a maximum of one million euros.

With that time nearly up, yesterday Ziggo broke cover to become the first of the pair to block the site. On a dedicated diversion page, somewhat humorously titled ziggo.nl/yarrr, the ISP explained the situation to now-blocked users.

“You are trying to visit a page of The Pirate Bay. On September 22, the Hague Court obliged us to block access to this site. The pirate flag is thus handled by us. The case is currently at the Supreme Court which judges the basic questions in this case,” the notice reads.

Ziggo Pirate Bay message (translated)

Customers of XS4ALL currently have no problem visiting The Pirate Bay but according to a statement handed to Tweakers by a spokesperson, the blockade will be implemented today.

In addition to the site’s main domains, the injunction will force the ISPs to block 155 URLs and IP addresses in total, a list that has been drawn up by BREIN to include various mirrors, proxies, and alternate access points. XS4All says it will publish a list of all the blocked items on its notification page.

While the re-introduction of a Pirate Bay blockade in the Netherlands is an achievement for BREIN, it’s potentially bad timing for the copyright trolls waiting in the wings to snare Dutch file-sharers.

As recently reported, movie outfit Dutch Filmworks (DFW) is preparing a wave of cash-settlement copyright-trolling letters to mimic those sent by companies elsewhere.

There’s little doubt that users of The Pirate Bay would’ve been DFW’s targets but it seems likely that given the introduction of blockades, many Dutch users will start to educate themselves on the use of VPNs to protect their privacy, or at least become more aware of the risks.

Of course, there will be no real shortage of people who’ll continue to download without protection, but DFW are getting into this game just as it’s likely to get more difficult for them. As more and more sites get blocked (and that is definitely BREIN’s overall plan) the low hanging fruit will sit higher and higher up the tree – and the cash with it.

Like all methods of censorship, site-blocking eventually drives communication underground. While anti-piracy outfits all say blocking is necessary, obfuscation and encryption isn’t welcomed by any of them.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

More notes on US-CERTs IOCs

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2017/06/more-notes-on-us-certs-iocs.html

Yet another Russian attack against the power grid, and yet more bad IOCs from the DHS US-CERT.

IOCs are “indicators of compromise“, things you can look for in order to order to see if you, too, have been hacked by the same perpetrators. There are several types of IOCs, ranging from the highly specific to the uselessly generic.

A uselessly generic IOC would be like trying to identify bank robbers by the fact that their getaway car was “white” in color. It’s worth documenting, so that if the police ever show up in a suspected cabin in the woods, they can note that there’s a “white” car parked in front.

But if you work bank security, that doesn’t mean you should be on the lookout for “white” cars. That would be silly.

This is what happens with US-CERT’s IOCs. They list some potentially useful things, but they also list a lot of junk that waste’s people’s times, with little ability to distinguish between the useful and the useless.

An example: a few months ago was the GRIZZLEYBEAR report published by US-CERT. Among other things, it listed IP addresses used by hackers. There was no description which would be useful IP addresses to watch for, and which would be useless.

Some of these IP addresses were useful, pointing to servers the group has been using a long time as command-and-control servers. Other IP addresses are more dubious, such as Tor exit nodes. You aren’t concerned about any specific Tor exit IP address, because it changes randomly, so has no relationship to the attackers. Instead, if you cared about those Tor IP addresses, what you should be looking for is a dynamically updated list of Tor nodes updated daily.

And finally, they listed IP addresses of Yahoo, because attackers passed data through Yahoo servers. No, it wasn’t because those Yahoo servers had been compromised, it’s just that everyone passes things though them, like email.

A Vermont power-plant blindly dumped all those IP addresses into their sensors. As a consequence, the next morning when an employee checked their Yahoo email, the sensors triggered. This resulted in national headlines about the Russians hacking the Vermont power grid.

Today, the US-CERT made similar mistakes with CRASHOVERRIDE. They took a report from Dragos Security, then mutilated it. Dragos’s own IOCs focused on things like hostile strings and file hashes of the hostile files. They also included filenames, but similar to the reason you’d noticed a white car — because it happened, not because you should be on the lookout for it. In context, there’s nothing wrong with noting the file name.

But the US-CERT pulled the filenames out of context. One of those filenames was, humorously, “svchost.exe”. It’s the name of an essential Windows service. Every Windows computer is running multiple copies of “svchost.exe”. It’s like saying “be on the lookout for Windows”.

Yes, it’s true that viruses use the same filenames as essential Windows files like “svchost.exe”. That’s, generally, something you should be aware of. But that CRASHOVERRIDE did this is wholly meaningless.

What Dragos Security was actually reporting was that a “svchost.exe” with the file hash of 79ca89711cdaedb16b0ccccfdcfbd6aa7e57120a was the virus — it’s the hash that’s the important IOC. Pulling the filename out of context is just silly.

Luckily, the DHS also provides some of the raw information provided by Dragos. But even then, there’s problems: they provide it in formatted form, for HTML, PDF, or Excel documents. This corrupts the original data so that it’s no longer machine readable. For example, from their webpage, they have the following:

import “pe”
import “hash”

Among the problems are the fact that the quote marks have been altered, probably by Word’s “smart quotes” feature. In other cases, I’ve seen PDF documents get confused by the number 0 and the letter O, as if the raw data had been scanned in from a printed document and OCRed.

If this were a “threat intel” company,  we’d call this snake oil. The US-CERT is using Dragos Security’s reports to promote itself, but ultimate providing negative value, mutilating the content.

This, ultimately, causes a lot of harm. The press trusted their content. So does the network of downstream entities, like municipal power grids. There are tens of thousands of such consumers of these reports, often with less expertise than even US-CERT. There are sprinklings of smart people in these organizations, I meet them at hacker cons, and am fascinated by their stories. But institutionally, they are dumbed down the same level as these US-CERT reports, with the smart people marginalized.

There are two solutions to this problem. The first is that when the stupidity of what you do causes everyone to laugh at you, stop doing it. The second is to value technical expertise, empowering those who know what they are doing. Examples of what not to do are giving power to people like Obama’s cyberczar, Michael Daniels, who once claimed his lack of technical knowledge was a bonus, because it allowed him to see the strategic picture instead of getting distracted by details.

“Only a year? It’s felt like forever”: a twelve-month retrospective

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/12-months-raspberry-pi/

This weekend saw my first anniversary at Raspberry Pi, and this blog marks my 100th post written for the company. It would have been easy to let one milestone or the other slide had they not come along hand in hand, begging for some sort of acknowledgement.

Alex, Matt, and Courtney in a punt on the Cam

The day Liz decided to keep me

So here it is!

Joining the crew

Prior to my position in the Comms team as Social Media Editor, my employment history was largely made up of retail sales roles and, before that, bit parts in theatrical backstage crews. I never thought I would work for the Raspberry Pi Foundation, despite its firm position on my Top Five Awesome Places I’d Love to Work list. How could I work for a tech company when my knowledge of tech stretched as far as dismantling my Game Boy when I was a kid to see how the insides worked, or being the one friend everyone went to when their phone didn’t do what it was meant to do? I never thought about the other side of the Foundation coin, or how I could find my place within the hidden workings that turned the cogs that brought everything together.

… when suddenly, as if out of nowhere, a new job with a dream company. #raspberrypi #positive #change #dosomething

12 Likes, 1 Comments – Alex J’rassic (@thealexjrassic) on Instagram: “… when suddenly, as if out of nowhere, a new job with a dream company. #raspberrypi #positive…”

A little luck, a well-written though humorous resumé, and a meeting with Liz and Helen later, I found myself the newest member of the growing team at Pi Towers.

Ticking items off the Bucket List

I thought it would be fun to point out some of the chances I’ve had over the last twelve months and explain how they fit within the world of Raspberry Pi. After all, we’re about more than just a $35 credit card-sized computer. We’re a charitable Foundation made up of some wonderful and exciting projects, people, and goals.

High altitude ballooning (HAB)

Skycademy offers educators in the UK the chance to come to Pi Towers Cambridge to learn how to plan a balloon launch, build a payload with onboard Raspberry Pi and Camera Module, and provide teachers with the skills needed to take their students on an adventure to near space, with photographic evidence to prove it.

All the screens you need to hunt balloons. . We have our landing point and are now rushing to Therford to find the payload in a field. . #HAB #RasppberryPi

332 Likes, 5 Comments – Raspberry Pi (@raspberrypifoundation) on Instagram: “All the screens you need to hunt balloons. . We have our landing point and are now rushing to…”

I was fortunate enough to join Sky Captain James, along with Dan Fisher, Dave Akerman, and Steve Randell on a test launch back in August last year. Testing out new kit that James had still been tinkering with that morning, we headed to a field in Elsworth, near Cambridge, and provided Facebook Live footage of the process from payload build to launch…to the moment when our balloon landed in an RAF shooting range some hours later.

RAF firing range sign

“Can we have our balloon back, please, mister?”

Having enjoyed watching Blue Peter presenters send up a HAB when I was a child, I marked off the event on my bucket list with a bold tick, and I continue to show off the photographs from our Raspberry Pi as it reached near space.

Spend the day launching/chasing a high-altitude balloon. Look how high it went!!! #HAB #ballooning #space #wellspacekinda #ish #photography #uk #highaltitude

13 Likes, 2 Comments – Alex J’rassic (@thealexjrassic) on Instagram: “Spend the day launching/chasing a high-altitude balloon. Look how high it went!!! #HAB #ballooning…”

You can find more information on Skycademy here, plus more detail about our test launch day in Dan’s blog post here.

Dear Raspberry Pi Friends…

My desk is slowly filling with stuff: notes, mementoes, and trinkets that find their way to me from members of the community, both established and new to the life of Pi. There are thank you notes, updates, and more from people I’ve chatted to online as they explore their way around the world of Pi.

Letter of thanks to Raspberry Pi from a young fan

*heart melts*

By plugging myself into social media on a daily basis, I often find hidden treasures that go unnoticed due to the high volume of tags we receive on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and so on. Kids jumping off chairs in delight as they complete their first Scratch project, newcomers to the Raspberry Pi shedding a tear as they make an LED blink on their kitchen table, and seasoned makers turning their hobby into something positive to aid others.

It’s wonderful to join in the excitement of people discovering a new skill and exploring the community of Raspberry Pi makers: I’ve been known to shed a tear as a result.

Meeting educators at Bett, chatting to teen makers at makerspaces, and sharing a cupcake or three at the birthday party have been incredible opportunities to get to know you all.

You’re all brilliant.

The Queens of Robots, both shoddy and otherwise

Last year we welcomed the Queen of Shoddy Robots, Simone Giertz to Pi Towers, where we chatted about making, charity, and space while wandering the colleges of Cambridge and hanging out with flat Tim Peake.

Queen of Robots @simonegiertz came to visit #PiTowers today. We hung out with cardboard @astro_timpeake and ate chelsea buns at @fitzbillies #Cambridge. . We also had a great talk about the educational projects of the #RaspberryPi team, #AstroPi and how not enough people realise we’re a #charity. . If you’d like to learn more about the Raspberry Pi Foundation and the work we do with #teachers and #education, check out our website – www.raspberrypi.org. . How was your day? Get up to anything fun?

597 Likes, 3 Comments – Raspberry Pi (@raspberrypifoundation) on Instagram: “Queen of Robots @simonegiertz came to visit #PiTowers today. We hung out with cardboard…”

And last month, the wonderful Estefannie ‘Explains it All’ de La Garza came to hang out, make things, and discuss our educational projects.

Estefannie on Twitter

Ahhhh!!! I still can’t believe I got to hang out and make stuff at the @Raspberry_Pi towers!! Thank you thank you!!

Meeting such wonderful, exciting, and innovative YouTubers was a fantastic inspiration to work on my own projects and to try to do more to help others discover ways to connect with tech through their own interests.

Those ‘wow’ moments

Every Raspberry Pi project I see on a daily basis is awesome. The moment someone takes an idea and does something with it is, in my book, always worthy of awe and appreciation. Whether it be the aforementioned flashing LED, or sending Raspberry Pis to the International Space Station, if you have turned your idea into reality, I applaud you.

Some of my favourite projects over the last twelve months have not only made me say “Wow!”, they’ve also inspired me to want to do more with myself, my time, and my growing maker skill.

Museum in a Box on Twitter

Great to meet @alexjrassic today and nerd out about @Raspberry_Pi and weather balloons and @Space_Station and all things #edtech 🎈⛅🛰📚🤖

Projects such as Museum in a Box, a wonderful hands-on learning aid that brings the world to the hands of children across the globe, honestly made me tear up as I placed a miniaturised 3D-printed Virginia Woolf onto a wooden box and gasped as she started to speak to me.

Jill Ogle’s Let’s Robot project had me in awe as Twitch-controlled Pi robots tackled mazes, attempted to cut birthday cake, or swung to slap Jill in the face over webcam.

Jillian Ogle on Twitter

@SryAbtYourCats @tekn0rebel @Beam Lol speaking of faces… https://t.co/1tqFlMNS31

Every day I discover new, wonderful builds that both make me wish I’d thought of them first, and leave me wondering how they manage to make them work in the first place.

Space

We have Raspberry Pis in space. SPACE. Actually space.

Raspberry Pi on Twitter

New post: Mission accomplished for the European @astro_pi challenge and @esa @Thom_astro is on his way home 🚀 https://t.co/ycTSDR1h1Q

Twelve months later, this still blows my mind.

And let’s not forget…

  • The chance to visit both the Houses of Parliment and St James’s Palace

Raspberry Pi team at the Houses of Parliament

  • Going to a Doctor Who pre-screening and meeting Peter Capaldi, thanks to Clare Sutcliffe

There’s no need to smile when you’re #DoctorWho.

13 Likes, 2 Comments – Alex J’rassic (@thealexjrassic) on Instagram: “There’s no need to smile when you’re #DoctorWho.”

We’re here. Where are you? . . . . . #raspberrypi #vidconeu #vidcon #pizero #zerow #travel #explore #adventure #youtube

1,944 Likes, 30 Comments – Raspberry Pi (@raspberrypifoundation) on Instagram: “We’re here. Where are you? . . . . . #raspberrypi #vidconeu #vidcon #pizero #zerow #travel #explore…”

  • Making a GIF Cam and other builds, and sharing them with you all via the blog

Made a Gif Cam using a Raspberry Pi, Pi camera, button and a couple LEDs. . When you press the button, it takes 8 images and stitches them into a gif file. The files then appear on my MacBook. . Check out our Twitter feed (Raspberry_Pi) for examples! . Next step is to fit it inside a better camera body. . #DigitalMaking #Photography #Making #Camera #Gif #MakersGonnaMake #LED #Creating #PhotosofInstagram #RaspberryPi

19 Likes, 1 Comments – Alex J’rassic (@thealexjrassic) on Instagram: “Made a Gif Cam using a Raspberry Pi, Pi camera, button and a couple LEDs. . When you press the…”

The next twelve months

Despite Eben jokingly firing me near-weekly across Twitter, or Philip giving me the ‘Dad glare’ when I pull wires and buttons out of a box under my desk to start yet another project, I don’t plan on going anywhere. Over the next twelve months, I hope to continue discovering awesome Pi builds, expanding on my own skills, and curating some wonderful projects for you via the Raspberry Pi blog, the Raspberry Pi Weekly newsletter, my submissions to The MagPi Magazine, and the occasional video interview or two.

It’s been a pleasure. Thank you for joining me on the ride!

The post “Only a year? It’s felt like forever”: a twelve-month retrospective appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

John Oliver is wrong about Net Neutrality

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2017/05/john-oliver-is-wrong-about-net.html

People keep linking to John Oliver bits. We should stop doing this. This is comedy, but people are confused into thinking Oliver is engaging in rational political debate:
Enlightened people know that reasonable people disagree, that there’s two sides to any debate. John Oliver’s bit erodes that belief, making one side (your side) sound smart, and the other side sound unreasonable.
The #1 thing you should know about Net Neutrality is that reasonable people disagree. It doesn’t mean they are right, only that they are reasonable. They aren’t stupid. They aren’t shills for the telcom lobby, or confused by the telcom lobby. Indeed, those opposed to Net Neutrality are the tech experts who know how packets are routed, whereas the supporters tend only to be lawyers, academics, and activists. If you think that the anti-NetNeutrality crowd is unreasonable, then you are in a dangerous filter bubble.
Most everything in John Oliver’s piece is incorrect.
For example, he says that without Net Neutrality, Comcast can prefer original shows it produces, and slow down competing original shows by Netflix. This is silly: Comcast already does that, even with NetNeutrality rules.
Comcast owns NBC, which produces a lot of original shows. During prime time (8pm to 11pm), Comcast delivers those shows at 6-mbps to its customers, while Netflix is throttled to around 3-mbps. Because of this, Comcast original shows are seen at higher quality than Netflix shows.
Comcast can do this, even with NetNeutrality rules, because it separates its cables into “channels”. One channel carries public Internet traffic, like Netflix. The other channels carry private Internet traffic, for broadcast TV shows and pay-per-view.
All NetNeutrality means is that if Comcast wants to give preference to its own contents/services, it has to do so using separate channels on the wire, rather than pushing everything over the same channel. This is a detail nobody tells you because NetNeutrality proponents aren’t techies. They are lawyers and academics. They maximize moral outrage, while ignoring technical details.
Another example in Oliver’s show is whether search engines like Google or the (hypothetical) Bing can pay to get faster access to customers. They already do that. The average distance a packet travels on the web is less than 100-miles. That’s because the biggest companies (Google, Facebook, Netflix, etc.) pay to put servers in your city close to you. Smaller companies, such as search engine DuckDuckGo.com, also pay third-party companies like Akamai or Amazon Web Services to get closer to you. The smallest companies, however, get poor performance, being a thousand miles away.
You can test this out for yourself. Run a packet-sniffer on your home network for a week, then for each address, use mapping tools like ping and traceroute to figure out how far away things are.
The Oliver bit mentioned how Verizon banned Google Wallet. Again, technical details are important here. It had nothing to do with Net Neutrality issues blocking network packets, but only had to do with Verizon-branded phones blocking access to the encrypted enclave. You could use Google Wallet on unlocked phones you bought separately. Moreover, market forces won in the end, with Google Wallet (aka. Android Wallet) now the preferred wallet on their network. In other words, this incident shows that the “free market” fixes things in the long run without the heavy hand of government.
Oliver shows a piece where FCC chief Ajit Pai points out that Internet companies didn’t do evil without Net Neutrality rules, and thus NetNeutrality rules were unneeded. Oliver claimed this was a “disingenuous” argument. No, it’s not “disingenuous”, it entirely the point of why Net Neutrality is bad. It’s chasing theoretical possibility of abuse, not the real thing. Sure, Internet companies will occasionally go down misguided paths. If it’s truly bad, customers will rebel. In some cases, it’s not actually a bad thing, and will end up being a benefit to customers (e.g. throttling BitTorrent during primetime would benefit most BitTorrent users). It’s the pro-NetNeutrality side that’s being disingenuous, knowingly trumping up things as problems that really aren’t.
The point is this. The argument here is a complicated one, between reasonable sides. For humor, John Oliver has created a one-sided debate that falls apart under any serious analysis. Those like the EFF should not mistake such humor for intelligent technical debate.

The command-line, for cybersec

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2017/01/the-command-line-for-cybersec.html

On Twitter I made the mistake of asking people about command-line basics for cybersec professionals. A got a lot of useful responses, which I summarize in this long (5k words) post. It’s mostly driven by the tools I use, with a bit of input from the tweets I got in response to my query.

bash

By command-line this document really means bash.

There are many types of command-line shells. Windows has two, ‘cmd.exe’ and ‘PowerShell’. Unix started with the Bourne shell ‘sh’, and there have been many variations of this over the years, ‘csh’, ‘ksh’, ‘zsh’, ‘tcsh’, etc. When GNU rewrote Unix user-mode software independently, they called their shell “Bourne Again Shell” or “bash” (queue “JSON Bourne” shell jokes here).

Bash is the default shell for Linux and macOS. It’s also available on Windows, as part of their special “Windows Subsystem for Linux”. The windows version of ‘bash’ has become my most used shell.

For Linux IoT devices, BusyBox is the most popular shell. It’s easy to clear, as it includes feature-reduced versions of popular commands.

man

‘Man’ is the command you should not run if you want help for a command.

Man pages are designed to drive away newbies. They are only useful if you already mostly an expert with the command you desire help on. Man pages list all possible features of a program, but do not highlight examples of the most common features, or the most common way to use the commands.

Take ‘sed’ as an example. It’s used most commonly to do a search-and-replace in files, like so:

$ sed ‘s/rob/dave/’ foo.txt

This usage is so common that many non-geeks know of it. Yet, if you type ‘man sed’ to figure out how to do a search and replace, you’ll get nearly incomprehensible gibberish, and no example of this most common usage.

I point this out because most guides on using the shell recommend ‘man’ pages to get help. This is wrong, it’ll just endlessly frustrate you. Instead, google the commands you need help on, or better yet, search StackExchange for answers.

You might try asking questions, like on Twitter or forum sites, but this requires a strategy. If you ask a basic question, self-important dickholes will respond by telling you to “rtfm” or “read the fucking manual”. A better strategy is to exploit their dickhole nature, such as saying “too bad command xxx cannot do yyy”. Helpful people will gladly explain why you are wrong, carefully explaining how xxx does yyy.

If you must use ‘man’, use the ‘apropos’ command to find the right man page. Sometimes multiple things in the system have the same or similar names, leading you to the wrong page.

apt-get install yum

Using the command-line means accessing that huge open-source ecosystem. Most of the things in this guide do no already exist on the system. You have to either compile them from source, or install via a package-manager. Linux distros ship with a small footprint, but have a massive database of precompiled software “packages” in the cloud somewhere. Use the “package manager” to install the software from the cloud.

On Debian-derived systems (like Ubuntu, Kali, Raspbian), type “apt-get install masscan” to install “masscan” (as an example). Use “apt-cache search scan” to find a bunch of scanners you might want to install.

On RedHat systems, use “yum” instead. On BSD, use the “ports” system, which you can also get working for macOS.

If no pre-compiled package exists for a program, then you’ll have to download the source code and compile it. There’s about an 80% chance this will work easy, following the instructions. There is a 20% chance you’ll experience “dependency hell”, for example, needing to install two mutually incompatible versions of Python.

Bash is a scripting language

Don’t forget that shells are really scripting languages. The bit that executes a single command is just a degenerate use of the scripting language. For example, you can do a traditional for loop like:

$ for i in $(seq 1 9); do echo $i; done

In this way, ‘bash’ is no different than any other scripting language, like Perl, Python, NodeJS, PHP CLI, etc. That’s why a lot of stuff on the system actually exists as short ‘bash’ programs, aka. shell scripts.

Few want to write bash scripts, but you are expected to be able to read them, either to tweek existing scripts on the system, or to read StackExchange help.

File system commands

The macOS “Finder” or Windows “File Explorer” are just graphical shells that help you find files, open, and save them. The first commands you learn are for the same functionality on the command-line: pwd, cd, ls, touch, rm, rmdir, mkdir, chmod, chown, find, ln, mount.

The command “rm –rf /” removes everything starting from the root directory. This will also follow mounted server directories, deleting files on the server. I point this out to give an appreciation of the raw power you have over the system from the command-line, and how easy you can disrupt things.

Of particular interest is the “mount” command. Desktop versions of Linux typically mount USB flash drives automatically, but on servers, you need to do it manually, e.g.:

$ mkdir ~/foobar
$ mount /dev/sdb ~/foobar

You’ll also use the ‘mount’ command to connect to file servers, using the “cifs” package if they are Windows file servers:

# apt-get install cifs-utils
# mkdir /mnt/vids
# mount -t cifs -o username=robert,password=foobar123  //192.168.1.11/videos /mnt/vids

Linux system commands

The next commands you’ll learn are about syadmin the Linux system: ps, top, who, history, last, df, du, kill, killall, lsof, lsmod, uname, id, shutdown, and so on.

The first thing hackers do when hacking into a system is run “uname” (to figure out what version of the OS is running) and “id” (to figure out which account they’ve acquired, like “root” or some other user).

The Linux system command I use most is “dmesg” (or ‘tail –f /var/log/dmesg’) which shows you the raw system messages. For example, when I plug in USB drives to a server, I look in ‘dmesg’ to find out which device was added so that I can mount it. I don’t know if this is the best way, it’s just the way I do it (servers don’t automount USB drives like desktops do).

Networking commands

The permanent state of the network (what gets configured on the next bootup) is configured in text files somewhere. But there are a wealth of commands you’ll use to view the current state of networking, make temporary changes, and diagnose problems.

The ‘ifconfig’ command has long been used to view the current TCP/IP configuration and make temporary changes. Learning how TCP/IP works means playing a lot with ‘ifconfig’. Use “ifconfig –a” for even more verbose information.

Use the “route” command to see if you are sending packets to the right router.

Use ‘arp’ command to make sure you can reach the local router.

Use ‘traceroute’ to make sure packets are following the correct route to their destination. You should learn the nifty trick it’s based on (TTLs). You should also play with the TCP, UDP, and ICMP options.

Use ‘ping’ to see if you can reach the target across the Internet. Usefully measures the latency in milliseconds, and congestion (via packet loss). For example, ping NetFlix throughout the day, and notice how the ping latency increases substantially during “prime time” viewing hours.

Use ‘dig’ to make sure DNS resolution is working right. (Some use ‘nslookup’ instead). Dig is useful because it’s the raw universal DNS tool – every time they add some new standard feature to DNS, they add that feature into ‘dig’ as well.

The ‘netstat –tualn’ command views the current TCP/IP connections and which ports are listening. I forget what the various options “tualn” mean, only it’s the output I always want to see, rather than the raw “netstat” command by itself.

You’ll want to use ‘ethtool –k’ to turn off checksum and segmentation offloading. These are features that break packet-captures sometimes.

There is this new fangled ‘ip’ system for Linux networking, replacing many of the above commands, but as an old timer, I haven’t looked into that.

Some other tools for diagnosing local network issues are ‘tcpdump’, ‘nmap’, and ‘netcat’. These are described in more detail below.

ssh

In general, you’ll remotely log into a system in order to use the command-line. We use ‘ssh’ for that. It uses a protocol similar to SSL in order to encrypt the connection. There are two ways to use ‘ssh’ to login, with a password or with a client-side certificate.

When using SSH with a password, you type “ssh [email protected]”. The remote system will then prompt you for a password for that account.

When using client-side certificates, use “ssh-keygen” to generate a key, then either copy the public-key of the client to the server manually, or use “ssh-copy-id” to copy it using the password method above.

How this works is basic application of public-key cryptography. When logging in with a password, you get a copy of the server’s public-key the first time you login, and if it ever changes, you get a nasty warning that somebody may be attempting a man in the middle attack.

$ ssh [email protected]
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@    WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED!     @
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
IT IS POSSIBLE THAT SOMEONE IS DOING SOMETHING NASTY!

When using client-side certificates, the server trusts your public-key. This is similar to how client-side certificates work in SSL VPNs.

You can use SSH for things other than loging into a remote shell. You can script ‘ssh’ to run commands remotely on a system in a local shell script. You can use ‘scp’ (SSH copy) to transfer files to and from a remote system. You can do tricks with SSH to create tunnels, which is popular way to bypass the restrictive rules of your local firewall nazi.

openssl

This is your general cryptography toolkit, doing everything from simple encryption, to public-key certificate signing, to establishing SSL connections.

It is extraordinarily user hostile, with terrible inconsistency among options. You can only figure out how to do things by looking up examples on the net, such as on StackExchange. There are competing SSL libraries with their own command-line tools, like GnuTLS and Mozilla NSS that you might find easier to use.

The fundamental use of the ‘openssl’ tool is to create public-keys, “certificate requests”, and creating self-signed certificates. All the web-site certificates I’ve ever obtained has been using the openssl command-line tool to create CSRs.

You should practice using the ‘openssl’ tool to encrypt files, sign files, and to check signatures.

You can use openssl just like PGP for encrypted emails/messages, but following the “S/MIME” standard rather than PGP standard. You might consider learning the ‘pgp’ command-line tools, or the open-source ‘gpg’ or ‘gpg2’ tools as well.

You should learn how to use the “openssl s_client” feature to establish SSL connections, as well as the “openssl s_server” feature to create an SSL proxy for a server that doesn’t otherwise support SSL.

Learning all the ways of using the ‘openssl’ tool to do useful things will go a long way in teaching somebody about crypto and cybersecurity. I can imagine an entire class consisting of nothing but learning ‘openssl’.

netcat (nc, socat, cyptocat, ncat)

A lot of Internet protocols are based on text. That means you can create a raw TCP connection to the service and interact with them using your keyboard. The classic tool for doing this is known as “netcat”, abbreviated “nc”. For example, connect to Google’s web server at port and type the HTTP HEAD command followed by a blank line (hit [return] twice):

$ nc www.google.com 80
HEAD / HTTP/1.0

HTTP/1.0 200 OK
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 01:53:28 GMT
Expires: -1
Cache-Control: private, max-age=0
Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
P3P: CP=”This is not a P3P policy! See https://www.google.com/support/accounts/answer/151657?hl=en for more info.”
Server: gws
X-XSS-Protection: 1; mode=block
X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN
Set-Cookie: NID=95=o7GT1uJCWTPhaPAefs4CcqF7h7Yd7HEqPdAJncZfWfDSnNfliWuSj3XfS5GJXGt67-QJ9nc8xFsydZKufBHLj-K242C3_Vak9Uz1TmtZwT-1zVVBhP8limZI55uXHuPrejAxyTxSCgR6MQ; expires=Wed, 19-Jul-2017 01:53:28 GMT; path=/; domain=.google.com; HttpOnly
Accept-Ranges: none
Vary: Accept-Encoding

Another classic example is to connect to port 25 on a mail server to send email, spoofing the “MAIL FROM” address.

There are several versions of ‘netcat’ that work over SSL as well. My favorite is ‘ncat’, which comes with ‘nmap’, as it’s actively maintained. In theory, “openssl s_client” should also work this way.

nmap

At some point, you’ll need to port scan. The standard program for this is ‘nmap’, and it’s the best. The classic way of using it is something like:

# nmap –A scanme.nmap.org

The ‘-A’ option means to enable all the interesting features like OS detection, version detection, and basic scripts on the most common ports that a server might have open. It takes awhile to run. The “scanme.nmap.org” is a good site to practice on.

Nmap is more than just a port scanner. It has a rich scripting system for probing more deeply into a system than just a port, and to gather more information useful for attacks. The scripting system essentially contains some attacks, such as password guessing.

Scanning the Internet, finding services identified by ‘nmap’ scripts, and interacting with them with tools like ‘ncat’ will teach you a lot about how the Internet works.

BTW, if ‘nmap’ is too slow, using ‘masscan’ instead. It’s a lot faster, though has much more limited functionality.

Packet sniffing with tcpdump and tshark

All Internet traffic consists of packets going between IP addresses. You can capture those packets and view them using “packet sniffers”. The most important packet-sniffer is “Wireshark”, a GUI. For the command-line, there is ‘tcpdump’ and ‘tshark’.

You can run tcpdump on the command-line to watch packets go in/out of the local computer. This performs a quick “decode” of packets as they are captured. It’ll reverse-lookup IP addresses into DNS names, which means its buffers can overflow, dropping new packets while it’s waiting for DNS name responses for previous packets (which can be disabled with -n):

# tcpdump –p –i eth0

A common task is to create a round-robin set of files, saving the last 100 files of 1-gig each. Older files are overwritten. Thus, when an attack happens, you can stop capture, and go backward in times and view the contents of the network traffic using something like Wireshark:

# tcpdump –p -i eth0 -s65535 –C 1000 –W 100 –w cap

Instead of capturing everything, you’ll often set “BPF” filters to narrow down to traffic from a specific target, or a specific port.

The above examples use the –p option to capture traffic destined to the local computer. Sometimes you may want to look at all traffic going to other machines on the local network. You’ll need to figure out how to tap into wires, or setup “monitor” ports on switches for this to work.

A more advanced command-line program is ‘tshark’. It can apply much more complex filters. It can also be used to extract the values of specific fields and dump them to a text files.

Base64/hexdump/xxd/od

These are some rather trivial commands, but you should know them.

The ‘base64’ command encodes binary data in text. The text can then be passed around, such as in email messages. Base64 encoding is often automatic in the output from programs like openssl and PGP.

In many cases, you’ll need to view a hex dump of some binary data. There are many programs to do this, such as hexdump, xxd, od, and more.

grep

Grep searches for a pattern within a file. More important, it searches for a regular expression (regex) in a file. The fu of Unix is that a lot of stuff is stored in text files, and use grep for regex patterns in order to extra stuff stored in those files.

The power of this tool really depends on your mastery of regexes. You should master enough that you can understand StackExhange posts that explain almost what you want to do, and then tweek them to make them work.

Grep, by default, shows only the matching lines. In many cases, you only want the part that matches. To do that, use the –o option. (This is not available on all versions of grep).

You’ll probably want the better, “extended” regular expressions, so use the –E option.

You’ll often want “case-insensitive” options (matching both upper and lower case), so use the –i option.

For example, to extract all MAC address from a text file, you might do something like the following. This extracts all strings that are twelve hex digits.

$ grep –Eio ‘[0-9A-F]{12}’ foo.txt

Text processing

Grep is just the first of the various “text processing filters”. Other useful ones include ‘sed’, ‘cut’, ‘sort’, and ‘uniq’.

You’ll be an expert as piping output of one to the input of the next. You’ll use “sort | uniq” as god (Dennis Ritchie) intended and not the heresy of “sort –u”.

You might want to master ‘awk’. It’s a new programming language, but once you master it, it’ll be easier than other mechanisms.

You’ll end up using ‘wc’ (word-count) a lot. All it does is count the number of lines, words, characters in a file, but you’ll find yourself wanting to do this a lot.

csvkit and jq

You get data in CSV format and JSON format a lot. The tools ‘csvkit’ and ‘jq’ respectively help you deal with those tools, to convert these files into other formats, sticking the data in databases, and so forth.

It’ll be easier using these tools that understand these text formats to extract data than trying to write ‘awk’ command or ‘grep’ regexes.

strings

Most files are binary with a few readable ASCII strings. You use the program ‘strings’ to extract those strings.

This one simple trick sounds stupid, but it’s more powerful than you’d think. For example, I knew that a program probably contained a hard-coded password. I then blindly grabbed all the strings in the program’s binary file and sent them to a password cracker to see if they could decrypt something. And indeed, one of the 100,000 strings in the file worked, thus finding the hard-coded password.

tail -f

So ‘tail’ is just a standard Linux tool for looking at the end of files. If you want to keep checking the end of a live file that’s constantly growing, then use “tail –f”. It’ll sit there waiting for something new to be added to the end of the file, then print it out. I do this a lot, so I thought it’d be worth mentioning.

tar –xvfz, gzip, xz, 7z

In prehistorical times (like the 1980s), Unix was backed up to tape drives. The tar command could be used to combine a bunch of files into a single “archive” to be sent to the tape drive, hence “tape archive” or “tar”.

These days, a lot of stuff you download will be in tar format (ending in .tar). You’ll need to learn how to extract it:

$ tar –xvf something.tar

Nobody knows what the “xvf” options mean anymore, but these letters most be specified in that order. I’m joking here, but only a little: somebody did a survey once and found that virtually nobody know how to use ‘tar’ other than the canned formulas such as this.

Along with combining files into an archive you also need to compress them. In prehistoric Unix, the “compress” command would be used, which would replace a file with a compressed version ending in ‘.z’. This would found to be encumbered with patents, so everyone switched to ‘gzip’ instead, which replaces a file with a new one ending with ‘.gz’.

$ ls foo.txt*
foo.txt
$ gzip foo.txt
$ ls foo.txt*
foo.txt.gz

Combined with tar, you get files with either the “.tar.gz” extension, or simply “.tgz”. You can untar and uncompress at the same time:

$ tar –xvfz something .tar.gz

Gzip is always good enough, but nerds gonna nerd and want to compress with slightly better compression programs. They’ll have extensions like “.bz2”, “.7z”, “.xz”, and so on. There are a ton of them. Some of them are supported directly by the ‘tar’ program:

$ tar –xvfj something.tar.bz2

Then there is the “zip/unzip” program, which supports Windows .zip file format. To create compressed archives these days, I don’t bother with tar, but just use the ZIP format. For example, this will recursively descend a directory, adding all files to a ZIP file that can easily be extracted under Windows:

$ zip –r test.zip ./test/

dd

I should include this under the system tools at the top, but it’s interesting for a number of purposes. The usage is simply to copy one file to another, the in-file to the out-file.

$ dd if=foo.txt of=foo2.txt

But that’s not interesting. What interesting is using it to write to “devices”. The disk drives in your system also exist as raw devices under the /dev directory.

For example, if you want to create a boot USB drive for your Raspberry Pi:

# dd if=rpi-ubuntu.img of=/dev/sdb

Or, you might want to hard erase an entire hard drive by overwriting random data:

# dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sdc

Or, you might want to image a drive on the system, for later forensics, without stumbling on things like open files.

# dd if=/dev/sda of=/media/Lexar/infected.img

The ‘dd’ program has some additional options, like block size and so forth, that you’ll want to pay attention to.

screen and tmux

You log in remotely and start some long running tool. Unfortunately, if you log out, all the processes you started will be killed. If you want it to keep running, then you need a tool to do this.

I use ‘screen’. Before I start a long running port scan, I run the “screen” command. Then, I type [ctrl-a][ctrl-d] to disconnect from that screen, leaving it running in the background.

Then later, I type “screen –r” to reconnect to it. If there are more than one screen sessions, using ‘-r’ by itself will list them all. Use “-r pid” to reattach to the proper one. If you can’t, then use “-D pid” or “-D –RR pid” to forced the other session to detached from whoever is using it.

Tmux is an alternative to screen that many use. It’s cool for also having lots of terminal screens open at once.

curl and wget

Sometimes you want to download files from websites without opening a browser. The ‘curl’ and ‘wget’ programs do that easily. Wget is the traditional way of doing this, but curl is a bit more flexible. I use curl for everything these days, except mirroring a website, in which case I just do “wget –m website”.

The thing that makes ‘curl’ so powerful is that it’s really designed as a tool for poking and prodding all the various features of HTTP. That it’s also useful for downloading files is a happy coincidence. When playing with a target website, curl will allow you do lots of complex things, which you can then script via bash. For example, hackers often write their cross-site scripting/forgeries in bash scripts using curl.

node/php/python/perl/ruby/lua

As mentioned above, bash is its own programming language. But it’s weird, and annoying. So sometimes you want a real programming language. Here are some useful ones.

Yes, PHP is a language that runs in a web server for creating web pages. But if you know the language well, it’s also a fine command-line language for doing stuff.

Yes, JavaScript is a language that runs in the web browser. But if you know it well, it’s also a great language for doing stuff, especially with the “nodejs” version.

Then there are other good command line languages, like the Python, Ruby, Lua, and the venerable Perl.

What makes all these great is the large library support. Somebody has already written a library that nearly does what you want that can be made to work with a little bit of extra code of your own.

My general impression is that Python and NodeJS have the largest libraries likely to have what you want, but you should pick whichever language you like best, whichever makes you most productive. For me, that’s NodeJS, because of the great Visual Code IDE/debugger.

iptables, iptables-save

I shouldn’t include this in the list. Iptables isn’t a command-line tool as such. The tool is the built-in firewalling/NAT features within the Linux kernel. Iptables is just the command to configure it.

Firewalling is an important part of cybersecurity. Everyone should have some experience playing with a Linux system doing basic firewalling tasks: basic rules, NATting, and transparent proxying for mitm attacks.

Use ‘iptables-save’ in order to persistently save your changes.

MySQL

Similar to ‘iptables’, ‘mysql’ isn’t a tool in its own right, but a way of accessing a database maintained by another process on the system.

Filters acting on text files only goes so far. Sometimes you need to dump it into a database, and make queries on that database.

There is also the offensive skill needed to learn how targets store things in a database, and how attackers get the data.

Hackers often publish raw SQL data they’ve stolen in their hacks (like the Ashley-Madisan dump). Being able to stick those dumps into your own database is quite useful. Hint: disable transaction logging while importing mass data.

If you don’t like SQL, you might consider NoSQL tools like Elasticsearch, MongoDB, and Redis that can similarly be useful for arranging and searching data. You’ll probably have to learn some JSON tools for formatting the data.

Reverse engineering tools

A cybersecurity specialty is “reverse engineering”. Some want to reverse engineer the target software being hacked, to understand vulnerabilities. This is needed for commercial software and device firmware where the source code is hidden. Others use these tools to analyze viruses/malware.

The ‘file’ command uses heuristics to discover the type of a file.

There’s a whole skillset for analyzing PDF and Microsoft Office documents. I play with pdf-parser. There’s a long list at this website:
https://zeltser.com/analyzing-malicious-documents/

There’s a whole skillset for analyzing executables. Binwalk is especially useful for analyzing firmware images.

Qemu is useful is a useful virtual-machine. It can emulate full systems, such as an IoT device based on the MIPS processor. Like some other tools mentioned here, it’s more a full subsystem than a simple command-line tool.

On a live system, you can use ‘strace’ to view what system calls a process is making. Use ‘lsof’ to view which files and network connections a process is making.

Password crackers

A common cybersecurity specialty is “password cracking”. There’s two kinds: online and offline password crackers.

Typical online password crackers are ‘hydra’ and ‘medusa’. They can take files containing common passwords and attempt to log on to various protocols remotely, like HTTP, SMB, FTP, Telnet, and so on. I used ‘hydra’ recently in order to find the default/backdoor passwords to many IoT devices I’ve bought recently in my test lab.

Online password crackers must open TCP connections to the target, and try to logon. This limits their speed. They also may be stymied by systems that lock accounts, or introduce delays, after too many bad password attempts.

Typical offline password crackers are ‘hashcat’ and ‘jtr’ (John the Ripper). They work off of stolen encrypted passwords. They can attempt billions of passwords-per-second, because there’s no network interaction, nothing slowing them down.

Understanding offline password crackers means getting an appreciation for the exponential difficulty of the problem. A sufficiently long and complex encrypted password is uncrackable. Instead of brute-force attempts at all possible combinations, we must use tricks, like mutating the top million most common passwords.

I use hashcat because of the great GPU support, but John is also a great program.

WiFi hacking

A common specialty in cybersecurity is WiFi hacking. The difficulty in WiFi hacking is getting the right WiFi hardware that supports the features (monitor mode, packet injection), then the right drivers installed in your operating system. That’s why I use Kali rather than some generic Linux distribution, because it’s got the right drivers installed.

The ‘aircrack-ng’ suite is the best for doing basic hacking, such as packet injection. When the parents are letting the iPad babysit their kid with a loud movie at the otherwise quite coffeeshop, use ‘aircrack-ng’ to deauth the kid.

The ‘reaver’ tool is useful for hacking into sites that leave WPS wide open and misconfigured.

Remote exploitation

A common specialty in cybersecurity is pentesting.

Nmap, curl, and netcat (described above) above are useful tools for this.

Some useful DNS tools are ‘dig’ (described above), dnsrecon/dnsenum/fierce that try to enumerate and guess as many names as possible within a domain. These tools all have unique features, but also have a lot of overlap.

Nikto is a basic tool for probing for common vulnerabilities, out-of-date software, and so on. It’s not really a vulnerability scanner like Nessus used by defenders, but more of a tool for attack.

SQLmap is a popular tool for probing for SQL injection weaknesses.

Then there is ‘msfconsole’. It has some attack features. This is humor – it has all the attack features. Metasploit is the most popular tool for running remote attacks against targets, exploiting vulnerabilities.

Text editor

Finally, there is the decision of text editor. I use ‘vi’ variants. Others like ‘nano’ and variants. There’s no wrong answer as to which editor to use, unless that answer is ‘emacs’.

Conclusion

Obviously, not every cybersecurity professional will be familiar with every tool in this list. If you don’t do reverse-engineering, then you won’t use reverse-engineering tools.

On the other hand, regardless of your specialty, you need to know basic crypto concepts, so you should know something like the ‘openssl’ tool. You need to know basic networking, so things like ‘nmap’ and ‘tcpdump’. You need to be comfortable processing large dumps of data, manipulating it with any tool available. You shouldn’t be frightened by a little sysadmin work.

The above list is therefore a useful starting point for cybersecurity professionals. Of course, those new to the industry won’t have much familiarity with them. But it’s fair to say that I’ve used everything listed above at least once in the last year, and the year before that, and the year before that. I spend a lot of time on StackExchange and Google searching the exact options I need, so I’m not an expert, but I am familiar with the basic use of all these things.

On a technicality

Post Syndicated from Eevee original https://eev.ee/blog/2016/07/22/on-a-technicality/

Apropos of nothing, I’d like to tell you a story. I’ve touched on this before, but this is the full version. It’s the story of hypothetical small-to-medium Internet community.

Stop me if you’ve heard this one

You create a little community for a thing you like. You give it a phpBB forum or something.

You want people to be nice, so you make a couple rules. No swearing. No spamming. Don’t use all caps.

You invite your friends, and they invite their friends, and all is well and good. There are a few squabbles now and then, but they get resolved without too much trouble, and everyone more or less gets along.

One day, a new person shows up, and starts linking to their website in almost every thread. Their website mostly consists of very mean-spirited articles written about several well-known and well-liked people in the group. When people ask them to stop, they lash out with harsh insults.

So you ban them.

There is immediate protest from a number of people, most of whom you strangely don’t recognize. The person didn’t break any of the rules — how dare you ban them? They never swore. They never used all caps. They never even spammed, because technically spam is unwanted and automated, and this was a real person linking their website which is related to the thing the community is about.

You can’t think of a good counter-argument for this, so you unban them. You also add a new rule, prohibiting linking to websites.

Now the majority of the community is affected, because they can’t link their own work any more. This won’t work. You repeal the previous rule, and instead make one that limits the number of website links to one per day.

The original jerk responds by linking their website once a day, and then making other posts that link to that first post they made. They continue to be abrasive towards everyone else, but they never swear, and you’re just not sure what to do about that.

A few other people start posting, seemingly just to make fun of the rest of you, but likewise never break any of your rules.

A preposterous arms race follows, with the rules becoming increasingly nitpicky as you try to distinguish overt antagonism from mundane and innocent behavior.

After a while, you notice that many of your friends no longer come around. And there seem to be a lot more jerks than there were before. You don’t understand why. Your rules are reasonable, and you enforced them fairly, right?

But it’s not really a swear word

I’ve noticed that people really like to write rules that sound objective. Seems like a good enough idea, right? Lets everyone know exactly what the line is.

The trick is that human behavior, and especially human language, are very… squishy. We gauge each other based on a lot of unspoken context: our prior relationship, how both of us seem to be feeling, whether or not we skipped lunch today. When the same comment or action can mean radically different things in different circumstances, it’s hard to draw a fine distinction between what’s acceptable behavior and what’s not.

And rules are written in human language, which makes them just as squishy. Who decides what “swearing” is? If all caps aren’t allowed, how about 90%? Who decides what’s a slur? What, precisely, constitutes harassment? These things sound straightforward and concrete, but they can still be nitpicked to death.

We give people the benefit of the doubt and assume they’ll try to respect what we clearly mean, but there’s nothing guaranteeing that.

Have you ever tried to politely decline a request or invitation, and been asked why not? Then the other party starts trying to weasel around your reason, and now you’re somehow part of a debate about what you want? I’ve seen it happen with mundane social interactions, with freelance workers, and of course, with small online communities.

This isn’t to say that hunting for technicalities is a sign of aggressive malice; it’s human nature. We want to do a thing, we’re told me can’t because of X, and so we see X as an obstacle to overcome. Language is subjective, so it’s the easiest avenue of attack.

Fixing this in rules is a hard problem. The obvious approach is to add increasingly specific details, though then you risk catching innocent behaviors, and you can end up stuck in an almost comical game of cat-and-mouse where you keep trying to find ways to edit your own rules so you’re allowed to punish someone you’ve already passed judgment on.

I think we forget that even real laws are somewhat subjective, often hinging on intent. There are entire separate crimes for homicide, depending on whether it was intentional or accidental or due to clear neglect. These things get decided by a judge or a jury and become case law, the somewhat murky extra rules that aren’t part of formal law but are binding nonetheless.

(In an awkward twist, a lot of communities — especially very large platforms! — don’t explain their reasoning for punishing any particular behavior. That somewhat protects them from being “but technically“-ed, but it also means there’s no case law, and no one else can quite be sure what’s expected behavior.)

That’s why I mostly now make quasirules like “don’t be a dick” or “keep your vitriol to your own blog“. The general expectation is still clear, and it’s obvious that I reserve the right to judge individual cases — which, in the case of a small community, is going to happen anyway. Let’s face it: small communities are monarchies, not democracies.

I do have another reason for this, which is based on another observation I’ve made of small communities. I’ve joined a few where I didn’t bother reading the rules, made some conversation, never bothered anyone, and then later discovered that I’d pretty clearly violated a rule. But no one ever pointed it out, and perhaps no one even noticed, because I wasn’t being a dick.

So I concluded that, for a smaller community, the people who need the rules are likely to be people who you don’t want around in the first place. And “don’t be a dick” covers that just as well.

Evaporative cooling

There are some nice people in the world. I mean nice people, the sort I couldn’t describe myself as. People who are friends with everyone, who are somehow never involved in any argument, who seem content to spend their time drawing pictures of bumblebees on flowers that make everyone happy.

Those people are great to have around. You want to hold onto them as much as you can.

But people only have so much tolerance for jerkiness, and really nice people often have less tolerance than the rest of us.

The trouble with not ejecting a jerk — whether their shenanigans are deliberate or incidental — is that you allow the average jerkiness of the community to rise slightly. The higher it goes, the more likely it is that those really nice people will come around less often, or stop coming around at all. That, in turn, makes the average jerkiness rise even more, which teaches the original jerk that their behavior is acceptable and makes your community more appealing to other jerks. Meanwhile, more people at the nice end of the scale are drifting away.

And this goes for a community of any size, though it may take more jerks to significantly affect a very large platform.

It’s still hard to give someone the boot, though, because it just feels like a really harsh thing to do to someone, especially for an abstract reason like “preserving the feel of the community”. And a jerk is more likely to make a fuss about being made to leave, which makes it feel like a huge issue — whereas nice people generally leave very quietly, and you may not even notice until several of them have been gone for a while.

There’s a human tendency to measure peace as though it were the inverse of volume: the louder people get, the less peaceful it is. We then try to optimize for the least arguing. I’m sure you’ve seen this happen before: someone in a group points out that the group is doing something destructive, that causes an argument, and then onlookers blame the person who pointed out the problem for causing the argument to happen. You can probably think of some pretty high-profile examples in some current events.

(You may relatedly enjoy the tale of the missing stair.)

Have you ever watched one of those TV shows where a dude comes in to berate restaurant owners for all the ridiculous things they’ve been doing? One of the most common defenses is: “well, no one complained“.

In the age of the Internet, where it seems like everyone is always complaining about something, it’s easy to forget that by and large people don’t complain. Sure, they might complain on their Twitter or to their friends or whatever, but chances are, they won’t complain to you. Consider: either you’re aware of the problem and have failed to solve it, or you’re clueless for not noticing. Either way, complaining won’t help anything; it’ll just cause conflict, making them that person who “caused” an argument by pointing out the obvious.

Gamification

Some people are aware of the technicality game on some level, and decide to play it — deliberately. Maybe to get their way; maybe just for fun.

These are people who think “it’d be a shame if something happened to it” is just the way people talk. Layered thick with multiple levels of irony, cloaked in jokes and misdirection, up to its eyeballs in plausible deniability, but crystal clear to the right audience.

It’s a game that offers them a massive advantage, because even if you both know you’re playing it, they have much more experience. Oh, and chances are they don’t even truly care about whether they’re banned or not, so they have nothing to lose — whereas you’re stuck with an existential crisis, questioning everything you believe about free speech and community management, while your nicest peers sneak out the back door.

I remember a time when someone in a community I helped run decided they didn’t like me. They started making subtle jabs, and eventually built up to saying the most biting and personal things they could think to say. Those things weren’t true, but they didn’t know that, and they phrased everything in such a way that their friends could rationalize them as not really trying to be cruel. And they had quite a lot of friends in the community, which put me in a pretty awkward position. How do I justify banning them, if a significant number of people are sure they’re innocent? Am I fucking crazy for seeing this glaring pattern when no one else does?

I did eventually ban them, but it contributed to a complete schism where most of the more grating people left to form their own clubhouse. Win/win?

Or let’s say, hypothetically, that some miscreant constructs a fake tweet screenshot. It’s shared by a high-profile person and spreads like wildfire.

Should either of them be punished? Which one, and why? The faker probably regarded it as a harmless joke; if not for the sharer, it would’ve remained one. Yet the sharer’s only crime was being popular. Did the sharer know it was fake? Was the sharer trying to inflict harm, draw attention to troubling behavior, or share something that made them laugh? Are the faker and the sharer the same person? If you can’t be sure either way, does it matter?

What if, instead of the thing you may be thinking about, the forgery depicted Donald Trump plagiarizing Barack Obama’s tweet congratulating Michelle Obama for her speech? Does that change any of the answers?

This is really difficult in extremely large groups, where you most want to avoid doling out arbitrary punishment, yet where people who play this game can inflict the most damage. The people who make and enforce the rules may not even be part of the group any more, and certainly can’t form an impression of every individual person in the group, so how can anything be enforced consistently? How do you account for intention, sarcasm, irony, self-deprecating humor? How do you explain this clearly without subjecting yourself to an endless deluge of technicalities? You could refuse to explain yourself at all, of course, but then you leave yourself open for people to offer their own explanations: you’re a tyrant who bans anyone who contradicts you, or you hated them for demographic reasons, or you’re just plain irrational and do zany cruel things to people around you on a whim.

I don’t have any good answers

I’m not sure there are any. Corralling people is a tricky problem. We still barely know how to do it in meatspace groups of half a dozen, let alone digital groups numbering in the hundreds of millions.

Our current approaches kinda suck, though.

"Dogs Raise Fireworks Threat Level to ‘Gray’"

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2016/07/dogs_raise_fire.html

Funny:

The Department of Canine Security urges dogs to remain on high alert and employ the tactic of See Something, Say Something. Remember to bark upon spotting anything suspicious; e.g. firecrackers, sparklers, Roman candles, cats, squirrels, mail carriers, shadows, reflections, other dogs on TV, etc.

Mourning Hans-Jürgen Koch

Post Syndicated from corbet original http://lwn.net/Articles/691000/rss

Thomas Gleixner wrote the following to us: The Linux Kernel community is
mourning the passing of Hans-Jürgen Koch. Hans
was a free-software enthusiast and an active contributor. He worked on Radio
Data System support both in kernel and user space and was the main author and
maintainer of the UIO subsystem and contributed in various ways to the Linux
kernel as a professional and hobbyist. He authored a UIO book, gave
countless
talks at various open-source conferences, and served as a member of the
Linuxtag program committee.

His calm and modest nature made it a pleasure to work with him. Meeting him in
person was always a enjoyable experience. His interests spanned a broad range
from literature, music and history to politics and engagement for the german
branch of Friends of the Earth. His wicked sense of humor along with his
always ready to be told bag of anecdotes enlivened quite some social events.

He will be sorely missed and our thoughts are with his family and friends.