Tag Archives: passwords

The Raspberry Pi PiServer tool

Post Syndicated from Gordon Hollingworth original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/piserver/

As Simon mentioned in his recent blog post about Raspbian Stretch, we have developed a new piece of software called PiServer. Use this tool to easily set up a network of client Raspberry Pis connected to a single x86-based server via Ethernet. With PiServer, you don’t need SD cards, you can control all clients via the server, and you can add and configure user accounts — it’s ideal for the classroom, your home, or an industrial setting.

PiServer diagram

Client? Server?

Before I go into more detail, let me quickly explain some terms.

  • Server — the server is the computer that provides the file system, boot files, and password authentication to the client(s)
  • Client — a client is a computer that retrieves boot files from the server over the network, and then uses a file system the server has shared. More than one client can connect to a server, but all clients use the same file system.
  • User – a user is a user name/password combination that allows someone to log into a client to access the file system on the server. Any user can log into any client with their credentials, and will always see the same server and share the same file system. Users do not have sudo capability on a client, meaning they cannot make significant changes to the file system and software.

I see no SD cards

Last year we described how the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B can be booted without an SD card over an Ethernet network from another computer (the server). This is called network booting or PXE (pronounced ‘pixie’) booting.

Why would you want to do this?

  • A client computer (the Raspberry Pi) doesn’t need any permanent storage (an SD card) to boot.
  • You can network a large number of clients to one server, and all clients are exactly the same. If you log into one of the clients, you will see the same file system as if you logged into any other client.
  • The server can be run on an x86 system, which means you get to take advantage of the performance, network, and disk speed on the server.

Sounds great, right? Of course, for the less technical, creating such a network is very difficult. For example, there’s setting up all the required DHCP and TFTP servers, and making sure they behave nicely with the rest of the network. If you get this wrong, you can break your entire network.

PiServer to the rescue

To make network booting easy, I thought it would be nice to develop an application which did everything for you. Let me introduce: PiServer!

PiServer has the following functionalities:

  • It automatically detects Raspberry Pis trying to network boot, so you don’t have to work out their Ethernet addresses.
  • It sets up a DHCP server — the thing inside the router that gives all network devices an IP address — either in proxy mode or in full IP mode. No matter the mode, the DHCP server will only reply to the Raspberry Pis you have specified, which is important for network safety.
  • It creates user names and passwords for the server. This is great for a classroom full of Pis: just set up all the users beforehand, and everyone gets to log in with their passwords and keep all their work in a central place. Moreover, users cannot change the software, so educators have control over which programs their learners can use.
  • It uses a slightly altered Raspbian build which allows separation of temporary spaces, doesn’t have the default ‘pi’ user, and has LDAP enabled for log-in.

What can I do with PiServer?

Serve a whole classroom of Pis

In a classroom, PiServer allows all files for lessons or projects to be stored on a central x86-based computer. Each user can have their own account, and any files they create are also stored on the server. Moreover, the networked Pis doesn’t need to be connected to the internet. The teacher has centralised control over all Pis, and all Pis are user-agnostic, meaning there’s no need to match a person with a computer or an SD card.

Build a home server

PiServer could be used in the home to serve file systems for all Raspberry Pis around the house — either a single common Raspbian file system for all Pis or a different operating system for each. Hopefully, our extensive OS suppliers will provide suitable build files in future.

Use it as a controller for networked Pis

In an industrial scenario, it is possible to use PiServer to develop a network of Raspberry Pis (maybe even using Power over Ethernet (PoE)) such that the control software for each Pi is stored remotely on a server. This enables easy remote control and provisioning of the Pis from a central repository.

How to use PiServer

The client machines

So that you can use a Pi as a client, you need to enable network booting on it. Power it up using an SD card with a Raspbian Lite image, and open a terminal window. Type in

echo program_usb_boot_mode=1 | sudo tee -a /boot/config.txt

and press Return. This adds the line program_usb_boot_mode=1 to the end of the config.txt file in /boot. Now power the Pi down and remove the SD card. The next time you connect the Pi to a power source, you will be able to network boot it.

The server machine

As a server, you will need an x86 computer on which you can install x86 Debian Stretch. Refer to Simon’s blog post for additional information on this. It is possible to use a Raspberry Pi to serve to the client Pis, but the file system will be slower, especially at boot time.

Make sure your server has a good amount of disk space available for the file system — in general, we recommend at least 16Gb SD cards for Raspberry Pis. The whole client file system is stored locally on the server, so the disk space requirement is fairly significant.

Next, start PiServer by clicking on the start icon and then clicking Preferences > PiServer. This will open a graphical user interface — the wizard — that will walk you through setting up your network. Skip the introduction screen, and you should see a screen looking like this:

PiServer GUI screenshot

If you’ve enabled network booting on the client Pis and they are connected to a power source, their MAC addresses will automatically appear in the table shown above. When you have added all your Pis, click Next.

PiServer GUI screenshot

On the Add users screen, you can set up users on your server. These are pairs of user names and passwords that will be valid for logging into the client Raspberry Pis. Don’t worry, you can add more users at any point. Click Next again when you’re done.

PiServer GUI screenshot

The Add software screen allows you to select the operating system you want to run on the attached Pis. (You’ll have the option to assign an operating system to each client individually in the setting after the wizard has finished its job.) There are some automatically populated operating systems, such as Raspbian and Raspbian Lite. Hopefully, we’ll add more in due course. You can also provide your own operating system from a local file, or install it from a URL. For further information about how these operating system images are created, have a look at the scripts in /var/lib/piserver/scripts.

Once you’re done, click Next again. The wizard will then install the necessary components and the operating systems you’ve chosen. This will take a little time, so grab a coffee (or decaffeinated drink of your choice).

When the installation process is finished, PiServer is up and running — all you need to do is reboot the Pis to get them to run from the server.

Shooting troubles

If you have trouble getting clients connected to your network, there are a fewthings you can do to debug:

  1. If some clients are connecting but others are not, check whether you’ve enabled the network booting mode on the Pis that give you issues. To do that, plug an Ethernet cable into the Pi (with the SD card removed) — the LEDs on the Pi and connector should turn on. If that doesn’t happen, you’ll need to follow the instructions above to boot the Pi and edit its /boot/config.txt file.
  2. If you can’t connect to any clients, check whether your network is suitable: format an SD card, and copy bootcode.bin from /boot on a standard Raspbian image onto it. Plug the card into a client Pi, and check whether it appears as a new MAC address in the PiServer GUI. If it does, then the problem is a known issue, and you can head to our forums to ask for advice about it (the network booting code has a couple of problems which we’re already aware of). For a temporary fix, you can clone the SD card on which bootcode.bin is stored for all your clients.

If neither of these things fix your problem, our forums are the place to find help — there’s a host of people there who’ve got PiServer working. If you’re sure you have identified a problem that hasn’t been addressed on the forums, or if you have a request for a functionality, then please add it to the GitHub issues.

The post The Raspberry Pi PiServer tool appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

University College London is Accidentally Running a Huge “Pirate” Movie Site

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/university-college-london-is-accidentally-running-a-huge-pirate-movie-site-171216/

If someone wants to obtain the latest movies for free, all they need to do is head over to the nearest torrent or streaming portal, press a few buttons, and the content appears in a matter of seconds or minutes, dependent on choice.

Indeed, for those seeking mainstream content DRM-free, this is the only way to obtain it, since studios generally don’t make their content available in this fashion. But we know an establishment that does, on a grand scale.

University College London is the third largest university in the UK. According to accounts (pdf) published this summer, it has revenues of more than £1.32 billion. Somewhat surprisingly, this educational behemoth also has a sensational multimedia trick up its considerable sleeve.

The university’s website, located at UCL.ac.uk, is a polished affair and provides all the information anyone could need. However, until one browses to the Self-Access Centre, the full glory of the platform remains largely hidden.

Located at resources.clie.ucl.ac.uk/home/sac/english/films, it looks not unlike Netflix, or indeed any one of thousands of pirate streaming sites around today. However, it appears to be intended for university and educational use only.

UCL’s Self-Access Centre

“Welcome to the Self-Access Centre materials database. Here you can find out about the English materials we have in the SAC and explore our online materials,” the site reads.

“They were designed to help you improve your English skills. Most of the video materials, including films and documentaries, are now available to be watched online. Log on with your UCL id and password to watch them!”

According to a university video tutorial, all content on the SAC can be viewed on campus or from home, as long as a proper login and password is entered. The material is provided for educational purposes and when viewed through the portal, is accompanied by questions, notes, and various exercises.

Trouble is, the entire system is open to the wider Internet, with no logins or passwords required.

A sample of the movies on offer for direct download

The above image doesn’t even begin to scratch the surface. In one directory alone, TorrentFreak counted more than 700 English language movies. In another, more than 600 documentaries including all episodes of the BBC’s Blue Planet II. World Cinema produced close to 90 results, with hundreds of titles voiced in languages from Arabic to Japanese to Welsh.

Links can be pasted into VLC and streamed direct

Quite how long this massive trove of films and TV shows has been open to the public isn’t clear but a simple Google search reveals not only the content itself, but also links to movies and other material on sites in the Middle East and social networks in Russia.

Some of them date back to at least 2016 so it’s probably safe to assume that untold terabytes of data have already been liberated from the university’s servers for the pleasure of the public.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN discounts, offers and coupons

How to Enhance the Security of Sensitive Customer Data by Using Amazon CloudFront Field-Level Encryption

Post Syndicated from Alex Tomic original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-enhance-the-security-of-sensitive-customer-data-by-using-amazon-cloudfront-field-level-encryption/

Amazon CloudFront is a web service that speeds up distribution of your static and dynamic web content to end users through a worldwide network of edge locations. CloudFront provides a number of benefits and capabilities that can help you secure your applications and content while meeting compliance requirements. For example, you can configure CloudFront to help enforce secure, end-to-end connections using HTTPS SSL/TLS encryption. You also can take advantage of CloudFront integration with AWS Shield for DDoS protection and with AWS WAF (a web application firewall) for protection against application-layer attacks, such as SQL injection and cross-site scripting.

Now, CloudFront field-level encryption helps secure sensitive data such as a customer phone numbers by adding another security layer to CloudFront HTTPS. Using this functionality, you can help ensure that sensitive information in a POST request is encrypted at CloudFront edge locations. This information remains encrypted as it flows to and beyond your origin servers that terminate HTTPS connections with CloudFront and throughout the application environment. In this blog post, we demonstrate how you can enhance the security of sensitive data by using CloudFront field-level encryption.

Note: This post assumes that you understand concepts and services such as content delivery networks, HTTP forms, public-key cryptography, CloudFrontAWS Lambda, and the AWS CLI. If necessary, you should familiarize yourself with these concepts and review the solution overview in the next section before proceeding with the deployment of this post’s solution.

How field-level encryption works

Many web applications collect and store data from users as those users interact with the applications. For example, a travel-booking website may ask for your passport number and less sensitive data such as your food preferences. This data is transmitted to web servers and also might travel among a number of services to perform tasks. However, this also means that your sensitive information may need to be accessed by only a small subset of these services (most other services do not need to access your data).

User data is often stored in a database for retrieval at a later time. One approach to protecting stored sensitive data is to configure and code each service to protect that sensitive data. For example, you can develop safeguards in logging functionality to ensure sensitive data is masked or removed. However, this can add complexity to your code base and limit performance.

Field-level encryption addresses this problem by ensuring sensitive data is encrypted at CloudFront edge locations. Sensitive data fields in HTTPS form POSTs are automatically encrypted with a user-provided public RSA key. After the data is encrypted, other systems in your architecture see only ciphertext. If this ciphertext unintentionally becomes externally available, the data is cryptographically protected and only designated systems with access to the private RSA key can decrypt the sensitive data.

It is critical to secure private RSA key material to prevent unauthorized access to the protected data. Management of cryptographic key material is a larger topic that is out of scope for this blog post, but should be carefully considered when implementing encryption in your applications. For example, in this blog post we store private key material as a secure string in the Amazon EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store. The Parameter Store provides a centralized location for managing your configuration data such as plaintext data (such as database strings) or secrets (such as passwords) that are encrypted using AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS). You may have an existing key management system in place that you can use, or you can use AWS CloudHSM. CloudHSM is a cloud-based hardware security module (HSM) that enables you to easily generate and use your own encryption keys in the AWS Cloud.

To illustrate field-level encryption, let’s look at a simple form submission where Name and Phone values are sent to a web server using an HTTP POST. A typical form POST would contain data such as the following.

POST / HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
Content-Length:60

Name=Jane+Doe&Phone=404-555-0150

Instead of taking this typical approach, field-level encryption converts this data similar to the following.

POST / HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
Content-Length: 1713

Name=Jane+Doe&Phone=AYABeHxZ0ZqWyysqxrB5pEBSYw4AAA...

To further demonstrate field-level encryption in action, this blog post includes a sample serverless application that you can deploy by using a CloudFormation template, which creates an application environment using CloudFront, Amazon API Gateway, and Lambda. The sample application is only intended to demonstrate field-level encryption functionality and is not intended for production use. The following diagram depicts the architecture and data flow of this sample application.

Sample application architecture and data flow

Diagram of the solution's architecture and data flow

Here is how the sample solution works:

  1. An application user submits an HTML form page with sensitive data, generating an HTTPS POST to CloudFront.
  2. Field-level encryption intercepts the form POST and encrypts sensitive data with the public RSA key and replaces fields in the form post with encrypted ciphertext. The form POST ciphertext is then sent to origin servers.
  3. The serverless application accepts the form post data containing ciphertext where sensitive data would normally be. If a malicious user were able to compromise your application and gain access to your data, such as the contents of a form, that user would see encrypted data.
  4. Lambda stores data in a DynamoDB table, leaving sensitive data to remain safely encrypted at rest.
  5. An administrator uses the AWS Management Console and a Lambda function to view the sensitive data.
  6. During the session, the administrator retrieves ciphertext from the DynamoDB table.
  7. The administrator decrypts sensitive data by using private key material stored in the EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store.
  8. Decrypted sensitive data is transmitted over SSL/TLS via the AWS Management Console to the administrator for review.

Deployment walkthrough

The high-level steps to deploy this solution are as follows:

  1. Stage the required artifacts
    When deployment packages are used with Lambda, the zipped artifacts have to be placed in an S3 bucket in the target AWS Region for deployment. This step is not required if you are deploying in the US East (N. Virginia) Region because the package has already been staged there.
  2. Generate an RSA key pair
    Create a public/private key pair that will be used to perform the encrypt/decrypt functionality.
  3. Upload the public key to CloudFront and associate it with the field-level encryption configuration
    After you create the key pair, the public key is uploaded to CloudFront so that it can be used by field-level encryption.
  4. Launch the CloudFormation stack
    Deploy the sample application for demonstrating field-level encryption by using AWS CloudFormation.
  5. Add the field-level encryption configuration to the CloudFront distribution
    After you have provisioned the application, this step associates the field-level encryption configuration with the CloudFront distribution.
  6. Store the RSA private key in the Parameter Store
    Store the private key in the Parameter Store as a SecureString data type, which uses AWS KMS to encrypt the parameter value.

Deploy the solution

1. Stage the required artifacts

(If you are deploying in the US East [N. Virginia] Region, skip to Step 2, “Generate an RSA key pair.”)

Stage the Lambda function deployment package in an Amazon S3 bucket located in the AWS Region you are using for this solution. To do this, download the zipped deployment package and upload it to your in-region bucket. For additional information about uploading objects to S3, see Uploading Object into Amazon S3.

2. Generate an RSA key pair

In this section, you will generate an RSA key pair by using OpenSSL:

  1. Confirm access to OpenSSL.
    $ openssl version

    You should see version information similar to the following.

    OpenSSL <version> <date>

  1. Create a private key using the following command.
    $ openssl genrsa -out private_key.pem 2048

    The command results should look similar to the following.

    Generating RSA private key, 2048 bit long modulus
    ................................................................................+++
    ..........................+++
    e is 65537 (0x10001)
  1. Extract the public key from the private key by running the following command.
    $ openssl rsa -pubout -in private_key.pem -out public_key.pem

    You should see output similar to the following.

    writing RSA key
  1. Restrict access to the private key.$ chmod 600 private_key.pem Note: You will use the public and private key material in Steps 3 and 6 to configure the sample application.

3. Upload the public key to CloudFront and associate it with the field-level encryption configuration

Now that you have created the RSA key pair, you will use the AWS Management Console to upload the public key to CloudFront for use by field-level encryption. Complete the following steps to upload and configure the public key.

Note: Do not include spaces or special characters when providing the configuration values in this section.

  1. From the AWS Management Console, choose Services > CloudFront.
  2. In the navigation pane, choose Public Key and choose Add Public Key.
    Screenshot of adding a public key

Complete the Add Public Key configuration boxes:

  • Key Name: Type a name such as DemoPublicKey.
  • Encoded Key: Paste the contents of the public_key.pem file you created in Step 2c. Copy and paste the encoded key value for your public key, including the -----BEGIN PUBLIC KEY----- and -----END PUBLIC KEY----- lines.
  • Comment: Optionally add a comment.
  1. Choose Create.
  2. After adding at least one public key to CloudFront, the next step is to create a profile to tell CloudFront which fields of input you want to be encrypted. While still on the CloudFront console, choose Field-level encryption in the navigation pane.
  3. Under Profiles, choose Create profile.
    Screenshot of creating a profile

Complete the Create profile configuration boxes:

  • Name: Type a name such as FLEDemo.
  • Comment: Optionally add a comment.
  • Public key: Select the public key you configured in Step 4.b.
  • Provider name: Type a provider name such as FLEDemo.
    This information will be used when the form data is encrypted, and must be provided to applications that need to decrypt the data, along with the appropriate private key.
  • Pattern to match: Type phone. This configures field-level encryption to match based on the phone.
  1. Choose Save profile.
  2. Configurations include options for whether to block or forward a query to your origin in scenarios where CloudFront can’t encrypt the data. Under Encryption Configurations, choose Create configuration.
    Screenshot of creating a configuration

Complete the Create configuration boxes:

  • Comment: Optionally add a comment.
  • Content type: Enter application/x-www-form-urlencoded. This is a common media type for encoding form data.
  • Default profile ID: Select the profile you added in Step 3e.
  1. Choose Save configuration

4. Launch the CloudFormation stack

Launch the sample application by using a CloudFormation template that automates the provisioning process.

Input parameter Input parameter description
ProviderID Enter the Provider name you assigned in Step 3e. The ProviderID is used in field-level encryption configuration in CloudFront (letters and numbers only, no special characters)
PublicKeyName Enter the Key Name you assigned in Step 3b. This name is assigned to the public key in field-level encryption configuration in CloudFront (letters and numbers only, no special characters).
PrivateKeySSMPath Leave as the default: /cloudfront/field-encryption-sample/private-key
ArtifactsBucket The S3 bucket with artifact files (staged zip file with app code). Leave as default if deploying in us-east-1.
ArtifactsPrefix The path in the S3 bucket containing artifact files. Leave as default if deploying in us-east-1.

To finish creating the CloudFormation stack:

  1. Choose Next on the Select Template page, enter the input parameters and choose Next.
    Note: The Artifacts configuration needs to be updated only if you are deploying outside of us-east-1 (US East [N. Virginia]). See Step 1 for artifact staging instructions.
  2. On the Options page, accept the defaults and choose Next.
  3. On the Review page, confirm the details, choose the I acknowledge that AWS CloudFormation might create IAM resources check box, and then choose Create. (The stack will be created in approximately 15 minutes.)

5. Add the field-level encryption configuration to the CloudFront distribution

While still on the CloudFront console, choose Distributions in the navigation pane, and then:

    1. In the Outputs section of the FLE-Sample-App stack, look for CloudFrontDistribution and click the URL to open the CloudFront console.
    2. Choose Behaviors, choose the Default (*) behavior, and then choose Edit.
    3. For Field-level Encryption Config, choose the configuration you created in Step 3g.
      Screenshot of editing the default cache behavior
    4. Choose Yes, Edit.
    5. While still in the CloudFront distribution configuration, choose the General Choose Edit, scroll down to Distribution State, and change it to Enabled.
    6. Choose Yes, Edit.

6. Store the RSA private key in the Parameter Store

In this step, you store the private key in the EC2 Systems Manager Parameter Store as a SecureString data type, which uses AWS KMS to encrypt the parameter value. For more information about AWS KMS, see the AWS Key Management Service Developer Guide. You will need a working installation of the AWS CLI to complete this step.

  1. Store the private key in the Parameter Store with the AWS CLI by running the following command. You will find the <KMSKeyID> in the KMSKeyID in the CloudFormation stack Outputs. Substitute it for the placeholder in the following command.
    $ aws ssm put-parameter --type "SecureString" --name /cloudfront/field-encryption-sample/private-key --value file://private_key.pem --key-id "<KMSKeyID>"
    
    ------------------
    |  PutParameter  |
    +----------+-----+
    |  Version |  1  |
    +----------+-----+

  1. Verify the parameter. Your private key material should be accessible through the ssm get-parameter in the following command in the Value The key material has been truncated in the following output.
    $ aws ssm get-parameter --name /cloudfront/field-encryption-sample/private-key --with-decryption
    
    -----…
    
    ||  Value  |  -----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
    MIIEowIBAAKCAQEAwGRBGuhacmw+C73kM6Z…….

    Notice we use the —with decryption argument in this command. This returns the private key as cleartext.

    This completes the sample application deployment. Next, we show you how to see field-level encryption in action.

  1. Delete the private key from local storage. On Linux for example, using the shred command, securely delete the private key material from your workstation as shown below. You may also wish to store the private key material within an AWS CloudHSM or other protected location suitable for your security requirements. For production implementations, you also should implement key rotation policies.
    $ shred -zvu -n  100 private*.pem
    
    shred: private_encrypted_key.pem: pass 1/101 (random)...
    shred: private_encrypted_key.pem: pass 2/101 (dddddd)...
    shred: private_encrypted_key.pem: pass 3/101 (555555)...
    ….

Test the sample application

Use the following steps to test the sample application with field-level encryption:

  1. Open sample application in your web browser by clicking the ApplicationURL link in the CloudFormation stack Outputs. (for example, https:d199xe5izz82ea.cloudfront.net/prod/). Note that it may take several minutes for the CloudFront distribution to reach the Deployed Status from the previous step, during which time you may not be able to access the sample application.
  2. Fill out and submit the HTML form on the page:
    1. Complete the three form fields: Full Name, Email Address, and Phone Number.
    2. Choose Submit.
      Screenshot of completing the sample application form
      Notice that the application response includes the form values. The phone number returns the following ciphertext encryption using your public key. This ciphertext has been stored in DynamoDB.
      Screenshot of the phone number as ciphertext
  3. Execute the Lambda decryption function to download ciphertext from DynamoDB and decrypt the phone number using the private key:
    1. In the CloudFormation stack Outputs, locate DecryptFunction and click the URL to open the Lambda console.
    2. Configure a test event using the “Hello World” template.
    3. Choose the Test button.
  4. View the encrypted and decrypted phone number data.
    Screenshot of the encrypted and decrypted phone number data

Summary

In this blog post, we showed you how to use CloudFront field-level encryption to encrypt sensitive data at edge locations and help prevent access from unauthorized systems. The source code for this solution is available on GitHub. For additional information about field-level encryption, see the documentation.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing this solution, please start a new thread on the CloudFront forum.

– Alex and Cameron

net-creds – Sniff Passwords From Interface or PCAP File

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2017/12/net-creds-sniff-passwords-from-interface-or-pcap-file/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

net-creds – Sniff Passwords From Interface or PCAP File

net-creds is a Python-based tool for sniffing plaintext passwords and hashes from a network interface or PCAP file – it doesn’t rely on port numbers for service identification and can concatenate fragmented packets.

Features of net-creds for Sniffing Passwords

It can sniff the following directly from a network interface or from a PCAP file:

  • URLs visited
  • POST loads sent
  • HTTP form logins/passwords
  • HTTP basic auth logins/passwords
  • HTTP searches
  • FTP logins/passwords
  • IRC logins/passwords
  • POP logins/passwords
  • IMAP logins/passwords
  • Telnet logins/passwords
  • SMTP logins/passwords
  • SNMP community string
  • NTLMv1/v2 all supported protocols: HTTP, SMB, LDAP, etc.

Read the rest of net-creds – Sniff Passwords From Interface or PCAP File now! Only available at Darknet.

Your Holiday Cybersecurity Guide

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2017/11/your-holiday-cybersecurity-guide.html

Many of us are visiting parents/relatives this Thanksgiving/Christmas, and will have an opportunity to help our them with cybersecurity issues. I thought I’d write up a quick guide of the most important things.

1. Stop them from reusing passwords

By far the biggest threat to average people is that they re-use the same password across many websites, so that when one website gets hacked, all their accounts get hacked.
To demonstrate the problem, go to haveibeenpwned.com and enter the email address of your relatives. This will show them a number of sites where their password has already been stolen, like LinkedIn, Adobe, etc. That should convince them of the severity of the problem.

They don’t need a separate password for every site. You don’t care about the majority of website whether you get hacked. Use a common password for all the meaningless sites. You only need unique passwords for important accounts, like email, Facebook, and Twitter.

Write down passwords and store them in a safe place. Sure, it’s a common joke that people in offices write passwords on Post-It notes stuck on their monitors or under their keyboards. This is a common security mistake, but that’s only because the office environment is widely accessible. Your home isn’t, and there’s plenty of places to store written passwords securely, such as in a home safe. Even if it’s just a desk drawer, such passwords are safe from hackers, because they aren’t on a computer.

Write them down, with pen and paper. Don’t put them in a MyPasswords.doc, because when a hacker breaks in, they’ll easily find that document and easily hack your accounts.

You might help them out with getting a password manager, or two-factor authentication (2FA). Good 2FA like YubiKey will stop a lot of phishing threats. But this is difficult technology to learn, and of course, you’ll be on the hook for support issues, such as when they lose the device. Thus, while 2FA is best, I’m only recommending pen-and-paper to store passwords. (AccessNow has a guide, though I think YubiKey/U2F keys for Facebook and GMail are the best).

2. Lock their phone (passcode, fingerprint, faceprint)
You’ll lose your phone at some point. It has the keys all all your accounts, like email and so on. With your email, phones thieves can then reset passwords on all your other accounts. Thus, it’s incredibly important to lock the phone.

Apple has made this especially easy with fingerprints (and now faceprints), so there’s little excuse not to lock the phone.

Note that Apple iPhones are the most secure. I give my mother my old iPhones so that they will have something secure.

My mom demonstrates a problem you’ll have with the older generation: she doesn’t reliably have her phone with her, and charged. She’s the opposite of my dad who religiously slaved to his phone. Even a small change to make her lock her phone means it’ll be even more likely she won’t have it with her when you need to call her.

3. WiFi (WPA)
Make sure their home WiFi is WPA encrypted. It probably already is, but it’s worthwhile checking.

The password should be written down on the same piece of paper as all the other passwords. This is importance. My parents just moved, Comcast installed a WiFi access point for them, and they promptly lost the piece of paper. When I wanted to debug some thing on their network today, they didn’t know the password, and couldn’t find the paper. Get that password written down in a place it won’t get lost!

Discourage them from extra security features like “SSID hiding” and/or “MAC address filtering”. They provide no security benefit, and actually make security worse. It means a phone has to advertise the SSID when away from home, and it makes MAC address randomization harder, both of which allows your privacy to be tracked.

If they have a really old home router, you should probably replace it, or at least update the firmware. A lot of old routers have hacks that allow hackers (like me masscaning the Internet) to easily break in.

4. Ad blockers or Brave

Most of the online tricks that will confuse your older parents will come via advertising, such as popups claiming “You are infected with a virus, click here to clean it”. Installing an ad blocker in the browser, such as uBlock Origin, stops most all this nonsense.

For example, here’s a screenshot of going to the “Speedtest” website to test the speed of my connection (I took this on the plane on the way home for Thanksgiving). Ignore the error (plane’s firewall Speedtest) — but instead look at the advertising banner across the top of the page insisting you need to download a browser extension. This is tricking you into installing malware — the ad appears as if it’s a message from Speedtest, it’s not. Speedtest is just selling advertising and has no clue what the banner says. This sort of thing needs to be blocked — it fools even the technologically competent.

uBlock Origin for Chrome is the one I use. Another option is to replace their browser with Brave, a browser that blocks ads, but at the same time, allows micropayments to support websites you want to support. I use Brave on my iPhone.
A side benefit of ad blockers or Brave is that web surfing becomes much faster, since you aren’t downloading all this advertising. The smallest NYtimes story is 15 megabytes in size due to all the advertisements, for example.

5. Cloud Backups
Do backups, in the cloud. It’s a good idea in general, especially with the threat of ransomware these days.

In particular, consider your photos. Over time, they will be lost, because people make no effort to keep track of them. All hard drives will eventually crash, deleting your photos. Sure, a few key ones are backed up on Facebook for life, but the rest aren’t.
There are so many excellent online backup services out there, like DropBox and Backblaze. Or, you can use the iCloud feature that Apple provides. My favorite is Microsoft’s: I already pay $99 a year for Office 365 subscription, and it comes with 1-terabyte of online storage.

6. Separate email accounts
You should have three email accounts: work, personal, and financial.

First, you really need to separate your work account from personal. The IT department is already getting misdirected emails with your spouse/lover that they don’t want to see. Any conflict with your work, such as getting fired, gives your private correspondence to their lawyers.

Second, you need a wholly separate account for financial stuff, like Amazon.com, your bank, PayPal, and so on. That prevents confusion with phishing attacks.

Consider this warning today:

If you had split accounts, you could safely ignore this. The USPS would only know your financial email account, which gets no phishing attacks, because it’s not widely known. When your receive the phishing attack on your personal email, you ignore it, because you know the USPS doesn’t know your personal email account.

Phishing emails are so sophisticated that even experts can’t tell the difference. Splitting financial from personal emails makes it so you don’t have to tell the difference — anything financial sent to personal email can safely be ignored.

7. Deauth those apps!

Twitter user @tompcoleman comments that we also need deauth apps.
Social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Google encourage you to enable “apps” that work their platforms, often demanding privileges to generate messages on your behalf. The typical scenario is that you use them only once or twice and forget about them.
A lot of them are hostile. For example, my niece’s twitter account would occasional send out advertisements, and she didn’t know why. It’s because a long time ago, she enabled an app with the permission to send tweets for her. I had to sit down and get rid of most of her apps.
Now would be a good time to go through your relatives Facebook, Twitter, and Google/GMail and disable those apps. Don’t be a afraid to be ruthless — they probably weren’t using them anyway. Some will still be necessary. For example, Twitter for iPhone shows up in the list of Twitter apps. The URL for editing these apps for Twitter is https://twitter.com/settings/applications. Google link is here (thanks @spextr). I don’t know of simple URLs for Facebook, but you should find it somewhere under privacy/security settings.
Update: Here’s a more complete guide for a even more social media services.
https://www.permissions.review/

8. Up-to-date software? maybe

I put this last because it can be so much work.

You should install the latest OS (Windows 10, macOS High Sierra), and also turn on automatic patching.

But remember it may not be worth the huge effort involved. I want my parents to be secure — but no so secure I have to deal with issues.

For example, when my parents updated their HP Print software, the icon on the desktop my mom usually uses to scan things in from the printer disappeared, and needed me to spend 15 minutes with her helping find the new way to access the software.
However, I did get my mom a new netbook to travel with instead of the old WinXP one. I want to get her a Chromebook, but she doesn’t want one.
For iOS, you can probably make sure their phones have the latest version without having these usability problems.

Conclusion

You can’t solve every problem for your relatives, but these are the more critical ones.

How to Recover From Ransomware

Post Syndicated from Roderick Bauer original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/complete-guide-ransomware/

Here’s the scenario. You’re working on your computer and you notice that it seems slower. Or perhaps you can’t access document or media files that were previously available.

You might be getting error messages from Windows telling you that a file is of an “Unknown file type” or “Windows can’t open this file.”

Windows error message

If you’re on a Mac, you might see the message “No associated application,” or “There is no application set to open the document.”

MacOS error message

Another possibility is that you’re completely locked out of your system. If you’re in an office, you might be looking around and seeing that other people are experiencing the same problem. Some are already locked out, and others are just now wondering what’s going on, just as you are.

Then you see a message confirming your fears.

wana decrypt0r ransomware message

You’ve been infected with ransomware.

You’ll have lots of company this year. The number of ransomware attacks on businesses tripled in the past year, jumping from one attack every two minutes in Q1 to one every 40 seconds by Q3.There were over four times more new ransomware variants in the first quarter of 2017 than in the first quarter of 2016, and damages from ransomware are expected to exceed $5 billion this year.

Growth in Ransomware Variants Since December 2015

Source: Proofpoint Q1 2017 Quarterly Threat Report

This past summer, our local PBS and NPR station in San Francisco, KQED, was debilitated for weeks by a ransomware attack that forced them to go back to working the way they used to prior to computers. Five months have passed since the attack and they’re still recovering and trying to figure out how to prevent it from happening again.

How Does Ransomware Work?

Ransomware typically spreads via spam or phishing emails, but also through websites or drive-by downloads, to infect an endpoint and penetrate the network. Once in place, the ransomware then locks all files it can access using strong encryption. Finally, the malware demands a ransom (typically payable in bitcoins) to decrypt the files and restore full operations to the affected IT systems.

Encrypting ransomware or “cryptoware” is by far the most common recent variety of ransomware. Other types that might be encountered are:

  • Non-encrypting ransomware or lock screens (restricts access to files and data, but does not encrypt them)
  • Ransomware that encrypts the Master Boot Record (MBR) of a drive or Microsoft’s NTFS, which prevents victims’ computers from being booted up in a live OS environment
  • Leakware or extortionware (exfiltrates data that the attackers threaten to release if ransom is not paid)
  • Mobile Device Ransomware (infects cell-phones through “drive-by downloads” or fake apps)

The typical steps in a ransomware attack are:

1
Infection
After it has been delivered to the system via email attachment, phishing email, infected application or other method, the ransomware installs itself on the endpoint and any network devices it can access.
2
Secure Key Exchange
The ransomware contacts the command and control server operated by the cybercriminals behind the attack to generate the cryptographic keys to be used on the local system.
3
Encryption
The ransomware starts encrypting any files it can find on local machines and the network.
4
Extortion
With the encryption work done, the ransomware displays instructions for extortion and ransom payment, threatening destruction of data if payment is not made.
5
Unlocking
Organizations can either pay the ransom and hope for the cybercriminals to actually decrypt the affected files (which in many cases does not happen), or they can attempt recovery by removing infected files and systems from the network and restoring data from clean backups.

Who Gets Attacked?

Ransomware attacks target firms of all sizes — 5% or more of businesses in the top 10 industry sectors have been attacked — and no no size business, from SMBs to enterprises, are immune. Attacks are on the rise in every sector and in every size of business.

Recent attacks, such as WannaCry earlier this year, mainly affected systems outside of the United States. Hundreds of thousands of computers were infected from Taiwan to the United Kingdom, where it crippled the National Health Service.

The US has not been so lucky in other attacks, though. The US ranks the highest in the number of ransomware attacks, followed by Germany and then France. Windows computers are the main targets, but ransomware strains exist for Macintosh and Linux, as well.

The unfortunate truth is that ransomware has become so wide-spread that for most companies it is a certainty that they will be exposed to some degree to a ransomware or malware attack. The best they can do is to be prepared and understand the best ways to minimize the impact of ransomware.

“Ransomware is more about manipulating vulnerabilities in human psychology than the adversary’s technological sophistication.” — James Scott, expert in Artificial Intelligence

Phishing emails, malicious email attachments, and visiting compromised websites have been common vehicles of infection (we wrote about protecting against phishing recently), but other methods have become more common in past months. Weaknesses in Microsoft’s Server Message Block (SMB) and Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) have allowed cryptoworms to spread. Desktop applications — in one case an accounting package — and even Microsoft Office (Microsoft’s Dynamic Data Exchange — DDE) have been the agents of infection.

Recent ransomware strains such as Petya, CryptoLocker, and WannaCry have incorporated worms to spread themselves across networks, earning the nickname, “cryptoworms.”

How to Defeat Ransomware

1
Isolate the Infection
Prevent the infection from spreading by separating all infected computers from each other, shared storage, and the network.
2
Identify the Infection
From messages, evidence on the computer, and identification tools, determine which malware strain you are dealing with.
3
Report
Report to the authorities to support and coordinate measures to counter attacks.
4
Determine Your Options
You have a number of ways to deal with the infection. Determine which approach is best for you.
5
Restore and Refresh
Use safe backups and program and software sources to restore your computer or outfit a new platform.
6
Plan to Prevent Recurrence
Make an assessment of how the infection occurred and what you can do to put measures into place that will prevent it from happening again.

1 — Isolate the Infection

The rate and speed of ransomware detection is critical in combating fast moving attacks before they succeed in spreading across networks and encrypting vital data.

The first thing to do when a computer is suspected of being infected is to isolate it from other computers and storage devices. Disconnect it from the network (both wired and Wi-Fi) and from any external storage devices. Cryptoworms actively seek out connections and other computers, so you want to prevent that happening. You also don’t want the ransomware communicating across the network with its command and control center.

Be aware that there may be more than just one patient zero, meaning that the ransomware may have entered your organization or home through multiple computers, or may be dormant and not yet shown itself on some systems. Treat all connected and networked computers with suspicion and apply measures to ensure that all systems are not infected.

This Week in Tech (TWiT.tv) did a videocast showing what happens when WannaCry is released on an isolated system and encrypts files and trys to spread itself to other computers. It’s a great lesson on how these types of cryptoworms operate.

2 — Identify the Infection

Most often the ransomware will identify itself when it asks for ransom. There are numerous sites that help you identify the ransomware, including ID Ransomware. The No More Ransomware! Project provides the Crypto Sheriff to help identify ransomware.

Identifying the ransomware will help you understand what type of ransomware you have, how it propagates, what types of files it encrypts, and maybe what your options are for removal and disinfection. It also will enable you to report the attack to the authorities, which is recommended.

wanna decryptor 2.0 ransomware message

WannaCry Ransomware Extortion Dialog

3 — Report to the Authorities

You’ll be doing everyone a favor by reporting all ransomware attacks to the authorities. The FBI urges ransomware victims to report ransomware incidents regardless of the outcome. Victim reporting provides law enforcement with a greater understanding of the threat, provides justification for ransomware investigations, and contributes relevant information to ongoing ransomware cases. Knowing more about victims and their experiences with ransomware will help the FBI to determine who is behind the attacks and how they are identifying or targeting victims.

You can file a report with the FBI at the Internet Crime Complaint Center.

There are other ways to report ransomware, as well.

4 — Determine Your Options

Your options when infected with ransomware are:

  1. Pay the ransom
  2. Try to remove the malware
  3. Wipe the system(s) and reinstall from scratch

It’s generally considered a bad idea to pay the ransom. Paying the ransom encourages more ransomware, and in most cases the unlocking of the encrypted files is not successful.

In a recent survey, more than three-quarters of respondents said their organization is not at all likely to pay the ransom in order to recover their data (77%). Only a small minority said they were willing to pay some ransom (3% of companies have already set up a Bitcoin account in preparation).

Even if you decide to pay, it’s very possible you won’t get back your data.

5 — Restore or Start Fresh

You have the choice of trying to remove the malware from your systems or wiping your systems and reinstalling from safe backups and clean OS and application sources.

Get Rid of the Infection

There are internet sites and software packages that claim to be able to remove ransomware from systems. The No More Ransom! Project is one. Other options can be found, as well.

Whether you can successfully and completely remove an infection is up for debate. A working decryptor doesn’t exist for every known ransomware, and unfortunately it’s true that the newer the ransomware, the more sophisticated it’s likely to be and a perhaps a decryptor has not yet been created.

It’s Best to Wipe All Systems Completely

The surest way of being certain that malware or ransomware has been removed from a system is to do a complete wipe of all storage devices and reinstall everything from scratch. If you’ve been following a sound backup strategy, you should have copies of all your documents, media, and important files right up to the time of the infection.

Be sure to determine as well as you can from file dates and other information what was the date of infection. Consider that an infection might have been dormant in your system for a while before it activated and made significant changes to your system. Identifying and learning about the particular malware that attacked your systems will enable you to understand how that malware operates and what your best strategy should be for restoring your systems.

Backblaze Backup enables you to go back in time and specify the date prior to which you wish to restore files. That date should precede the date your system was infected.

Choose files to restore from earlier date in Backblaze Backup

If you’ve been following a good backup policy with both local and off-site backups, you should be able to use backup copies that you are sure were not connected to your network after the time of attack and hence protected from infection. Backup drives that were completely disconnected should be safe, as are files stored in the cloud, as with Backblaze Backup.

System Restores Are not the Best Strategy for Dealing with Ransomware and Malware

You might be tempted to use a System Restore point to get your system back up and running. System Restore is not a good solution for removing viruses or other malware. Since malicious software is typically buried within all kinds of places on a system, you can’t rely on System Restore being able to root out all parts of the malware. Instead, you should rely on a quality virus scanner that you keep up to date. Also, System Restore does not save old copies of your personal files as part of its snapshot. It also will not delete or replace any of your personal files when you perform a restoration, so don’t count on System Restore as working like a backup. You should always have a good backup procedure in place for all your personal files.

Local backups can be encrypted by ransomware. If your backup solution is local and connected to a computer that gets hit with ransomware, the chances are good your backups will be encrypted along with the rest of your data.

With a good backup solution that is isolated from your local computers, such as Backblaze Backup, you can easily obtain the files you need to get your system working again. You have the flexility to determine which files to restore, from which date you want to restore, and how to obtain the files you need to restore your system.

Choose how to obtain your backup files

You’ll need to reinstall your OS and software applications from the source media or the internet. If you’ve been managing your account and software credentials in a sound manner, you should be able to reactivate accounts for applications that require it.

If you use a password manager, such as 1Password or LastPass, to store your account numbers, usernames, passwords, and other essential information, you can access that information through their web interface or mobile applications. You just need to be sure that you still know your master username and password to obtain access to these programs.

6 — How to Prevent a Ransomware Attack

“Ransomware is at an unprecedented level and requires international investigation.” — European police agency EuroPol

A ransomware attack can be devastating for a home or a business. Valuable and irreplaceable files can be lost and tens or even hundreds of hours of effort can be required to get rid of the infection and get systems working again.

Security experts suggest several precautionary measures for preventing a ransomware attack.

  1. Use anti-virus and anti-malware software or other security policies to block known payloads from launching.
  2. Make frequent, comprehensive backups of all important files and isolate them from local and open networks. Cybersecurity professionals view data backup and recovery (74% in a recent survey) by far as the most effective solution to respond to a successful ransomware attack.
  3. Keep offline backups of data stored in locations inaccessible from any potentially infected computer, such as external storage drives or the cloud, which prevents them from being accessed by the ransomware.
  4. Install the latest security updates issued by software vendors of your OS and applications. Remember to Patch Early and Patch Often to close known vulnerabilities in operating systems, browsers, and web plugins.
  5. Consider deploying security software to protect endpoints, email servers, and network systems from infection.
  6. Exercise cyber hygiene, such as using caution when opening email attachments and links.
  7. Segment your networks to keep critical computers isolated and to prevent the spread of malware in case of attack. Turn off unneeded network shares.
  8. Turn off admin rights for users who don’t require them. Give users the lowest system permissions they need to do their work.
  9. Restrict write permissions on file servers as much as possible.
  10. Educate yourself, your employees, and your family in best practices to keep malware out of your systems. Update everyone on the latest email phishing scams and human engineering aimed at turning victims into abettors.

It’s clear that the best way to respond to a ransomware attack is to avoid having one in the first place. Other than that, making sure your valuable data is backed up and unreachable by ransomware infection will ensure that your downtime and data loss will be minimal or avoided completely.

Have you endured a ransomware attack or have a strategy to avoid becoming a victim? Please let us know in the comments.

The post How to Recover From Ransomware appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Google’s Data on Login Thefts

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/11/googles_data_on.html

This is interesting research and data:

With Google accounts as a case-study, we teamed up with the University of California, Berkeley to better understand how hijackers attempt to take over accounts in the wild. From March 2016 to March 2017, we analyzed several black markets to see how hijackers steal passwords and other sensitive data.

[…]

Our research tracked several black markets that traded third-party password breaches, as well as 25,000 blackhat tools used for phishing and keylogging. In total, these sources helped us identify 788,000 credentials stolen via keyloggers, 12 million credentials stolen via phishing, and 3.3 billion credentials exposed by third-party breaches.

The report.

Top 10 Torrent Site TorrentDownloads Blocked By Chrome and Firefox

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/top-10-torrent-site-torrentdownloads-blocked-by-chrome-and-firefox-171107/

While the popularity of torrent sites isn’t as strong as it used to be, dozens of millions of people use them on a daily basis.

Content availability is rich and the majority of the main movie, TV show, game and software releases appear on them within minutes, offering speedy and convenient downloads. Nevertheless, things don’t always go as smoothly as people might like.

Over the past couple of days that became evident to visitors of TorrentDownloads, one of the Internet’s most popular torrent sites.

TorrentDownloads – usually a reliable and tidy platform

Instead of viewing the rather comprehensive torrent index that made the Top 10 Most Popular Torrent Site lists in 2016 and 2017, visitors receive a warning.

“Attackers on torrentdownloads.me may trick you into doing something dangerous like installing software or revealing your personal information (for example, passwords, phone numbers or credit cards),” Chrome users are warned.

“Google Safe Browsing recently detected phishing on torrentdownloads.me. Phishing sites pretend to be other websites to trick you.”

Chrome warning

People using Firefox also receive a similar warning.

“This web page at torrentdownloads.me has been reported as a deceptive site and has been blocked based on your security preferences,” the browser warns.

“Deceptive sites are designed to trick you into doing something dangerous, like installing software, or revealing your personal information, like passwords, phone numbers or credit cards.”

A deeper check on Google’s malware advisory service echoes the same information, noting that the site contains “harmful content” that may “trick visitors into sharing personal info or downloading software.” Checks carried out with MalwareBytes reveal that service blocking the domain too.

TorrentFreak spoke with the operator of TorrentDownloads who told us that the warnings had been triggered by a rogue advertiser which was immediately removed from the site.

“We have already requested a review with Google Webmaster after we removed an old affiliates advertiser and changed the links on the site,” he explained.

“In Google Webmaster they state that the request will be processed within 72 Hours, so I think it will be reviewed today when 72 hours are completed.”

This statement suggests that the site itself wasn’t the direct culprit, but ads hosted elsewhere. That being said, these kinds of warnings look very scary to visitors and sites have to take responsibility, so completely expelling the bad player from the platform was the correct choice. Nevertheless, people shouldn’t be too surprised at the appearance of suspect ads.

Many top torrent sites have suffered from similar warnings, including The Pirate Bay and KickassTorrents, which are often a product of anti-piracy efforts from the entertainment industries.

In the past, torrent and streaming sites could display ads from top-tier providers with few problems. However, in recent years, the so-called “follow the money” anti-piracy tactic has forced the majority away from pirate sites, meaning they now have to do business with ad networks that may not always be as tidy as one might hope.

While these warnings are the very last thing the sites in question want (they’re hardly good for increasing visitor numbers), they’re a gift to entertainment industry groups.

At the same time as the industries are forcing decent ads away, these alerts provide a great opportunity to warn users about the potential problems left behind as a result. A loose analogy might be deliberately cutting off beer supply to an unlicensed bar then warning people not to go there because the homebrew sucks. It some cases it can be true, but it’s a problem only being exacerbated by industry tactics.

It’s worth noting that no warnings are received by visitors to TorrentDownloads using Android devices, meaning that desktop users were probably the only people at risk. In any event, it’s expected that the warnings will disappear during the next day, so the immediate problems will be over. As far as TF is informed, the offending ads were removed days ago.

That appears to be backed up by checks carried out on a number of other malware scanning services. Norton, Opera, SiteAdvisor, Spamhaus, Yandex and ESET all declare the site to be clean.

Technical Chrome and Firefox users who are familiar with these types of warnings can take steps (Chrome, FF) to bypass the blocks, if they really must.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Pirate-Friendly Coinhive’s DNS Hacked, User Hashes Stolen

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/pirate-friendly-coinhives-dns-hacked-user-hashes-stolen-171025/

Just over a month ago, a Javascript cryptocurrency miner was silently added to The Pirate Bay. Noticed by users who observed their CPU usage going through the roof, it later transpired the site was trialing a miner operated by Coinhive.

Many users were disappointed that The Pirate Bay had added the Javascript-based Monero coin miner without their permission. However, it didn’t take long for people to see the potential benefits, with a raft of other sites adding the miner in the hope of generating additional revenue.

Now, however, Coinhive has an unexpected and potentially serious problem to deal with. The company has just revealed that on Monday night its DNS records maintained at Cloudflare were accessed by a third-party, allowing an unnamed attacker to redirect user mining traffic to a server they controlled.

“The DNS records for coinhive.com have been manipulated to redirect requests for the coinhive.min.js to a third party server. This third party server hosted a modified version of the JavaScript file with a hardcoded site key. This essentially let the attacker ‘steal’ hashes from our users,” Coinhive said in a statement.

The company hasn’t revealed how long the unauthorized redirect stayed in place for, but it appears that all coins mined on sites hosting Coinhive’s script were ‘stolen’ during the period, instead of being credited to their accounts.

Coinhive stresses that no user account information was leaked and that its website and database servers were uncompromised. But while that’s good news, the method that the hackers used to access the company’s DNS provider lay in a basic security error.

Back in 2014, crowdfunding platform Kickstarter – which Coinhive used – fell victim to a security breach. After being advised of the fact by law enforcement officials, Kickstarter shut down unauthorized access, began strengthening its systems, while advising customers to do the same.

While Coinhive did respond to the warning to ensure that its data was safe, something slipped through the net. One piece of information – its Cloudflare account password – remained unchanged after the Kickstarter attack. It now seems the most likely culprit for this week’s DNS breach.

“The root cause for this incident was an insecure password for our Cloudflare account that was probably leaked with the Kickstarter data breach back in 2014,” Coinhive says.

“We have learned hard lessons about security and used 2FA and unique passwords with all services since, but we neglected to update our years old Cloudflare account.”

While not mentioning Coinhive explicitly, Kickstarter warned earlier this month that the 2014 incident may not be completely over. In an update posted on the site Oct 6, Kickstarter noted that some of its customers had recently been hearing more information about the breach from notification service Have I been pwned?.

In the meantime, Coinhive has issued an apology and indicated it will find ways to reimburse sites which have lost revenue as a result of the DNS hack.

“We’re deeply sorry about this severe oversight,” the company said. “Our current plan is to credit all sites with an additional 12 hours of their the daily average hashrate. Please give us a few hours to roll this out.”

Based on earlier calculations carried out by TF, The Pirate Bay (if it was mining during the breach) could be potentially owed around $200 for the lost hashes, give or take. After turning off mining in September, the site reactivated it again in October, with no opt-out. The situation appears fluid.

While the hack is obviously a disappointment, Coinhive appears to have advised its users quickly and transparently, which under the circumstances is exactly what’s required. The fact that it’s offering compensation to users will also be welcomed.

The breach is the latest controversy to hit the company. Earlier this month, Cloudflare began banning sites which implemented Coinhive mining without informing their users. The CDN company said it considered non-advised mining as malware.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Introducing AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory (Standard Edition)

Post Syndicated from Peter Pereira original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/introducing-aws-directory-service-for-microsoft-active-directory-standard-edition/

Today, AWS introduced AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory (Standard Edition), also known as AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition), which is managed Microsoft Active Directory (AD) that is performance optimized for small and midsize businesses. AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) offers you a highly available and cost-effective primary directory in the AWS Cloud that you can use to manage users, groups, and computers. It enables you to join Amazon EC2 instances to your domain easily and supports many AWS and third-party applications and services. It also can support most of the common use cases of small and midsize businesses. When you use AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) as your primary directory, you can manage access and provide single sign-on (SSO) to cloud applications such as Microsoft Office 365. If you have an existing Microsoft AD directory, you can also use AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) as a resource forest that contains primarily computers and groups, allowing you to migrate your AD-aware applications to the AWS Cloud while using existing on-premises AD credentials.

In this blog post, I help you get started by answering three main questions about AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition):

  1. What do I get?
  2. How can I use it?
  3. What are the key features?

After answering these questions, I show how you can get started with creating and using your own AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) directory.

1. What do I get?

When you create an AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) directory, AWS deploys two Microsoft AD domain controllers powered by Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 in your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC). To help deliver high availability, the domain controllers run in different Availability Zones in the AWS Region of your choice.

As a managed service, AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) configures directory replication, automates daily snapshots, and handles all patching and software updates. In addition, AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) monitors and automatically recovers domain controllers in the event of a failure.

AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) has been optimized as a primary directory for small and midsize businesses with the capacity to support approximately 5,000 employees. With 1 GB of directory object storage, AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) has the capacity to store 30,000 or more total directory objects (users, groups, and computers). AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) also gives you the option to add domain controllers to meet the specific performance demands of your applications. You also can use AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) as a resource forest with a trust relationship to your on-premises directory.

2. How can I use it?

With AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition), you can share a single directory for multiple use cases. For example, you can share a directory to authenticate and authorize access for .NET applications, Amazon RDS for SQL Server with Windows Authentication enabled, and Amazon Chime for messaging and video conferencing.

The following diagram shows some of the use cases for your AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) directory, including the ability to grant your users access to external cloud applications and allow your on-premises AD users to manage and have access to resources in the AWS Cloud. Click the diagram to see a larger version.

Diagram showing some ways you can use AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition)--click the diagram to see a larger version

Use case 1: Sign in to AWS applications and services with AD credentials

You can enable multiple AWS applications and services such as the AWS Management Console, Amazon WorkSpaces, and Amazon RDS for SQL Server to use your AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) directory. When you enable an AWS application or service in your directory, your users can access the application or service with their AD credentials.

For example, you can enable your users to sign in to the AWS Management Console with their AD credentials. To do this, you enable the AWS Management Console as an application in your directory, and then assign your AD users and groups to IAM roles. When your users sign in to the AWS Management Console, they assume an IAM role to manage AWS resources. This makes it easy for you to grant your users access to the AWS Management Console without needing to configure and manage a separate SAML infrastructure.

Use case 2: Manage Amazon EC2 instances

Using familiar AD administration tools, you can apply AD Group Policy objects (GPOs) to centrally manage your Amazon EC2 for Windows or Linux instances by joining your instances to your AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) domain.

In addition, your users can sign in to your instances with their AD credentials. This eliminates the need to use individual instance credentials or distribute private key (PEM) files. This makes it easier for you to instantly grant or revoke access to users by using AD user administration tools you already use.

Use case 3: Provide directory services to your AD-aware workloads

AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) is an actual Microsoft AD that enables you to run traditional AD-aware workloads such as Remote Desktop Licensing Manager, Microsoft SharePoint, and Microsoft SQL Server Always On in the AWS Cloud. AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) also helps you to simplify and improve the security of AD-integrated .NET applications by using group Managed Service Accounts (gMSAs) and Kerberos constrained delegation (KCD).

Use case 4: SSO to Office 365 and other cloud applications

You can use AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) to provide SSO for cloud applications. You can use Azure AD Connect to synchronize your users into Azure AD, and then use Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) so that your users can access Microsoft Office 365 and other SAML 2.0 cloud applications by using their AD credentials.

Use case 5: Extend your on-premises AD to the AWS Cloud

If you already have an AD infrastructure and want to use it when migrating AD-aware workloads to the AWS Cloud, AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) can help. You can use AD trusts to connect AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) to your existing AD. This means your users can access AD-aware and AWS applications with their on-premises AD credentials, without needing you to synchronize users, groups, or passwords.

For example, your users can sign in to the AWS Management Console and Amazon WorkSpaces by using their existing AD user names and passwords. Also, when you use AD-aware applications such as SharePoint with AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition), your logged-in Windows users can access these applications without needing to enter credentials again.

3. What are the key features?

AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) includes the features detailed in this section.

Extend your AD schema

With AWS Microsoft AD, you can run customized AD-integrated applications that require changes to your directory schema, which defines the structures of your directory. The schema is composed of object classes such as user objects, which contain attributes such as user names. AWS Microsoft AD lets you extend the schema by adding new AD attributes or object classes that are not present in the core AD attributes and classes.

For example, if you have a human resources application that uses employee badge color to assign specific benefits, you can extend the schema to include a badge color attribute in the user object class of your directory. To learn more, see How to Move More Custom Applications to the AWS Cloud with AWS Directory Service.

Create user-specific password policies

With user-specific password policies, you can apply specific restrictions and account lockout policies to different types of users in your AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) domain. For example, you can enforce strong passwords and frequent password change policies for administrators, and use less-restrictive policies with moderate account lockout policies for general users.

Add domain controllers

You can increase the performance and redundancy of your directory by adding domain controllers. This can help improve application performance by enabling directory clients to load-balance their requests across a larger number of domain controllers.

Encrypt directory traffic

You can use AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) to encrypt Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) communication between your applications and your directory. By enabling LDAP over Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)/Transport Layer Security (TLS), also called LDAPS, you encrypt your LDAP communications end to end. This helps you to protect sensitive information you keep in your directory when it is accessed over untrusted networks.

Improve the security of signing in to AWS services by using multi-factor authentication (MFA)

You can improve the security of signing in to AWS services, such as Amazon WorkSpaces and Amazon QuickSight, by enabling MFA in your AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) directory. With MFA, your users must enter a one-time passcode (OTP) in addition to their AD user names and passwords to access AWS applications and services you enable in AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition).

Get started

To get started, use the Directory Service console to create your first directory with just a few clicks. If you have not used Directory Service before, you may be eligible for a 30-day limited free trial.

Summary

In this blog post, I explained what AWS Microsoft AD (Standard Edition) is and how you can use it. With a single directory, you can address many use cases for your business, making it easier to migrate and run your AD-aware workloads in the AWS Cloud, provide access to AWS applications and services, and connect to other cloud applications. To learn more about AWS Microsoft AD, see the Directory Service home page.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about this blog post, start a new thread on the Directory Service forum.

– Peter

Reaper Botnet

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/10/reaper_botnet.html

It’s based on the Mirai code, but much more virulent:

While Mirai caused widespread outages, it impacted IP cameras and internet routers by simply exploiting their weak or default passwords. The latest botnet threat, known as alternately as IoT Troop or Reaper, has evolved that strategy, using actual software-hacking techniques to break into devices instead. It’s the difference between checking for open doors and actively picking locks­ — and it’s already enveloped devices on a million networks and counting.

It’s already infected a million IoT devices.

Federate Database User Authentication Easily with IAM and Amazon Redshift

Post Syndicated from Thiyagarajan Arumugam original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/federate-database-user-authentication-easily-with-iam-and-amazon-redshift/

Managing database users though federation allows you to manage authentication and authorization procedures centrally. Amazon Redshift now supports database authentication with IAM, enabling user authentication though enterprise federation. No need to manage separate database users and passwords to further ease the database administration. You can now manage users outside of AWS and authenticate them for access to an Amazon Redshift data warehouse. Do this by integrating IAM authentication and a third-party SAML-2.0 identity provider (IdP), such as AD FS, PingFederate, or Okta. In addition, database users can also be automatically created at their first login based on corporate permissions.

In this post, I demonstrate how you can extend the federation to enable single sign-on (SSO) to the Amazon Redshift data warehouse.

SAML and Amazon Redshift

AWS supports Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) 2.0, which is an open standard for identity federation used by many IdPs. SAML enables federated SSO, which enables your users to sign in to the AWS Management Console. Users can also make programmatic calls to AWS API actions by using assertions from a SAML-compliant IdP. For example, if you use Microsoft Active Directory for corporate directories, you may be familiar with how Active Directory and AD FS work together to enable federation. For more information, see the Enabling Federation to AWS Using Windows Active Directory, AD FS, and SAML 2.0 AWS Security Blog post.

Amazon Redshift now provides the GetClusterCredentials API operation that allows you to generate temporary database user credentials for authentication. You can set up an IAM permissions policy that generates these credentials for connecting to Amazon Redshift. Extending the IAM authentication, you can configure the federation of AWS access though a SAML 2.0–compliant IdP. An IAM role can be configured to permit the federated users call the GetClusterCredentials action and generate temporary credentials to log in to Amazon Redshift databases. You can also set up policies to restrict access to Amazon Redshift clusters, databases, database user names, and user group.

Amazon Redshift federation workflow

In this post, I demonstrate how you can use a JDBC– or ODBC-based SQL client to log in to the Amazon Redshift cluster using this feature. The SQL clients used with Amazon Redshift JDBC or ODBC drivers automatically manage the process of calling the GetClusterCredentials action, retrieving the database user credentials, and establishing a connection to your Amazon Redshift database. You can also use your database application to programmatically call the GetClusterCredentials action, retrieve database user credentials, and connect to the database. I demonstrate these features using an example company to show how different database users accounts can be managed easily using federation.

The following diagram shows how the SSO process works:

  1. JDBC/ODBC
  2. Authenticate using Corp Username/Password
  3. IdP sends SAML assertion
  4. Call STS to assume role with SAML
  5. STS Returns Temp Credentials
  6. Use Temp Credentials to get Temp cluster credentials
  7. Connect to Amazon Redshift using temp credentials

Walkthrough

Example Corp. is using Active Directory (idp host:demo.examplecorp.com) to manage federated access for users in its organization. It has an AWS account: 123456789012 and currently manages an Amazon Redshift cluster with the cluster ID “examplecorp-dw”, database “analytics” in us-west-2 region for its Sales and Data Science teams. It wants the following access:

  • Sales users can access the examplecorp-dw cluster using the sales_grp database group
  • Sales users access examplecorp-dw through a JDBC-based SQL client
  • Sales users access examplecorp-dw through an ODBC connection, for their reporting tools
  • Data Science users access the examplecorp-dw cluster using the data_science_grp database group.
  • Partners access the examplecorp-dw cluster and query using the partner_grp database group.
  • Partners are not federated through Active Directory and are provided with separate IAM user credentials (with IAM user name examplecorpsalespartner).
  • Partners can connect to the examplecorp-dw cluster programmatically, using language such as Python.
  • All users are automatically created in Amazon Redshift when they log in for the first time.
  • (Optional) Internal users do not specify database user or group information in their connection string. It is automatically assigned.
  • Data warehouse users can use SSO for the Amazon Redshift data warehouse using the preceding permissions.

Step 1:  Set up IdPs and federation

The Enabling Federation to AWS Using Windows Active Directory post demonstrated how to prepare Active Directory and enable federation to AWS. Using those instructions, you can establish trust between your AWS account and the IdP and enable user access to AWS using SSO.  For more information, see Identity Providers and Federation.

For this walkthrough, assume that this company has already configured SSO to their AWS account: 123456789012 for their Active Directory domain demo.examplecorp.com. The Sales and Data Science teams are not required to specify database user and group information in the connection string. The connection string can be configured by adding SAML Attribute elements to your IdP. Configuring these optional attributes enables internal users to conveniently avoid providing the DbUser and DbGroup parameters when they log in to Amazon Redshift.

The user-name attribute can be set up as follows, with a user ID (for example, nancy) or an email address (for example. [email protected]):

<Attribute Name="https://redshift.amazon.com/SAML/Attributes/DbUser">  
  <AttributeValue>user-name</AttributeValue>
</Attribute>

The AutoCreate attribute can be defined as follows:

<Attribute Name="https://redshift.amazon.com/SAML/Attributes/AutoCreate">
    <AttributeValue>true</AttributeValue>
</Attribute>

The sales_grp database group can be included as follows:

<Attribute Name="https://redshift.amazon.com/SAML/Attributes/DbGroups">
    <AttributeValue>sales_grp</AttributeValue>
</Attribute>

For more information about attribute element configuration, see Configure SAML Assertions for Your IdP.

Step 2: Create IAM roles for access to the Amazon Redshift cluster

The next step is to create IAM policies with permissions to call GetClusterCredentials and provide authorization for Amazon Redshift resources. To grant a SQL client the ability to retrieve the cluster endpoint, region, and port automatically, include the redshift:DescribeClusters action with the Amazon Redshift cluster resource in the IAM role.  For example, users can connect to the Amazon Redshift cluster using a JDBC URL without the need to hardcode the Amazon Redshift endpoint:

Previous:  jdbc:redshift://endpoint:port/database

Current:  jdbc:redshift:iam://clustername:region/dbname

Use IAM to create the following policies. You can also use an existing user or role and assign these policies. For example, if you already created an IAM role for IdP access, you can attach the necessary policies to that role. Here is the policy created for sales users for this example:

Sales_DW_IAM_Policy

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:DescribeClusters"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:cluster:examplecorp-dw"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:GetClusterCredentials"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:cluster:examplecorp-dw",
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}"
            ],
            "Condition": {
                "StringEquals": {
                    "aws:userid": "AIDIODR4TAW7CSEXAMPLE:${redshift:DbUser}@examplecorp.com"
                }
            }
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:CreateClusterUser"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:JoinGroup"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbgroup:examplecorp-dw/sales_grp"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

The policy uses the following parameter values:

  • Region: us-west-2
  • AWS Account: 123456789012
  • Cluster name: examplecorp-dw
  • Database group: sales_grp
  • IAM role: AIDIODR4TAW7CSEXAMPLE
Policy Statement Description
{
"Effect":"Allow",
"Action":[
"redshift:DescribeClusters"
],
"Resource":[
"arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:cluster:examplecorp-dw"
]
}

Allow users to retrieve the cluster endpoint, region, and port automatically for the Amazon Redshift cluster examplecorp-dw. This specification uses the resource format arn:aws:redshift:region:account-id:cluster:clustername. For example, the SQL client JDBC can be specified in the format jdbc:redshift:iam://clustername:region/dbname.

For more information, see Amazon Resource Names.

{
"Effect":"Allow",
"Action":[
"redshift:GetClusterCredentials"
],
"Resource":[
"arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:cluster:examplecorp-dw",
"arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}"
],
"Condition":{
"StringEquals":{
"aws:userid":"AIDIODR4TAW7CSEXAMPLE:${redshift:DbUser}@examplecorp.com"
}
}
}

Generates a temporary token to authenticate into the examplecorp-dw cluster. “arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}” restricts the corporate user name to the database user name for that user. This resource is specified using the format: arn:aws:redshift:region:account-id:dbuser:clustername/dbusername.

The Condition block enforces that the AWS user ID should match “AIDIODR4TAW7CSEXAMPLE:${redshift:DbUser}@examplecorp.com”, so that individual users can authenticate only as themselves. The AIDIODR4TAW7CSEXAMPLE role has the Sales_DW_IAM_Policy policy attached.

{
"Effect":"Allow",
"Action":[
"redshift:CreateClusterUser"
],
"Resource":[
"arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}"
]
}
Automatically creates database users in examplecorp-dw, when they log in for the first time. Subsequent logins reuse the existing database user.
{
"Effect":"Allow",
"Action":[
"redshift:JoinGroup"
],
"Resource":[
"arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbgroup:examplecorp-dw/sales_grp"
]
}
Allows sales users to join the sales_grp database group through the resource “arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbgroup:examplecorp-dw/sales_grp” that is specified in the format arn:aws:redshift:region:account-id:dbgroup:clustername/dbgroupname.

Similar policies can be created for Data Science users with access to join the data_science_grp group in examplecorp-dw. You can now attach the Sales_DW_IAM_Policy policy to the role that is mapped to IdP application for SSO.
 For more information about how to define the claim rules, see Configuring SAML Assertions for the Authentication Response.

Because partners are not authorized using Active Directory, they are provided with IAM credentials and added to the partner_grp database group. The Partner_DW_IAM_Policy is attached to the IAM users for partners. The following policy allows partners to log in using the IAM user name as the database user name.

Partner_DW_IAM_Policy

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:DescribeClusters"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:cluster:examplecorp-dw"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:GetClusterCredentials"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:cluster:examplecorp-dw",
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}"
            ],
            "Condition": {
                "StringEquals": {
                    "redshift:DbUser": "${aws:username}"
                }
            }
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:CreateClusterUser"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbuser:examplecorp-dw/${redshift:DbUser}"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "redshift:JoinGroup"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:redshift:us-west-2:123456789012:dbgroup:examplecorp-dw/partner_grp"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

redshift:DbUser“: “${aws:username}” forces an IAM user to use the IAM user name as the database user name.

With the previous steps configured, you can now establish the connection to Amazon Redshift through JDBC– or ODBC-supported clients.

Step 3: Set up database user access

Before you start connecting to Amazon Redshift using the SQL client, set up the database groups for appropriate data access. Log in to your Amazon Redshift database as superuser to create a database group, using CREATE GROUP.

Log in to examplecorp-dw/analytics as superuser and create the following groups and users:

CREATE GROUP sales_grp;
CREATE GROUP datascience_grp;
CREATE GROUP partner_grp;

Use the GRANT command to define access permissions to database objects (tables/views) for the preceding groups.

Step 4: Connect to Amazon Redshift using the JDBC SQL client

Assume that sales user “nancy” is using the SQL Workbench client and JDBC driver to log in to the Amazon Redshift data warehouse. The following steps help set up the client and establish the connection:

  1. Download the latest Amazon Redshift JDBC driver from the Configure a JDBC Connection page
  2. Build the JDBC URL with the IAM option in the following format:
    jdbc:redshift:iam://examplecorp-dw:us-west-2/sales_db

Because the redshift:DescribeClusters action is assigned to the preceding IAM roles, it automatically resolves the cluster endpoints and the port. Otherwise, you can specify the endpoint and port information in the JDBC URL, as described in Configure a JDBC Connection.

Identify the following JDBC options for providing the IAM credentials (see the “Prepare your environment” section) and configure in the SQL Workbench Connection Profile:

plugin_name=com.amazon.redshift.plugin.AdfsCredentialsProvider 
idp_host=demo.examplecorp.com (The name of the corporate identity provider host)
idp_port=443  (The port of the corporate identity provider host)
user=examplecorp\nancy(corporate user name)
password=***(corporate user password)

The SQL workbench configuration looks similar to the following screenshot:

Now, “nancy” can connect to examplecorp-dw by authenticating using the corporate Active Directory. Because the SAML attributes elements are already configured for nancy, she logs in as database user nancy and is assigned the sales_grp. Similarly, other Sales and Data Science users can connect to the examplecorp-dw cluster. A custom Amazon Redshift ODBC driver can also be used to connect using a SQL client. For more information, see Configure an ODBC Connection.

Step 5: Connecting to Amazon Redshift using JDBC SQL Client and IAM Credentials

This optional step is necessary only when you want to enable users that are not authenticated with Active Directory. Partners are provided with IAM credentials that they can use to connect to the examplecorp-dw Amazon Redshift clusters. These IAM users are attached to Partner_DW_IAM_Policy that assigns them to be assigned to the public database group in Amazon Redshift. The following JDBC URLs enable them to connect to the Amazon Redshift cluster:

jdbc:redshift:iam//examplecorp-dw/analytics?AccessKeyID=XXX&SecretAccessKey=YYY&DbUser=examplecorpsalespartner&DbGroup= partner_grp&AutoCreate=true

The AutoCreate option automatically creates a new database user the first time the partner logs in. There are several other options available to conveniently specify the IAM user credentials. For more information, see Options for providing IAM credentials.

Step 6: Connecting to Amazon Redshift using an ODBC client for Microsoft Windows

Assume that another sales user “uma” is using an ODBC-based client to log in to the Amazon Redshift data warehouse using Example Corp Active Directory. The following steps help set up the ODBC client and establish the Amazon Redshift connection in a Microsoft Windows operating system connected to your corporate network:

  1. Download and install the latest Amazon Redshift ODBC driver.
  2. Create a system DSN entry.
    1. In the Start menu, locate the driver folder or folders:
      • Amazon Redshift ODBC Driver (32-bit)
      • Amazon Redshift ODBC Driver (64-bit)
      • If you installed both drivers, you have a folder for each driver.
    2. Choose ODBC Administrator, and then type your administrator credentials.
    3. To configure the driver for all users on the computer, choose System DSN. To configure the driver for your user account only, choose User DSN.
    4. Choose Add.
  3. Select the Amazon Redshift ODBC driver, and choose Finish. Configure the following attributes:
    Data Source Name =any friendly name to identify the ODBC connection 
    Database=analytics
    user=uma(corporate user name)
    Auth Type-Identity Provider: AD FS
    password=leave blank (Windows automatically authenticates)
    Cluster ID: examplecorp-dw
    idp_host=demo.examplecorp.com (The name of the corporate IdP host)

This configuration looks like the following:

  1. Choose OK to save the ODBC connection.
  2. Verify that uma is set up with the SAML attributes, as described in the “Set up IdPs and federation” section.

The user uma can now use this ODBC connection to establish the connection to the Amazon Redshift cluster using any ODBC-based tools or reporting tools such as Tableau. Internally, uma authenticates using the Sales_DW_IAM_Policy  IAM role and is assigned the sales_grp database group.

Step 7: Connecting to Amazon Redshift using Python and IAM credentials

To enable partners, connect to the examplecorp-dw cluster programmatically, using Python on a computer such as Amazon EC2 instance. Reuse the IAM users that are attached to the Partner_DW_IAM_Policy policy defined in Step 2.

The following steps show this set up on an EC2 instance:

  1. Launch a new EC2 instance with the Partner_DW_IAM_Policy role, as described in Using an IAM Role to Grant Permissions to Applications Running on Amazon EC2 Instances. Alternatively, you can attach an existing IAM role to an EC2 instance.
  2. This example uses Python PostgreSQL Driver (PyGreSQL) to connect to your Amazon Redshift clusters. To install PyGreSQL on Amazon Linux, use the following command as the ec2-user:
    sudo easy_install pip
    sudo yum install postgresql postgresql-devel gcc python-devel
    sudo pip install PyGreSQL

  1. The following code snippet demonstrates programmatic access to Amazon Redshift for partner users:
    #!/usr/bin/env python
    """
    Usage:
    python redshift-unload-copy.py <config file> <region>
    
    * Copyright 2014, Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.
    *
    * Licensed under the Amazon Software License (the "License").
    * You may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
    * A copy of the License is located at
    *
    * http://aws.amazon.com/asl/
    *
    * or in the "license" file accompanying this file. This file is distributed
    * on an "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either
    * express or implied. See the License for the specific language governing
    * permissions and limitations under the License.
    """
    
    import sys
    import pg
    import boto3
    
    REGION = 'us-west-2'
    CLUSTER_IDENTIFIER = 'examplecorp-dw'
    DB_NAME = 'sales_db'
    DB_USER = 'examplecorpsalespartner'
    
    options = """keepalives=1 keepalives_idle=200 keepalives_interval=200
                 keepalives_count=6"""
    
    set_timeout_stmt = "set statement_timeout = 1200000"
    
    def conn_to_rs(host, port, db, usr, pwd, opt=options, timeout=set_timeout_stmt):
        rs_conn_string = """host=%s port=%s dbname=%s user=%s password=%s
                             %s""" % (host, port, db, usr, pwd, opt)
        print "Connecting to %s:%s:%s as %s" % (host, port, db, usr)
        rs_conn = pg.connect(dbname=rs_conn_string)
        rs_conn.query(timeout)
        return rs_conn
    
    def main():
        # describe the cluster and fetch the IAM temporary credentials
        global redshift_client
        redshift_client = boto3.client('redshift', region_name=REGION)
        response_cluster_details = redshift_client.describe_clusters(ClusterIdentifier=CLUSTER_IDENTIFIER)
        response_credentials = redshift_client.get_cluster_credentials(DbUser=DB_USER,DbName=DB_NAME,ClusterIdentifier=CLUSTER_IDENTIFIER,DurationSeconds=3600)
        rs_host = response_cluster_details['Clusters'][0]['Endpoint']['Address']
        rs_port = response_cluster_details['Clusters'][0]['Endpoint']['Port']
        rs_db = DB_NAME
        rs_iam_user = response_credentials['DbUser']
        rs_iam_pwd = response_credentials['DbPassword']
        # connect to the Amazon Redshift cluster
        conn = conn_to_rs(rs_host, rs_port, rs_db, rs_iam_user,rs_iam_pwd)
        # execute a query
        result = conn.query("SELECT sysdate as dt")
        # fetch results from the query
        for dt_val in result.getresult() :
            print dt_val
        # close the Amazon Redshift connection
        conn.close()
    
    if __name__ == "__main__":
        main()

You can save this Python program in a file (redshiftscript.py) and execute it at the command line as ec2-user:

python redshiftscript.py

Now partners can connect to the Amazon Redshift cluster using the Python script, and authentication is federated through the IAM user.

Summary

In this post, I demonstrated how to use federated access using Active Directory and IAM roles to enable single sign-on to an Amazon Redshift cluster. I also showed how partners outside an organization can be managed easily using IAM credentials.  Using the GetClusterCredentials API action, now supported by Amazon Redshift, lets you manage a large number of database users and have them use corporate credentials to log in. You don’t have to maintain separate database user accounts.

Although this post demonstrated the integration of IAM with AD FS and Active Directory, you can replicate this solution across with your choice of SAML 2.0 third-party identity providers (IdP), such as PingFederate or Okta. For the different supported federation options, see Configure SAML Assertions for Your IdP.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.


Additional Reading

Learn how to establish federated access to your AWS resources by using Active Directory user attributes.


About the Author

Thiyagarajan Arumugam is a Big Data Solutions Architect at Amazon Web Services and designs customer architectures to process data at scale. Prior to AWS, he built data warehouse solutions at Amazon.com. In his free time, he enjoys all outdoor sports and practices the Indian classical drum mridangam.

 

IoT Cybersecurity: What’s Plan B?

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/10/iot_cybersecuri.html

In August, four US Senators introduced a bill designed to improve Internet of Things (IoT) security. The IoT Cybersecurity Improvement Act of 2017 is a modest piece of legislation. It doesn’t regulate the IoT market. It doesn’t single out any industries for particular attention, or force any companies to do anything. It doesn’t even modify the liability laws for embedded software. Companies can continue to sell IoT devices with whatever lousy security they want.

What the bill does do is leverage the government’s buying power to nudge the market: any IoT product that the government buys must meet minimum security standards. It requires vendors to ensure that devices can not only be patched, but are patched in an authenticated and timely manner; don’t have unchangeable default passwords; and are free from known vulnerabilities. It’s about as low a security bar as you can set, and that it will considerably improve security speaks volumes about the current state of IoT security. (Full disclosure: I helped draft some of the bill’s security requirements.)

The bill would also modify the Computer Fraud and Abuse and the Digital Millennium Copyright Acts to allow security researchers to study the security of IoT devices purchased by the government. It’s a far narrower exemption than our industry needs. But it’s a good first step, which is probably the best thing you can say about this legislation.

However, it’s unlikely this first step will even be taken. I am writing this column in August, and have no doubt that the bill will have gone nowhere by the time you read it in October or later. If hearings are held, they won’t matter. The bill won’t have been voted on by any committee, and it won’t be on any legislative calendar. The odds of this bill becoming law are zero. And that’s not just because of current politics — I’d be equally pessimistic under the Obama administration.

But the situation is critical. The Internet is dangerous — and the IoT gives it not just eyes and ears, but also hands and feet. Security vulnerabilities, exploits, and attacks that once affected only bits and bytes now affect flesh and blood.

Markets, as we’ve repeatedly learned over the past century, are terrible mechanisms for improving the safety of products and services. It was true for automobile, food, restaurant, airplane, fire, and financial-instrument safety. The reasons are complicated, but basically, sellers don’t compete on safety features because buyers can’t efficiently differentiate products based on safety considerations. The race-to-the-bottom mechanism that markets use to minimize prices also minimizes quality. Without government intervention, the IoT remains dangerously insecure.

The US government has no appetite for intervention, so we won’t see serious safety and security regulations, a new federal agency, or better liability laws. We might have a better chance in the EU. Depending on how the General Data Protection Regulation on data privacy pans out, the EU might pass a similar security law in 5 years. No other country has a large enough market share to make a difference.

Sometimes we can opt out of the IoT, but that option is becoming increasingly rare. Last year, I tried and failed to purchase a new car without an Internet connection. In a few years, it’s going to be nearly impossible to not be multiply connected to the IoT. And our biggest IoT security risks will stem not from devices we have a market relationship with, but from everyone else’s cars, cameras, routers, drones, and so on.

We can try to shop our ideals and demand more security, but companies don’t compete on IoT safety — and we security experts aren’t a large enough market force to make a difference.

We need a Plan B, although I’m not sure what that is. E-mail me if you have any ideas.

This essay previously appeared in the September/October issue of IEEE Security & Privacy.

Some notes on the KRACK attack

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2017/10/some-notes-on-krack-attack.html

This is my interpretation of the KRACK attacks paper that describes a way of decrypting encrypted WiFi traffic with an active attack.

tl;dr: Wow. Everyone needs to be afraid. (Well, worried — not panicked.) It means in practice, attackers can decrypt a lot of wifi traffic, with varying levels of difficulty depending on your precise network setup. My post last July about the DEF CON network being safe was in error.

Details

This is not a crypto bug but a protocol bug (a pretty obvious and trivial protocol bug).
When a client connects to the network, the access-point will at some point send a random “key” data to use for encryption. Because this packet may be lost in transmission, it can be repeated many times.
What the hacker does is just repeatedly sends this packet, potentially hours later. Each time it does so, it resets the “keystream” back to the starting conditions. The obvious patch that device vendors will make is to only accept the first such packet it receives, ignore all the duplicates.
At this point, the protocol bug becomes a crypto bug. We know how to break crypto when we have two keystreams from the same starting position. It’s not always reliable, but reliable enough that people need to be afraid.
Android, though, is the biggest danger. Rather than simply replaying the packet, a packet with key data of all zeroes can be sent. This allows attackers to setup a fake WiFi access-point and man-in-the-middle all traffic.
In a related case, the access-point/base-station can sometimes also be attacked, affecting the stream sent to the client.
Not only is sniffing possible, but in some limited cases, injection. This allows the traditional attack of adding bad code to the end of HTML pages in order to trick users into installing a virus.

This is an active attack, not a passive attack, so in theory, it’s detectable.

Who is vulnerable?

Everyone, pretty much.
The hacker only needs to be within range of your WiFi. Your neighbor’s teenage kid is going to be downloading and running the tool in order to eavesdrop on your packets.
The hacker doesn’t need to be logged into your network.
It affects all WPA1/WPA2, the personal one with passwords that we use in home, and the enterprise version with certificates we use in enterprises.
It can’t defeat SSL/TLS or VPNs. Thus, if you feel your laptop is safe surfing the public WiFi at airports, then your laptop is still safe from this attack. With Android, it does allow running tools like sslstrip, which can fool many users.
Your home network is vulnerable. Many devices will be using SSL/TLS, so are fine, like your Amazon echo, which you can continue to use without worrying about this attack. Other devices, like your Phillips lightbulbs, may not be so protected.

How can I defend myself?

Patch.
More to the point, measure your current vendors by how long it takes them to patch. Throw away gear by those vendors that took a long time to patch and replace it with vendors that took a short time.
High-end access-points that contains “WIPS” (WiFi Intrusion Prevention Systems) features should be able to detect this and block vulnerable clients from connecting to the network (once the vendor upgrades the systems, of course). Even low-end access-points, like the $30 ones you get for home, can easily be updated to prevent packet sequence numbers from going back to the start (i.e. from the keystream resetting back to the start).
At some point, you’ll need to run the attack against yourself, to make sure all your devices are secure. Since you’ll be constantly allowing random phones to connect to your network, you’ll need to check their vulnerability status before connecting them. You’ll need to continue doing this for several years.
Of course, if you are using SSL/TLS for everything, then your danger is mitigated. This is yet another reason why you should be using SSL/TLS for internal communications.
Most security vendors will add things to their products/services to defend you. While valuable in some cases, it’s not a defense. The defense is patching the devices you know about, and preventing vulnerable devices from attaching to your network.
If I remember correctly, DEF CON uses Aruba. Aruba contains WIPS functionality, which means by the time DEF CON roles around again next year, they should have the feature to deny vulnerable devices from connecting, and specifically to detect an attack in progress and prevent further communication.
However, for an attacker near an Android device using a low-powered WiFi, it’s likely they will be able to conduct man-in-the-middle without any WIPS preventing them.

Impersonating iOS Password Prompts

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/10/impersonating_i.html

This is an interesting security vulnerability: because it is so easy to impersonate iOS password prompts, a malicious app can steal your password just by asking.

Why does this work?

iOS asks the user for their iTunes password for many reasons, the most common ones are recently installed iOS operating system updates, or iOS apps that are stuck during installation.

As a result, users are trained to just enter their Apple ID password whenever iOS prompts you to do so. However, those popups are not only shown on the lock screen, and the home screen, but also inside random apps, e.g. when they want to access iCloud, GameCenter or In-App-Purchases.

This could easily be abused by any app, just by showing an UIAlertController, that looks exactly like the system dialog.

Even users who know a lot about technology have a hard time detecting that those alerts are phishing attacks.

The essay proposes some solutions, but I’m not sure they’ll work. We’re all trained to trust our computers and the applications running on them.

Taringa Hack – 27 Million User Records Leaked

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2017/10/taringa-hack-27-million-user-records-leaked/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

Taringa Hack – 27 Million User Records Leaked

The Taringa hack is actually one of the biggest leaks of the year with 27 million weakly hashed passwords breached, but it’s not often covered in the Western media with it being a Latin American site (something like Reddit).

The leak happened in August and it seems like the hackers were able to brute force around 95% of the account passwords fairly quickly with Taringa using an outdated and flawing hashing algorithm – md5.

Read the rest of Taringa Hack – 27 Million User Records Leaked now! Only available at Darknet.