Tag Archives: Raspberry Pi Camera Module

Really, really awesome Raspberry Pi NeoPixel LED mirror

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/awesome-neopixel-led-mirror/

Check out Super Make Something’s awesome NeoPixel LED mirror: a 576 RGB LED display that converts images via the Raspberry Pi Camera Module and Raspberry Pi 3B+ into a pixelated light show.

Neopixel LED Mirror (Python, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, 3D Printing, Laser Cutting!) DIY How To

Time to pull out all the stops for the biggest Super Make Something project to date! Using 3D printing, laser cutting, a Raspberry Pi, computer vision, Python, and nearly 600 Neopixel LEDs, I build a low resolution LED mirror that displays your reflection on a massive 3 foot by 3 foot grid made from an array of 24 by 24 RGB LEDs!

Mechanical mirrors

If you’re into cool uses of tech, you may be aware of Daniel Rozin, the creative artist building mechanical mirrors out of wooden panels, trash, and…penguins, to name but a few of his wonderful builds.

A woman standing in front of a mechanical mirror made of toy penguins

Yup, this is a mechanical mirror made of toy penguins.

A digital mechanical mirror?

Inspired by Daniel Rozin’s work, Alex, the person behind Super Make Something, put an RGB LED spin on the concept, producing this stunning mirror that thoroughly impressed visitors at Cleveland Maker Faire last month.

“Inspired by Danny Rozin’s mechanical mirrors, this 3 foot by 3 foot mirror is powered by a Raspberry Pi, and uses Python and OpenCV computer vision libraries to process captured images in real time to light up 576 individual RGB LEDs!” Alex explains on Instagram. “Also onboard are nearly 600 3D-printed squares to diffuse the light from each NeoPixel, as well as 16 laser-cut panels to hold everything in place!”

The video above gives a brilliantly detailed explanation of how Alex made the, so we highly recommend giving it a watch if you’re feeling inspired to make your own.

Seriously, we really want to make one of these for Raspberry Pi Towers!

As always, be sure to subscribe to Super Make Something on YouTube and leave a comment on the video if, like us, you love the project. Most online makers are producing content such as this with very little return on their investment, so every like and subscriber really does make a difference.

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The Nest Box: DIY Springwatch with Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Helen Lynn original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-nest-box-diy-springwatch/

Last week, lots and lots of you shared your Raspberry Pi builds with us on social media using the hashtag #IUseMyRaspberryPiFor. Jay Wainwright from Liverpool noticed the conversation and got in touch to tell us about The Nest Box, which uses Raspberry Pi to bring impressively high-quality images and video from British bird boxes to your Facebook feed.

Jay runs a small network of livestreaming nest box cameras, with three currently sited and another three in the pipeline; excitingly, the new ones will include a kestrel box and a barn owl box! During the spring, all the cameras stream live to The Nest Box’s Facebook page, which has steadily built a solid following of several thousand wildlife fans.

A pair of blue tits feeds their chicks in a woolly nest

The Nest Box’s setup uses a Raspberry Pi and Camera Module, along with a Raspberry Pi PoE HAT to provide both power and internet connectivity, so there’s only one cable connection to weatherproof. There’s also a custom HAT that Jay has designed to control LED lights and to govern the Raspberry Pi Camera Module’s IR filter, ensuring high-quality images both during the day and at night. To top it all off, he has written some Python code to record visitors to the nest boxes and go into live streaming mode whenever the action is happening.

As we can see from this nest box design for swifts, shown on the project’s crowdfunding profile, plenty of thought has evidently been put into the design of the boxes so that they provide tempting quarters for their feathered occupants while also accommodating all the electronic components.

Follow The Nest Box on Facebook to add British birds into your social media mix — whatever you’ve got now, I’ll bet all tomorrow’s coffees that it’ll be an improvement. And if you’re using Raspberry Pi for a wildlife project, or you’ve got plans along those lines, let us know in the comments.

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Raspberry Pi snail habitats for Mrs Nation’s class

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-snail-habitats-for-mrs-nations-class/

These Raspberry Pis take hourly photographs of snails in plastic container habitats, sharing them to the Snail Habitat website.

Snails

While some might find them kind of icky, I am in love with snails (less so with their homeless cousin, the slug), so this snail habitat project from Mrs Nation’s class is right up my alley.

Snail Habitats



This project was done in a classroom with 22 students. We broke the kids out into groups and created 5 snail habitats. It would be a great project to do school-wide too, where you create 1 snail habitat per class. This would allow the entire school to get involved and monitor each other’s habitats.

Each snail habitat in Mrs Nation’s class is monitored by a Raspberry Pi and camera module, and Misty Lackie has written specific code to take a photo every hour, uploading the image to the dedicated Snail Habitat website. This allows the class to check in on their mollusc friends without disturbing their environment.

“I would love to see others habitats,” Misty states on the project’s GitHub repo, “so if you create one, please share it and I would be happy to publish it on snailhabitat.com.”

Snail facts according to Emma, our resident Bug Doctor

  • The World Snail Racing Championships take place in Norfolk every year. Emma’s friend took a snail there once, but it didn’t win.
  • Roman snails, while common in the UK, aren’t native to the country. They were brought to the country by the Romans. Emma is 99% sure this fact is correct.
  • Garlic snails, when agitated, emit a garlic scent. Helen likes the idea of self-seasoning escargots. Alex is less than convinced.
  • Snails have no backbone, making them awful wingmen during late-night pub brawls and confrontations.
  • This GIF may be fake:

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Estefannie’s Jurassic Park goggles

Post Syndicated from Helen Lynn original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/estefannies-jurassic-park-goggles/

When we invited Estefannie Explains It All to present at Coolest Projects International, she decided to make something cool with a Raspberry Pi to bring along. But being Estefannie, she didn’t just make something a little bit cool. She went ahead and made Raspberry Pi Zero-powered Jurassic Park goggles, or, as she calls them, the world’s first globally triggered, mass broadcasting, photon-emitting and -collecting head unit.

Make your own Jurassic Park goggles using a Raspberry Pi // MAKE SOMETHING

Is it heavy? Yes. But these goggles are not expensive. Follow along as I make the classic Jurassic Park Goggles from scratch!! The 3D Models: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3732889 My code: https://github.com/estefanniegg/estefannieExplainsItAll/blob/master/makes/JurassicGoggles/jurassic_park.py Thank you Coolest Projects for bringing me over to speak in Ireland!! https://coolestprojects.org/ Thank you Polymaker for sending me the Polysher and the PolySmooth filament!!!!

3D-printing, sanding, and sanding

Estefannie’s starting point was the set of excellent 3D models of the iconic goggles that Jurassicpaul has kindly made available on Thingiverse. There followed several 3D printing attempts and lots of sanding, sanding, sanding, spray painting, and sanding, then some more printing with special Polymaker filament that can be ethanol polished.

Adding the electronics and assembling the goggles

Estefannie soldered rings of addressable LEDs and created custom models for 3D-printable pieces to fit both them and the goggles. She added a Raspberry Pi Zero, some more LEDs and buttons, an adjustable headgear part from a welding mask, and – importantly – four circles of green acetate. After quite a lot of gluing, soldering, and wiring, she ended up with an entirely magnificent set of goggles.

Here, they’re modelled magnificently by Raspberry Pi videographer Brian. I think you’ll agree he cuts quite a dash.

Coding and LED user interface

Estefannie wrote a Python script to interact with Twitter, take photos, and provide information about the goggles’ current status via the LED rings. When Estefannie powers up the Raspberry Pi, it runs a script on startup and connects to her phone’s wireless hotspot. A red LED on the front of the goggles indicates that the script is up and running.

Once it’s running, pressing a button at the back of the head unit makes the Raspberry Pi search Twitter for mentions of @JurassicPi. The LEDs light up green while it searches, just like you remember from the film. If Estefannie’s script finds a mention, the LEDs flash white and the Raspberry Pi camera module takes a photo. Then they light up blue while the script tweets the photo.




All the code is available on Estefannie’s GitHub. I love this project – I love the super clear, simple user experience provided by the LED rings, and there’s something I really appealing about the asynchronous Twitter interaction, where you mention @JurassicPi and then get an image later, the next time googles are next turned on.

Extra bonus Coolest Projects

If you read the beginning of this post and thought, “wait, what’s Coolest Projects?” then be sure to watch to the end of Estefannie’s video to catch her excellentCoolest Projects mini vlog. And then sign up for updates about Coolest Projects events near you, so you can join in next year, or help a team of young people to join in.

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Growth Monitor pi: an open monitoring system for plant science

Post Syndicated from Helen Lynn original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/growth-monitor-pi-an-open-monitoring-system-for-plant-science/

Plant scientists and agronomists use growth chambers to provide consistent growing conditions for the plants they study. This reduces confounding variables – inconsistent temperature or light levels, for example – that could render the results of their experiments less meaningful. To make sure that conditions really are consistent both within and between growth chambers, which minimises experimental bias and ensures that experiments are reproducible, it’s helpful to monitor and record environmental variables in the chambers.

A neat grid of small leafy plants on a black plastic tray. Metal housing and tubing is visible to the sides.

Arabidopsis thaliana in a growth chamber on the International Space Station. Many experimental plants are less well monitored than these ones.
(“Arabidopsis thaliana plants […]” by Rawpixel Ltd (original by NASA) / CC BY 2.0)

In a recent paper in Applications in Plant Sciences, Brandin Grindstaff and colleagues at the universities of Missouri and Arizona describe how they developed Growth Monitor pi, or GMpi: an affordable growth chamber monitor that provides wider functionality than other devices. As well as sensing growth conditions, it sends the gathered data to cloud storage, captures images, and generates alerts to inform scientists when conditions drift outside of an acceptable range.

The authors emphasise – and we heartily agree – that you don’t need expertise with software and computing to build, use, and adapt a system like this. They’ve written a detailed protocol and made available all the necessary software for any researcher to build GMpi, and they note that commercial solutions with similar functionality range in price from $10,000 to $1,000,000 – something of an incentive to give the DIY approach a go.

GMpi uses a Raspberry Pi Model 3B+, to which are connected temperature-humidity and light sensors from our friends at Adafruit, as well as a Raspberry Pi Camera Module.

The team used open-source app Rclone to upload sensor data to a cloud service, choosing Google Drive since it’s available for free. To alert users when growing conditions fall outside of a set range, they use the incoming webhooks app to generate notifications in a Slack channel. Sensor operation, data gathering, and remote monitoring are supported by a combination of software that’s available for free from the open-source community and software the authors developed themselves. Their package GMPi_Pack is available on GitHub.

With a bill of materials amounting to something in the region of $200, GMpi is another excellent example of affordable, accessible, customisable open labware that’s available to researchers and students. If you want to find out how to build GMpi for your lab, or just for your greenhouse, Affordable remote monitoring of plant growth in facilities using Raspberry Pi computers by Brandin et al. is available on PubMed Central, and it includes appendices with clear and detailed set-up instructions for the whole system.

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A low-cost, open-source, computer-assisted microscope

Post Syndicated from Helen Lynn original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/a-low-cost-open-source-computer-assisted-microscope/

Low-cost open labware is a good thing in the world, and I was particularly pleased when micropalaeontologist Martin Tetard got in touch about the Raspberry Pi-based microscope he is developing. The project is called microscoPI (what else?), and it can capture, process, and store images and image analysis results. Martin is engaged in climate research: he uses microscopy to study tiny fossil remains, from which he gleans information about the environmental conditions that prevailed in the far-distant past.

microscoPI: a microcomputer-assisted microscope

microscoPI a project that aims to design a multipurpose, open-source and inexpensive micro-computer-assisted microscope (Raspberry PI 3). This microscope can automatically take images, process them, and save them altogether with the results of image analyses on a flash drive. It it multipurpose as it can be used on various kinds of images (e.g.

Martin repurposed an old microscope with a Z-axis adjustable stage for accurate focusing, and sourced an inexpensive X/Y movable stage to allow more accurate horizontal positioning of samples under the camera. He emptied the head of the scope to install a Raspberry Pi Camera Module, and he uses an M12 lens adapter to attach lenses suitable for single-specimen close-ups or for imaging several specimens at once. A Raspberry Pi 3B sits above the head of the microscope, and a 3.5-inch TFT touchscreen mounted on top of the Raspberry Pi allows the user to check images as they are captured and processed.

The Raspberry Pi runs our free operating system, Raspbian, and free image-processing software ImageJ. Martin and his colleagues use a number of plugins, some developed themselves and some by others, to support the specific requirements of their research. With this software, microscoPI can capture and analyse microfossil images automatically: it can count particles, including tiny specimens that are touching, analyse their shape and size, and save images and results before prompting the user for the name of the next sample.

microscoPI is compact – less than 30cm in height – and it’s powered by a battery bank secured under the base of the microscope, so it’s easily portable. The entire build comes in at under 160 Euros. You can find out more, and get in touch with Martin, on the microscoPI website.

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Retrofit a vintage camera flash with a Raspberry Pi Camera Module

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/retrofit-vintage-camera-flash-with-camera-module/

Wanting to break from the standard practice of updating old analogue cameras with digital technology, Alan Wang decided to retrofit a broken vintage camera flash with a Raspberry Pi Zero W to produce a video-capturing action cam.

Raspberry Pi Zero Flash Cam Video Test

Full story of this project: https://www.hackster.io/alankrantas/raspberry-pi-zero-flash-cam-359875

By hacking a somewhat gnarly hole into the body of the broken flash unit, Alan fit in the Raspberry Pi Zero W and Camera Module, along with a few other components. He powers the whole unit via a USB power bank.

At every touch of the onboard touchpad, the retrofit camera films 12 seconds of footage and saves it as an MP4 file on the onboard SD card or an optional USB flash drive.

While the project didn’t technically bring the flash unit back to life — as the flash function is still broken — it’s a nice example of upcycling old tech, and it looks pretty sweet. Plus, you can attach it to your existing film camera to produce some cool side-by-side comparison imagery, as seen in the setup above.

For a full breakdown of the build, including the code needed to run the camera, check out the project’s Hackster.io page.

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Build your own Raspberry Pi night vision camera

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-your-own-raspberry-pi-night-vision-camera/

A Raspberry Pi Zero W, Pimoroni HyperPixel screen, and Raspberry Pi IR Camera Module are all you need to build this homemade night vision camera.

How to build a night vision camera

How to build a night vision camera, video showing the process and problems that I came across when building this camera

Raspberry Pi night vison camera

Built into the body of an old camera flash, Dan’s Raspberry Pi night vision camera is a homage to a childhood spent sneaking around the levels of Splinter Cell. Says Dan:

The iconic image from the game is the night vision goggles that Sam Fisher wears. I have always been fascinated by the idea that you can see in the dark and this formed the foundation of my idea to build a portable hand-held night vision piece of equipment.

The camera, running on Raspbian, boasts several handy functions, including touchscreen controls courtesy of the Pimoroni HyperPixel, realtime video and image capture, and a viewing distance of two to five metres.

It’s okay to FAIL

Embracing the FAIL (First Attempt In Learning) principle, Dan goes into detail about the issues he had to overcome while building the camera, which is another reason why we really enjoyed this project. It’s okay to fail when trying your hand at digital making, because you learn from your mistakes! Dan’s explanations of the struggles he faced and how he overcame them are 👌.

For a full rundown of the project and tips on building your own, check out its Hackster.io page.

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Rather lovely Raspberry Pi time lapses

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/rather-lovely-raspberry-pi-time-lapses/

Having just sat and watched this gorgeous time lapse of a Finnish lake, we thought it would be nice to finish off the working week with a collection of lovely Raspberry Pi Camera Module time lapses.

Summer over a Finnish lake

Summer time lapse over a Finnish lake.

Time lapse over a Finnish lake from July 2019. Shot with a DIY all-weather HDR time-lapse camera built from ZWO ASI 224MC and Raspberry Pi 3. The camera was built to function as an all-sky camera for recording the night sky year round but since in July the stars were not visible in Finland I decided to test it aimed horizontally over a lake and was positively surprised about the results.

Time-lapse over a Finnish lake from July 2019. Shot with a DIY all-weather HDR time-lapse camera built from ZWO ASI 224MC and Raspberry Pi 3.

Six days of cress growth

Cress Seeds Growing Raspberry Pi Time Lapse Video

Filmed over 6 days using a Raspberry Pi Zero W and Raspberry Pi Camera. Once photo taken every 5 minutes and then played back at 24 fps. I removed the night time photos and then the images were stitched together using the ‘Stop Motion’ app on an iPhone.

Filmed over 6 days using a Raspberry Pi Zero W and Raspberry Pi Camera. Once photo taken every 5 minutes and then played back at 24 fps.

Growing salad

Salad Growth | Timelapse | Raspberry Pi Camera | PiMeetsPlants

Timelapse about salad growth. Period of Picture Making: 03-04 to 02-05-2016 Camera has shot 2087 pictures in a distance of 20 minutes. Camera: Raspberry Pi Camera Module Music: Valesco – Stay With Me: http://soundcloud.com/valesco_official/stay-with-me Valesco on Soundcloud: http://soundcloud.com/valesco_official My Links: Website: https://pimeetsplants.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/PiMeetsPlants Google+: https://plus.google.com/+Pimeetsplants

I think I have a thing for time-lapse videos of plant growth. They’re just so friggin’ cool!

Skyline time lapse

Skyline Timelapse: Day to Night l SainSmart FOV160° Raspberry Pi Camera

More info : https://www.sainsmart.com/products/wide-angle-fov160-5-megapixel-camera-module-for-raspberry-pi FOLLOW US Twitter: https://twitter.com/Sain_Smart Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SainSmart/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sainsmart/

A time lapse of slime

PHYSARUM MACHINE

Summer Project 2018 – Computational Arts MA, Goldsmiths University London. Time-lapse footage of Physarum Polycephalum captured with Raspberry Pi and IR camera, slit-scan program in Open Frameworks.

Summer Project 2018 – Computational Arts MA, Goldsmiths University London. Time-lapse footage of Physarum Polycephalum captured with Raspberry Pi and IR camera, slit-scan program in Open Frameworks.

Setting up the Raspberry Pi Store, Cambridge

Setting up the Raspberry Pi Shop, Cambridge

Given that we had access to a bunch of Raspberry Pis, we thought that we should use some of them to get some timelapse footage of the shop being set up. Read more about the Raspberry Pi shop on our blog: http://rpf.io/ytstoreblog

We couldn’t help ourselves. When the time came to set up the Raspberry Pi retail store in Cambridge, we just had to install a time-lapse camera in the corner.

Technically…

While this time lapse wasn’t taken with a Raspberry Pi Camera Module, the slider moving the camera was controlled using Raspberry Pi. That counts, right?

The Burren

The Burren is a karst landscape region in north-west Co. Clare in Ireland. It is one of the largest karst regions in Europe. I have been photographing The Burren over the last 5 years, and recently got into time lapse photography. The Burren was an obvious place for me to do this first video.

The Burren is a karst landscape region in north-west Co. Clare in Ireland. It is one of the largest karst regions in Europe. I have been photographing The Burren over the last 5 years, and recently got into time-lapse photography. The Burren was an obvious place for me to do this first video.

Your turn

Want to set up your own Raspberry Pi time-lapse camera? Our handy guide shows you how.

Do you have a time-lapse video you’d like to share with us? Then please post your link in the comments below.

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Playback your favourite records with Plynth

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/playback-your-favourite-records-with-plynth/

Use album artwork to trigger playback of your favourite music with Plynth, the Raspberry Pi–powered, camera-enhanced record stand.

Plynth Demo

This is “Plynth Demo” by Plynth on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Record playback with Plynth

Plynth uses a Raspberry Pi and Pi Camera Module to identify cover artwork and play the respective album on your sound system, via your preferred streaming service or digital library.

As the project’s website explains, using Plynth is pretty simple. Just:

  • Place a n LP, CD, tape, VHS, DVD, piece of artwork – anything, really – onto Plynth
  • Plynth uses its built-in camera to scan and identify the work
  • Plynth starts streaming your music on your connected speakers or home stereo system

As for Plynth’s innards? The stand houses a Raspberry Pi 3B+ and Camera Module, and relies on “a combination of the Google Vision API and OpenCV, which is great because there’s a lot of documentation online for both of them”, states the project creator, sp_cecamp, on Reddit.

Other uses

Some of you may wonder why you wouldn’t have your records with your record player and, as such, use that record player to play those records. If you are one of these people, then consider, for example, the beautiful Damien Rice LP I own that tragically broke during a recent house move. While I can no longer play the LP, its artwork is still worthy of a place on my record shelf, and with Plynth I can still play the album as well.

In addition, instead of album artwork to play an album, you could use photographs, doodles, or type to play curated playlists, or, as mentioned on the website, DVDs to play the movies soundtrack, or CDs to correctly select the right disc in a disc changer.

Convinced or not, I think what we can all agree on is that Plynth is a good-looking bit of kit, and at Pi Towers look forward to seeing where they project leads.

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Penguin Watch — Pi Zeros and Camera Modules in the Antarctic

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/penguin-watch/

Long-time readers will remember Penguin Lifelines, one of our very favourite projects from back in the mists of time (which is to say 2014 — we have short memories around here).

Penguins

Click on penguins for fun and conservation

Penguin Lifelines was a programme run by the Zoological Society of London, crowdsourcing the tracking of penguin colonies in Antarctica. It’s since evolved into something called Penguin Watch, now working with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS). It’s citizen science on a big scale: thousands of people from all over the world come together on the internet to…click on penguins. By counting the birds in their colonies, users help penguinologists measure changes in the birds’ behaviour and habitat, and in the larger ecosystem, thus assisting in their conservation.

The penguin people say this about Penguin Watch:

Some of these colonies are so difficult to get to that they haven’t been visited for 50 years! The images contain unprecedented detail, giving us the opportunity to gather new data on the number of penguins in the region. This information will help us understand how they are being affected by climate change, the potential impact of local fisheries, and how we can help conserve these incredible species.

Pis in the coldest, wildest place

And what are those special cameras? The static ones providing time-lapse images are Raspberry Pi Camera Modules, mounted on Raspberry Pi Zeros, and we’re really proud to see just how robust they’ve been in the face of Antarctic winters.

Alasdair Davies on Twitter

Success! The @arribada_i timelapse @Raspberry_Pi Zero cameras built for @penguin_watch survived the Antarctic winter! They captured these fantastic photos of a Gentoo penguin rookery for https://t.co/MEzxbqSyc1 #WorldPenguinDay 🐧@helenlynn @philipcolligan https://t.co/M0TK5NLT6G

These things are incredibly tough. They’re the same cameras that Alasdair and colleagues have been sticking on turtles, at depths of down to 500m; I can’t think of a better set of tests for robustness.

Want to get involved? Head over to Penguin Watch, and get clicking! We warn you, though — it’s a little addictive.

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Raspberry Pi captures a Soyuz in space!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-captures-soyuz-in-space/

So this happened. And we are buzzing!

You’re most likely aware of the Astro Pi Challenge. In case you’re not, it’s a wonderfully exciting programme organised by the European Space Agency (ESA) and us at Raspberry Pi. Astro Pi challenges European young people to write scientific experiments in code, and the best experiments run aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on two Astro Pi units: Raspberry Pi 1 B+ and Sense HATs encased in flight-grade aluminium spacesuits.

It’s very cool. So, so cool. As adults, we’re all extremely jealous that we’re unable to take part. We all love space and, to be honest, we all want to be astronauts. Astronauts are the coolest.

So imagine our excitement at Pi Towers when ESA shared this photo on Friday:

This is a Soyuz vehicle on its way to dock with the International Space Station. And while Soyuz vehicles ferry between earth and the ISS all the time, what’s so special about this occasion is that this very photo was captured using a Raspberry Pi 1 B+ and a Raspberry Pi Camera Module, together known as Izzy, one of the Astro Pi units!

So if anyone ever asks you whether the Raspberry Pi Camera Module is any good, just show them this photo. We don’t think you’ll need to provide any further evidence after that.

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Hacking an Etch-A-Sketch with a Raspberry Pi and camera: Etch-A-Snap!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hacking-etch-a-sketch-raspberry-pi-camera-etch-a-snap/

Kids of the 1980s, rejoice: the age of the digital Etch-A-Sketch is now!

What is an Etch-A-Sketch

Introduced in 1960, the Etch-A-Sketch was invented by Frenchman André Cassagnes and manufactured by the Ohio Art Company.

The back of the Etch-A-Sketch screen is covered in very fine aluminium powder. Turning one of the two directional knobs runs a stylus across the back of the screen, displacing the powder and creating a dark grey line visible in the front side.

can it run DOOM?

yes

The Etch-A-Sketch was my favourite childhood toy. So you can imagine how excited I was to see the Etch-A-Snap project when I logged into Reddit this morning!

Digital Etch-A-Sketch

Yesterday, Martin Fitzpatrick shared on Reddit how he designed and built Etch-A-Snap, a Raspberry Pi Zero– and Camera Module–connected Etch-A-Sketch that (slowly) etches photographs using one continuous line.

Etch-A-Snap is (probably) the world’s first Etch-A-Sketch Camera. Powered by a Raspberry Pi Zero (or Zero W), it snaps photos just like any other camera, but outputs them by drawing to an Pocket Etch-A-Sketch screen. Quite slowly.

Unless someone can show us another Etch-A-Sketch camera like this, we’re happy to agree that this is a first!

Raspberry Pi–powered Etch-A-Sketch

Powered by four AA batteries and three 18650 LiPo cells, Etch-A-Snap houses the $5 Raspberry Pi Zero and two 5V stepper motors within a 3D-printed case mounted on the back of a pocket-sized Etch-A-Sketch.

Photos taken using the Raspberry Pi Camera Module are converted into 1-bit, 100px × 60px, black-and-white images using Pillow and OpenCV. Next, these smaller images are turned into plotter commands using networkx. Finally, the Raspberry Pi engages the two 5V stepper motors to move the Etch-A-Sketch control knobs, producing a sketch within 15 minutes to an hour, depending on the level of detail in the image.

Build your own Etch-A-Snap

On his website, Martin goes into some serious detail about Etch-A-Snap, perfect for anyone interested in building their own, or in figuring out how it all works. You’ll find an overview with videos, along with breakdowns of the build, processing, drawing, and plotter.

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Build a security camera with Raspberry Pi and OpenCV

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-security-camera-opencv/

Tired of opening the refrigerator only to find that your favourite snack is missing? Get video evidence of sneaky fridge thieves sent to your phone, with Adrian Rosebeck’s Raspberry Pi security camera project.

Building a Raspberry Pi security camera with OpenCV

Learn how to build a IoT + Raspberry Pi security camera using OpenCV and computer vision. Send TXT/MMS message notifications, images, and video clips when the security camera is triggered. Full tutorial (including code) here: https://www.pyimagesearch.com/2019/03/25/building-a-raspberry-pi-security-camera-with-opencv

Protecting hummus

Adrian loves hummus. And, as you can see from my author bio, so do I. So it wasn’t hard for me to relate to Adrian’s story about his college roommates often stealing his cherished chickpea dip.

Garlic dessert

“Of course, back then I wasn’t as familiar with computer vision and OpenCV as I am now,” he explains on his blog. “Had I known what I do at present, I would have built a Raspberry Pi security camera to capture the hummus heist in action!”

Raspberry Pi security camera

So, in homage to his time as an undergrad, Adrian decided to finally build that security camera for his fridge, despite now only needing to protect his hummus from his wife. And to build it, he opted to use OpenCV, a Raspberry Pi, and a Raspberry Pi Camera Module.

Adrian’s camera is an IoT project: it not only captures footage but also uses Twillo to send that footage, via a cloud service (AWS), to a smartphone.

Because the content of your fridge lives in the dark when you’re not inspecting it, the code for capturing video footage detects light and dark, and records everything that occurs between the fridge door opening and closing. “You could also deploy this inside a mailbox that opens/closes,” suggests Adrian.

Get the code and more

Adrian provides all the code for the project on his blog, pyimagesearch, with a full explanation of why each piece of code is used — thanks, Adrian!

For more from Adrian, check out his brilliant deep learning projects: a fully functional Pokémon Pokédex and Santa Detector.

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Stereoscopic photography with StereoPi and a Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/stereoscopic-photography-stereopi-raspberry-pi/

StereoPi allows users to attached two Camera Modules to their Raspberry Pi Compute Module — it’s a great tool for building stereoscopic cameras, 360º monitors, and virtual reality rigs.

StereoPi draft 1

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My love for stereoscopic photography goes way back

My great-uncle Eric was a keen stereoscopic photographer and member of The Stereoscopic Society. Every memory I have of visiting him includes looking at his latest stereo creations through a pair of gorgeously antique-looking, wooden viewers. And I’ve since inherited the beautiful mahogany viewing cabinet that used to stand in his dining room.

It looks like this, but fancier

Stereoscopic photography has always fascinated me. Two images that seem identical suddenly become, as if by magic, a three-dimensional wonder. As a child, I couldn’t make sense of it. And even now, while I do understand how it actually works, it remains magical in my mind — like fairies at the bottom of the garden. Or magnets.

So it’s no wonder that I was instantly taken with StereoPi when I stumbled across its crowdfunding campaign on Twitter. Having wanted to make a Pi-based stereoscopic camera ever since I joined the organisation, but not knowing how best to go about it, I thought this new board seemed ideal for me.

The StereoPi board

Despite its name, StereoPi is more than just a stereoscopic camera board. How to attach two Camera Modules to a Raspberry Pi is a question people ask us frequently and for various projects, from home security systems to robots, cameras, and VR.

Slim and standard editions of the StereoPi

Slim and standard editions of the StereoPi

The board attaches to any version of the Raspberry Pi Compute Module, including the newly released CM3+, and you can use it in conjunction with Raspbian to control it via the Python module picamera.

StereoPi stereoscopic livestream over 4G

StereoPi stereoscopic livestream over 4G. Project site: http://StereoPi.com

When it comes to what you can do with StereoPi, the possibilities are almost endless: mount two wide-angle lenses for 360º recording, build a VR rig to test out virtual reality games, or, as I plan to do, build a stereoscopic camera!

It’s on Crowd Supply now!

StereoPi is currently available to back on Crowd Supply, and purchase options start from $69. At 69% funded with 30 days still to go, we have faith that the StereoPi project will reach its goal and make its way into the world of impressive Raspberry Pi add-ons.

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SelfieBot: taking and printing photos with a smile

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/selfiebot-sophy-wong-raspberry-pi-camera/

Does your camera giggle and smile as it takes your photo? Does your camera spit out your image from a thermal printer? No? Well, Sophy Wong’s SelfieBot does!

Raspberry Pi SelfieBot: Selfie Camera with a Personality

SelfieBot is a project Kim and I originally made for our booth at Seattle Mini Maker Faire 2017. Now, you can build your own! A full tutorial for SelfieBot is up on the Adafruit Learning System at https://learn.adafruit.com/raspberry-pi-selfie-bot/ This was our first Raspberry Pi project, and is an experiment in DIY AI.

Pasties, projects, and plans

Last year, I built a Raspberry Pi photobooth for a friend’s wedding, complete with a thermal printer for instant printouts, and a Twitter feed to keep those unable to attend the event in the loop. I called the project PastyCam, because I built it into the paper mache body of a Cornish pasty, and I planned on creating a tutorial blog post for the build. But I obviously haven’t. And I think it’s time, a year later, to admit defeat.

A photo of the Cornish Pasty photo booth Alex created for a wedding in Cornwall - SelfieBot Raspberry Pi Camera

The wedding was in Cornwall, so the Cornish pasty totally makes sense, alright?

But lucky for us, Sophy Wong has gifted us all with SelfieBot.

Sophy Wong

If you subscribe to HackSpace magazine, you’ll recognise Sophy from issue 4, where she adorned the cover, complete with glowing fingernails. And if you’re like me, you instantly wanted to be her as soon as you saw that image.

SelfieBot Raspberry Pi Camera

Makers should also know Sophy from her impressive contributions to the maker community, including her tutorials for Adafruit, her YouTube channel, and most recently her work with Mythbusters Jr.

sophy wong on Twitter

Filming for #MythbustersJr is wrapped, and I’m heading home to Seattle. What an incredible summer filled with amazing people. I’m so inspired by every single person, crew and cast, on this show, and I’ll miss you all until our paths cross again someday 😊

SelfieBot at MakerFaire

I saw SelfieBot in passing at Maker Faire Bay Area earlier this year. Yet somehow I managed to not introduce myself to Sophy and have a play with her Pi-powered creation. So a few weeks back at World Maker Faire New York, I accosted Sophy as soon as I could, and we bonded by swapping business cards and Pimoroni pins.

Creating SelfieBot

SelfieBot is more than just a printing photo booth. It giggles, it talks, it reacts to movement. It’s the robot version of that friend of yours who’s always taking photos. Always. All the time, Amy. It’s all the time! *ahem*

SelfieBot Raspberry Pi Camera

SelfieBot consists of a Raspberry Pi 2, a Pi Camera Module, a 5″ screen, an accelerometer, a mini thermal printer, and more, including 3D-printed and laser-cut parts.

sophy wong on Twitter

Getting SelfieBot ready for Maker Faire Bay Area next weekend! Super excited to be talking on Sunday with @kpimmel – come see us and meet SelfieBot!

If you want to build your own SelfieBot — and obviously you do — then you can find a complete breakdown of the build process, including info on all parts you’ll need, files for 3D printing, and so, so many wonderfully informative photographs, on the Adafruit Learning System!

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A waterproof Raspberry Pi?! Five 3D-printable projects to try

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/waterproof-3d-printing-raspberry-pi/

Summer is coming to a close. The evenings grow darker. So pack away your flip flops, hang up your beach towel, and settle in for the colder months with these fun 3D-printable projects to make at home or in your local makerspace.

Fallout 4 desktop terminal

Power Up Props’ replica of the Fallout desktop terminals fits a 3.5″ screen and a Raspberry Pi 3B. Any Fallout fans out there will be pleased to know that you don’t need to raise your Science level to hack into this terminal — you’ll just need access to a 3D printer and these free files from My Mini Factory.

Fallout 4 terminal 3d-printable raspberry pi case

And while you’re waiting for this to print, check out Power Up Props’ wall-mounted terminal!

Fallout 4 – Working Terminal (Raspberry Pi Version) – Power Up Props

Howdy neighbors, grab some fusion cores and put on your power armor because today we’re making a working replica of the wall mounted computer “terminals” from the Fallout series, powered by a Raspberry Pi! Want one of your very own terminals?

Falcon Heavy night light

Remixing DAKINGINDANORF‘s low-poly Arduino-based design, this 3D-printable night light is a replica of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. The replica uses a Raspberry Pi Zero and a Pimoroni Unicorn pHAT to create a rather lovely rocket launch effect. Perfect for the budding space explorer in your home!

Falcon Heavy night light

I 3D printed a SpaceX Falcon Heavy night light, with some nice effects like it’s actually launching. Useful? Hell no. Cool? Hell yes! Blogpost with files and code: https://www.dennisjanssen.be/tutorials/falcon-heavy-night-light/

You can download the files directly from Dennis Janssen’s website.

Swimming IoT satellite

We’re really excited about this design and already thinking about how we’ll use it for our own projects:

Floating Raspberry Pi case

Using an acrylic Christmas bauble and 3D-printed parts, you can set your Raspberry Pi Zero W free in local bodies of water — ideal for nature watching and citizen science experiments.

Art Deco clock and weather display

Channel your inner Jay Gatsby with this Art Deco-effect clock and weather display.

Art Deco Raspberry Pi Clock

Fitted with a Raspberry Pi Zero W and an Adafruit piTFT display, this build is ideally suited for any late-night cocktail parties you may have planned.

High-altitude rocket holder

Send four Raspberry Pi Zeros and Camera Modules into the skies with this holder design from Thingiverse user randysteck.

Raspberry Pi Zero rocket holder

The 3D-printable holder will keep your boards safe and sound while they simultaneously record photos or video of their airborne adventure.

More more more

What projects did we miss? Share your favourite 3D-printable designs for Raspberry Pis in the comments so we can see more builds from the internet’s very best community!

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Your face, 14 ft tall: image mapping with As We Are

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/as-we-are-face-mapping/

While at World Maker Faire New York last weekend, I found myself chatting to a rather lovely gentleman by the name of Mac Pierce. During our conversation, Mac mentioned a project he’d worked on called As We Are, an interactive art installation located in the Greater Columbus Convention Center in Columbus, Ohio.

as we are

“So it’s this 14-foot head covered in LEDs…”, Mac began, and after his brief explanation, I found myself grabbing nearby makers to have him tell them about the project too. I was hooked! I hadn’t even seen photos of the sculpture, yet I was hooked. And true to his word, Mac had the press release for As We Are sitting in my inbox when I returned to Pi Towers.

So here is it:

The Greater Columbus Convention Center: “As We Are” – Creating the Ultimate Selfie Machine

DCL, an award-winning fabricator of architectural specialties and custom experiential design elements, worked with artist Matthew Mohr to develop, engineer and fabricate this 14ft, 7,000lb, interactive digital sculpture. Featuring custom LED modules, an integrated 3D photobooth, 32 cameras, and a touch-screen display – this unique project combines technologies to present a seamless experience for visitors to display their own portrait on the sculpture.

As We Are

The brainchild of artist Matthew Mohr, As We Are was engineered and produced by DCL, an award-winning Boston-based fabricator whose greatest achievement to date, in my opinion at least, is hiring Mac Pierce.

as we are

YAY!

DCL built the 14-foot structure using 24 layers of aluminium ‘ribs’ covered in custom Sansi LED modules. These modules add up to an astounding 850000 individual LEDs, allowing for crisp detail of images displayed by the build.

as we are

When a visitor to the Convention Center steps inside the interactive sculpture, they’re met with a wall of 32 Raspberry Pis plus Camera Modules. The Pis use facial recognition software to 3D scan the visitor’s face and flattened the image, and then map the face across the outer surface of the structure.

Matthew Mohr was inspired to show off the diversity of Columbus, OH, while also creating a sense of oneness with As We Are. Combining technology and interaction, the sculpture has been called “the ultimate selfie machine”.

If you’re in or near Columbus and able to visit the installation, we’d love to see your photos, so please share them with us on our social media platforms.

Raspberry Pi facial mapping as we are

You see now why I was dumbstruck when Mac told me about this project, yes?

Always tell us

Had it not been for a chance encounter with Mac at Maker Faire, we may never have heard of As We Are. While Matthew Mohr and DCL installed the sculpture in 2017, very little fuss was made about the use of Raspberry Pis within it, and it completely slipped under our radar. So if you are working on a project for your business, as a maker, or for any other reason, and you’re using a Raspberry Pi, please make sure to let us know by emailing [email protected].

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Rock, paper, scissors, lizard, Spock, fire, water balloon!

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/rock-paper-scissors-lizard-spock-fire-water-balloon/

Use a Raspberry Pi and a Pi Camera Module to build your own machine learning–powered rock paper scissors game!

Rock-Paper-Scissors game using computer vision and machine learning on Raspberry Pi

A Rock-Paper-Scissors game using computer vision and machine learning on the Raspberry Pi. Project GitHub page: https://github.com/DrGFreeman/rps-cv PROJECT ORIGIN: This project results from a challenge my son gave me when I was teaching him the basics of computer programming making a simple text based Rock-Paper-Scissors game in Python.

Virtual rock paper scissors

Here’s why you should always leave comments on our blog: this project from Julien de la Bruère-Terreault instantly had our attention when he shared it on our recent Android Things post.

Julien and his son were building a text-based version of rock paper scissors in Python when his son asked him: “Could you make a rock paper scissors game that uses the camera to detect hand gestures?” Obviously, Julien really had no choice but to accept the challenge.

“The game uses a Raspberry Pi computer and Raspberry Pi Camera Module installed on a 3D-printed support with LED strips to achieve consistent images,” Julien explains in the tutorial for the build. “The pictures taken by the camera are processed and fed to an image classifier that determines whether the gesture corresponds to ‘Rock’, ‘Paper’, or ‘Scissors’ gestures.”

How does it work?

Physically, the build uses a Pi 3 Model B and a Camera Module V2 alongside 3D-printed parts. The parts are all green, since a consistent colour allows easy subtraction of background from the captured images. You can download the files for the setup from Thingiverse.

rock paper scissors raspberry pi

To illustrate how the software works, Julien has created a rather delightful pipeline demonstrating where computer vision and machine learning come in.

rock paper scissors using raspberry pi

The way the software works means the game doesn’t need to be limited to the standard three hand signs. If you wanted to, you could add other signs such as ‘lizard’ and ‘Spock’! Or ‘fire’ and ‘water balloon’. Or any other alterations made to the game in your pop culture favourites.

rock paper scissors lizard spock

Check out Julien’s full tutorial to build your own AI-powered rock paper scissors game here on Julien’s GitHub. Massive kudos to Julien for spending a year learning the skills required to make it happen. And a massive thank you to Julien’s son for inspiring him! This is why it’s great to do coding and digital making with kids — they have the best project ideas!

Sharing is caring

If you’ve built your own project using Raspberry Pi, please share it with us in the comments below, or via social media. As you can tell from today’s blog post, we love to see them and share them with the whole community!

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Recording lost seconds with the Augenblick blink camera

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/augenblick-camera/

Warning: a GIF used in today’s blog contains flashing images.

Students at the University of Bremen, Germany, have built a wearable camera that records the seconds of vision lost when you blink. Augenblick uses a Raspberry Pi Zero and Camera Module alongside muscle sensors to record footage whenever you close your eyes, producing a rather disjointed film of the sights you miss out on.

Augenblick blink camera recording using a Raspberry Pi Zero

Blink and you’ll miss it

The average person blinks up to five times a minute, with each blink lasting 0.5 to 0.8 seconds. These half-seconds add up to about 30 minutes a day. What sights are we losing during these minutes? That is the question asked by students Manasse Pinsuwan and René Henrich when they set out to design Augenblick.

Blinking is a highly invasive mechanism for our eyesight. Every day we close our eyes thousands of times without noticing it. Our mind manages to never let us wonder what exactly happens in the moments that we miss.

Capturing lost moments

For Augenblick, the wearer sticks MyoWare Muscle Sensor pads to their face, and these detect the electrical impulses that trigger blinking.

Augenblick blink camera recording using a Raspberry Pi Zero

Two pads are applied over the orbicularis oculi muscle that forms a ring around the eye socket, while the third pad is attached to the cheek as a neutral point.

Biology fact: there are two muscles responsible for blinking. The orbicularis oculi muscle closes the eye, while the levator palpebrae superioris muscle opens it — and yes, they both sound like the names of Harry Potter spells.

The sensor is read 25 times a second. Whenever it detects that the orbicularis oculi is active, the Camera Module records video footage.

Augenblick blink recording using a Raspberry Pi Zero

Pressing a button on the side of the Augenblick glasses set the code running. An LED lights up whenever the camera is recording and also serves to confirm the correct placement of the sensor pads.

Augenblick blink camera recording using a Raspberry Pi Zero

The Pi Zero saves the footage so that it can be stitched together later to form a continuous, if disjointed, film.

Learn more about the Augenblick blink camera

You can find more information on the conception, design, and build process of Augenblick here in German, with a shorter explanation including lots of photos here in English.

And if you’re keen to recreate this project, our free project resource for a wearable Pi Zero time-lapse camera will come in handy as a starting point.

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