Tag Archives: Brazil

Huge Anti-Piracy Operation in Brazil Targets Hundreds of Websites & Apps

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/huge-anti-piracy-operation-in-brazil-targets-hundreds-of-websites-apps-191104/

Authorities in Brazil have periodically attempted to disrupt piracy in the region, including actions such as ‘Operation Copyright‘ that targeted a large private torrent site in January.

Last Friday, however, it became clear that a much more ambitious operation had begun. Codenamed ‘Operation 404’ after the HTTP error of the same name, the action was announced by Brazil’s Ministry of Justice and Public Security.

During an early press conference detailing progress thus far, the Secretariat of Integrated Operations (Seopi) revealed that “136 websites and 100 applications” had already been suspended alongside the execution of 30 search and seizure warrants.

“After four months of investigation, it can be said that the action is a milestone for piracy in the country, which causes various damages to society,” said Alesandro Barreto, coordinator of Seopi’s Cyber ​​Operations Laboratory.

“I don’t know of another operation that has blocked so many apps and websites in one day. This is a very clear message and that the judicial police, through the integrated operation with Seopi, will act against this crime that cannot be tolerated.”

Operation 404

The authorities did not release the names of any websites or applications targeted nor specifically detail what “suspension” means in the context of any specific case. Suspensions can take many forms, from serious ones (raids and equipment confiscations, for example) through to ones that have a more limited long-term impact, such as blocking or domain seizures.

Details are fairly scarce but TF learned that a site known locally as Megacine announced that it had decided to close down following the operation. A notice now displayed on the football-focused site Futemax indicates that it is being blocked but is still online.

Blocked in Brazil

The Ministry of Justice states that at least in some instances it had worked with authorities in France, the United States and Canada to suspend domains, arrange “de-indexing from search engines” while suspending profile pages on social networks.

The operation is said to be receiving support from local anti-piracy groups including ANCINE (National Film Agency) and the National Council for the Fight Against Piracy (CNCP). Additionally, the US Embassy in Brazil, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and the US Department of Justice have reportedly played roles.

While the early figures presented (136 websites and 100 applications suspended) were already significant, local media reports suggest that the number is increasing fairly rapidly.

Globo reports that 210 sites involved in the unlawful distribution of movies, TV shows and live TV have been targeted, in addition to the initial 100 apps that provide access to “illegal content streaming”.

Raids have been carried out in 12 states in Brazil and in six states, at least eight people have been arrested. Details include:

  • Warrant executed against a 33-year-old for the unlicensed distribution of TV signals (no arrest)
  • Warrant executed against an individual suspected of “stealing” a TV operator’s signals. Computer seized but no arrest
  • A 63-year-old man was arrested in São Paulo under suspicion of operating a website that broadcast TV channels in return for a US$7.50 per month subscription fee

Penalties for operating piracy sites or services in Brazil can reach four years in prison, more if other criminal aspects such as money laundering are involved.

According to the Ministry of Justice, up to 20 million households in Brazil access pirated content via the Internet but many citizens are said to have a poor understanding of which services are legitimate and which ones are not.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

Mega Overturns Brazilian ISP Copyright Block

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/mega-overturns-brazilian-isp-copyright-block-191018/

The inevitable situation facing any site that hosts user-uploaded files is that some users will attempt to store copyright-infringing content.

The bigger the site, the bigger the problem, as YouTube’s copyright department knows only too well. But while few rightsholders would attempt to take on YouTube by filing for an ISP blocking order, plenty of other sites are considered fair game, Mega for example.

After a standing start in 2013, Mega is now a major player in the file-hosting market. Due to its early connections with Kim Dotcom, the site was under huge scrutiny from the very beginning and as such, has always insisted that it is fully compliant when it comes to copyright issues.

Nevertheless, earlier this month it was discovered that users in Brazil could no longer access the service. ISPs in the country had begun blocking the site following a copyright complaint initiated by the Brazilian Association of Subscription Television (ABTA).

Following a September decision, the São Paulo Court of Justice ordered four Internet service providers – Claro Brasil, Vivo-Telefonica, Oi and Algar Telecom – to prevent their subscribers from accessing several domains on copyright grounds, Mega.nz included.

“With respect to the block in Brazil, we respectfully believe that the order is wrong and that the Court has been misled. MEGA has excellent compliance. We are working on a solution,” the company told its customers.

The nature of that solution wasn’t specified at the time but Mega Executive Chairman Stephen Hall says that the company mounted a legal challenge to a process that had actually begun months earlier and didn’t initially include Mega.

“The case started in January 2019 with various sites but not Mega,” Hall informs TorrentFreak.

“The case has been held in secret, apparently because the ABTA submitted that various sites included could change settings in order to evade the block.”

Hall says that Mega was added to the case in September 2019 based on the allegation that a single URL on the site led to infringing content. However, that URL had never been reported to the company as posing a problem.

“We submitted to the Appeal Court details of our rigorous compliance activity such as fast response to copyright takedown requests, suspension of accounts with repeat allegations of copyright infringement etc, as reported in our Transparency Report,” Hall says.

Mega’s Executive Chairman notes that Brazilian law only allows courts to suspend access to a service if it fails to respond to legal requests so Mega eventually came out on top.

“The Appeal Court ordered the block of Mega.nz to be reversed. I believe the lower Court will now reconsider its inclusion of Mega. We are confident that access won’t be blocked again,” Hall concludes.

Reports posted by Mega users to Twitter suggest that at least some previously-blocked users are now able to access the site once again but the company is urging that any still experiencing difficulties should contact their providers.

“Contact your ISP if you still cannot access https://mega.nz,” the company says.

According to SimilarWeb stats, there are more visitors to Mega from Brazil than any other country, together making up almost 10% of Mega’s traffic and making it the country’s 108th most popular site.

A report by Mega in January revealed the massive scale of its global operations since its launch six years ago.

“To date, more than 130 million registered MEGA users have uploaded over 53 billion files, utilizing the user-controlled end-to-end encryption we provide,” the company said.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

Mega.nz and Openload Blocked in Brazil Following Court Order

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/mega-nz-and-openload-blocked-in-brazil-following-court-order/

Founded in 2013, Mega quickly grew to become one of the world’s dominant file-hosting and sharing platforms.

Launched by Kim Dotcom, who later appeared to distance himself from the site, Mega was promoted as a privacy solution, a place where files could be kept safe from prying eyes. However, in common with file-hosting sites of all kinds, some people use it to store copyrighted content, with large volumes being offered publicly.

This has created friction between Mega and some rightsholders, despite the former insisting that it does all it can within the law to respond to claims. Nevertheless, some rightsholders prefer the strong-arm approach.

During yesterday, reports from Brazil indicated that Mega had become inaccessible via some ISPs. The problem was spotted at Mega too, which tweeted to one ISP, Vivo, to sort out the issue.

“Hello @vivobr,” Mega wrote in Portuguese. “We are receiving reports from our users that Vivo is blocking https://mega.nz through a DNS block. Please rectify this as soon as possible! You are interfering with your customers’ Internet.”

Soon after, however, it became clear that Vivo and indeed additional ISPs weren’t in a position to do anything about the problem.

According to legal resource JusBrasil, there was a court process on September 12, 2019, which ordered four Internet service providers — Claro Brasil, Vivo-Telefonica, Oi and Algar Telecom — to prevent their subscribers from accessing 10 domains, including Mega.nz.

The most recognizable of the other nine domains is oload.tv, which appears to be a domain operated by file-hosting giant Openload. Last December, Vivo told a local publication that it had been forced to block Openload in Brazil following an earlier court decision but declined to provide additional details.

The rest of the list consists of Alfastream.cc, which doesn’t present itself as a regular hosting service but has URLs listed online which indicate content is available on the platform. Similarly, Akugyash.com only displays a brief message but elsewhere on the web is described as a video balancer.

Verystream.net is helpful in that it describes its function on its homepage as the CDN (Content Delivery Network) used by file-hosting site Verystream.com. Fembed.net and Ruvid.nl both point to the same file-hosting service with the former’s branding, with ClipWatching.com and VideoShare.club acting as file-storage sites.

The final and most strange domain on the list is centrelinguistique.com, which appears to be a French language school, which doesn’t fit the file-storage theme of the other domains in any way.

According to Brazil’s Technoblog, the details of the blocking case are being kept secret, which does nothing to unravel the language school mystery. However, it does claim to have identified ABTA — the Brazilian Association of Subscription Television — as the plaintiff in the matter.

Documents that are publicly available suggest that this is probably an expansion of an earlier ruling, with a note that the plaintiff requested an “extension” of an earlier action due to the “distributor and facilitator websites” adopting “new techniques to circumvent the blockages made by the providers.”

In any event, the operators of Mega feel that its domain has been blocked inappropriately.

“With respect to the block in Brazil, we respectfully believe that the order is wrong and that the Court has been misled,” the company wrote in Portuguese this morning.

“MEGA has excellent compliance. We are working on a solution. We apologize for the inconvenience and appreciate your patience!”

Whether that solution is legal or technical in nature isn’t yet clear. However, there are reports that the targeted ISPs are employing different blocking measures, with some targeting IP addresses (which can be bypassed using a VPN) and others meddling with DNS (which can be circumvented by using an alternative, such as OpenDNS).

There’s no mention of the action on the website of the Brazilian Association of Subscription Television but they do have a selection of ominous anti-piracy videos, one of which is embedded below.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

Brazilian Cell Phone Hack

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2019/08/brazilian_cell_.html

I know there’s a lot of politics associated with this story, but concentrate on the cybersecurity aspect for a moment. The cell phones of a thousand Brazilians, including senior government officials, were hacked — seemingly by actors much less sophisticated than rival governments.

Brazil’s federal police arrested four people for allegedly hacking 1,000 cellphones belonging to various government officials, including that of President Jair Bolsonaro.

Police detective João Vianey Xavier Filho said the group hacked into the messaging apps of around 1,000 different cellphone numbers, but provided little additional information at a news conference in Brasilia on Wednesday. Cellphones used by Bolsonaro were among those attacked by the group, the justice ministry said in a statement on Thursday, adding that the president was informed of the security breach.

[…]

In the court order determining the arrest of the four suspects, Judge Vallisney de Souza Oliveira wrote that the hackers had accessed Moro’s Telegram messaging app, along with those of two judges and two federal police officers.

When I say that smartphone security equals national security, this is the kind of thing I am talking about.

HackSpace magazine 7: Internet of Everything

Post Syndicated from Andrew Gregory original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hackspace-magazine-7-internet-of-everything/

We’re usually averse to buzzwords at HackSpace magazine, but not this month: in issue 7, we’re taking a deep dive into the Internet of Things.HackSpace magazine issue 7 cover

Internet of Things (IoT)

To many people, IoT is a shady term used by companies to sell you something you already own, but this time with WiFi; to us, it’s a way to make our builds smarter, more useful, and more connected. In HackSpace magazine #7, you can join us on a tour of the boards that power IoT projects, marvel at the ways in which other makers are using IoT, and get started with your first IoT project!

Awesome projects

DIY retro computing: this issue, we’re taking our collective hat off to Spencer Owen. He stuck his home-brew computer on Tindie thinking he might make a bit of beer money — now he’s paying the mortgage with his making skills and inviting others to build modules for his machine. And if that tickles your fancy, why not take a crack at our Z80 tutorial? Get out your breadboard, assemble your jumper wires, and prepare to build a real-life computer!

Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7

Shameless patriotism: combine Lego, Arduino, and the car of choice for 1960 gold bullion thieves, and you’ve got yourself a groovy weekend project. We proudly present to you one man’s epic quest to add LED lights (controllable via a smartphone!) to his daughter’s LEGO Mini Cooper.

Makerspaces

Patriotism intensifies: for the last 200-odd years, the Black Country has been a hotbed of making. Urban Hax, based in Walsall, is the latest makerspace to show off its riches in the coveted Space of the Month pages. Every space has its own way of doing things, but not every space has a portrait of Rob Halford on the wall. All hail!

Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7

Diversity: advice on diversity often boils down to ‘Be nice to people’, which might feel more vague than actionable. This is where we come in to help: it is truly worth making the effort to give people of all backgrounds access to your makerspace, so we take a look at why it’s nice to be nice, and at the ways in which one makerspace has put niceness into practice — with great results.

And there’s more!

We also show you how to easily calculate the size and radius of laser-cut gears, use a bank of LEDs to etch PCBs in your own mini factory, and use chemistry to mess with your lunch menu.

Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7
Helen Steer inside HackSpace magazine issue 7
Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7

All this plus much, much more waits for you in HackSpace magazine issue 7!

Get your copy of HackSpace magazine

If you like the sound of that, you can find HackSpace magazine in WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and independent newsagents in the UK. If you live in the US, check out your local Barnes & Noble, Fry’s, or Micro Center next week. We’re also shipping to stores in Australia, Hong Kong, Canada, Singapore, Belgium, and Brazil, so be sure to ask your local newsagent whether they’ll be getting HackSpace magazine.

And if you can’t get to the shops, fear not: you can subscribe from £4 an issue from our online shop. And if you’d rather try before you buy, you can always download the free PDF. Happy reading, and happy making!

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Hackspace magazine 6: Paper Engineering

Post Syndicated from Andrew Gregory original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hackspace-magazine-6/

HackSpace magazine is back with our brand-new issue 6, available for you on shop shelves, in your inbox, and on our website right now.

Inside Hackspace magazine 6

Paper is probably the first thing you ever used for making, and for good reason: in no other medium can you iterate through 20 designs at the cost of only a few pennies. We’ve roped in Rob Ives to show us how to make a barking paper dog with moveable parts and a cam mechanism. Even better, the magazine includes this free paper automaton for you to make yourself. That’s right: free!

At the other end of the scale, there’s the forge, where heat, light, and noise combine to create immutable steel. We speak to Alec Steele, YouTuber, blacksmith, and philosopher, about his amazingly beautiful Damascus steel creations, and about why there’s no difference between grinding a knife and blowing holes in a mountain to build a road through it.

HackSpace magazine 6 Alec Steele

Do it yourself

You’ve heard of reading glasses — how about glasses that read for you? Using a camera, optical character recognition software, and a text-to-speech engine (and of course a Raspberry Pi to hold it all together), reader Andrew Lewis has hacked together his own system to help deal with age-related macular degeneration.

It’s the definition of hacking: here’s a problem, there’s no solution in the shops, so you go and build it yourself!

Radio

60 years ago, the cutting edge of home hacking was the transistor radio. Before the internet was dreamt of, the transistor radio made the world smaller and brought people together. Nowadays, the components you need to build a radio are cheap and easily available, so if you’re in any way electronically inclined, building a radio is an ideal excuse to dust off your soldering iron.

Tutorials

If you’re a 12-month subscriber (if you’re not, you really should be), you’ve no doubt been thinking of all sorts of things to do with the Adafruit Circuit Playground Express we gave you for free. How about a sewable circuit for a canvas bag? Use the accelerometer to detect patterns of movement — walking, for example — and flash a series of lights in response. It’s clever, fun, and an easy way to add some programmable fun to your shopping trips.


We’re also making gin, hacking a children’s toy car to unlock more features, and getting started with robot sumo to fill the void left by the cancellation of Robot Wars.

HackSpace magazine 6

All this, plus an 11-metre tall mechanical miner, in HackSpace magazine issue 6 — subscribe here from just £4 an issue or get the PDF version for free. You can also find HackSpace magazine in WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and independent newsagents in the UK. If you live in the US, check out your local Barnes & Noble, Fry’s, or Micro Center next week. We’re also shipping to stores in Australia, Hong Kong, Canada, Singapore, Belgium, and Brazil, so be sure to ask your local newsagent whether they’ll be getting HackSpace magazine.

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Cambridge Analytica Facebook Data Scandal

Post Syndicated from Darknet original https://www.darknet.org.uk/2018/03/cambridge-analytica-facebook-data-scandal/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=darknetfeed

Cambridge Analytica Facebook Data Scandal

One of the biggest stories of the year so far has been the scandal surrounding Cambridge Analytica that came out after a Channel 4 expose that demonstrated the depths they are willing to go to profile voters, manipulate elections and much more.

It’s kicking off in the UK and the US and Mark Zuckerberg has had to come out publically and apologise about the involvement of Facebook.

This goes deep with ties to elections and political activities in Malaysia, Mexico, Brazil, Australia and Kenya.

Read the rest of Cambridge Analytica Facebook Data Scandal now! Only available at Darknet.

HackSpace magazine 5: Inside Adafruit

Post Syndicated from Andrew Gregory original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hackspace-5/

There’s a new issue of HackSpace magazine on the shelves today, and as usual it’s full of things to make and do!

HackSpace magazine issue 5 Adafruit

Adafruit

We love making hardware, and we’d also love to turn this hobby into a way to make a living. So in the hope of picking up a few tips, we spoke to the woman behind Adafruit: Limor Fried, aka Ladyada.

HackSpace magazine issue 5 Adafruit

Adafruit has played a massive part in bringing the maker movement into homes and schools, so we’re chuffed to have Limor’s words of wisdom in the magazine.

Raspberry Pi 3B+

As you may have heard, there’s a new Pi in town, and that can only mean one thing for HackSpace magazine: let’s test it to its limits!

HackSpace magazine issue 5 Adafruit

The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is faster, better, and stronger, but what does that mean in practical terms for your projects?

Toys

Kids are amazing! Their curious minds, untouched by mundane adulthood, come up with crazy stuff that no sensible grown-up would think to build. No sensible grown-up, that is, apart from the engineers behind Kids Invent Stuff, the brilliant YouTube channel that takes children’s inventions and makes them real.

So what is Kids Invent Stuff?!

Kids Invent Stuff is the YouTube channel where kids’ invention ideas get made into real working inventions. Learn more about Kids Invent Stuff at www.kidsinventstuff.com Have you seen Connor’s Crazy Car invention? https://youtu.be/4_sF6ZFNzrg Have you seen our Flamethrowing piano?

We spoke to Ruth Amos, entrepreneur, engineer, and one half of the Kids Invent Stuff team.

Buggy!

It shouldn’t just be kids who get to play with fun stuff! This month, in the name of research, we’ve brought a Stirling engine–powered buggy from Shenzhen.

HackSpace magazine issue 5 Adafruit

This ingenious mechanical engine is the closest you’ll get to owning a home-brew steam engine without running the risk of having a boiler explode in your face.

Tutorials

In this issue, turn a Dremel multitool into a workbench saw with some wood, perspex, and a bit of laser cutting; make a Starfleet com-badge and pretend you’re Captain Jean-Luc Picard (shaving your hair off not compulsory); add intelligence to builds the easy way with Node-RED; and get stuck into Cheerlights, one of the world’s biggest IoT project.


All this, plus your ultimate guide to blinkenlights, and the only knot you’ll ever need, in HackSpace magazine issue 5.

Subscribe, save, and get free stuff

Save up to 35% on the retail price by signing up to HackSpace magazine today. When you take out a 12-month subscription, you’ll also get a free Adafruit Circuit Playground Express!

HackSpace magazine issue 5 Adafruit

Individual copies of HackSpace magazine are available in selected stockists across the UK, including Tesco, WHSmith, and Sainsbury’s. They’ll also be making their way across the globe to USA, Canada, Australia, Brazil, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Belgium in the coming weeks, so ask your local retailer whether they’re getting a delivery.

You can also purchase your copy on the Raspberry Pi Press website, and browse our complete collection of other Raspberry Pi publications, such as The MagPi, Hello World, and Raspberry Pi Projects Books.

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Happy birthday to us!

Post Syndicated from Eben Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/happy-birthday-2018/

The eagle-eyed among you may have noticed that today is 28 February, which is as close as you’re going to get to our sixth birthday, given that we launched on a leap day. For the last three years, we’ve launched products on or around our birthday: Raspberry Pi 2 in 2015; Raspberry Pi 3 in 2016; and Raspberry Pi Zero W in 2017. But today is a snow day here at Pi Towers, so rather than launching something, we’re taking a photo tour of the last six years of Raspberry Pi products before we don our party hats for the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend this Saturday and Sunday.

Prehistory

Before there was Raspberry Pi, there was the Broadcom BCM2763 ‘micro DB’, designed, as it happens, by our very own Roger Thornton. This was the first thing we demoed as a Raspberry Pi in May 2011, shown here running an ARMv6 build of Ubuntu 9.04.

BCM2763 micro DB

Ubuntu on Raspberry Pi, 2011-style

A few months later, along came the first batch of 50 “alpha boards”, designed for us by Broadcom. I used to have a spreadsheet that told me where in the world each one of these lived. These are the first “real” Raspberry Pis, built around the BCM2835 application processor and LAN9512 USB hub and Ethernet adapter; remarkably, a software image taken from the download page today will still run on them.

Raspberry Pi alpha board, top view

Raspberry Pi alpha board

We shot some great demos with this board, including this video of Quake III:

Raspberry Pi – Quake 3 demo

A little something for the weekend: here’s Eben showing the Raspberry Pi running Quake 3, and chatting a bit about the performance of the board. Thanks to Rob Bishop and Dave Emett for getting the demo running.

Pete spent the second half of 2011 turning the alpha board into a shippable product, and just before Christmas we produced the first 20 “beta boards”, 10 of which were sold at auction, raising over £10000 for the Foundation.

The beginnings of a Bramble

Beta boards on parade

Here’s Dom, demoing both the board and his excellent taste in movie trailers:

Raspberry Pi Beta Board Bring up

See http://www.raspberrypi.org/ for more details, FAQ and forum.

Launch

Rather to Pete’s surprise, I took his beta board design (with a manually-added polygon in the Gerbers taking the place of Paul Grant’s infamous red wire), and ordered 2000 units from Egoman in China. After a few hiccups, units started to arrive in Cambridge, and on 29 February 2012, Raspberry Pi went on sale for the first time via our partners element14 and RS Components.

Pallet of pis

The first 2000 Raspberry Pis

Unboxing continues

The first Raspberry Pi from the first box from the first pallet

We took over 100000 orders on the first day: something of a shock for an organisation that had imagined in its wildest dreams that it might see lifetime sales of 10000 units. Some people who ordered that day had to wait until the summer to finally receive their units.

Evolution

Even as we struggled to catch up with demand, we were working on ways to improve the design. We quickly replaced the USB polyfuses in the top right-hand corner of the board with zero-ohm links to reduce IR drop. If you have a board with polyfuses, it’s a real limited edition; even more so if it also has Hynix memory. Pete’s “rev 2” design made this change permanent, tweaked the GPIO pin-out, and added one much-requested feature: mounting holes.

Revision 1 versus revision 2

If you look carefully, you’ll notice something else about the revision 2 board: it’s made in the UK. 2012 marked the start of our relationship with the Sony UK Technology Centre in Pencoed, South Wales. In the five years since, they’ve built every product we offer, including more than 12 million “big” Raspberry Pis and more than one million Zeros.

Celebrating 500,000 Welsh units, back when that seemed like a lot

Economies of scale, and the decline in the price of SDRAM, allowed us to double the memory capacity of the Model B to 512MB in the autumn of 2012. And as supply of Model B finally caught up with demand, we were able to launch the Model A, delivering on our original promise of a $25 computer.

A UK-built Raspberry Pi Model A

In 2014, James took all the lessons we’d learned from two-and-a-bit years in the market, and designed the Model B+, and its baby brother the Model A+. The Model B+ established the form factor for all our future products, with a 40-pin extended GPIO connector, four USB ports, and four mounting holes.

The Raspberry Pi 1 Model B+ — entering the era of proper product photography with a bang.

New toys

While James was working on the Model B+, Broadcom was busy behind the scenes developing a follow-on to the BCM2835 application processor. BCM2836 samples arrived in Cambridge at 18:00 one evening in April 2014 (chips never arrive at 09:00 — it’s always early evening, usually just before a public holiday), and within a few hours Dom had Raspbian, and the usual set of VideoCore multimedia demos, up and running.

We launched Raspberry Pi 2 at the start of 2015, pairing BCM2836 with 1GB of memory. With a quad-core Arm Cortex-A7 clocked at 900MHz, we’d increased performance sixfold, and memory fourfold, in just three years.

Nobody mention the xenon death flash.

And of course, while James was working on Raspberry Pi 2, Broadcom was developing BCM2837, with a quad-core 64-bit Arm Cortex-A53 clocked at 1.2GHz. Raspberry Pi 3 launched barely a year after Raspberry Pi 2, providing a further doubling of performance and, for the first time, wireless LAN and Bluetooth.

All our recent products are just the same board shot from different angles

Zero to hero

Where the PC industry has historically used Moore’s Law to “fill up” a given price point with more performance each year, the original Raspberry Pi used Moore’s law to deliver early-2000s PC performance at a lower price. But with Raspberry Pi 2 and 3, we’d gone back to filling up our original $35 price point. After the launch of Raspberry Pi 2, we started to wonder whether we could pull the same trick again, taking the original Raspberry Pi platform to a radically lower price point.

The result was Raspberry Pi Zero. Priced at just $5, with a 1GHz BCM2835 and 512MB of RAM, it was cheap enough to bundle on the front of The MagPi, making us the first computer magazine to give away a computer as a cover gift.

Cheap thrills

MagPi issue 40 in all its glory

We followed up with the $10 Raspberry Pi Zero W, launched exactly a year ago. This adds the wireless LAN and Bluetooth functionality from Raspberry Pi 3, using a rather improbable-looking PCB antenna designed by our buddies at Proant in Sweden.

Up to our old tricks again

Other things

Of course, this isn’t all. There has been a veritable blizzard of point releases; RAM changes; Chinese red units; promotional blue units; Brazilian blue-ish units; not to mention two Camera Modules, in two flavours each; a touchscreen; the Sense HAT (now aboard the ISS); three compute modules; and cases for the Raspberry Pi 3 and the Zero (the former just won a Design Effectiveness Award from the DBA). And on top of that, we publish three magazines (The MagPi, Hello World, and HackSpace magazine) and a whole host of Project Books and Essentials Guides.

Chinese Raspberry Pi 1 Model B

RS Components limited-edition blue Raspberry Pi 1 Model B

Brazilian-market Raspberry Pi 3 Model B

Visible-light Camera Module v2

Learning about injection moulding the hard way

250 pages of content each month, every month

Essential reading

Forward the Foundation

Why does all this matter? Because we’re providing everyone, everywhere, with the chance to own a general-purpose programmable computer for the price of a cup of coffee; because we’re giving people access to tools to let them learn new skills, build businesses, and bring their ideas to life; and because when you buy a Raspberry Pi product, every penny of profit goes to support the Raspberry Pi Foundation in its mission to change the face of computing education.

We’ve had an amazing six years, and they’ve been amazing in large part because of the community that’s grown up alongside us. This weekend, more than 150 Raspberry Jams will take place around the world, comprising the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend.

Raspberry Pi Big Birthday Weekend 2018. GIF with confetti and bopping JAM balloons

If you want to know more about the Raspberry Pi community, go ahead and find your nearest Jam on our interactive map — maybe we’ll see you there.

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Big Birthday Weekend 2018: find a Jam near you!

Post Syndicated from Ben Nuttall original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/big-birthday-weekend-2018-find-a-jam-near-you/

We’re just over three weeks away from the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend 2018, our community celebration of Raspberry Pi’s sixth birthday. Instead of an event in Cambridge, as we’ve held in the past, we’re coordinating Raspberry Jam events to take place around the world on 3–4 March, so that as many people as possible can join in. Well over 100 Jams have been confirmed so far.

Raspberry Pi Big Birthday Weekend Jam

Find a Jam near you

There are Jams planned in Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Colombia, Dominican Republic, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, India, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Poland, South Africa, Spain, Taiwan, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, and Zimbabwe.

Take a look at the events map and the full list (including those who haven’t added their event to the map quite yet).

Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend 2018 event map

We will have Raspberry Jams in 35 countries across six continents

Birthday kits

We had some special swag made especially for the birthday, including these T-shirts, which we’ve sent to Jam organisers:

Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend 2018 T-shirt

There is also a poster with a list of participating Jams, which you can download:

Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend 2018 list

Raspberry Jam photo booth

I created a Raspberry Jam photo booth that overlays photos with the Big Birthday Weekend logo and then tweets the picture from your Jam’s account — you’ll be seeing plenty of those if you follow the #PiParty hashtag on 3–4 March.

Check out the project on GitHub, and feel free to set up your own booth, or modify it to your own requirements. We’ve included text annotations in several languages, and more contributions are very welcome.

There’s still time…

If you can’t find a Jam near you, there’s still time to organise one for the Big Birthday Weekend. All you need to do is find a venue — a room in a school or library will do — and think about what you’d like to do at the event. Some Jams have Raspberry Pis set up for workshops and practical activities, some arrange tech talks, some put on show-and-tell — it’s up to you. To help you along, there’s the Raspberry Jam Guidebook full of advice and tips from Jam organisers.

Raspberry Pi on Twitter

The packed. And they packed. And they packed some more. Who’s expecting one of these #rjam kits for the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend?

Download the Raspberry Jam branding pack, and the special birthday branding pack, where you’ll find logos, graphical assets, flyer templates, worksheets, and more. When you’re ready to announce your event, create a webpage for it — you can use a site like Eventbrite or Meetup — and submit your Jam to us so it will appear on the Jam map!

We are six

We’re really looking forward to celebrating our birthday with thousands of people around the world. Over 48 hours, people of all ages will come together at more than 100 events to learn, share ideas, meet people, and make things during our Big Birthday Weekend.

Raspberry Jam Manchester
Raspberry Jam Manchester
Raspberry Jam Manchester

Since we released the first Raspberry Pi in 2012, we’ve sold 17 million of them. We’re also reaching almost 200000 children in 130 countries around the world through Code Club and CoderDojo, we’ve trained over 1500 Raspberry Pi Certified Educators, and we’ve sent code written by more than 6800 children into space. Our magazines are read by a quarter of a million people, and millions more use our free online learning resources. There’s plenty to celebrate and even more still to do: we really hope you’ll join us from a Jam near you on 3–4 March.

The post Big Birthday Weekend 2018: find a Jam near you! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 28

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2018/01/05/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-28/

Happy new year! Grafana Labs is getting back in the swing of things after taking some time off to celebrate 2017, and spending time with family and friends. We’re diligently working on the new Grafana v5.0 release (planning v5.0 beta release by end of January), which includes a ton of new features, a new layout engine, and a polished UI. We’d love to hear your feedback!


Latest Stable Release

Grafana 4.6.3 is now available. Latest bugfixes include:

  • Gzip: Fixes bug Gravatar images when gzip was enabled #5952
  • Alert list: Now shows alert state changes even after adding manual annotations on dashboard #99513
  • Alerting: Fixes bug where rules evaluated as firing when all conditions was false and using OR operator. #93183
  • Cloudwatch: CloudWatch no longer display metrics’ default alias #101514, thx @mtanda

Download Grafana 4.6.3 Now


From the Blogosphere

Why Observability Matters – Now and in the Future: Our own Carl Bergquist teamed up with Neil Gehani, Director of Product at Weaveworks to discuss best practices on how to get started with monitoring your application and infrastructure. This video focuses on modern containerized applications instrumented to use Prometheus to generate metrics and Grafana to visualize them.

How to Install and Secure Grafana on Ubuntu 16.04: In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to install and secure Grafana with a SSL certificate and a Nginx reverse proxy, then you’ll modify Grafana’s default settings for even tighter security.

Monitoring Informix with Grafana: Ben walks us through how to use Grafana to visualize data from IBM Informix and offers a practical demonstration using Docker containers. He also talks about his philosophy of sharing dashboards across teams, important metrics to collect, and how he would like to improve his monitoring stack.

Monitor your hosts with Glances + InfluxDB + Grafana: Glances is a cross-platform system monitoring tool written in Python. This article takes you step by step through the pieces of the stack, installation, confirguration and provides a sample dashboard to get you up and running.


GrafanaCon Tickets are Going Fast!

Lock in your seat for GrafanaCon EU while there are still tickets avaialable! Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and more.

We have some exciting talks lined up from Google, CERN, Bloomberg, eBay, Red Hat, Tinder, Fastly, Automattic, Prometheus, InfluxData, Percona and more! You can see the full list of speakers below, but be sure to get your ticket now.

Get Your Ticket Now

GrafanaCon EU will feature talks from:

“Google Bigtable”
Misha Brukman
PROJECT MANAGER,
GOOGLE CLOUD
GOOGLE

“Monitoring at Bloomberg”
Stig Sorensen
HEAD OF TELEMETRY
BLOOMBERG

“Monitoring at Bloomberg”
Sean Hanson
SOFTWARE DEVELOPER
BLOOMBERG

“Monitoring Tinder’s Billions of Swipes with Grafana”
Utkarsh Bhatnagar
SR. SOFTWARE ENGINEER
TINDER

“Grafana at CERN”
Borja Garrido
PROJECT ASSOCIATE
CERN

“Monitoring the Huge Scale at Automattic”
Abhishek Gahlot
SOFTWARE ENGINEER
Automattic

“Real-time Engagement During the 2016 US Presidential Election”
Anna MacLachlan
CONTENT MARKETING MANAGER
Fastly

“Real-time Engagement During the 2016 US Presidential Election”
Gerlando Piro
FRONT END DEVELOPER
Fastly

“Grafana v5 and the Future”
Torkel Odegaard
CREATOR | PROJECT LEAD
GRAFANA

“Prometheus for Monitoring Metrics”
Brian Brazil
FOUNDER
ROBUST PERCEPTION

“What We Learned Integrating Grafana with Prometheus”
Peter Zaitsev
CO-FOUNDER | CEO
PERCONA

“The Biz of Grafana”
Raj Dutt
CO-FOUNDER | CEO
GRAFANA LABS

“What’s New In Graphite”
Dan Cech
DIR, PLATFORM SERVICES
GRAFANA LABS

“The Design of IFQL, the New Influx Functional Query Language”
Paul Dix
CO-FOUNTER | CTO
INFLUXDATA

“Writing Grafana Dashboards with Jsonnet”
Julien Pivotto
OPEN SOURCE CONSULTANT
INUITS

“Monitoring AI Platform at eBay”
Deepak Vasthimal
MTS-2 SOFTWARE ENGINEER
EBAY

“Running a Power Plant with Grafana”
Ryan McKinley
DEVELOPER
NATEL ENERGY

“Performance Metrics and User Experience: A “Tinder” Experience”
Susanne Greiner
DATA SCIENTIST
WÜRTH PHOENIX S.R.L.

“Analyzing Performance of OpenStack with Grafana Dashboards”
Alex Krzos
SENIOR SOFTWARE ENGINEER
RED HAT INC.

“Storage Monitoring at Shell Upstream”
Arie Jan Kraai
STORAGE ENGINEER
SHELL TECHNICAL LANDSCAPE SERVICE

“The RED Method: How To Instrument Your Services”
Tom Wilkie
FOUNDER
KAUSAL

“Grafana Usage in the Quality Assurance Process”
Andrejs Kalnacs
LEAD SOFTWARE DEVELOPER IN TEST
EVOLUTION GAMING

“Using Prometheus and Grafana for Monitoring my Power Usage”
Erwin de Keijzer
LINUX ENGINEER
SNOW BV

“Weather, Power & Market Forecasts with Grafana”
Max von Roden
DATA SCIENTIST
ENERGY WEATHER

“Weather, Power & Market Forecasts with Grafana”
Steffen Knott
HEAD OF IT
ENERGY WEATHER

“Inherited Technical Debt – A Tale of Overcoming Enterprise Inertia”
Jordan J. Hamel
HEAD OF MONITORING PLATFORMS
AMGEN

“Grafanalib: Dashboards as Code”
Jonathan Lange
VP OF ENGINEERING
WEAVEWORKS

“The Journey of Shifting the MQTT Broker HiveMQ to Kubernetes”
Arnold Bechtoldt
SENIOR SYSTEMS ENGINEER
INOVEX

“Graphs Tell Stories”
Blerim Sheqa
SENIOR DEVELOPER
NETWAYS

[email protected] or How to Store Millions of Metrics per Second”
Vladimir Smirnov
SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR
Booking.com


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We also like to make sure we mention other Grafana-related events happening all over the world. If you’re putting on just such an event, let us know and we’ll list it here.

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. There is no need to register; all are welcome.

Jfokus | Stockholm, Sweden – Feb 5-7, 2018:
Carl Bergquist – Quickie: Monitoring? Not OPS Problem

Why should we monitor our system? Why can’t we just rely on the operations team anymore? They use to be able to do that. What’s currently changing? Presentation content: – Why do we monitor our system – How did it use to work? – Whats changing – Why do we need to shift focus – Everyone should be on call. – Resilience is the goal (Best way of having someone care about quality is to make them responsible).

Register Now

Jfokus | Stockholm, Sweden – Feb 5-7, 2018:
Leonard Gram – Presentation: DevOps Deconstructed

What’s a Site Reliability Engineer and how’s that role different from the DevOps engineer my boss wants to hire? I really don’t want to be on call, should I? Is Docker the right place for my code or am I better of just going straight to Serverless? And why should I care about any of it? I’ll try to answer some of these questions while looking at what DevOps really is about and how commodisation of servers through “the cloud” ties into it all. This session will be an opinionated piece from a developer who’s been on-call for the past 6 years and would like to convince you to do the same, at least once.

Register Now

Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

Awesome! Let us know if you have any questions – we’re happy to help out. We also have a bunch of screencasts to help you get going.


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

That’s a wrap! Let us know what you think about timeShift. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. See you next year!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

AWS Direct Connect Update – Ten New Locations Added in Late 2017

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-direct-connect-update-ten-new-locations-added-in-late-2017/

Happy 2018! I am looking forward to getting back to my usual routine, working with our teams to learn about their upcoming launches and then writing blog posts to bring the news to you. Right now I am still catching up on a few launches and announcements from late 2017.

First on the list for today is our most recent round of new cities for AWS Direct Connect. AWS customers all over the world use Direct Connect to create dedicated network connections from their premises to AWS in order to reduce their network costs, increase throughput, and to pursue a more consistent network experience.

We added ten new locations to our Direct Connect roster in December, all of which offer both 1 Gbps and 10 Gbps connectivity, along with partner-supplied options for speeds below 1 Gbps. Here are the newest locations, along withe the data centers and associated AWS Regions:

  • Bangalore, India – NetMagic DC2Asia Pacific (Mumbai).
  • Cape Town, South Africa – Teraco Ct1EU (Ireland).
  • Johannesburg, South Africa – Teraco JB1EU (Ireland).
  • London, UK – Telehouse North TwoEU (London).
  • Miami, Florida, US – Equinix MI1US East (Northern Virginia).
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota, US – Cologix MIN3US East (Ohio)
  • Ningxia, China – Shapotou IDC – China (Ningxia).
  • Ningxia, China – Industrial Park IDC – China (Ningxia).
  • Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – Equinix RJ2South America (São Paulo).
  • Tokyo, Japan – AT Tokyo ChuoAsia Pacific (Tokyo).

You can use these new locations in conjunction with the AWS Direct Connect Gateway to set up connectivity that spans Virtual Private Clouds (VPCs) spread across multiple AWS Regions (this does not apply to the AWS Regions in China).

If you are interested in putting Direct Connect to use, be sure to check out our ever-growing list of Direct Connect Partners.

Jeff;

AWS Architecture Monthly for Kindle

Post Syndicated from Jamey Tisdale original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/architecture/aws-architecture-monthly-for-kindle/

We recently launched AWS Architecture Monthly, a new subscription service on Kindle that will push a selection of the best content around cloud architecture from AWS, with a few pointers to other content you might also enjoy.

From building a simple website to crafting an AI-based chat bot, the choices of technologies and the best practices in how to apply them are constantly evolving. Our goal is to supply you each month with a broad selection of the best new tech content from AWS — from deep-dive tutorials to industry-trend articles.

With your free subscription, you can look forward to fresh content delivered directly to your Kindledevice or Kindle app including:
– Technical whitepapers
– Reference architectures
– New solutions and implementation guides
– Training and certification opportunities
– Industry trends

The January issue is now live. This month includes:
– AWS Architecture Blog: Glenn Gore’s Take on re:Invent 2017 (Chief Architect for AWS)
– AWS Reference Architectures: Java Microservices Deployed on EC2 Container Service; Node.js Microservices Deployed on EC2 Container Service
– AWS Training & Certification: AWS Certified Solutions Architect – Associate
– Sample Code: aws-serverless-express
– Technical Whitepaper: Serverless Architectures with AWS Lambda – Overview and Best Practices

At this time, Architecture Monthly annual subscriptions are only available in the France (new), US, UK, and Germany. As more countries become available, we’ll update you here on the blog. For Amazon.com countries not listed above, we are offering single-issue downloads — also accessible from our landing page. The content is the same as in the subscription but requires individual-issue downloads.

FAQ
I have to submit my credit card information for a free subscription?
While you do have to submit your card information at this time (as you would for a free book in the Kindle store), it won’t be charged. This will remain a free, annual subscription and includes all 10 issues for the year.

Why isn’t the subscription available everywhere?
As new countries get added to Kindle Newsstand, we’ll ensure we add them for Architecture Monthly. This month we added France but anticipate it will take some time for the new service to move into additional markets.

What countries are included in the Amazon.com list where the issues can be downloaded?
Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Gibraltar, Guernsey, India, Ireland, Isle of Man, Japan, Jersey, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, San Marino, Spain, Switzerland, Vatican City

HackSpace magazine 2: 3D printing and cheese making

Post Syndicated from Andrew Gregory original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hackspace-magazine-issue-2/

After an incredible response to our first issue of HackSpace magazine last month, we’re excited to announce today’s release of issue 2, complete with cheese making, digital braille, and…a crochet Cthulhu?
HackSpace magazine issue 2 cover

Your spaces

This issue, we visit Swansea Hackspace to learn how to crochet, we hear about the superb things that Birmingham’s fizzPOP maker space is doing, and we’re extremely impressed by the advances in braille reader technology that are coming out of Bristol Hackspace. People are amazing.

Your projects

We’ve also collected page upon page of projects for you to try your hand at. Fancy an introduction to laser cutting? A homemade sine wave stylophone? Or how about our first foray into Adafruit’s NeoPixels, adding blinkenlights to a pair of snowboarding goggles?

And (much) older technology gets a look in too, including a tutorial showing you how to make a knife in your own cheap and cheerful backyard forge.



As always, issue 2 of HackSpace magazine is available as a free PDF download, but we’ll also be publishing online versions of selected articles for easier browsing, so be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter. And, of course, we want to hear your thoughts – contact us to let us know what you like and what else you’d like to see, or just to demand that we feature your project, interest or current curiosity in the next issue.

Get your copy

You can grab issue 2 of HackSpace magazine right now from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and independent newsagents. If you live in the US, check out your local Barnes & Noble, Fry’s, or Micro Center next week. We’re also shipping to stores in Australia, Hong Kong, Canada, Singapore, Belgium, and Brazil, so be sure to ask your local newsagent whether they’ll be getting HackSpace magazine.

Alternatively, you can get the new issue online from our store, or digitally via our Android or iOS apps. And don’t forget, as with all our publications, a free PDF of HackSpace magazine is available from release day.

That’s it from us for this year; see you in 2018 for a ton of new things to make and do!

The post HackSpace magazine 2: 3D printing and cheese making appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

HackSpace magazine #1 is out now!

Post Syndicated from Andrew Gregory original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hackspace-magazine-1/

HackSpace magazine is finally here! Grab your copy of the new magazine for makers today, and try your hand at some new, exciting skills.

HackSpace magazine issue 1 cover

What is HackSpace magazine?

HackSpace magazine is the newest publication from the team behind The MagPi. Chock-full of amazing projects, tutorials, features, and maker interviews, HackSpace magazine brings together the makers of the world every month, with you — the community — providing the content.

HackSpace magazine is out now!

The new magazine for the modern maker is out now! Learn more at https://hsmag.cc HackSpace magazine is the new monthly magazine for people who love to make things and those who want to learn. Grab some duct tape, fire up a microcontroller, ready a 3D printer and hack the world around you!

Inside issue 1

Fancy smoking bacon with your very own cold smoker? How about protecting your home with a mini trebuchet for your front lawn? Or maybe you’d like to learn from awesome creator Becky Stern how to get paid for making the things you love? No matter whether it’s handheld consoles, robot prosthetics, Christmas projects, or, er, duct tape — whatever your maker passion, issue 1 is guaranteed to tick your boxes!



HackSpace magazine is packed with content from every corner of the maker world: from welding to digital making, and from woodwork to wearables. And whatever you enjoy making, we want to see it! So as you read through this first issue, imagine your favourite homemade projects on our pages, then make that a reality by emailing us the details via [email protected].

Get your copy

You can grab issue 1 of HackSpace magazine right now from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and independent newsagents. If you live in the US, check out your local Barnes & Noble, Fry’s, or Micro Center next week. We’re also shipping to stores in Australia, Hong Kong, Canada, Singapore, Belgium and Brazil — ask your local newsagent whether they’ll be getting HackSpace magazine. Alternatively, you can get the new issue online from our store, or digitally via our Android or iOS apps. And don’t forget, as with all our publications, a free PDF of HackSpace magazine is available from release day.

We’re also offering money-saving subscriptions — find details on the the magazine website. And if you’re a subscriber of The MagPi, your free copy of HackSpace magazine is on its way, with details of a super 50% discount on subscriptions! Could this be the Christmas gift you didn’t know you wanted?

Share your makes and thoughts

Make sure to follow HackSpace magazine on Facebook and Twitter, or email the team at [email protected] to tell us about your projects and share your thoughts about issue 1. We’ve loved creating this new magazine for the maker community, and we hope you enjoy it as much as we do.

The post HackSpace magazine #1 is out now! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 22

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/11/17/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-22/

Welome to TimeShift

We hope you liked our recent article with videos and slides from the events we’ve participated in recently. With Thanksgiving right around the corner, we’re getting a breather from work-related travel, but only a short one. We have some events in the coming weeks, and of course are busy filling in the details for GrafanaCon EU.

This week we have a lot of articles, videos and presentations to share, as well as some important plugin updates. Enjoy!


Latest Release

Grafana 4.6.2 is now available and includes some bug fixes:

  • Prometheus: Fixes bug with new Prometheus alerts in Grafana. Make sure to download this version if your using Prometheus for alerting. More details in the issue. #9777
  • Color picker: Bug after using textbox input field to change/paste color string #9769
  • Cloudwatch: build using golang 1.9.2 #9667, thanks @mtanda
  • Heatmap: Fixed tooltip for “time series buckets” mode #9332
  • InfluxDB: Fixed query editor issue when using > or < operators in WHERE clause #9871

Download Grafana 4.6.2 Now


From the Blogosphere

Cloud Tech 10 – 13th November 2017 – Grafana, Linux FUSE Adapter, Azure Stack and more!: Mark Whitby is a Cloud Solution Architect at Microsoft UK. Each week he prodcues a video reviewing new developments with Microsoft Azure. This week Mark covers the new Azure Monitoring Plugin we recently announced. He also shows you how to get up and running with Grafana quickly using the Azure Marketplace.

Using Prometheus and Grafana to Monitor WebLogic Server on Kubernetes: Oracle published an article on monitoring WebLogic server on Kubernetes. To do this, you’ll use the WebLogic Monitoring Exporter to scrape the server metrics and feed them to Prometheus, then visualize the data in Grafana. Marina goes into a lot of detail and provides sample files and configs to help you get going.

Getting Started with Prometheus: Will Robinson has started a new series on monitoring with Prometheus from someone who has never touched it before. Part 1 introduces a number of monitoring tools and concepts, and helps define a number of monitoring terms. Part 2 teaches you how to spin up Prometheus in a Docker container, and takes a look at writing queries. Looking forward to the third post, when he dives into the visualization aspect.

Monitoring with Prometheus: Alexander Schwartz has made the slides from his most recent presentation from the Continuous Lifcycle Conference in Germany available. In his talk, he discussed getting started with Prometheus, how it differs from other monitoring concepts, and provides examples of how to monitor and alert. We’ll link to the video of the talk when it’s available.

Using Grafana with SiriDB: Jeroen van der Heijden has written an in-depth tutorial to help you visualize data from the open source TSDB, SiriDB in Grafana. This tutorial will get you familiar with setting up SiriDB and provides a sample dashboard to help you get started.

Real-Time Monitoring with Grafana, StatsD and InfluxDB – Artur Caliendo Prado: This is a video from a talk at The Conf, held in Brazil. Artur’s presentation focuses on the experiences they had building a monitoring stack at Youse, how their monitoring became more complex as they scaled, and the platform they built to make sense of their data.

Using Grafana & Inlfuxdb to view XIV Host Performance Metrics – Part 4 Array Stats: This is the fourth part in a series of posts about host performance metrics. This post dives in to array stats to identify workloads and maintain balance across ports. Check out part 1, part 2 and part 3.


GrafanaCon Tickets are Going Fast

Tickets are going fast for GrafanaCon EU, but we still have a seat reserved for you. Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and more.

Get Your Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

Plugin authors are often adding new features and fixing bugs, which will make your plugin perform better – so it’s important to keep your plugins up to date. We’ve made updating easy; for on-prem Grafana, use the Grafana-cli tool, or update with 1 click if you’re using Hosted Grafana.

UPDATED PLUGIN

Hawkular data source – There is an important change in this release – as this datasource is now able to fetch not only Hawkular Metrics but also Hawkular Alerts, the server URL in the datasource configuration must be updated: http://myserver:123/hawkular/metrics must be changed to http://myserver:123/hawkular

Some of the changes (see the release notes) for more details):

  • Allow per-query tenant configuration
  • Annotations can now be configured out of Availability metrics and Hawkular Alerts events in addition to string metrics
  • allows dot character in tag names

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Diagram Panel – This is the first release in a while for the popular Diagram Panel plugin.

In addition to these changes, there are also a number of bug fixes:

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Influx Admin Panel – received a number of improvements:

  • Fix issue always showing query results
  • When there is only one row, swap rows/cols (ie: SHOW DIAGNOSTICS)
  • Improved auto-refresh behavior
  • Fix query time sorting
  • show ‘status’ field (killed, etc)

Update


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We have some awesome talks and events coming soon. Hope to see you at one of these!

How to Use Open Source Projects for Performance Monitoring | Webinar
Nov. 29, 1pm EST
:
Check out how you can use popular open source projects, for performance monitoring of your Infrastructure, Application, and Cloud faster, easier, and to scale. In this webinar, Daniel Lee from Grafana Labs, and Chris Churilo from InfluxData, will provide you with step by step instruction from download & configure, to collecting metrics and building dashboards and alerts.

RSVP

KubeCon | Austin, TX – Dec. 6-8, 2017: We’re sponsoring KubeCon 2017! This is the must-attend conference for cloud native computing professionals. KubeCon + CloudNativeCon brings together leading contributors in:

  • Cloud native applications and computing
  • Containers
  • Microservices
  • Central orchestration processing
  • And more

Buy Tickets

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. Carl Bergquist is managing the Cloud and Monitoring Devroom, and the CFP is now open. There is no need to register; all are welcome. If you’re interested in speaking at FOSDEM, submit your talk now!


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

We were glad to be a part of InfluxDays this year, and looking forward to seeing the InfluxData team in NYC in February.


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

I enjoy writing these weekly roudups, but am curious how I can improve them. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Help us make these weekly roundups better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

Brand new and blue: our Brazilian Raspberry Pi 3

Post Syndicated from Mike Buffham original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-brazil/

Programa de revendedor aprovado agora no Brasil — our Approved Reseller programme is live in Brazil, with Anatel-approved Raspberry Pis in a rather delicious shade of blue on sale from today.

A photo of the blue-variant Raspberry Pi 3

Blue Raspberry is more than just the best Jolly Ranger flavour

The challenge

The difficulty in buying our products — and the lack of Anatel certification — have been consistent points of feedback from our many Brazilian customers and followers. In much the same way that electrical products in the USA must be FCC-approved in order to be produced or sold there, products sold in Brazil must be approved by Anatel. And so we’re pleased to tell you that the Raspberry Pi finally has this approval.

Blue Raspberry

Today we’re also announcing the appointment of our first Approved Reseller in Brazil: FilipeFlop will be able to sell Raspberry Pi 3 units across the country.

Filipeflop logo - Raspberry Pi Brazil

A big shout-out to the team at FilipeFlop that has worked so hard with us to ensure that we’re getting the product on sale in Brazil at the right price. (They also helped us understand the various local duties and taxes which need to be paid!)

Please note: the blue colouring of the Raspberry Pi 3 sold in Brazil is the only difference between it and the standard green model. People outside Brazil will not be able to purchase the blue variant from FilipeFlop.

More Raspberry Pi Approved Resellers

Raspberry Pi Approved Reseller logo - Raspberry Pi Brazil

Since first announcing it back in August, we have further expanded our Approved Reseller programme by adding resellers for Austria, Canada, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Poland, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland, and the US. All Approved Resellers are listed on our products page, and more will follow over the next few weeks!

Make and share

If you’re based in Brazil and you’re ordering the new, blue Raspberry Pi, make sure to share your projects with us on social media. We can’t wait to see what you get up to with them!

The post Brand new and blue: our Brazilian Raspberry Pi 3 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Approved Reseller programme launch PLUS more Pi Zero resellers

Post Syndicated from Mike Buffham original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/approved-reseller/

Ever since the launch of the first Raspberry Pi back in 2012, one thing that has been critical to us is to make our products easy to buy in as many countries as possible.

Buying a Raspberry Pi is certainly much simpler nowadays than it was when we were just starting out. Nevertheless, we want to go even further, and so today we are introducing an Approved Reseller programme. With this programme, we aim to recognise those resellers that represent Raspberry Pi products well, and make purchasing them easy for their customers.

The Raspberry Pi Approved Reseller programme

We’re launching the programme in eleven countries today: the UK, Ireland, France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Greece and South Africa. Over the next few weeks, you will see us expand it to at least 50 countries.

We will link to the Approved Resellers’ websites directly from our Products page via the “Buy now” button. For customers who want to buy for business applications we have also added a “Buy for business” button. After clicking it, you will be able to select your country from a drop down menu. Doing so will link you directly to the local websites of our two licensed partners, Premier Farnell and Electrocomponents.

Our newest Raspberry Pi Zero resellers

On top of this we are also adding 6 new Raspberry Pi Zero resellers, giving 13 countries direct access to the Raspberry Pi Zero for the first time. We are particularly excited that these countries include Brazil and India, since they both have proved difficult to supply in the past.

The full list of new resellers is:

Hong Kong and China

Brazil

Raspberry Pi Brazil

India

Raspberry Pi India

Czech Republic and Slovakia

Raspberry Pi Czech Republic and Slovakia

Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina

Raspberry Pi Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia

Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary

Raspberry Pi Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary

Mexico

Raspberry Pi Mexico

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Growing Code Club

Post Syndicated from Philip Colligan original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/growing-code-club/

In November 2015 we announced that the Raspberry Pi Foundation was joining forces with Code Club to give more young people the opportunity to learn how to make things with computers. In the 18 months since we made that announcement, we have more than doubled the number of Code Clubs. Over 10,000 clubs are now active, in communities all over the world.

Photo of a Code Club in a classroom: six or seven children focus intently on Scratch programs and other tasks, and adults are helping and supervising in the background

Children at a Code Club in Australia

The UK is where the movement started, and there are now an amazing 5750 Code Clubs engaging over 85,000 young people in the UK each week. The rest of the world is catching up rapidly. With the help of our regional partners, there are over 4000 clubs outside the UK, and fast-growing Code Club communities in Australia, Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, Croatia, France, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and Ukraine. This year we have already launched new partnerships in Spain and South Korea, with more to come.

It’s fantastic to see the movement growing so quickly, and it’s all due to the amazing community of volunteers, teachers, parents, and young people who make everything possible. Thank you all!

Today, we are announcing the next stage of Code Club’s evolution. Drum roll, please…

Starting in September, we are extending Code Club to 9- to 13-year-olds.

Three girls, all concentrating, one smiling, work together at a computer at Code Club

Students at a Code Club in Brazil

Those in the know will remember that Code Club has, until now, been focused on 9- to 11-year-olds. So why the change?

Put simply: demand. There is a huge demand from young people for more opportunities to learn about computing generally, and for Code Club specifically. The first generations of Code Club graduates have moved on to more senior schools, and they’re telling us that they just don’t have the opportunities they need to learn more about digital making. We’ve decided to take up the challenge.

For the UK, this means that schools will be supported to set up Code Clubs for Years 7 and 8. Non-school venues, like libraries, will be able to offer their clubs to a wider age group.

Growing Code Club International

Code Club is a global movement, and we will be working with our regional partners to make sure that it is available to 9- to 13-year-olds in every community in the world. That includes accelerating the work to translate club materials into even more languages.

Two boys and a woman wearing a Code Club T-shirt sit and pose for the camera in a classroom

A Code Club volunteer and students in Brazil

As part of the change, we will be expanding our curriculum and free educational resources to cater for older children and more experienced coders. Like all our educational resources, the new materials will be created by qualified and experienced educators. They will be designed to help young people build a wide range of skills and competencies, including teamwork, problem-solving, and creativity.

Our first step towards supporting a wider age range is a pilot programme, launching today, with 50 secondary schools in the UK. Over the next few months, we will be working closely with them to find out the best ways to make the programme work for older kids.

Supporting Code Club

For now, you can help us spread the word. If you know a school, youth club, library, or similar venue that could host a club for young people aged 9 to 13, then encourage them to get involved.

Lastly, I want to say a massive “thank you!” to all the organisations and individuals that support Code Club financially. We care passionately about Code Club being free for every child to attend. That’s only possible because of the generous donations and grants that we receive from so many companies, foundations, and people who share our mission to put the power of digital making into the hands of people all over the world.

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