Tag Archives: vulnerabilities

Nasty Windows Printer Driver Vulnerability

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2021/07/nasty-printer-driver-vulnerability.html

From SentinelLabs, a critical vulnerability in HP printer drivers:

Researchers have released technical details on a high-severity privilege-escalation flaw in HP printer drivers (also used by Samsung and Xerox), which impacts hundreds of millions of Windows machines.

If exploited, cyberattackers could bypass security products; install programs; view, change, encrypt or delete data; or create new accounts with more extensive user rights.

The bug (CVE-2021-3438) has lurked in systems for 16 years, researchers at SentinelOne said, but was only uncovered this year. It carries an 8.8 out of 10 rating on the CVSS scale, making it high-severity.

Look for your printer here, and download the patch if there is one.

China Taking Control of Zero-Day Exploits

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2021/07/china-taking-control-of-zero-day-exploits.html

China is making sure that all newly discovered zero-day exploits are disclosed to the government.

Under the new rules, anyone in China who finds a vulnerability must tell the government, which will decide what repairs to make. No information can be given to “overseas organizations or individuals” other than the product’s manufacturer.

No one may “collect, sell or publish information on network product security vulnerabilities,” say the rules issued by the Cyberspace Administration of China and the police and industry ministries.

This just blocks the cyber-arms trade. It doesn’t prevent researchers from telling the products’ companies, even if they are outside of China.

Details of the REvil Ransomware Attack

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2021/07/details-of-the-revil-ransomware-attack.html

ArsTechnica has a good story on the REvil ransomware attack of last weekend, with technical details:

This weekend’s attack was carried out with almost surgical precision. According to Cybereason, the REvil affiliates first gained access to targeted environments and then used the zero-day in the Kaseya Agent Monitor to gain administrative control over the target’s network. After writing a base-64-encoded payload to a file named agent.crt the dropper executed it.

[…]

The ransomware dropper Agent.exe is signed with a Windows-trusted certificate that uses the registrant name “PB03 TRANSPORT LTD.” By digitally signing their malware, attackers are able to suppress many security warnings that would otherwise appear when it’s being installed. Cybereason said that the certificate appears to have been used exclusively by REvil malware that was deployed during this attack.

To add stealth, the attackers used a technique called DLL Side-Loading, which places a spoofed malicious DLL file in a Windows’ WinSxS directory so that the operating system loads the spoof instead of the legitimate file. In the case here, Agent.exe drops an outdated version that is vulnerable to DLL Side-Loading of “msmpeng.exe,” which is the file for the Windows Defender executable.

Once executed, the malware changes the firewall settings to allow local windows systems to be discovered. Then, it starts to encrypt the files on the system….

REvil is demanding $70 million for a universal decryptor that will recover the data from the 1,500 affected Kaseya customers.

More news.

Note that this is yet another supply-chain attack. Instead of infecting those 1,500 networks directly, REvil infected a single managed service provider. And it leveraged a zero-day vulnerability in that provider.

EDITED TO ADD (7/13): Employees warned Kaseya’s management for years about critical security flaws, but they were ignored.

Vulnerability in the Kaspersky Password Manager

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2021/07/vulnerability-in-the-kaspersky-password-manager.html

A vulnerability (just patched) in the random number generator used in the Kaspersky Password Manager resulted in easily guessable passwords:

The password generator included in Kaspersky Password Manager had several problems. The most critical one is that it used a PRNG not suited for cryptographic purposes. Its single source of entropy was the current time. All the passwords it created could be bruteforced in seconds. This article explains how to securely generate passwords, why Kaspersky Password Manager failed, and how to exploit this flaw. It also provides a proof of concept to test if your version is vulnerable.

The product has been updated and its newest versions aren’t affected by this issue.

Stupid programming mistake, or intentional backdoor? We don’t know.

More generally: generating random numbers is hard. I recommend my own algorithm: Fortuna. I also recommend my own password manager: Password Safe.

EDITED TO ADD: Commentary from Matthew Green.

Risks of Evidentiary Software

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2021/06/risks-of-evidentiary-software.html

Over at Lawfare, Susan Landau has an excellent essay on the risks posed by software used to collect evidence (a Breathalyzer is probably the most obvious example).

Bugs and vulnerabilities can lead to inaccurate evidence, but the proprietary nature of software makes it hard for defendants to examine it.

The software engineers proposed a three-part test. First, the court should have access to the “Known Error Log,” which should be part of any professionally developed software project. Next the court should consider whether the evidence being presented could be materially affected by a software error. Ladkin and his co-authors noted that a chain of emails back and forth are unlikely to have such an error, but the time that a software tool logs when an application was used could easily be incorrect. Finally, the reliability experts recommended seeing whether the code adheres to an industry standard used in an non-computerized version of the task (e.g., bookkeepers always record every transaction, and thus so should bookkeeping software).

[…]

Inanimate objects have long served as evidence in courts of law: the door handle with a fingerprint, the glove found at a murder scene, the Breathalyzer result that shows a blood alcohol level three times the legal limit. But the last of those examples is substantively different from the other two. Data from a Breathalyzer is not the physical entity itself, but rather a software calculation of the level of alcohol in the breath of a potentially drunk driver. As long as the breath sample has been preserved, one can always go back and retest it on a different device.

What happens if the software makes an error and there is no sample to check or if the software itself produces the evidence? At the time of our writing the article on the use of software as evidence, there was no overriding requirement that law enforcement provide a defendant with the code so that they might examine it themselves.

[…]

Given the high rate of bugs in complex software systems, my colleagues and I concluded that when computer programs produce the evidence, courts cannot assume that the evidentiary software is reliable. Instead the prosecution must make the code available for an “adversarial audit” by the defendant’s experts. And to avoid problems in which the government doesn’t have the code, government procurement contracts must include delivery of source code­ — code that is more-or-less readable by people — ­for every version of the code or device.

NFC Flaws in POS Devices and ATMs

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2021/06/nfc-flaws-in-pos-devices-and-atms.html

It’s a series of vulnerabilities:

Josep Rodriguez, a researcher and consultant at security firm IOActive, has spent the last year digging up and reporting vulnerabilities in the so-called near-field communications reader chips used in millions of ATMs and point-of-sale systems worldwide. NFC systems are what let you wave a credit card over a reader — rather than swipe or insert it — to make a payment or extract money from a cash machine. You can find them on countless retail store and restaurant counters, vending machines, taxis, and parking meters around the globe.

Now Rodriguez has built an Android app that allows his smartphone to mimic those credit card radio communications and exploit flaws in the NFC systems’ firmware. With a wave of his phone, he can exploit a variety of bugs to crash point-of-sale devices, hack them to collect and transmit credit card data, invisibly change the value of transactions, and even lock the devices while displaying a ransomware message. Rodriguez says he can even force at least one brand of ATMs to dispense cash­though that “jackpotting” hack only works in combination with additional bugs he says he’s found in the ATMs’ software. He declined to specify or disclose those flaws publicly due to nondisclosure agreements with the ATM vendors.

Protecting against recently disclosed Microsoft Exchange Server vulnerabilities: CVE-2021-26855, CVE-2021-26857, CVE-2021-26858, and CVE-2021-27065

Post Syndicated from Patrick R. Donahue original https://blog.cloudflare.com/protecting-against-microsoft-exchange-server-cves/

Protecting against recently disclosed Microsoft Exchange Server vulnerabilities: CVE-2021-26855, CVE-2021-26857, CVE-2021-26858, and CVE-2021-27065

Enabling the Cloudflare WAF and Cloudflare Specials ruleset protects against exploitation of unpatched CVEs: CVE-2021-26855, CVE-2021-26857, CVE-2021-26858, and CVE-2021-27065.

Cloudflare has deployed managed rules protecting customers against a series of remotely exploitable vulnerabilities that were recently found in Microsoft Exchange Server. Web Application Firewall customers with the Cloudflare Specials ruleset enabled are automatically protected against CVE-2021-26855, CVE-2021-26857, CVE-2021-26858, and CVE-2021-27065.

If you are running Exchange Server 2013, 2016, or 2019, and do not have the Cloudflare Specials ruleset enabled, we strongly recommend that you do so. You should also follow Microsoft’s urgent recommendation to patch your on-premise systems immediately. These vulnerabilities are actively being exploited in the wild by attackers to exfiltrate email inbox content and move laterally within organizations’ IT systems.

Edge Mitigation

If you are running the Cloudflare WAF and have enabled the Cloudflare Specials ruleset, there is nothing else you need to do. We have taken the unusual step of immediately deploying these rules in “Block” mode given active attempted exploitation.

If you wish to disable the rules for any reason, e.g., you are experiencing a false positive mitigation, you can do so by following these instructions:

  1. Login to the Cloudflare Dashboard and click on the Cloudflare Firewall tab and then Managed Rules.
  2. Click on the “Advanced” link at the bottom of the Cloudflare Managed Ruleset card and search for rule ID 100179. Select any appropriate action or disable the rule.
  3. Repeat step #2 for rule ID 100181.

Server Side Mitigation

In addition to blocking attacks at the edge, we recommend that you follow Microsoft’s urgent recommendation to patch your on-premise systems immediately. For those that are unable to immediately patch their systems, Microsoft posted yesterday with interim mitigations that can be applied.

To determine whether your system is (still) exploitable, you can run an Nmap script posted by Microsoft to GitHub: https://github.com/microsoft/CSS-Exchange/blob/main/Security/http-vuln-cve2021-26855.nse.

Vulnerability Details

The attacks observed in the wild take advantage of multiple CVEs that can result in exfiltration of email inboxes and remote code execution when chained together. Security researchers at Volexity have published a detailed analysis of the zero-day vulnerabilities.

Briefly, attackers are:

  1. First exploiting a server-side request forgery (SSRF) vulnerability documented as CVE-2021-26855 to send arbitrary HTTP requests and authenticate as the Microsoft Exchange server.
  2. Using this SYSTEM-level authentication to send SOAP payloads that are insecurely deserialized by the Unified Messaging Service, as documented in CVE-2021-26857. An example of the malicious SOAP payload can be found in the Volexity post linked above.
  3. Additionally taking advantage of CVE-2021-26858 and CVE-2021-27065 to upload arbitrary files such as webshells that allow further exploitation of the system along with a base to move laterally to other systems and networks. These file writes require authentication but this can be bypassed using CVE-2021-26855.

All 4 of the CVEs listed above are blocked by the recently deployed Cloudflare Specials rules: 100179 and 100181. Additionally, existing rule ID 100173, also enabled to Block by default, partially mitigates the vulnerability by blocking the upload of certain scripts.

Additional Recommendations

Organizations can deploy additional protections against this type of attack by adopting a Zero Trust model and making the Exchange server available only to trusted connections. The CVE guidance recommends deploying a VPN or other solutions to block attempts to reach public endpoints. In addition to the edge mitigations from the Cloudflare WAF, your team can protect your Exchange server by using Cloudflare for Teams to block all unauthorized requests.

Twelve-Year-Old Vulnerability Found in Windows Defender

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2021/02/twelve-year-old-vulnerability-found-in-windows-defender.html

Researchers found, and Microsoft has patched, a vulnerability in Windows Defender that has been around for twelve years. There is no evidence that anyone has used the vulnerability during that time.

The flaw, discovered by researchers at the security firm SentinelOne, showed up in a driver that Windows Defender — renamed Microsoft Defender last year — uses to delete the invasive files and infrastructure that malware can create. When the driver removes a malicious file, it replaces it with a new, benign one as a sort of placeholder during remediation. But the researchers discovered that the system doesn’t specifically verify that new file. As a result, an attacker could insert strategic system links that direct the driver to overwrite the wrong file or even run malicious code.

It isn’t unusual that vulnerabilities lie around for this long. They can’t be fixed until someone finds them, and people aren’t always looking.

Dependency Confusion: Another Supply-Chain Vulnerability

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2021/02/dependency-confusion-another-supply-chain-vulnerability.html

Alex Birsan writes about being able to install malware into proprietary corporate software by naming the code files to be identical to internal corporate code files. From a ZDNet article:

Today, developers at small or large companies use package managers to download and import libraries that are then assembled together using build tools to create a final app.

This app can be offered to the company’s customers or can be used internally at the company as an employee tool.

But some of these apps can also contain proprietary or highly-sensitive code, depending on their nature. For these apps, companies will often use private libraries that they store inside a private (internal) package repository, hosted inside the company’s own network.

When apps are built, the company’s developers will mix these private libraries with public libraries downloaded from public package portals like npm, PyPI, NuGet, or others.

[…]

Researchers showed that if an attacker learns the names of private libraries used inside a company’s app-building process, they could register these names on public package repositories and upload public libraries that contain malicious code.

The “dependency confusion” attack takes place when developers build their apps inside enterprise environments, and their package manager prioritizes the (malicious) library hosted on the public repository instead of the internal library with the same name.

The research team said they put this discovery to the test by searching for situations where big tech firms accidentally leaked the names of various internal libraries and then registered those same libraries on package repositories like npm, RubyGems, and PyPI.

Using this method, researchers said they successfully loaded their (non-malicious) code inside apps used by 35 major tech firms, including the likes of Apple, Microsoft, PayPal, Shopify, Netflix, Yelp, Uber, and others.

Clever attack, and one that has netted him $130K in bug bounties.

More news articles.

Router Security

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2021/02/router-security.html

This report is six months old, and I don’t know anything about the organization that produced it, but it has some alarming data about router security.

Conclusion: Our analysis showed that Linux is the most used OS running on more than 90% of the devices. However, many routers are powered by very old versions of Linux. Most devices are still powered with a 2.6 Linux kernel, which is no longer maintained for many years. This leads to a high number of critical and high severity CVEs affecting these devices.

Since Linux is the most used OS, exploit mitigation techniques could be enabled very easily. Anyhow, they are used quite rarely by most vendors except the NX feature.

A published private key provides no security at all. Nonetheless, all but one vendor spread several private keys in almost all firmware images.

Mirai used hard-coded login credentials to infect thousands of embedded devices in the last years. However, hard-coded credentials can be found in many of the devices and some of them are well known or at least easy crackable.

However, we can tell for sure that the vendors prioritize security differently. AVM does better job than the other vendors regarding most aspects. ASUS and Netgear do a better job in some aspects than D-Link, Linksys, TP-Link and Zyxel.

Additionally, our evaluation showed that large scale automated security analysis of embedded devices is possible today utilizing just open source software. To sum it up, our analysis shows that there is no router without flaws and there is no vendor who does a perfect job regarding all security aspects. Much more effort is needed to make home routers as secure as current desktop of server systems.

One comment on the report:

One-third ship with Linux kernel version 2.6.36 was released in October 2010. You can walk into a store today and buy a brand new router powered by software that’s almost 10 years out of date! This outdated version of the Linux kernel has 233 known security vulnerabilities registered in the Common Vulnerability and Exposures (CVE) database. The average router contains 26 critically-rated security vulnerabilities, according to the study.

We know the reasons for this. Most routers are designed offshore, by third parties, and then private labeled and sold by the vendors you’ve heard of. Engineering teams come together, design and build the router, and then disperse. There’s often no one around to write patches, and most of the time router firmware isn’t even patchable. The way to update your home router is to throw it away and buy a new one.

And this paper demonstrates that even the new ones aren’t likely to be secure.

Russia’s SolarWinds Attack

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/12/russias-solarwinds-attack.html

Recent news articles have all been talking about the massive Russian cyberattack against the United States, but that’s wrong on two accounts. It wasn’t a cyberattack in international relations terms, it was espionage. And the victim wasn’t just the US, it was the entire world. But it was massive, and it is dangerous.

Espionage is internationally allowed in peacetime. The problem is that both espionage and cyberattacks require the same computer and network intrusions, and the difference is only a few keystrokes. And since this Russian operation isn’t at all targeted, the entire world is at risk — and not just from Russia. Many countries carry out these sorts of operations, none more extensively than the US. The solution is to prioritize security and defense over espionage and attack.

Here’s what we know: Orion is a network management product from a company named SolarWinds, with over 300,000 customers worldwide. Sometime before March, hackers working for the Russian SVR — previously known as the KGB — hacked into SolarWinds and slipped a backdoor into an Orion software update. (We don’t know how, but last year the company’s update server was protected by the password “solarwinds123” — something that speaks to a lack of security culture.) Users who downloaded and installed that corrupted update between March and June unwittingly gave SVR hackers access to their networks.

This is called a supply-chain attack, because it targets a supplier to an organization rather than an organization itself — and can affect all of a supplier’s customers. It’s an increasingly common way to attack networks. Other examples of this sort of attack include fake apps in the Google Play store, and hacked replacement screens for your smartphone.

SolarWinds has removed its customer list from its website, but the Internet Archive saved it: all five branches of the US military, the state department, the White House, the NSA, 425 of the Fortune 500 companies, all five of the top five accounting firms, and hundreds of universities and colleges. In an SEC filing, SolarWinds said that it believes “fewer than 18,000” of those customers installed this malicious update, another way of saying that more than 17,000 did.

That’s a lot of vulnerable networks, and it’s inconceivable that the SVR penetrated them all. Instead, it chose carefully from its cornucopia of targets. Microsoft’s analysis identified 40 customers who were infiltrated using this vulnerability. The great majority of those were in the US, but networks in Canada, Mexico, Belgium, Spain, the UK, Israel and the UAE were also targeted. This list includes governments, government contractors, IT companies, thinktanks, and NGOs — and it will certainly grow.

Once inside a network, SVR hackers followed a standard playbook: establish persistent access that will remain even if the initial vulnerability is fixed; move laterally around the network by compromising additional systems and accounts; and then exfiltrate data. Not being a SolarWinds customer is no guarantee of security; this SVR operation used other initial infection vectors and techniques as well. These are sophisticated and patient hackers, and we’re only just learning some of the techniques involved here.

Recovering from this attack isn’t easy. Because any SVR hackers would establish persistent access, the only way to ensure that your network isn’t compromised is to burn it to the ground and rebuild it, similar to reinstalling your computer’s operating system to recover from a bad hack. This is how a lot of sysadmins are going to spend their Christmas holiday, and even then they can&;t be sure. There are many ways to establish persistent access that survive rebuilding individual computers and networks. We know, for example, of an NSA exploit that remains on a hard drive even after it is reformatted. Code for that exploit was part of the Equation Group tools that the Shadow Brokers — again believed to be Russia — stole from the NSA and published in 2016. The SVR probably has the same kinds of tools.

Even without that caveat, many network administrators won’t go through the long, painful, and potentially expensive rebuilding process. They’ll just hope for the best.

It’s hard to overstate how bad this is. We are still learning about US government organizations breached: the state department, the treasury department, homeland security, the Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories (where nuclear weapons are developed), the National Nuclear Security Administration, the National Institutes of Health, and many more. At this point, there’s no indication that any classified networks were penetrated, although that could change easily. It will take years to learn which networks the SVR has penetrated, and where it still has access. Much of that will probably be classified, which means that we, the public, will never know.

And now that the Orion vulnerability is public, other governments and cybercriminals will use it to penetrate vulnerable networks. I can guarantee you that the NSA is using the SVR’s hack to infiltrate other networks; why would they not? (Do any Russian organizations use Orion? Probably.)

While this is a security failure of enormous proportions, it is not, as Senator Richard Durban said, “virtually a declaration of war by Russia on the United States.” While President-elect Biden said he will make this a top priority, it’s unlikely that he will do much to retaliate.

The reason is that, by international norms, Russia did nothing wrong. This is the normal state of affairs. Countries spy on each other all the time. There are no rules or even norms, and it’s basically “buyer beware.” The US regularly fails to retaliate against espionage operations — such as China’s hack of the Office of Personal Management (OPM) and previous Russian hacks — because we do it, too. Speaking of the OPM hack, the then director of national intelligence, James Clapper, said: “You have to kind of salute the Chinese for what they did. If we had the opportunity to do that, I don’t think we’d hesitate for a minute.”

We don’t, and I’m sure NSA employees are grudgingly impressed with the SVR. The US has by far the most extensive and aggressive intelligence operation in the world. The NSA’s budget is the largest of any intelligence agency. It aggressively leverages the US’s position controlling most of the internet backbone and most of the major internet companies. Edward Snowden disclosed many targets of its efforts around 2014, which then included 193 countries, the World Bank, the IMF and the International Atomic Energy Agency. We are undoubtedly running an offensive operation on the scale of this SVR operation right now, and it’ll probably never be made public. In 2016, President Obama boasted that we have “more capacity than anybody both offensively and defensively.”

He may have been too optimistic about our defensive capability. The US prioritizes and spends many times more on offense than on defensive cybersecurity. In recent years, the NSA has adopted a strategy of “persistent engagement,” sometimes called “defending forward.” The idea is that instead of passively waiting for the enemy to attack our networks and infrastructure, we go on the offensive and disrupt attacks before they get to us. This strategy was credited with foiling a plot by the Russian Internet Research Agency to disrupt the 2018 elections.

But if persistent engagement is so effective, how could it have missed this massive SVR operation? It seems that pretty much the entire US government was unknowingly sending information back to Moscow. If we had been watching everything the Russians were doing, we would have seen some evidence of this. The Russians’ success under the watchful eye of the NSA and US Cyber Command shows that this is a failed approach.

And how did US defensive capability miss this? The only reason we know about this breach is because, earlier this month, the security company FireEye discovered that it had been hacked. During its own audit of its network, it uncovered the Orion vulnerability and alerted the US government. Why don’t organizations like the Departments of State, Treasury and Homeland Wecurity regularly conduct that level of audit on their own systems? The government’s intrusion detection system, Einstein 3, failed here because it doesn’t detect new sophisticated attacks — a deficiency pointed out in 2018 but never fixed. We shouldn’t have to rely on a private cybersecurity company to alert us of a major nation-state attack.

If anything, the US’s prioritization of offense over defense makes us less safe. In the interests of surveillance, the NSA has pushed for an insecure cell phone encryption standard and a backdoor in random number generators (important for secure encryption). The DoJ has never relented in its insistence that the world’s popular encryption systems be made insecure through back doors — another hot point where attack and defense are in conflict. In other words, we allow for insecure standards and systems, because we can use them to spy on others.

We need to adopt a defense-dominant strategy. As computers and the internet become increasingly essential to society, cyberattacks are likely to be the precursor to actual war. We are simply too vulnerable when we prioritize offense, even if we have to give up the advantage of using those insecurities to spy on others.

Our vulnerability is magnified as eavesdropping may bleed into a direct attack. The SVR’s access allows them not only to eavesdrop, but also to modify data, degrade network performance, or erase entire networks. The first might be normal spying, but the second certainly could be considered an act of war. Russia is almost certainly laying the groundwork for future attack.

This preparation would not be unprecedented. There’s a lot of attack going on in the world. In 2010, the US and Israel attacked the Iranian nuclear program. In 2012, Iran attacked the Saudi national oil company. North Korea attacked Sony in 2014. Russia attacked the Ukrainian power grid in 2015 and 2016. Russia is hacking the US power grid, and the US is hacking Russia’s power grid — just in case the capability is needed someday. All of these attacks began as a spying operation. Security vulnerabilities have real-world consequences.

We’re not going to be able to secure our networks and systems in this no-rules, free-for-all every-network-for-itself world. The US needs to willingly give up part of its offensive advantage in cyberspace in exchange for a vastly more secure global cyberspace. We need to invest in securing the world’s supply chains from this type of attack, and to press for international norms and agreements prioritizing cybersecurity, like the 2018 Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace or the Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace. Hardening widely used software like Orion (or the core internet protocols) helps everyone. We need to dampen this offensive arms race rather than exacerbate it, and work towards cyber peace. Otherwise, hypocritically criticizing the Russians for doing the same thing we do every day won’t help create the safer world in which we all want to live.

This essay previously appeared in the Guardian.

Impressive iPhone Exploit

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/12/impressive-iphone-exploit.html

This is a scarily impressive vulnerability:

Earlier this year, Apple patched one of the most breathtaking iPhone vulnerabilities ever: a memory corruption bug in the iOS kernel that gave attackers remote access to the entire device­ — over Wi-Fi, with no user interaction required at all. Oh, and exploits were wormable­ — meaning radio-proximity exploits could spread from one nearby device to another, once again, with no user interaction needed.

[…]

Beer’s attack worked by exploiting a buffer overflow bug in a driver for AWDL, an Apple-proprietary mesh networking protocol that makes things like Airdrop work. Because drivers reside in the kernel — ­one of the most privileged parts of any operating system­ — the AWDL flaw had the potential for serious hacks. And because AWDL parses Wi-Fi packets, exploits can be transmitted over the air, with no indication that anything is amiss.

[…]

Beer developed several different exploits. The most advanced one installs an implant that has full access to the user’s personal data, including emails, photos, messages, and passwords and crypto keys stored in the keychain. The attack uses a laptop, a Raspberry Pi, and some off-the-shelf Wi-Fi adapters. It takes about two minutes to install the prototype implant, but Beer said that with more work a better written exploit could deliver it in a “handful of seconds.” Exploits work only on devices that are within Wi-Fi range of the attacker.

There is no evidence that this vulnerability was ever used in the wild.

EDITED TO ADD: Slashdot thread.

SAD DNS Explained

Post Syndicated from Marek Vavruša original https://blog.cloudflare.com/sad-dns-explained/

SAD DNS Explained

This week, at the ACM CCS 2020 conference, researchers from UC Riverside and Tsinghua University announced a new attack against the Domain Name System (DNS) called SAD DNS (Side channel AttackeD DNS). This attack leverages recent features of the networking stack in modern operating systems (like Linux) to allow attackers to revive a classic attack category: DNS cache poisoning. As part of a coordinated disclosure effort earlier this year, the researchers contacted Cloudflare and other major DNS providers and we are happy to announce that 1.1.1.1 Public Resolver is no longer vulnerable to this attack.

In this post, we’ll explain what the vulnerability was, how it relates to previous attacks of this sort, what mitigation measures we have taken to protect our users, and future directions the industry should consider to prevent this class of attacks from being a problem in the future.

DNS Basics

The Domain Name System (DNS) is what allows users of the Internet to get around without memorizing long sequences of numbers. What’s often called the “phonebook of the Internet” is more like a helpful system of translators that take natural language domain names (like blog.cloudflare.com or gov.uk) and translate them into the native language of the Internet: IP addresses (like 192.0.2.254 or [2001:db8::cf]). This translation happens behind the scenes so that users only need to remember hostnames and don’t have to get bogged down with remembering IP addresses.

DNS is both a system and a protocol. It refers to the hierarchical system of computers that manage the data related to naming on a network and it refers to the language these computers use to speak to each other to communicate answers about naming. The DNS protocol consists of pairs of messages that correspond to questions and responses. Each DNS question (query) and answer (reply) follows a standard format and contains a set of parameters that contain relevant information such as the name of interest (such as blog.cloudflare.com) and the type of response record desired (such as A for IPv4 or AAAA for IPv6).

The DNS Protocol and Spoofing

These DNS messages are exchanged over a network between machines using a transport protocol. Originally, DNS used UDP, a simple stateless protocol in which messages are endowed with a set of metadata indicating a source port and a destination port. More recently, DNS has adapted to use more complex transport protocols such as TCP and even advanced protocols like TLS or HTTPS, which incorporate encryption and strong authentication into the mix (see Peter Wu’s blog post about DNS protocol encryption).

Still, the most common transport protocol for message exchange is UDP, which has the advantages of being fast, ubiquitous and requiring no setup. Because UDP is stateless, the pairing of a response to an outstanding query is based on two main factors: the source address and port pair, and information in the DNS message. Given that UDP is both stateless and unauthenticated, anyone, and not just the recipient, can send a response with a forged source address and port, which opens up a range of potential problems.

SAD DNS Explained
The blue portions contribute randomness

Since the transport layer is inherently unreliable and untrusted, the DNS protocol was designed with additional mechanisms to protect against forged responses. The first two bytes in the message form a message or transaction ID that must be the same in the query and response. When a DNS client sends a query, it will set the ID to a random value and expect the value in the response to match. This unpredictability introduces entropy into the protocol, which makes it less likely that a malicious party will be able to construct a valid DNS reply without first seeing the query. There are other potential variables to account for, like the DNS query name and query type are also used to pair query and response, but these are trivial to guess and don’t introduce an additional entropy.

Those paying close attention to the diagram may notice that the amount of entropy introduced by this measure is only around 16 bits, which means that there are fewer than a hundred thousand possibilities to go through to find the matching reply to a given query. More on this later.

The DNS Ecosystem

DNS servers fall into one of a few main categories: recursive resolvers (like 1.1.1.1 or 8.8.8.8), nameservers (like the DNS root servers or Cloudflare Authoritative DNS). There are also elements of the ecosystem that act as “forwarders” such as dnsmasq. In a typical DNS lookup, these DNS servers work together to complete the task of delivering the IP address for a specified domain to the client (the client is usually a stub resolver – a simple resolver built into an operating system). For more detailed information about the DNS ecosystem, take a look at our learning site. The SAD DNS attack targets the communication between recursive resolvers and nameservers.

Each of the participants in DNS (client, resolver, nameserver) uses the DNS protocol to communicate with each other. Most of the latest innovations in DNS revolve around upgrading the transport between users and recursive resolvers to use encryption. Upgrading the transport protocol between resolvers and authoritative servers is a bit more complicated as it requires a new discovery mechanism to instruct the resolver when to (and when not to use) a more secure channel.  Aside from a few examples like our work with Facebook to encrypt recursive-to-authoritative traffic with DNS-over-TLS, most of these exchanges still happen over UDP. This is the core issue that enables this new attack on DNS, and one that we’ve seen before.

Kaminsky’s Attack

Prior to 2008, recursive resolvers typically used a single open port (usually port 53) to send and receive messages to authoritative nameservers. This made guessing the source port trivial, so the only variable an attacker needed to guess to forge a response to a query was the 16-bit message ID. The attack Kaminsky described was relatively simple: whenever a recursive resolver queried the authoritative name server for a given domain, an attacker would flood the resolver with DNS responses for some or all of the 65 thousand or so possible message IDs. If the malicious answer with the right message ID arrived before the response from the authoritative server, then the DNS cache would be effectively poisoned, returning the attacker’s chosen answer instead of the real one for as long as the DNS response was valid (called the TTL, or time-to-live).

For popular domains, resolvers contact authoritative servers once per TTL (which can be as short as 5 minutes), so there are plenty of opportunities to mount this attack. Forwarders that cache DNS responses are also vulnerable to this type of attack.

SAD DNS Explained

In response to this attack, DNS resolvers started doing source port randomization and careful checking of the security ranking of cached data. To poison these updated resolvers, forged responses would not only need to guess the message ID, but they would also have to guess the source port, bringing the number of guesses from the tens of thousands to over a trillion. This made the attack effectively infeasible. Furthermore, the IETF published RFC 5452 on how to harden DNS from guessing attacks.

It should be noted that this attack did not work for DNSSEC-signed domains since their answers are digitally signed. However, even now in 2020, DNSSEC is far from universal.

Defeating Source Port Randomization with Fragmentation

Another way to avoid having to guess the source port number and message ID is to split the DNS response in two. As is often the case in computer security, old attacks become new again when attackers discover new capabilities. In 2012, researchers Amir Herzberg and Haya Schulman from Bar Ilan University discovered that it was possible for a remote attacker to defeat the protections provided by source port randomization. This new attack leveraged another feature of UDP: fragmentation. For a primer on the topic of UDP fragmentation, check out our previous blog post on the subject by Marek Majkowski.

The key to this attack is the fact that all the randomness that needs to be guessed in a DNS poisoning attack is concentrated at the beginning of the DNS message (UDP header and DNS header).If the UDP response packet (sometimes called a datagram) is split into two fragments, the first half containing the message ID and source port and the second containing part of the DNS response, then all an attacker needs to do is forge the second fragment and make sure that the fake second fragment arrives at the resolver before the true second fragment does. When a datagram is fragmented, each fragment is assigned a 16-bit IDs (called IP-ID), which is used to reassemble it at the other end of the connection. Since the second fragment only has the IP-ID as entropy (again, this is a familiar refrain in this area), this attack is feasible with a relatively small number of forged packets. The downside of this attack is the precondition that the response must be fragmented in the first place, and the fragment must be carefully altered to pass the original section counts and UDP checksum.

SAD DNS Explained

Also discussed in the original and follow-up papers is a method of forcing two remote servers to send packets between each other which are fragmented at an attacker-controlled point, making this attack much more feasible. The details are in the paper, but it boils down to the fact that the control mechanism for describing the maximum transmissible unit (MTU) between two servers — which determines at which point packets are fragmented — can be set via a forged UDP packet.

SAD DNS Explained

We explored this risk in a previous blog post in the context of certificate issuance last year when we introduced our multi-path DCV service, which mitigates this risk in the context of certificate issuance by making DNS queries from multiple vantage points. Nevertheless, fragmentation-based attacks are proving less and less effective as DNS providers move to eliminate support for fragmented DNS packets (one of the major goals of DNS Flag Day 2020).

Defeating Source Port Randomization via ICMP error messages

Another way to defeat the source port randomization is to use some measurable property of the server that makes the source port easier to guess. If the attacker could ask the server which port number is being used for a pending query, that would make the construction of a spoofed packet much easier. No such thing exists, but it turns out there is something close enough – the attacker can discover which ports are surely closed (and thus avoid having to send traffic). One such mechanism is the ICMP “port unreachable” message.

Let’s say the target receives a UDP datagram destined for its IP and some port, the datagram either ends up either being accepted and silently discarded by the application, or rejected because the port is closed. If the port is closed, or more importantly, closed to the IP address that the UDP datagram was sent from, the target will send back an ICMP message notifying the attacker that the port is closed. This is handy to know since the attacker now doesn’t have to bother trying to guess the pending message ID on this port and move to other ports. A single scan of the server effectively reduces the search space of valid UDP responses from 232 (over a trillion) to 217 (around a hundred thousand), at least in theory.

This trick doesn’t always work. Many resolvers use “connected” UDP sockets instead of “open” UDP sockets to exchange messages between the resolver and nameserver. Connected sockets are tied to the peer address and port on the OS layer, which makes it impossible for an attacker to guess which “connected” UDP sockets are established between the target and the victim, and since the attacker isn’t the victim, it can’t directly observe the outcome of the probe.

To overcome this, the researchers found a very clever trick: they leverage ICMP rate limits as a side channel to reveal whether a given port is open or not. ICMP rate limiting was introduced (somewhat ironically, given this attack) as a security feature to prevent a server from being used as an unwitting participant in a reflection attack. In broad terms, it is used to limit how many ICMP responses a server will send out in a given time period. Say an attacker wanted to scan 10,000 ports and sent a burst of 10,000 UDP packets to a server configured with an ICMP rate limit of 50 per second, then only the first 50 would get an ICMP “port unreachable” message in reply.

Rate limiting seems innocuous until you remember one of the core rules of data security: don’t let private information influence publicly measurable metrics. ICMP rate limiting violates this rule because the rate limiter’s behavior can be influenced by an attacker making guesses as to whether a “secret” port number is open or not.

don’t let private information influence publicly measurable metrics

An attacker wants to know whether the target has an open port, so it sends a spoofed UDP message from the authoritative server to that port. If the port is open, no ICMP reply is sent and the rate counter remains unchanged. If the port is inaccessible, then an ICMP reply is sent (back to the authoritative server, not to the attacker) and the rate is increased by one. Although the attacker doesn’t see the ICMP response, it has influenced the counter. The counter itself isn’t known outside the server, but whether it has hit the rate limit or not can be measured by any outside observer by sending a UDP packet and waiting for a reply. If an ICMP “port unreachable” reply comes back, the rate limit hasn’t been reached. No reply means the rate limit has been met. This leaks one bit of information about the counter to the outside observer, which in the end is enough to reveal the supposedly secret information (whether the spoofed request got through or not).

SAD DNS Explained
Diagram inspired by original paper‌‌

Concretely, the attack works as follows: the attacker sends a bunch (large enough to trigger the rate limiting) of probe messages to the target, but with a forged source address of the victim. In the case where there are no open ports in the probed set, the target will send out the same amount of ICMP “port unreachable” responses back to the victim and trigger the rate limit on outgoing ICMP messages. The attacker can now send an additional verification message from its own address and observe whether an ICMP response comes back or not. If it does then there was at least one port open in the set and the attacker can divide the set and try again, or do a linear scan by inserting the suspected port number into a set of known closed ports. Using this approach, the attacker can narrow down to the open ports and try to guess the message ID until it is successful or gives up, similarly to the original Kaminsky attack.

In practice there are some hurdles to successfully mounting this attack.

  • First, the target IP, or a set of target IPs must be discovered. This might be trivial in some cases – a single forwarder, or a fixed set of IPs that can be discovered by probing and observing attacker controlled zones, but more difficult if the target IPs are partitioned across zones as the attacker can’t see the resolver egress IP unless she can monitor the traffic for the victim domain.
  • The attack also requires a large enough ICMP outgoing rate limit in order to be able to scan with a reasonable speed. The scan speed is critical, as it must be completed while the query to the victim nameserver is still pending. As the scan speed is effectively fixed, the paper instead describes a method to potentially extend the window of opportunity by triggering the victim’s response rate limiting (RRL), a technique to protect against floods of forged DNS queries. This may work if the victim implements RRL and the target resolver doesn’t implement a retry over TCP (A Quantitative Study of the Deployment of DNS Rate Limiting shows about 16% of nameservers implement some sort of RRL).
  • Generally, busy resolvers will have ephemeral ports opening and closing, which introduces false positive open ports for the attacker, and ports open for different pending queries than the one being attacked.

We’ve implemented an additional mitigation to 1.1.1.1 to prevent message ID guessing – if the resolver detects an ID enumeration attempt, it will stop accepting any more guesses and switches over to TCP. This reduces the number of attempts for the attacker even if it guesses the IP address and port correctly, similarly to how the number of password login attempts is limited.

Outlook

Ultimately these are just mitigations, and the attacker might be willing to play the long game. As long as the transport layer is insecure and DNSSEC is not widely deployed, there will be different methods of chipping away at these mitigations.

It should be noted that trying to hide source IPs or open port numbers is a form of security through obscurity. Without strong cryptographic authentication, it will always be possible to use spoofing to poison DNS resolvers. The silver lining here is that DNSSEC exists, and is designed to protect against this type of attack, and DNS servers are moving to explore cryptographically strong transports such as TLS for communicating between resolvers and authoritative servers.

At Cloudflare, we’ve been helping to reduce the friction of DNSSEC deployment, while also helping to improve transport security in the long run. There is also an effort to increase entropy in DNS messages with RFC 7873 – Domain Name System (DNS) Cookies, and make DNS over TCP support mandatory RFC 7766 – DNS Transport over TCP – Implementation Requirements, with even more documentation around ways to mitigate this type of issue available in different places. All of these efforts are complementary, which is a good thing. The DNS ecosystem consists of many different parties and software with different requirements and opinions, as long as the operators support at least one of the preventive measures, these types of attacks will become more and more difficult.

If you are an operator of an authoritative DNS server, you should consider taking the following steps to protect yourself from this attack:

We’d like to thank the researchers for responsibly disclosing this attack and look forward to working with them in the future on efforts to strengthen the DNS.

Tracking Users on Waze

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/10/tracking-users-on-waze.html

A security researcher discovered a wulnerability in Waze that breaks the anonymity of users:

I found out that I can visit Waze from any web browser at waze.com/livemap so I decided to check how are those driver icons implemented. What I found is that I can ask Waze API for data on a location by sending my latitude and longitude coordinates. Except the essential traffic information, Waze also sends me coordinates of other drivers who are nearby. What caught my eyes was that identification numbers (ID) associated with the icons were not changing over time. I decided to track one driver and after some time she really appeared in a different place on the same road.

The vulnerability has been fixed. More interesting is that the researcher was able to de-anonymize some of the Waze users, proving yet again that anonymity is hard when we’re all so different.

NSA Advisory on Chinese Government Hacking

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/10/nsa-advisory-on-chinese-government-hacking.html

The NSA released an advisory listing the top twenty-five known vulnerabilities currently being exploited by Chinese nation-state attackers.

This advisory provides Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVEs) known to be recently leveraged, or scanned-for, by Chinese state-sponsored cyber actors to enable successful hacking operations against a multitude of victim networks. Most of the vulnerabilities listed below can be exploited to gain initial access to victim networks using products that are directly accessible from the Internet and act as gateways to internal networks. The majority of the products are either for remote access (T1133) or for external web services (T1190), and should be prioritized for immediate patching.

Hacking Apple for Profit

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/10/hacking-apple-for-profit.html

Five researchers hacked Apple Computer’s networks — not their products — and found fifty-five vulnerabilities. So far, they have received $289K.

One of the worst of all the bugs they found would have allowed criminals to create a worm that would automatically steal all the photos, videos, and documents from someone’s iCloud account and then do the same to the victim’s contacts.

Lots of details in this blog post by one of the hackers.

Hacking a Coffee Maker

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/09/hacking-a-coffee-maker.html

As expected, IoT devices are filled with vulnerabilities:

As a thought experiment, Martin Hron, a researcher at security company Avast, reverse engineered one of the older coffee makers to see what kinds of hacks he could do with it. After just a week of effort, the unqualified answer was: quite a lot. Specifically, he could trigger the coffee maker to turn on the burner, dispense water, spin the bean grinder, and display a ransom message, all while beeping repeatedly. Oh, and by the way, the only way to stop the chaos was to unplug the power cord.

[…]

In any event, Hron said the ransom attack is just the beginning of what an attacker could do. With more work, he believes, an attacker could program a coffee maker — ­and possibly other appliances made by Smarter — ­to attack the router, computers, or other devices connected to the same network. And the attacker could probably do it with no overt sign anything was amiss.

New Bluetooth Vulnerability

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/09/new-bluetooth-vulnerability.html

There’s a new unpatched Bluetooth vulnerability:

The issue is with a protocol called Cross-Transport Key Derivation (or CTKD, for short). When, say, an iPhone is getting ready to pair up with Bluetooth-powered device, CTKD’s role is to set up two separate authentication keys for that phone: one for a “Bluetooth Low Energy” device, and one for a device using what’s known as the “Basic Rate/Enhanced Data Rate” standard. Different devices require different amounts of data — and battery power — from a phone. Being able to toggle between the standards needed for Bluetooth devices that take a ton of data (like a Chromecast), and those that require a bit less (like a smartwatch) is more efficient. Incidentally, it might also be less secure.

According to the researchers, if a phone supports both of those standards but doesn’t require some sort of authentication or permission on the user’s end, a hackery sort who’s within Bluetooth range can use its CTKD connection to derive its own competing key. With that connection, according to the researchers, this sort of erzatz authentication can also allow bad actors to weaken the encryption that these keys use in the first place — which can open its owner up to more attacks further down the road, or perform “man in the middle” style attacks that snoop on unprotected data being sent by the phone’s apps and services.

Another article:

Patches are not immediately available at the time of writing. The only way to protect against BLURtooth attacks is to control the environment in which Bluetooth devices are paired, in order to prevent man-in-the-middle attacks, or pairings with rogue devices carried out via social engineering (tricking the human operator).

However, patches are expected to be available at one point. When they’ll be, they’ll most likely be integrated as firmware or operating system updates for Bluetooth capable devices.

The timeline for these updates is, for the moment, unclear, as device vendors and OS makers usually work on different timelines, and some may not prioritize security patches as others. The number of vulnerable devices is also unclear and hard to quantify.

Many Bluetooth devices can’t be patched.

Final note: this seems to be another example of simultaneous discovery:

According to the Bluetooth SIG, the BLURtooth attack was discovered independently by two groups of academics from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) and Purdue University.