Tag Archives: navigation

Raspberry Pi as car computer

Post Syndicated from Liz Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-as-car-computer/

Carputers! Fabrice Aneche is documenting his ongoing build, which equips an older (2011) car with some of the features a 2018 model might have: thus far, a reversing camera (bought off the shelf, with a modified GUI to show the date and the camera’s output built with Qt and Golang), GPS and offline route guidance.

rearcam

We’re not sure how the car got through that little door there.

It was back in 2013, when the Raspberry Pi had been on the market for about a year, that we started to see carputer projects emerge. They tended to be focussed in two directions: in-car entertainment, and on-board diagnostics (OBD). We ended up hiring the wonderful Martin O’Hanlon, who wrote up the first OBD project we came across, just this year. Being featured on this blog can change your life, I tell you.

In the last five years, the Pi’s evolved: you’re now working with a lot more processing power, there’s onboard WiFi, and far more peripherals which can be useful in a…vehicular context are available. Consequently, the flavour of the car projects we’re seeing has changed somewhat, with navigation systems and cameras much more visible. Fabrice’s is one of the best examples we’ve found.

solarised map

Night-view navigation system

GPS is all very well, but you, the human person driver, will want directions at every turn. So Fabrice wrote a user interface to serve up live maps and directions, mostly in Qt5 and QML (he’s got some interesting discussion on his website about why he stopped using X11, which turned out to be too slow for his needs). All the non-QML work is done in Go. It’s all open-source, and on GitHub, if you’d like to contribute or roll your own project. He’s also worked over the Linux GPS daemons, found them lacking, and has produced his own:

…the Linux gps daemons are using obscure and over complicated protocols so I’ve decided to write my own gps daemon in Go using a gRPC stream interface. You can find it here.

I’m also not satisfied with the map matching of OSRM for real time display, I may rewrite one using mbmatch.

street map display

We’ll be keeping an eye on this project; given how much clever has gone into it already, we’re pretty sure that Fabrice will be adding new features. Thanks Fabrice!

The post Raspberry Pi as car computer appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Implement continuous integration and delivery of serverless AWS Glue ETL applications using AWS Developer Tools

Post Syndicated from Prasad Alle original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/implement-continuous-integration-and-delivery-of-serverless-aws-glue-etl-applications-using-aws-developer-tools/

AWS Glue is an increasingly popular way to develop serverless ETL (extract, transform, and load) applications for big data and data lake workloads. Organizations that transform their ETL applications to cloud-based, serverless ETL architectures need a seamless, end-to-end continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) pipeline: from source code, to build, to deployment, to product delivery. Having a good CI/CD pipeline can help your organization discover bugs before they reach production and deliver updates more frequently. It can also help developers write quality code and automate the ETL job release management process, mitigate risk, and more.

AWS Glue is a fully managed data catalog and ETL service. It simplifies and automates the difficult and time-consuming tasks of data discovery, conversion, and job scheduling. AWS Glue crawls your data sources and constructs a data catalog using pre-built classifiers for popular data formats and data types, including CSV, Apache Parquet, JSON, and more.

When you are developing ETL applications using AWS Glue, you might come across some of the following CI/CD challenges:

  • Iterative development with unit tests
  • Continuous integration and build
  • Pushing the ETL pipeline to a test environment
  • Pushing the ETL pipeline to a production environment
  • Testing ETL applications using real data (live test)
  • Exploring and validating data

In this post, I walk you through a solution that implements a CI/CD pipeline for serverless AWS Glue ETL applications supported by AWS Developer Tools (including AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeCommit, and AWS CodeBuild) and AWS CloudFormation.

Solution overview

The following diagram shows the pipeline workflow:

This solution uses AWS CodePipeline, which lets you orchestrate and automate the test and deploy stages for ETL application source code. The solution consists of a pipeline that contains the following stages:

1.) Source Control: In this stage, the AWS Glue ETL job source code and the AWS CloudFormation template file for deploying the ETL jobs are both committed to version control. I chose to use AWS CodeCommit for version control.

To get the ETL job source code and AWS CloudFormation template, download the gluedemoetl.zip file. This solution is developed based on a previous post, Build a Data Lake Foundation with AWS Glue and Amazon S3.

2.) LiveTest: In this stage, all resources—including AWS Glue crawlers, jobs, S3 buckets, roles, and other resources that are required for the solution—are provisioned, deployed, live tested, and cleaned up.

The LiveTest stage includes the following actions:

  • Deploy: In this action, all the resources that are required for this solution (crawlers, jobs, buckets, roles, and so on) are provisioned and deployed using an AWS CloudFormation template.
  • AutomatedLiveTest: In this action, all the AWS Glue crawlers and jobs are executed and data exploration and validation tests are performed. These validation tests include, but are not limited to, record counts in both raw tables and transformed tables in the data lake and any other business validations. I used AWS CodeBuild for this action.
  • LiveTestApproval: This action is included for the cases in which a pipeline administrator approval is required to deploy/promote the ETL applications to the next stage. The pipeline pauses in this action until an administrator manually approves the release.
  • LiveTestCleanup: In this action, all the LiveTest stage resources, including test crawlers, jobs, roles, and so on, are deleted using the AWS CloudFormation template. This action helps minimize cost by ensuring that the test resources exist only for the duration of the AutomatedLiveTest and LiveTestApproval

3.) DeployToProduction: In this stage, all the resources are deployed using the AWS CloudFormation template to the production environment.

Try it out

This code pipeline takes approximately 20 minutes to complete the LiveTest test stage (up to the LiveTest approval stage, in which manual approval is required).

To get started with this solution, choose Launch Stack:

This creates the CI/CD pipeline with all of its stages, as described earlier. It performs an initial commit of the sample AWS Glue ETL job source code to trigger the first release change.

In the AWS CloudFormation console, choose Create. After the template finishes creating resources, you see the pipeline name on the stack Outputs tab.

After that, open the CodePipeline console and select the newly created pipeline. Initially, your pipeline’s CodeCommit stage shows that the source action failed.

Allow a few minutes for your new pipeline to detect the initial commit applied by the CloudFormation stack creation. As soon as the commit is detected, your pipeline starts. You will see the successful stage completion status as soon as the CodeCommit source stage runs.

In the CodeCommit console, choose Code in the navigation pane to view the solution files.

Next, you can watch how the pipeline goes through the LiveTest stage of the deploy and AutomatedLiveTest actions, until it finally reaches the LiveTestApproval action.

At this point, if you check the AWS CloudFormation console, you can see that a new template has been deployed as part of the LiveTest deploy action.

At this point, make sure that the AWS Glue crawlers and the AWS Glue job ran successfully. Also check whether the corresponding databases and external tables have been created in the AWS Glue Data Catalog. Then verify that the data is validated using Amazon Athena, as shown following.

Open the AWS Glue console, and choose Databases in the navigation pane. You will see the following databases in the Data Catalog:

Open the Amazon Athena console, and run the following queries. Verify that the record counts are matching.

SELECT count(*) FROM "nycitytaxi_gluedemocicdtest"."data";
SELECT count(*) FROM "nytaxiparquet_gluedemocicdtest"."datalake";

The following shows the raw data:

The following shows the transformed data:

The pipeline pauses the action until the release is approved. After validating the data, manually approve the revision on the LiveTestApproval action on the CodePipeline console.

Add comments as needed, and choose Approve.

The LiveTestApproval stage now appears as Approved on the console.

After the revision is approved, the pipeline proceeds to use the AWS CloudFormation template to destroy the resources that were deployed in the LiveTest deploy action. This helps reduce cost and ensures a clean test environment on every deployment.

Production deployment is the final stage. In this stage, all the resources—AWS Glue crawlers, AWS Glue jobs, Amazon S3 buckets, roles, and so on—are provisioned and deployed to the production environment using the AWS CloudFormation template.

After successfully running the whole pipeline, feel free to experiment with it by changing the source code stored on AWS CodeCommit. For example, if you modify the AWS Glue ETL job to generate an error, it should make the AutomatedLiveTest action fail. Or if you change the AWS CloudFormation template to make its creation fail, it should affect the LiveTest deploy action. The objective of the pipeline is to guarantee that all changes that are deployed to production are guaranteed to work as expected.

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how easy it is to implement CI/CD for serverless AWS Glue ETL solutions with AWS developer tools like AWS CodePipeline and AWS CodeBuild at scale. Implementing such solutions can help you accelerate ETL development and testing at your organization.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.

 


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Implement Continuous Integration and Delivery of Apache Spark Applications using AWS and Build a Data Lake Foundation with AWS Glue and Amazon S3.

 


About the Authors

Prasad Alle is a Senior Big Data Consultant with AWS Professional Services. He spends his time leading and building scalable, reliable Big data, Machine learning, Artificial Intelligence and IoT solutions for AWS Enterprise and Strategic customers. His interests extend to various technologies such as Advanced Edge Computing, Machine learning at Edge. In his spare time, he enjoys spending time with his family.

 
Luis Caro is a Big Data Consultant for AWS Professional Services. He works with our customers to provide guidance and technical assistance on big data projects, helping them improving the value of their solutions when using AWS.

 

 

 

Tag Amazon EBS Snapshots on Creation and Implement Stronger Security Policies

Post Syndicated from Woo Kim original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/tag-amazon-ebs-snapshots-on-creation-and-implement-stronger-security-policies/

This blog was contributed by Rucha Nene, Sr. Product Manager for Amazon EBS

AWS customers use tags to track ownership of resources, implement compliance protocols, control access to resources via IAM policies, and drive their cost accounting processes. Last year, we made tagging for Amazon EC2 instances and Amazon EBS volumes easier by adding the ability to tag these resources upon creation. We are now extending this capability to EBS snapshots.

Earlier, you could tag your EBS snapshots only after the resource had been created and sometimes, ended up with EBS snapshots in an untagged state if tagging failed. You also could not control the actions that users and groups could take over specific snapshots, or enforce tighter security policies.

To address these issues, we are making tagging for EBS snapshots more flexible and giving customers more control over EBS snapshots by introducing two new capabilities:

  • Tag on creation for EBS snapshots – You can now specify tags for EBS snapshots as part of the API call that creates the resource or via the Amazon EC2 Console when creating an EBS snapshot.
  • Resource-level permission and enforced tag usage – The CreateSnapshot, DeleteSnapshot, and ModifySnapshotAttrribute API actions now support IAM resource-level permissions. You can now write IAM policies that mandate the use of specific tags when taking actions on EBS snapshots.

Tag on creation

You can now specify tags for EBS snapshots as part of the API call that creates the resources. The resource creation and the tagging are performed atomically; both must succeed in order for the operation CreateSnapshot to succeed. You no longer need to build tagging scripts that run after EBS snapshots have been created.

Here’s how you specify tags when you create an EBS snapshot, using the console:

  1. Open the Amazon EC2 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/ec2/.
  2. In the navigation pane, choose Snapshots, Create Snapshot.
  3. On the Create Snapshot page, select the volume for which to create a snapshot.
  4. (Optional) Choose Add tags to your snapshot. For each tag, provide a tag key and a tag value.
  5. Choose Create Snapshot.

Using the AWS CLI:

aws ec2 create-snapshot --volume-id vol-0c0e757e277111f3c --description 'Prod_Backup' --tag-specifications 
'ResourceType=snapshot,Tags=[{Key=costcenter,Value=115},{Key=IsProd,Value=Yes}]'

To learn more, see Using Tags.

Resource-level permissions and enforced tag usage

CreateSnapshot, DeleteSnapshot, and ModifySnapshotAttribute now support resource-level permissions, which allow you to exercise more control over EBS snapshots. You can write IAM policies that give you precise control over access to resources and let you specify which users are able to create snapshots for a given set of volumes. You can also enforce the use of specific tags to help track resources and achieve more accurate cost allocation reporting.

For example, here’s a statement that requires that the costcenter tag (with a value of “115”) be present on the volume from which snapshots are being created. It requires that this tag be applied to all newly created snapshots. In addition, it requires that the created snapshots are tagged with User:username for the customer.

{
   "Version":"2012-10-17",
   "Statement":[
      {
         "Effect":"Allow",
         "Action":"ec2:CreateSnapshot",
         "Resource":"arn:aws:ec2:us-east-1:123456789012:volume/*",
	   "Condition": {
		"StringEquals":{
               "ec2:ResourceTag/costcenter":"115"
}
 }
	
      },
      {
         "Sid":"AllowCreateTaggedSnapshots",
         "Effect":"Allow",
         "Action":"ec2:CreateSnapshot",
         "Resource":"arn:aws:ec2:us-east-1::snapshot/*",
         "Condition":{
            "StringEquals":{
               "aws:RequestTag/costcenter":"115",
		   "aws:RequestTag/User":"${aws:username}"
            },
            "ForAllValues:StringEquals":{
               "aws:TagKeys":[
                  "costcenter",
			"User"
               ]
            }
         }
      },
      {
         "Effect":"Allow",
         "Action":"ec2:CreateTags",
         "Resource":"arn:aws:ec2:us-east-1::snapshot/*",
         "Condition":{
            "StringEquals":{
               "ec2:CreateAction":"CreateSnapshot"
            }
         }
      }
   ]
}

To implement stronger compliance and security policies, you could also restrict access to DeleteSnapshot, if the resource is not tagged with the user’s name. Here’s a statement that allows the deletion of a snapshot only if the snapshot is tagged with User:username for the customer.

{
   "Version":"2012-10-17",
   "Statement":[
      {
         "Effect":"Allow",
         "Action":"ec2:DeleteSnapshot",
         "Resource":"arn:aws:ec2:us-east-1::snapshot/*",
         "Condition":{
            "StringEquals":{
               "ec2:ResourceTag/User":"${aws:username}"
            }
         }
      }
   ]
}

To learn more and to see some sample policies, see IAM Policies for Amazon EC2 and Working with Snapshots.

Available Now

These new features are available now in all AWS Regions. You can start using it today from the Amazon EC2 Console, AWS Command Line Interface (CLI), or the AWS APIs.

Performing Unit Testing in an AWS CodeStar Project

Post Syndicated from Jerry Mathen Jacob original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/performing-unit-testing-in-an-aws-codestar-project/

In this blog post, I will show how you can perform unit testing as a part of your AWS CodeStar project. AWS CodeStar helps you quickly develop, build, and deploy applications on AWS. With AWS CodeStar, you can set up your continuous delivery (CD) toolchain and manage your software development from one place.

Because unit testing tests individual units of application code, it is helpful for quickly identifying and isolating issues. As a part of an automated CI/CD process, it can also be used to prevent bad code from being deployed into production.

Many of the AWS CodeStar project templates come preconfigured with a unit testing framework so that you can start deploying your code with more confidence. The unit testing is configured to run in the provided build stage so that, if the unit tests do not pass, the code is not deployed. For a list of AWS CodeStar project templates that include unit testing, see AWS CodeStar Project Templates in the AWS CodeStar User Guide.

The scenario

As a big fan of superhero movies, I decided to list my favorites and ask my friends to vote on theirs by using a WebService endpoint I created. The example I use is a Python web service running on AWS Lambda with AWS CodeCommit as the code repository. CodeCommit is a fully managed source control system that hosts Git repositories and works with all Git-based tools.

Here’s how you can create the WebService endpoint:

Sign in to the AWS CodeStar console. Choose Start a project, which will take you to the list of project templates.

create project

For code edits I will choose AWS Cloud9, which is a cloud-based integrated development environment (IDE) that you use to write, run, and debug code.

choose cloud9

Here are the other tasks required by my scenario:

  • Create a database table where the votes can be stored and retrieved as needed.
  • Update the logic in the Lambda function that was created for posting and getting the votes.
  • Update the unit tests (of course!) to verify that the logic works as expected.

For a database table, I’ve chosen Amazon DynamoDB, which offers a fast and flexible NoSQL database.

Getting set up on AWS Cloud9

From the AWS CodeStar console, go to the AWS Cloud9 console, which should take you to your project code. I will open up a terminal at the top-level folder under which I will set up my environment and required libraries.

Use the following command to set the PYTHONPATH environment variable on the terminal.

export PYTHONPATH=/home/ec2-user/environment/vote-your-movie

You should now be able to use the following command to execute the unit tests in your project.

python -m unittest discover vote-your-movie/tests

cloud9 setup

Start coding

Now that you have set up your local environment and have a copy of your code, add a DynamoDB table to the project by defining it through a template file. Open template.yml, which is the Serverless Application Model (SAM) template file. This template extends AWS CloudFormation to provide a simplified way of defining the Amazon API Gateway APIs, AWS Lambda functions, and Amazon DynamoDB tables required by your serverless application.

AWSTemplateFormatVersion: 2010-09-09
Transform:
- AWS::Serverless-2016-10-31
- AWS::CodeStar

Parameters:
  ProjectId:
    Type: String
    Description: CodeStar projectId used to associate new resources to team members

Resources:
  # The DB table to store the votes.
  MovieVoteTable:
    Type: AWS::Serverless::SimpleTable
    Properties:
      PrimaryKey:
        # Name of the "Candidate" is the partition key of the table.
        Name: Candidate
        Type: String
  # Creating a new lambda function for retrieving and storing votes.
  MovieVoteLambda:
    Type: AWS::Serverless::Function
    Properties:
      Handler: index.handler
      Runtime: python3.6
      Environment:
        # Setting environment variables for your lambda function.
        Variables:
          TABLE_NAME: !Ref "MovieVoteTable"
          TABLE_REGION: !Ref "AWS::Region"
      Role:
        Fn::ImportValue:
          !Join ['-', [!Ref 'ProjectId', !Ref 'AWS::Region', 'LambdaTrustRole']]
      Events:
        GetEvent:
          Type: Api
          Properties:
            Path: /
            Method: get
        PostEvent:
          Type: Api
          Properties:
            Path: /
            Method: post

We’ll use Python’s boto3 library to connect to AWS services. And we’ll use Python’s mock library to mock AWS service calls for our unit tests.
Use the following command to install these libraries:

pip install --upgrade boto3 mock -t .

install dependencies

Add these libraries to the buildspec.yml, which is the YAML file that is required for CodeBuild to execute.

version: 0.2

phases:
  install:
    commands:

      # Upgrade AWS CLI to the latest version
      - pip install --upgrade awscli boto3 mock

  pre_build:
    commands:

      # Discover and run unit tests in the 'tests' directory. For more information, see <https://docs.python.org/3/library/unittest.html#test-discovery>
      - python -m unittest discover tests

  build:
    commands:

      # Use AWS SAM to package the application by using AWS CloudFormation
      - aws cloudformation package --template template.yml --s3-bucket $S3_BUCKET --output-template template-export.yml

artifacts:
  type: zip
  files:
    - template-export.yml

Open the index.py where we can write the simple voting logic for our Lambda function.

import json
import datetime
import boto3
import os

table_name = os.environ['TABLE_NAME']
table_region = os.environ['TABLE_REGION']

VOTES_TABLE = boto3.resource('dynamodb', region_name=table_region).Table(table_name)
CANDIDATES = {"A": "Black Panther", "B": "Captain America: Civil War", "C": "Guardians of the Galaxy", "D": "Thor: Ragnarok"}

def handler(event, context):
    if event['httpMethod'] == 'GET':
        resp = VOTES_TABLE.scan()
        return {'statusCode': 200,
                'body': json.dumps({item['Candidate']: int(item['Votes']) for item in resp['Items']}),
                'headers': {'Content-Type': 'application/json'}}

    elif event['httpMethod'] == 'POST':
        try:
            body = json.loads(event['body'])
        except:
            return {'statusCode': 400,
                    'body': 'Invalid input! Expecting a JSON.',
                    'headers': {'Content-Type': 'application/json'}}
        if 'candidate' not in body:
            return {'statusCode': 400,
                    'body': 'Missing "candidate" in request.',
                    'headers': {'Content-Type': 'application/json'}}
        if body['candidate'] not in CANDIDATES.keys():
            return {'statusCode': 400,
                    'body': 'You must vote for one of the following candidates - {}.'.format(get_allowed_candidates()),
                    'headers': {'Content-Type': 'application/json'}}

        resp = VOTES_TABLE.update_item(
            Key={'Candidate': CANDIDATES.get(body['candidate'])},
            UpdateExpression='ADD Votes :incr',
            ExpressionAttributeValues={':incr': 1},
            ReturnValues='ALL_NEW'
        )
        return {'statusCode': 200,
                'body': "{} now has {} votes".format(CANDIDATES.get(body['candidate']), resp['Attributes']['Votes']),
                'headers': {'Content-Type': 'application/json'}}

def get_allowed_candidates():
    l = []
    for key in CANDIDATES:
        l.append("'{}' for '{}'".format(key, CANDIDATES.get(key)))
    return ", ".join(l)

What our code basically does is take in the HTTPS request call as an event. If it is an HTTP GET request, it gets the votes result from the table. If it is an HTTP POST request, it sets a vote for the candidate of choice. We also validate the inputs in the POST request to filter out requests that seem malicious. That way, only valid calls are stored in the table.

In the example code provided, we use a CANDIDATES variable to store our candidates, but you can store the candidates in a JSON file and use Python’s json library instead.

Let’s update the tests now. Under the tests folder, open the test_handler.py and modify it to verify the logic.

import os
# Some mock environment variables that would be used by the mock for DynamoDB
os.environ['TABLE_NAME'] = "MockHelloWorldTable"
os.environ['TABLE_REGION'] = "us-east-1"

# The library containing our logic.
import index

# Boto3's core library
import botocore
# For handling JSON.
import json
# Unit test library
import unittest
## Getting StringIO based on your setup.
try:
    from StringIO import StringIO
except ImportError:
    from io import StringIO
## Python mock library
from mock import patch, call
from decimal import Decimal

@patch('botocore.client.BaseClient._make_api_call')
class TestCandidateVotes(unittest.TestCase):

    ## Test the HTTP GET request flow. 
    ## We expect to get back a successful response with results of votes from the table (mocked).
    def test_get_votes(self, boto_mock):
        # Input event to our method to test.
        expected_event = {'httpMethod': 'GET'}
        # The mocked values in our DynamoDB table.
        items_in_db = [{'Candidate': 'Black Panther', 'Votes': Decimal('3')},
                        {'Candidate': 'Captain America: Civil War', 'Votes': Decimal('8')},
                        {'Candidate': 'Guardians of the Galaxy', 'Votes': Decimal('8')},
                        {'Candidate': "Thor: Ragnarok", 'Votes': Decimal('1')}
                    ]
        # The mocked DynamoDB response.
        expected_ddb_response = {'Items': items_in_db}
        # The mocked response we expect back by calling DynamoDB through boto.
        response_body = botocore.response.StreamingBody(StringIO(str(expected_ddb_response)),
                                                        len(str(expected_ddb_response)))
        # Setting the expected value in the mock.
        boto_mock.side_effect = [expected_ddb_response]
        # Expecting that there would be a call to DynamoDB Scan function during execution with these parameters.
        expected_calls = [call('Scan', {'TableName': os.environ['TABLE_NAME']})]

        # Call the function to test.
        result = index.handler(expected_event, {})

        # Run unit test assertions to verify the expected calls to mock have occurred and verify the response.
        assert result.get('headers').get('Content-Type') == 'application/json'
        assert result.get('statusCode') == 200

        result_body = json.loads(result.get('body'))
        # Verifying that the results match to that from the table.
        assert len(result_body) == len(items_in_db)
        for i in range(len(result_body)):
            assert result_body.get(items_in_db[i].get("Candidate")) == int(items_in_db[i].get("Votes"))

        assert boto_mock.call_count == 1
        boto_mock.assert_has_calls(expected_calls)

    ## Test the HTTP POST request flow that places a vote for a selected candidate.
    ## We expect to get back a successful response with a confirmation message.
    def test_place_valid_candidate_vote(self, boto_mock):
        # Input event to our method to test.
        expected_event = {'httpMethod': 'POST', 'body': "{\"candidate\": \"D\"}"}
        # The mocked response in our DynamoDB table.
        expected_ddb_response = {'Attributes': {'Candidate': "Thor: Ragnarok", 'Votes': Decimal('2')}}
        # The mocked response we expect back by calling DynamoDB through boto.
        response_body = botocore.response.StreamingBody(StringIO(str(expected_ddb_response)),
                                                        len(str(expected_ddb_response)))
        # Setting the expected value in the mock.
        boto_mock.side_effect = [expected_ddb_response]
        # Expecting that there would be a call to DynamoDB UpdateItem function during execution with these parameters.
        expected_calls = [call('UpdateItem', {
                                                'TableName': os.environ['TABLE_NAME'], 
                                                'Key': {'Candidate': 'Thor: Ragnarok'},
                                                'UpdateExpression': 'ADD Votes :incr',
                                                'ExpressionAttributeValues': {':incr': 1},
                                                'ReturnValues': 'ALL_NEW'
                                            })]
        # Call the function to test.
        result = index.handler(expected_event, {})
        # Run unit test assertions to verify the expected calls to mock have occurred and verify the response.
        assert result.get('headers').get('Content-Type') == 'application/json'
        assert result.get('statusCode') == 200

        assert result.get('body') == "{} now has {} votes".format(
            expected_ddb_response['Attributes']['Candidate'], 
            expected_ddb_response['Attributes']['Votes'])

        assert boto_mock.call_count == 1
        boto_mock.assert_has_calls(expected_calls)

    ## Test the HTTP POST request flow that places a vote for an non-existant candidate.
    ## We expect to get back a successful response with a confirmation message.
    def test_place_invalid_candidate_vote(self, boto_mock):
        # Input event to our method to test.
        # The valid IDs for the candidates are A, B, C, and D
        expected_event = {'httpMethod': 'POST', 'body': "{\"candidate\": \"E\"}"}
        # Call the function to test.
        result = index.handler(expected_event, {})
        # Run unit test assertions to verify the expected calls to mock have occurred and verify the response.
        assert result.get('headers').get('Content-Type') == 'application/json'
        assert result.get('statusCode') == 400
        assert result.get('body') == 'You must vote for one of the following candidates - {}.'.format(index.get_allowed_candidates())

    ## Test the HTTP POST request flow that places a vote for a selected candidate but associated with an invalid key in the POST body.
    ## We expect to get back a failed (400) response with an appropriate error message.
    def test_place_invalid_data_vote(self, boto_mock):
        # Input event to our method to test.
        # "name" is not the expected input key.
        expected_event = {'httpMethod': 'POST', 'body': "{\"name\": \"D\"}"}
        # Call the function to test.
        result = index.handler(expected_event, {})
        # Run unit test assertions to verify the expected calls to mock have occurred and verify the response.
        assert result.get('headers').get('Content-Type') == 'application/json'
        assert result.get('statusCode') == 400
        assert result.get('body') == 'Missing "candidate" in request.'

    ## Test the HTTP POST request flow that places a vote for a selected candidate but not as a JSON string which the body of the request expects.
    ## We expect to get back a failed (400) response with an appropriate error message.
    def test_place_malformed_json_vote(self, boto_mock):
        # Input event to our method to test.
        # "body" receives a string rather than a JSON string.
        expected_event = {'httpMethod': 'POST', 'body': "Thor: Ragnarok"}
        # Call the function to test.
        result = index.handler(expected_event, {})
        # Run unit test assertions to verify the expected calls to mock have occurred and verify the response.
        assert result.get('headers').get('Content-Type') == 'application/json'
        assert result.get('statusCode') == 400
        assert result.get('body') == 'Invalid input! Expecting a JSON.'

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

I am keeping the code samples well commented so that it’s clear what each unit test accomplishes. It tests the success conditions and the failure paths that are handled in the logic.

In my unit tests I use the patch decorator (@patch) in the mock library. @patch helps mock the function you want to call (in this case, the botocore library’s _make_api_call function in the BaseClient class).
Before we commit our changes, let’s run the tests locally. On the terminal, run the tests again. If all the unit tests pass, you should expect to see a result like this:

You:~/environment $ python -m unittest discover vote-your-movie/tests
.....
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 5 tests in 0.003s

OK
You:~/environment $

Upload to AWS

Now that the tests have passed, it’s time to commit and push the code to source repository!

Add your changes

From the terminal, go to the project’s folder and use the following command to verify the changes you are about to push.

git status

To add the modified files only, use the following command:

git add -u

Commit your changes

To commit the changes (with a message), use the following command:

git commit -m "Logic and tests for the voting webservice."

Push your changes to AWS CodeCommit

To push your committed changes to CodeCommit, use the following command:

git push

In the AWS CodeStar console, you can see your changes flowing through the pipeline and being deployed. There are also links in the AWS CodeStar console that take you to this project’s build runs so you can see your tests running on AWS CodeBuild. The latest link under the Build Runs table takes you to the logs.

unit tests at codebuild

After the deployment is complete, AWS CodeStar should now display the AWS Lambda function and DynamoDB table created and synced with this project. The Project link in the AWS CodeStar project’s navigation bar displays the AWS resources linked to this project.

codestar resources

Because this is a new database table, there should be no data in it. So, let’s put in some votes. You can download Postman to test your application endpoint for POST and GET calls. The endpoint you want to test is the URL displayed under Application endpoints in the AWS CodeStar console.

Now let’s open Postman and look at the results. Let’s create some votes through POST requests. Based on this example, a valid vote has a value of A, B, C, or D.
Here’s what a successful POST request looks like:

POST success

Here’s what it looks like if I use some value other than A, B, C, or D:

 

POST Fail

Now I am going to use a GET request to fetch the results of the votes from the database.

GET success

And that’s it! You have now created a simple voting web service using AWS Lambda, Amazon API Gateway, and DynamoDB and used unit tests to verify your logic so that you ship good code.
Happy coding!

Grafana v5.0 Released

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2018/03/01/grafana-v5.0-released/

v5.0 Stable Released

We have been working on Grafana v5 for most of 2017 and it’s finally ready! This release is important
in a different way than previous releases as main focus has been on improving the core Grafana features and attributes.
That means vastly improved UX and page design, easier and more flexible dashboard building enabled by a
new grid layout system. Better support for large installations with the addition of Dashboard Folders, Teams and Permissions.
Improvements to provisioning/cloud-native setups by making datasources & dashboards configurable from files.

This is the most substantial update that Grafana has ever seen.

Download Grafana 5.0 Now

What’s New in Grafana v5.0

Video showing new features


New Dashboard Layout Engine

The new dashboard layout engine allows for much easier movement and sizing of panels, as other panels now move out of the way in
a very intuitive way. Panels are sized independently, so rows are no longer necessary to create layouts. This opens
up many new types of layouts where panels of different heights can be aligned easily. Checkout the new grid in the video
above or on the play site. All your existing dashboards will automatically migrate to the
new position system and look close to identical. The new panel position makes dashboards saved in v5.0 incompatible
with older versions of Grafana.

New UX

Almost every page has seen significant UX improvements. All pages (except dashboard pages) have a new tab-based layout that improves navigation between pages. The side menu has also changed quite a bit. You can still hide the side menu completely if you click on the Grafana logo.

Dashboard Settings

Dashboard pages have a new header toolbar where buttons and actions are now all moved to the right. All the dashboard
settings views have been combined with a side nav which allows you to easily move between different setting categories.

New Light Theme

This theme has not seen a lot of love in recent years and we felt it was time to give it a major overhaul. We are very happy with the result.

Dashboard Folders

The big new feature that comes with Grafana v5.0 is dashboard folders. Now you can organize your dashboards in folders,
which is very useful if you have a lot of dashboards or multiple teams.

  • New search design adds expandable sections for each folder, starred and recently viewed dashboards.
  • New manage dashboard pages enable batch actions and views for folder settings and permissions.
  • Set permissions on folders and have dashboards inherit the permissions.

Teams

A team is a new concept in Grafana v5. They are simply a group of users that can be used in the new permission system for dashboards and folders. Only an admin can create teams.
We hope to do more with teams in future releases like integration with LDAP and a team landing page.

Permissions

You can assign permissions to folders and dashboards. The default user role-based permissions can be removed and
replaced with specific teams or users enabling more control over what a user can see and edit.

Dashboard permissions only limits what dashboards & folders a user can view & edit not which
data sources a user can access nor what queries a user can issue.

Provisioning from configuration

In previous versions of Grafana, you could only use the API for provisioning data sources and dashboards.
But that required the service to be running before you started creating dashboards and you also needed to
set up credentials for the HTTP API. In v5.0 we decided to improve this experience by adding a new active
provisioning system that uses config files. This will make GitOps more natural as data sources and dashboards can
be defined via files that can be version controlled. We hope to extend this system to later add support for users, orgs
and alerts as well.

Data sources

Data sources can now be setup using config files. These data sources are by default not editable from the Grafana GUI.
It’s also possible to update and delete data sources from the config file. More info in the data source provisioning docs.

Dashboards

We also deprecated the [dashboard.json] in favor of our new dashboard provisioner that keeps dashboards on disk
in sync with dashboards in Grafana’s database. The dashboard provisioner has multiple advantages over the old
[dashboard.json] feature. Instead of storing the dashboard in memory we now insert the dashboard into the database,
which makes it possible to star them, use one as the home dashboard, set permissions and other features in Grafana that
expects the dashboards to exist in the database. More info in the dashboard provisioning docs

Graphite Tags & Integrated Function Docs

The Graphite query editor has been updated to support the latest Graphite version (v1.1) that adds
many new functions and support for querying by tags. You can now also view function documentation right in the query editor!

Read more on Graphite Tag Support.

Changelog

Checkout the CHANGELOG.md file for a complete list
of new features, changes, and bug fixes.

Download

Head to download page for download links & instructions.

Thanks

A big thanks to all the Grafana users who contribute by submitting PRs, bug reports & feedback!

How to Patch Linux Workloads on AWS

Post Syndicated from Koen van Blijderveen original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-patch-linux-workloads-on-aws/

Most malware tries to compromise your systems by using a known vulnerability that the operating system maker has already patched. As best practices to help prevent malware from affecting your systems, you should apply all operating system patches and actively monitor your systems for missing patches.

In this blog post, I show you how to patch Linux workloads using AWS Systems Manager. To accomplish this, I will show you how to use the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) to:

  1. Launch an Amazon EC2 instance for use with Systems Manager.
  2. Configure Systems Manager to patch your Amazon EC2 Linux instances.

In two previous blog posts (Part 1 and Part 2), I showed how to use the AWS Management Console to perform the necessary steps to patch, inspect, and protect Microsoft Windows workloads. You can implement those same processes for your Linux instances running in AWS by changing the instance tags and types shown in the previous blog posts.

Because most Linux system administrators are more familiar with using a command line, I show how to patch Linux workloads by using the AWS CLI in this blog post. The steps to use the Amazon EBS Snapshot Scheduler and Amazon Inspector are identical for both Microsoft Windows and Linux.

What you should know first

To follow along with the solution in this post, you need one or more Amazon EC2 instances. You may use existing instances or create new instances. For this post, I assume this is an Amazon EC2 for Amazon Linux instance installed from Amazon Machine Images (AMIs).

Systems Manager is a collection of capabilities that helps you automate management tasks for AWS-hosted instances on Amazon EC2 and your on-premises servers. In this post, I use Systems Manager for two purposes: to run remote commands and apply operating system patches. To learn about the full capabilities of Systems Manager, see What Is AWS Systems Manager?

As of Amazon Linux 2017.09, the AMI comes preinstalled with the Systems Manager agent. Systems Manager Patch Manager also supports Red Hat and Ubuntu. To install the agent on these Linux distributions or an older version of Amazon Linux, see Installing and Configuring SSM Agent on Linux Instances.

If you are not familiar with how to launch an Amazon EC2 instance, see Launching an Instance. I also assume you launched or will launch your instance in a private subnet. You must make sure that the Amazon EC2 instance can connect to the internet using a network address translation (NAT) instance or NAT gateway to communicate with Systems Manager. The following diagram shows how you should structure your VPC.

Diagram showing how to structure your VPC

Later in this post, you will assign tasks to a maintenance window to patch your instances with Systems Manager. To do this, the IAM user you are using for this post must have the iam:PassRole permission. This permission allows the IAM user assigning tasks to pass his own IAM permissions to the AWS service. In this example, when you assign a task to a maintenance window, IAM passes your credentials to Systems Manager. You also should authorize your IAM user to use Amazon EC2 and Systems Manager. As mentioned before, you will be using the AWS CLI for most of the steps in this blog post. Our documentation shows you how to get started with the AWS CLI. Make sure you have the AWS CLI installed and configured with an AWS access key and secret access key that belong to an IAM user that have the following AWS managed policies attached to the IAM user you are using for this example: AmazonEC2FullAccess and AmazonSSMFullAccess.

Step 1: Launch an Amazon EC2 Linux instance

In this section, I show you how to launch an Amazon EC2 instance so that you can use Systems Manager with the instance. This step requires you to do three things:

  1. Create an IAM role for Systems Manager before launching your Amazon EC2 instance.
  2. Launch your Amazon EC2 instance with Amazon EBS and the IAM role for Systems Manager.
  3. Add tags to the instances so that you can add your instances to a Systems Manager maintenance window based on tags.

A. Create an IAM role for Systems Manager

Before launching an Amazon EC2 instance, I recommend that you first create an IAM role for Systems Manager, which you will use to update the Amazon EC2 instance. AWS already provides a preconfigured policy that you can use for the new role and it is called AmazonEC2RoleforSSM.

  1. Create a JSON file named trustpolicy-ec2ssm.json that contains the following trust policy. This policy describes which principal (an entity that can take action on an AWS resource) is allowed to assume the role we are going to create. In this example, the principal is the Amazon EC2 service.
    {
      "Version": "2012-10-17",
      "Statement": {
        "Effect": "Allow",
        "Principal": {"Service": "ec2.amazonaws.com"},
        "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
      }
    }

  1. Use the following command to create a role named EC2SSM that has the AWS managed policy AmazonEC2RoleforSSM attached to it. This generates JSON-based output that describes the role and its parameters, if the command is successful.
    $ aws iam create-role --role-name EC2SSM --assume-role-policy-document file://trustpolicy-ec2ssm.json

  1. Use the following command to attach the AWS managed IAM policy (AmazonEC2RoleforSSM) to your newly created role.
    $ aws iam attach-role-policy --role-name EC2SSM --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/service-role/AmazonEC2RoleforSSM

  1. Use the following commands to create the IAM instance profile and add the role to the instance profile. The instance profile is needed to attach the role we created earlier to your Amazon EC2 instance.
    $ aws iam create-instance-profile --instance-profile-name EC2SSM-IP
    $ aws iam add-role-to-instance-profile --instance-profile-name EC2SSM-IP --role-name EC2SSM

B. Launch your Amazon EC2 instance

To follow along, you need an Amazon EC2 instance that is running Amazon Linux. You can use any existing instance you may have or create a new instance.

When launching a new Amazon EC2 instance, be sure that:

  1. Use the following command to launch a new Amazon EC2 instance using an Amazon Linux AMI available in the US East (N. Virginia) Region (also known as us-east-1). Replace YourKeyPair and YourSubnetId with your information. For more information about creating a key pair, see the create-key-pair documentation. Write down the InstanceId that is in the output because you will need it later in this post.
    $ aws ec2 run-instances --image-id ami-cb9ec1b1 --instance-type t2.micro --key-name YourKeyPair --subnet-id YourSubnetId --iam-instance-profile Name=EC2SSM-IP

  1. If you are using an existing Amazon EC2 instance, you can use the following command to attach the instance profile you created earlier to your instance.
    $ aws ec2 associate-iam-instance-profile --instance-id YourInstanceId --iam-instance-profile Name=EC2SSM-IP

C. Add tags

The final step of configuring your Amazon EC2 instances is to add tags. You will use these tags to configure Systems Manager in Step 2 of this post. For this example, I add a tag named Patch Group and set the value to Linux Servers. I could have other groups of Amazon EC2 instances that I treat differently by having the same tag name but a different tag value. For example, I might have a collection of other servers with the tag name Patch Group with a value of Web Servers.

  • Use the following command to add the Patch Group tag to your Amazon EC2 instance.
    $ aws ec2 create-tags --resources YourInstanceId --tags --tags Key="Patch Group",Value="Linux Servers"

Note: You must wait a few minutes until the Amazon EC2 instance is available before you can proceed to the next section. To make sure your Amazon EC2 instance is online and ready, you can use the following AWS CLI command:

$ aws ec2 describe-instance-status --instance-ids YourInstanceId

At this point, you now have at least one Amazon EC2 instance you can use to configure Systems Manager.

Step 2: Configure Systems Manager

In this section, I show you how to configure and use Systems Manager to apply operating system patches to your Amazon EC2 instances, and how to manage patch compliance.

To start, I provide some background information about Systems Manager. Then, I cover how to:

  1. Create the Systems Manager IAM role so that Systems Manager is able to perform patch operations.
  2. Create a Systems Manager patch baseline and associate it with your instance to define which patches Systems Manager should apply.
  3. Define a maintenance window to make sure Systems Manager patches your instance when you tell it to.
  4. Monitor patch compliance to verify the patch state of your instances.

You must meet two prerequisites to use Systems Manager to apply operating system patches. First, you must attach the IAM role you created in the previous section, EC2SSM, to your Amazon EC2 instance. Second, you must install the Systems Manager agent on your Amazon EC2 instance. If you have used a recent Amazon Linux AMI, Amazon has already installed the Systems Manager agent on your Amazon EC2 instance. You can confirm this by logging in to an Amazon EC2 instance and checking the Systems Manager agent log files that are located at /var/log/amazon/ssm/.

To install the Systems Manager agent on an instance that does not have the agent preinstalled or if you want to use the Systems Manager agent on your on-premises servers, see Installing and Configuring the Systems Manager Agent on Linux Instances. If you forgot to attach the newly created role when launching your Amazon EC2 instance or if you want to attach the role to already running Amazon EC2 instances, see Attach an AWS IAM Role to an Existing Amazon EC2 Instance by Using the AWS CLI or use the AWS Management Console.

A. Create the Systems Manager IAM role

For a maintenance window to be able to run any tasks, you must create a new role for Systems Manager. This role is a different kind of role than the one you created earlier: this role will be used by Systems Manager instead of Amazon EC2. Earlier, you created the role, EC2SSM, with the policy, AmazonEC2RoleforSSM, which allowed the Systems Manager agent on your instance to communicate with Systems Manager. In this section, you need a new role with the policy, AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole, so that the Systems Manager service can execute commands on your instance.

To create the new IAM role for Systems Manager:

  1. Create a JSON file named trustpolicy-maintenancewindowrole.json that contains the following trust policy. This policy describes which principal is allowed to assume the role you are going to create. This trust policy allows not only Amazon EC2 to assume this role, but also Systems Manager.
    {
       "Version":"2012-10-17",
       "Statement":[
          {
             "Sid":"",
             "Effect":"Allow",
             "Principal":{
                "Service":[
                   "ec2.amazonaws.com",
                   "ssm.amazonaws.com"
               ]
             },
             "Action":"sts:AssumeRole"
          }
       ]
    }

  1. Use the following command to create a role named MaintenanceWindowRole that has the AWS managed policy, AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole, attached to it. This command generates JSON-based output that describes the role and its parameters, if the command is successful.
    $ aws iam create-role --role-name MaintenanceWindowRole --assume-role-policy-document file://trustpolicy-maintenancewindowrole.json

  1. Use the following command to attach the AWS managed IAM policy (AmazonEC2RoleforSSM) to your newly created role.
    $ aws iam attach-role-policy --role-name MaintenanceWindowRole --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/service-role/AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole

B. Create a Systems Manager patch baseline and associate it with your instance

Next, you will create a Systems Manager patch baseline and associate it with your Amazon EC2 instance. A patch baseline defines which patches Systems Manager should apply to your instance. Before you can associate the patch baseline with your instance, though, you must determine if Systems Manager recognizes your Amazon EC2 instance. Use the following command to list all instances managed by Systems Manager. The --filters option ensures you look only for your newly created Amazon EC2 instance.

$ aws ssm describe-instance-information --filters Key=InstanceIds,Values= YourInstanceId

{
    "InstanceInformationList": [
        {
            "IsLatestVersion": true,
            "ComputerName": "ip-10-50-2-245",
            "PingStatus": "Online",
            "InstanceId": "YourInstanceId",
            "IPAddress": "10.50.2.245",
            "ResourceType": "EC2Instance",
            "AgentVersion": "2.2.120.0",
            "PlatformVersion": "2017.09",
            "PlatformName": "Amazon Linux AMI",
            "PlatformType": "Linux",
            "LastPingDateTime": 1515759143.826
        }
    ]
}

If your instance is missing from the list, verify that:

  1. Your instance is running.
  2. You attached the Systems Manager IAM role, EC2SSM.
  3. You deployed a NAT gateway in your public subnet to ensure your VPC reflects the diagram shown earlier in this post so that the Systems Manager agent can connect to the Systems Manager internet endpoint.
  4. The Systems Manager agent logs don’t include any unaddressed errors.

Now that you have checked that Systems Manager can manage your Amazon EC2 instance, it is time to create a patch baseline. With a patch baseline, you define which patches are approved to be installed on all Amazon EC2 instances associated with the patch baseline. The Patch Group resource tag you defined earlier will determine to which patch group an instance belongs. If you do not specifically define a patch baseline, the default AWS-managed patch baseline is used.

To create a patch baseline:

  1. Use the following command to create a patch baseline named AmazonLinuxServers. With approval rules, you can determine the approved patches that will be included in your patch baseline. In this example, you add all Critical severity patches to the patch baseline as soon as they are released, by setting the Auto approval delay to 0 days. By setting the Auto approval delay to 2 days, you add to this patch baseline the Important, Medium, and Low severity patches two days after they are released.
    $ aws ssm create-patch-baseline --name "AmazonLinuxServers" --description "Baseline containing all updates for Amazon Linux" --operating-system AMAZON_LINUX --approval-rules "PatchRules=[{PatchFilterGroup={PatchFilters=[{Values=[Critical],Key=SEVERITY}]},ApproveAfterDays=0,ComplianceLevel=CRITICAL},{PatchFilterGroup={PatchFilters=[{Values=[Important,Medium,Low],Key=SEVERITY}]},ApproveAfterDays=2,ComplianceLevel=HIGH}]"
    
    {
        "BaselineId": "YourBaselineId"
    }

  1. Use the following command to register the patch baseline you created with your instance. To do so, you use the Patch Group tag that you added to your Amazon EC2 instance.
    $ aws ssm register-patch-baseline-for-patch-group --baseline-id YourPatchBaselineId --patch-group "Linux Servers"
    
    {
        "PatchGroup": "Linux Servers",
        "BaselineId": "YourBaselineId"
    }

C.  Define a maintenance window

Now that you have successfully set up a role, created a patch baseline, and registered your Amazon EC2 instance with your patch baseline, you will define a maintenance window so that you can control when your Amazon EC2 instances will receive patches. By creating multiple maintenance windows and assigning them to different patch groups, you can make sure your Amazon EC2 instances do not all reboot at the same time.

To define a maintenance window:

  1. Use the following command to define a maintenance window. In this example command, the maintenance window will start every Saturday at 10:00 P.M. UTC. It will have a duration of 4 hours and will not start any new tasks 1 hour before the end of the maintenance window.
    $ aws ssm create-maintenance-window --name SaturdayNight --schedule "cron(0 0 22 ? * SAT *)" --duration 4 --cutoff 1 --allow-unassociated-targets
    
    {
        "WindowId": "YourMaintenanceWindowId"
    }

For more information about defining a cron-based schedule for maintenance windows, see Cron and Rate Expressions for Maintenance Windows.

  1. After defining the maintenance window, you must register the Amazon EC2 instance with the maintenance window so that Systems Manager knows which Amazon EC2 instance it should patch in this maintenance window. You can register the instance by using the same Patch Group tag you used to associate the Amazon EC2 instance with the AWS-provided patch baseline, as shown in the following command.
    $ aws ssm register-target-with-maintenance-window --window-id YourMaintenanceWindowId --resource-type INSTANCE --targets "Key=tag:Patch Group,Values=Linux Servers"
    
    {
        "WindowTargetId": "YourWindowTargetId"
    }

  1. Assign a task to the maintenance window that will install the operating system patches on your Amazon EC2 instance. The following command includes the following options.
    1. name is the name of your task and is optional. I named mine Patching.
    2. task-arn is the name of the task document you want to run.
    3. max-concurrency allows you to specify how many of your Amazon EC2 instances Systems Manager should patch at the same time. max-errors determines when Systems Manager should abort the task. For patching, this number should not be too low, because you do not want your entire patch task to stop on all instances if one instance fails. You can set this, for example, to 20%.
    4. service-role-arn is the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the AmazonSSMMaintenanceWindowRole role you created earlier in this blog post.
    5. task-invocation-parameters defines the parameters that are specific to the AWS-RunPatchBaseline task document and tells Systems Manager that you want to install patches with a timeout of 600 seconds (10 minutes).
      $ aws ssm register-task-with-maintenance-window --name "Patching" --window-id "YourMaintenanceWindowId" --targets "Key=WindowTargetIds,Values=YourWindowTargetId" --task-arn AWS-RunPatchBaseline --service-role-arn "arn:aws:iam::123456789012:role/MaintenanceWindowRole" --task-type "RUN_COMMAND" --task-invocation-parameters "RunCommand={Comment=,TimeoutSeconds=600,Parameters={SnapshotId=[''],Operation=[Install]}}" --max-concurrency "500" --max-errors "20%"
      
      {
          "WindowTaskId": "YourWindowTaskId"
      }

Now, you must wait for the maintenance window to run at least once according to the schedule you defined earlier. If your maintenance window has expired, you can check the status of any maintenance tasks Systems Manager has performed by using the following command.

$ aws ssm describe-maintenance-window-executions --window-id "YourMaintenanceWindowId"

{
    "WindowExecutions": [
        {
            "Status": "SUCCESS",
            "WindowId": "YourMaintenanceWindowId",
            "WindowExecutionId": "b594984b-430e-4ffa-a44c-a2e171de9dd3",
            "EndTime": 1515766467.487,
            "StartTime": 1515766457.691
        }
    ]
}

D.  Monitor patch compliance

You also can see the overall patch compliance of all Amazon EC2 instances using the following command in the AWS CLI.

$ aws ssm list-compliance-summaries

This command shows you the number of instances that are compliant with each category and the number of instances that are not in JSON format.

You also can see overall patch compliance by choosing Compliance under Insights in the navigation pane of the Systems Manager console. You will see a visual representation of how many Amazon EC2 instances are up to date, how many Amazon EC2 instances are noncompliant, and how many Amazon EC2 instances are compliant in relation to the earlier defined patch baseline.

Screenshot of the Compliance page of the Systems Manager console

In this section, you have set everything up for patch management on your instance. Now you know how to patch your Amazon EC2 instance in a controlled manner and how to check if your Amazon EC2 instance is compliant with the patch baseline you have defined. Of course, I recommend that you apply these steps to all Amazon EC2 instances you manage.

Summary

In this blog post, I showed how to use Systems Manager to create a patch baseline and maintenance window to keep your Amazon EC2 Linux instances up to date with the latest security patches. Remember that by creating multiple maintenance windows and assigning them to different patch groups, you can make sure your Amazon EC2 instances do not all reboot at the same time.

If you have comments about this post, submit them in the “Comments” section below. If you have questions about or issues implementing any part of this solution, start a new thread on the Amazon EC2 forum or contact AWS Support.

– Koen

Sharing Secrets with AWS Lambda Using AWS Systems Manager Parameter Store

Post Syndicated from Chris Munns original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/sharing-secrets-with-aws-lambda-using-aws-systems-manager-parameter-store/

This post courtesy of Roberto Iturralde, Sr. Application Developer- AWS Professional Services

Application architects are faced with key decisions throughout the process of designing and implementing their systems. One decision common to nearly all solutions is how to manage the storage and access rights of application configuration. Shared configuration should be stored centrally and securely with each system component having access only to the properties that it needs for functioning.

With AWS Systems Manager Parameter Store, developers have access to central, secure, durable, and highly available storage for application configuration and secrets. Parameter Store also integrates with AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), allowing fine-grained access control to individual parameters or branches of a hierarchical tree.

This post demonstrates how to create and access shared configurations in Parameter Store from AWS Lambda. Both encrypted and plaintext parameter values are stored with only the Lambda function having permissions to decrypt the secrets. You also use AWS X-Ray to profile the function.

Solution overview

This example is made up of the following components:

  • An AWS SAM template that defines:
    • A Lambda function and its permissions
    • An unencrypted Parameter Store parameter that the Lambda function loads
    • A KMS key that only the Lambda function can access. You use this key to create an encrypted parameter later.
  • Lambda function code in Python 3.6 that demonstrates how to load values from Parameter Store at function initialization for reuse across invocations.

Launch the AWS SAM template

To create the resources shown in this post, you can download the SAM template or choose the button to launch the stack. The template requires one parameter, an IAM user name, which is the name of the IAM user to be the admin of the KMS key that you create. In order to perform the steps listed in this post, this IAM user will need permissions to execute Lambda functions, create Parameter Store parameters, administer keys in KMS, and view the X-Ray console. If you have these privileges in your IAM user account you can use your own account to complete the walkthrough. You can not use the root user to administer the KMS keys.

SAM template resources

The following sections show the code for the resources defined in the template.
Lambda function

ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev:
    Type: 'AWS::Serverless::Function'
    Properties:
      FunctionName: 'ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev'
      Description: 'Integrating lambda with Parameter Store'
      Handler: 'lambda_function.lambda_handler'
      Role: !GetAtt ParameterStoreBlogFunctionRoleDev.Arn
      CodeUri: './code'
      Environment:
        Variables:
          ENV: 'dev'
          APP_CONFIG_PATH: 'parameterStoreBlog'
          AWS_XRAY_TRACING_NAME: 'ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev'
      Runtime: 'python3.6'
      Timeout: 5
      Tracing: 'Active'

  ParameterStoreBlogFunctionRoleDev:
    Type: AWS::IAM::Role
    Properties:
      AssumeRolePolicyDocument:
        Version: '2012-10-17'
        Statement:
          -
            Effect: Allow
            Principal:
              Service:
                - 'lambda.amazonaws.com'
            Action:
              - 'sts:AssumeRole'
      ManagedPolicyArns:
        - 'arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/service-role/AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole'
      Policies:
        -
          PolicyName: 'ParameterStoreBlogDevParameterAccess'
          PolicyDocument:
            Version: '2012-10-17'
            Statement:
              -
                Effect: Allow
                Action:
                  - 'ssm:GetParameter*'
                Resource: !Sub 'arn:aws:ssm:${AWS::Region}:${AWS::AccountId}:parameter/dev/parameterStoreBlog*'
        -
          PolicyName: 'ParameterStoreBlogDevXRayAccess'
          PolicyDocument:
            Version: '2012-10-17'
            Statement:
              -
                Effect: Allow
                Action:
                  - 'xray:PutTraceSegments'
                  - 'xray:PutTelemetryRecords'
                Resource: '*'

In this YAML code, you define a Lambda function named ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev using the SAM AWS::Serverless::Function type. The environment variables for this function include the ENV (dev) and the APP_CONFIG_PATH where you find the configuration for this app in Parameter Store. X-Ray tracing is also enabled for profiling later.

The IAM role for this function extends the AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole by adding IAM policies that grant the function permissions to write to X-Ray and get parameters from Parameter Store, limited to paths under /dev/parameterStoreBlog*.
Parameter Store parameter

SimpleParameter:
    Type: AWS::SSM::Parameter
    Properties:
      Name: '/dev/parameterStoreBlog/appConfig'
      Description: 'Sample dev config values for my app'
      Type: String
      Value: '{"key1": "value1","key2": "value2","key3": "value3"}'

This YAML code creates a plaintext string parameter in Parameter Store in a path that your Lambda function can access.
KMS encryption key

ParameterStoreBlogDevEncryptionKeyAlias:
    Type: AWS::KMS::Alias
    Properties:
      AliasName: 'alias/ParameterStoreBlogKeyDev'
      TargetKeyId: !Ref ParameterStoreBlogDevEncryptionKey

  ParameterStoreBlogDevEncryptionKey:
    Type: AWS::KMS::Key
    Properties:
      Description: 'Encryption key for secret config values for the Parameter Store blog post'
      Enabled: True
      EnableKeyRotation: False
      KeyPolicy:
        Version: '2012-10-17'
        Id: 'key-default-1'
        Statement:
          -
            Sid: 'Allow administration of the key & encryption of new values'
            Effect: Allow
            Principal:
              AWS:
                - !Sub 'arn:aws:iam::${AWS::AccountId}:user/${IAMUsername}'
            Action:
              - 'kms:Create*'
              - 'kms:Encrypt'
              - 'kms:Describe*'
              - 'kms:Enable*'
              - 'kms:List*'
              - 'kms:Put*'
              - 'kms:Update*'
              - 'kms:Revoke*'
              - 'kms:Disable*'
              - 'kms:Get*'
              - 'kms:Delete*'
              - 'kms:ScheduleKeyDeletion'
              - 'kms:CancelKeyDeletion'
            Resource: '*'
          -
            Sid: 'Allow use of the key'
            Effect: Allow
            Principal:
              AWS: !GetAtt ParameterStoreBlogFunctionRoleDev.Arn
            Action:
              - 'kms:Encrypt'
              - 'kms:Decrypt'
              - 'kms:ReEncrypt*'
              - 'kms:GenerateDataKey*'
              - 'kms:DescribeKey'
            Resource: '*'

This YAML code creates an encryption key with a key policy with two statements.

The first statement allows a given user (${IAMUsername}) to administer the key. Importantly, this includes the ability to encrypt values using this key and disable or delete this key, but does not allow the administrator to decrypt values that were encrypted with this key.

The second statement grants your Lambda function permission to encrypt and decrypt values using this key. The alias for this key in KMS is ParameterStoreBlogKeyDev, which is how you reference it later.

Lambda function

Here I walk you through the Lambda function code.

import os, traceback, json, configparser, boto3
from aws_xray_sdk.core import patch_all
patch_all()

# Initialize boto3 client at global scope for connection reuse
client = boto3.client('ssm')
env = os.environ['ENV']
app_config_path = os.environ['APP_CONFIG_PATH']
full_config_path = '/' + env + '/' + app_config_path
# Initialize app at global scope for reuse across invocations
app = None

class MyApp:
    def __init__(self, config):
        """
        Construct new MyApp with configuration
        :param config: application configuration
        """
        self.config = config

    def get_config(self):
        return self.config

def load_config(ssm_parameter_path):
    """
    Load configparser from config stored in SSM Parameter Store
    :param ssm_parameter_path: Path to app config in SSM Parameter Store
    :return: ConfigParser holding loaded config
    """
    configuration = configparser.ConfigParser()
    try:
        # Get all parameters for this app
        param_details = client.get_parameters_by_path(
            Path=ssm_parameter_path,
            Recursive=False,
            WithDecryption=True
        )

        # Loop through the returned parameters and populate the ConfigParser
        if 'Parameters' in param_details and len(param_details.get('Parameters')) > 0:
            for param in param_details.get('Parameters'):
                param_path_array = param.get('Name').split("/")
                section_position = len(param_path_array) - 1
                section_name = param_path_array[section_position]
                config_values = json.loads(param.get('Value'))
                config_dict = {section_name: config_values}
                print("Found configuration: " + str(config_dict))
                configuration.read_dict(config_dict)

    except:
        print("Encountered an error loading config from SSM.")
        traceback.print_exc()
    finally:
        return configuration

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    global app
    # Initialize app if it doesn't yet exist
    if app is None:
        print("Loading config and creating new MyApp...")
        config = load_config(full_config_path)
        app = MyApp(config)

    return "MyApp config is " + str(app.get_config()._sections)

Beneath the import statements, you import the patch_all function from the AWS X-Ray library, which you use to patch boto3 to create X-Ray segments for all your boto3 operations.

Next, you create a boto3 SSM client at the global scope for reuse across function invocations, following Lambda best practices. Using the function environment variables, you assemble the path where you expect to find your configuration in Parameter Store. The class MyApp is meant to serve as an example of an application that would need its configuration injected at construction. In this example, you create an instance of ConfigParser, a class in Python’s standard library for handling basic configurations, to give to MyApp.

The load_config function loads the all the parameters from Parameter Store at the level immediately beneath the path provided in the Lambda function environment variables. Each parameter found is put into a new section in ConfigParser. The name of the section is the name of the parameter, less the base path. In this example, the full parameter name is /dev/parameterStoreBlog/appConfig, which is put in a section named appConfig.

Finally, the lambda_handler function initializes an instance of MyApp if it doesn’t already exist, constructing it with the loaded configuration from Parameter Store. Then it simply returns the currently loaded configuration in MyApp. The impact of this design is that the configuration is only loaded from Parameter Store the first time that the Lambda function execution environment is initialized. Subsequent invocations reuse the existing instance of MyApp, resulting in improved performance. You see this in the X-Ray traces later in this post. For more advanced use cases where configuration changes need to be received immediately, you could implement an expiry policy for your configuration entries or push notifications to your function.

To confirm that everything was created successfully, test the function in the Lambda console.

  1. Open the Lambda console.
  2. In the navigation pane, choose Functions.
  3. In the Functions pane, filter to ParameterStoreBlogFunctionDev to find the function created by the SAM template earlier. Open the function name to view its details.
  4. On the top right of the function detail page, choose Test. You may need to create a new test event. The input JSON doesn’t matter as this function ignores the input.

After running the test, you should see output similar to the following. This demonstrates that the function successfully fetched the unencrypted configuration from Parameter Store.

Create an encrypted parameter

You currently have a simple, unencrypted parameter and a Lambda function that can access it.

Next, you create an encrypted parameter that only your Lambda function has permission to use for decryption. This limits read access for this parameter to only this Lambda function.

To follow along with this section, deploy the SAM template for this post in your account and make your IAM user name the KMS key admin mentioned earlier.

  1. In the Systems Manager console, under Shared Resources, choose Parameter Store.
  2. Choose Create Parameter.
    • For Name, enter /dev/parameterStoreBlog/appSecrets.
    • For Type, select Secure String.
    • For KMS Key ID, choose alias/ParameterStoreBlogKeyDev, which is the key that your SAM template created.
    • For Value, enter {"secretKey": "secretValue"}.
    • Choose Create Parameter.
  3. If you now try to view the value of this parameter by choosing the name of the parameter in the parameters list and then choosing Show next to the Value field, you won’t see the value appear. This is because, even though you have permission to encrypt values using this KMS key, you do not have permissions to decrypt values.
  4. In the Lambda console, run another test of your function. You now also see the secret parameter that you created and its decrypted value.

If you do not see the new parameter in the Lambda output, this may be because the Lambda execution environment is still warm from the previous test. Because the parameters are loaded at Lambda startup, you need a fresh execution environment to refresh the values.

Adjust the function timeout to a different value in the Advanced Settings at the bottom of the Lambda Configuration tab. Choose Save and test to trigger the creation of a new Lambda execution environment.

Profiling the impact of querying Parameter Store using AWS X-Ray

By using the AWS X-Ray SDK to patch boto3 in your Lambda function code, each invocation of the function creates traces in X-Ray. In this example, you can use these traces to validate the performance impact of your design decision to only load configuration from Parameter Store on the first invocation of the function in a new execution environment.

From the Lambda function details page where you tested the function earlier, under the function name, choose Monitoring. Choose View traces in X-Ray.

This opens the X-Ray console in a new window filtered to your function. Be aware of the time range field next to the search bar if you don’t see any search results.
In this screenshot, I’ve invoked the Lambda function twice, one time 10.3 minutes ago with a response time of 1.1 seconds and again 9.8 minutes ago with a response time of 8 milliseconds.

Looking at the details of the longer running trace by clicking the trace ID, you can see that the Lambda function spent the first ~350 ms of the full 1.1 sec routing the request through Lambda and creating a new execution environment for this function, as this was the first invocation with this code. This is the portion of time before the initialization subsegment.

Next, it took 725 ms to initialize the function, which includes executing the code at the global scope (including creating the boto3 client). This is also a one-time cost for a fresh execution environment.

Finally, the function executed for 65 ms, of which 63.5 ms was the GetParametersByPath call to Parameter Store.

Looking at the trace for the second, much faster function invocation, you see that the majority of the 8 ms execution time was Lambda routing the request to the function and returning the response. Only 1 ms of the overall execution time was attributed to the execution of the function, which makes sense given that after the first invocation you’re simply returning the config stored in MyApp.

While the Traces screen allows you to view the details of individual traces, the X-Ray Service Map screen allows you to view aggregate performance data for all traced services over a period of time.

In the X-Ray console navigation pane, choose Service map. Selecting a service node shows the metrics for node-specific requests. Selecting an edge between two nodes shows the metrics for requests that traveled that connection. Again, be aware of the time range field next to the search bar if you don’t see any search results.

After invoking your Lambda function several more times by testing it from the Lambda console, you can view some aggregate performance metrics. Look at the following:

  • From the client perspective, requests to the Lambda service for the function are taking an average of 50 ms to respond. The function is generating ~1 trace per minute.
  • The function itself is responding in an average of 3 ms. In the following screenshot, I’ve clicked on this node, which reveals a latency histogram of the traced requests showing that over 95% of requests return in under 5 ms.
  • Parameter Store is responding to requests in an average of 64 ms, but note the much lower trace rate in the node. This is because you only fetch data from Parameter Store on the initialization of the Lambda execution environment.

Conclusion

Deduplication, encryption, and restricted access to shared configuration and secrets is a key component to any mature architecture. Serverless architectures designed using event-driven, on-demand, compute services like Lambda are no different.

In this post, I walked you through a sample application accessing unencrypted and encrypted values in Parameter Store. These values were created in a hierarchy by application environment and component name, with the permissions to decrypt secret values restricted to only the function needing access. The techniques used here can become the foundation of secure, robust configuration management in your enterprise serverless applications.

AWS Glue Now Supports Scala Scripts

Post Syndicated from Mehul Shah original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/aws-glue-now-supports-scala-scripts/

We are excited to announce AWS Glue support for running ETL (extract, transform, and load) scripts in Scala. Scala lovers can rejoice because they now have one more powerful tool in their arsenal. Scala is the native language for Apache Spark, the underlying engine that AWS Glue offers for performing data transformations.

Beyond its elegant language features, writing Scala scripts for AWS Glue has two main advantages over writing scripts in Python. First, Scala is faster for custom transformations that do a lot of heavy lifting because there is no need to shovel data between Python and Apache Spark’s Scala runtime (that is, the Java virtual machine, or JVM). You can build your own transformations or invoke functions in third-party libraries. Second, it’s simpler to call functions in external Java class libraries from Scala because Scala is designed to be Java-compatible. It compiles to the same bytecode, and its data structures don’t need to be converted.

To illustrate these benefits, we walk through an example that analyzes a recent sample of the GitHub public timeline available from the GitHub archive. This site is an archive of public requests to the GitHub service, recording more than 35 event types ranging from commits and forks to issues and comments.

This post shows how to build an example Scala script that identifies highly negative issues in the timeline. It pulls out issue events in the timeline sample, analyzes their titles using the sentiment prediction functions from the Stanford CoreNLP libraries, and surfaces the most negative issues.

Getting started

Before we start writing scripts, we use AWS Glue crawlers to get a sense of the data—its structure and characteristics. We also set up a development endpoint and attach an Apache Zeppelin notebook, so we can interactively explore the data and author the script.

Crawl the data

The dataset used in this example was downloaded from the GitHub archive website into our sample dataset bucket in Amazon S3, and copied to the following locations:

s3://aws-glue-datasets-<region>/examples/scala-blog/githubarchive/data/

Choose the best folder by replacing <region> with the region that you’re working in, for example, us-east-1. Crawl this folder, and put the results into a database named githubarchive in the AWS Glue Data Catalog, as described in the AWS Glue Developer Guide. This folder contains 12 hours of the timeline from January 22, 2017, and is organized hierarchically (that is, partitioned) by year, month, and day.

When finished, use the AWS Glue console to navigate to the table named data in the githubarchive database. Notice that this data has eight top-level columns, which are common to each event type, and three partition columns that correspond to year, month, and day.

Choose the payload column, and you will notice that it has a complex schema—one that reflects the union of the payloads of event types that appear in the crawled data. Also note that the schema that crawlers generate is a subset of the true schema because they sample only a subset of the data.

Set up the library, development endpoint, and notebook

Next, you need to download and set up the libraries that estimate the sentiment in a snippet of text. The Stanford CoreNLP libraries contain a number of human language processing tools, including sentiment prediction.

Download the Stanford CoreNLP libraries. Unzip the .zip file, and you’ll see a directory full of jar files. For this example, the following jars are required:

  • stanford-corenlp-3.8.0.jar
  • stanford-corenlp-3.8.0-models.jar
  • ejml-0.23.jar

Upload these files to an Amazon S3 path that is accessible to AWS Glue so that it can load these libraries when needed. For this example, they are in s3://glue-sample-other/corenlp/.

Development endpoints are static Spark-based environments that can serve as the backend for data exploration. You can attach notebooks to these endpoints to interactively send commands and explore and analyze your data. These endpoints have the same configuration as that of AWS Glue’s job execution system. So, commands and scripts that work there also work the same when registered and run as jobs in AWS Glue.

To set up an endpoint and a Zeppelin notebook to work with that endpoint, follow the instructions in the AWS Glue Developer Guide. When you are creating an endpoint, be sure to specify the locations of the previously mentioned jars in the Dependent jars path as a comma-separated list. Otherwise, the libraries will not be loaded.

After you set up the notebook server, go to the Zeppelin notebook by choosing Dev Endpoints in the left navigation pane on the AWS Glue console. Choose the endpoint that you created. Next, choose the Notebook Server URL, which takes you to the Zeppelin server. Log in using the notebook user name and password that you specified when creating the notebook. Finally, create a new note to try out this example.

Each notebook is a collection of paragraphs, and each paragraph contains a sequence of commands and the output for that command. Moreover, each notebook includes a number of interpreters. If you set up the Zeppelin server using the console, the (Python-based) pyspark and (Scala-based) spark interpreters are already connected to your new development endpoint, with pyspark as the default. Therefore, throughout this example, you need to prepend %spark at the top of your paragraphs. In this example, we omit these for brevity.

Working with the data

In this section, we use AWS Glue extensions to Spark to work with the dataset. We look at the actual schema of the data and filter out the interesting event types for our analysis.

Start with some boilerplate code to import libraries that you need:

%spark

import com.amazonaws.services.glue.DynamicRecord
import com.amazonaws.services.glue.GlueContext
import com.amazonaws.services.glue.util.GlueArgParser
import com.amazonaws.services.glue.util.Job
import com.amazonaws.services.glue.util.JsonOptions
import com.amazonaws.services.glue.types._
import org.apache.spark.SparkContext

Then, create the Spark and AWS Glue contexts needed for working with the data:

@transient val spark: SparkContext = SparkContext.getOrCreate()
val glueContext: GlueContext = new GlueContext(spark)

You need the transient decorator on the SparkContext when working in Zeppelin; otherwise, you will run into a serialization error when executing commands.

Dynamic frames

This section shows how to create a dynamic frame that contains the GitHub records in the table that you crawled earlier. A dynamic frame is the basic data structure in AWS Glue scripts. It is like an Apache Spark data frame, except that it is designed and optimized for data cleaning and transformation workloads. A dynamic frame is well-suited for representing semi-structured datasets like the GitHub timeline.

A dynamic frame is a collection of dynamic records. In Spark lingo, it is an RDD (resilient distributed dataset) of DynamicRecords. A dynamic record is a self-describing record. Each record encodes its columns and types, so every record can have a schema that is unique from all others in the dynamic frame. This is convenient and often more efficient for datasets like the GitHub timeline, where payloads can vary drastically from one event type to another.

The following creates a dynamic frame, github_events, from your table:

val github_events = glueContext
                    .getCatalogSource(database = "githubarchive", tableName = "data")
                    .getDynamicFrame()

The getCatalogSource() method returns a DataSource, which represents a particular table in the Data Catalog. The getDynamicFrame() method returns a dynamic frame from the source.

Recall that the crawler created a schema from only a sample of the data. You can scan the entire dataset, count the rows, and print the complete schema as follows:

github_events.count
github_events.printSchema()

The result looks like the following:

The data has 414,826 records. As before, notice that there are eight top-level columns, and three partition columns. If you scroll down, you’ll also notice that the payload is the most complex column.

Run functions and filter records

This section describes how you can create your own functions and invoke them seamlessly to filter records. Unlike filtering with Python lambdas, Scala scripts do not need to convert records from one language representation to another, thereby reducing overhead and running much faster.

Let’s create a function that picks only the IssuesEvents from the GitHub timeline. These events are generated whenever someone posts an issue for a particular repository. Each GitHub event record has a field, “type”, that indicates the kind of event it is. The issueFilter() function returns true for records that are IssuesEvents.

def issueFilter(rec: DynamicRecord): Boolean = { 
    rec.getField("type").exists(_ == "IssuesEvent") 
}

Note that the getField() method returns an Option[Any] type, so you first need to check that it exists before checking the type.

You pass this function to the filter transformation, which applies the function on each record and returns a dynamic frame of those records that pass.

val issue_events =  github_events.filter(issueFilter)

Now, let’s look at the size and schema of issue_events.

issue_events.count
issue_events.printSchema()

It’s much smaller (14,063 records), and the payload schema is less complex, reflecting only the schema for issues. Keep a few essential columns for your analysis, and drop the rest using the ApplyMapping() transform:

val issue_titles = issue_events.applyMapping(Seq(("id", "string", "id", "string"),
                                                 ("actor.login", "string", "actor", "string"), 
                                                 ("repo.name", "string", "repo", "string"),
                                                 ("payload.action", "string", "action", "string"),
                                                 ("payload.issue.title", "string", "title", "string")))
issue_titles.show()

The ApplyMapping() transform is quite handy for renaming columns, casting types, and restructuring records. The preceding code snippet tells the transform to select the fields (or columns) that are enumerated in the left half of the tuples and map them to the fields and types in the right half.

Estimating sentiment using Stanford CoreNLP

To focus on the most pressing issues, you might want to isolate the records with the most negative sentiments. The Stanford CoreNLP libraries are Java-based and offer sentiment-prediction functions. Accessing these functions through Python is possible, but quite cumbersome. It requires creating Python surrogate classes and objects for those found on the Java side. Instead, with Scala support, you can use those classes and objects directly and invoke their methods. Let’s see how.

First, import the libraries needed for the analysis:

import java.util.Properties
import edu.stanford.nlp.ling.CoreAnnotations
import edu.stanford.nlp.neural.rnn.RNNCoreAnnotations
import edu.stanford.nlp.pipeline.{Annotation, StanfordCoreNLP}
import edu.stanford.nlp.sentiment.SentimentCoreAnnotations
import scala.collection.convert.wrapAll._

The Stanford CoreNLP libraries have a main driver that orchestrates all of their analysis. The driver setup is heavyweight, setting up threads and data structures that are shared across analyses. Apache Spark runs on a cluster with a main driver process and a collection of backend executor processes that do most of the heavy sifting of the data.

The Stanford CoreNLP shared objects are not serializable, so they cannot be distributed easily across a cluster. Instead, you need to initialize them once for every backend executor process that might need them. Here is how to accomplish that:

val props = new Properties()
props.setProperty("annotators", "tokenize, ssplit, parse, sentiment")
props.setProperty("parse.maxlen", "70")

object myNLP {
    lazy val coreNLP = new StanfordCoreNLP(props)
}

The properties tell the libraries which annotators to execute and how many words to process. The preceding code creates an object, myNLP, with a field coreNLP that is lazily evaluated. This field is initialized only when it is needed, and only once. So, when the backend executors start processing the records, each executor initializes the driver for the Stanford CoreNLP libraries only one time.

Next is a function that estimates the sentiment of a text string. It first calls Stanford CoreNLP to annotate the text. Then, it pulls out the sentences and takes the average sentiment across all the sentences. The sentiment is a double, from 0.0 as the most negative to 4.0 as the most positive.

def estimatedSentiment(text: String): Double = {
    if ((text == null) || (!text.nonEmpty)) { return Double.NaN }
    val annotations = myNLP.coreNLP.process(text)
    val sentences = annotations.get(classOf[CoreAnnotations.SentencesAnnotation])
    sentences.foldLeft(0.0)( (csum, x) => { 
        csum + RNNCoreAnnotations.getPredictedClass(x.get(classOf[SentimentCoreAnnotations.SentimentAnnotatedTree])) 
    }) / sentences.length
}

Now, let’s estimate the sentiment of the issue titles and add that computed field as part of the records. You can accomplish this with the map() method on dynamic frames:

val issue_sentiments = issue_titles.map((rec: DynamicRecord) => { 
    val mbody = rec.getField("title")
    mbody match {
        case Some(mval: String) => { 
            rec.addField("sentiment", ScalarNode(estimatedSentiment(mval)))
            rec }
        case _ => rec
    }
})

The map() method applies the user-provided function on every record. The function takes a DynamicRecord as an argument and returns a DynamicRecord. The code above computes the sentiment, adds it in a top-level field, sentiment, to the record, and returns the record.

Count the records with sentiment and show the schema. This takes a few minutes because Spark must initialize the library and run the sentiment analysis, which can be involved.

issue_sentiments.count
issue_sentiments.printSchema()

Notice that all records were processed (14,063), and the sentiment value was added to the schema.

Finally, let’s pick out the titles that have the lowest sentiment (less than 1.5). Count them and print out a sample to see what some of the titles look like.

val pressing_issues = issue_sentiments.filter(_.getField("sentiment").exists(_.asInstanceOf[Double] < 1.5))
pressing_issues.count
pressing_issues.show(10)

Next, write them all to a file so that you can handle them later. (You’ll need to replace the output path with your own.)

glueContext.getSinkWithFormat(connectionType = "s3", 
                              options = JsonOptions("""{"path": "s3://<bucket>/out/path/"}"""), 
                              format = "json")
            .writeDynamicFrame(pressing_issues)

Take a look in the output path, and you can see the output files.

Putting it all together

Now, let’s create a job from the preceding interactive session. The following script combines all the commands from earlier. It processes the GitHub archive files and writes out the highly negative issues:

import com.amazonaws.services.glue.DynamicRecord
import com.amazonaws.services.glue.GlueContext
import com.amazonaws.services.glue.util.GlueArgParser
import com.amazonaws.services.glue.util.Job
import com.amazonaws.services.glue.util.JsonOptions
import com.amazonaws.services.glue.types._
import org.apache.spark.SparkContext
import java.util.Properties
import edu.stanford.nlp.ling.CoreAnnotations
import edu.stanford.nlp.neural.rnn.RNNCoreAnnotations
import edu.stanford.nlp.pipeline.{Annotation, StanfordCoreNLP}
import edu.stanford.nlp.sentiment.SentimentCoreAnnotations
import scala.collection.convert.wrapAll._

object GlueApp {

    object myNLP {
        val props = new Properties()
        props.setProperty("annotators", "tokenize, ssplit, parse, sentiment")
        props.setProperty("parse.maxlen", "70")

        lazy val coreNLP = new StanfordCoreNLP(props)
    }

    def estimatedSentiment(text: String): Double = {
        if ((text == null) || (!text.nonEmpty)) { return Double.NaN }
        val annotations = myNLP.coreNLP.process(text)
        val sentences = annotations.get(classOf[CoreAnnotations.SentencesAnnotation])
        sentences.foldLeft(0.0)( (csum, x) => { 
            csum + RNNCoreAnnotations.getPredictedClass(x.get(classOf[SentimentCoreAnnotations.SentimentAnnotatedTree])) 
        }) / sentences.length
    }

    def main(sysArgs: Array[String]) {
        val spark: SparkContext = SparkContext.getOrCreate()
        val glueContext: GlueContext = new GlueContext(spark)

        val dbname = "githubarchive"
        val tblname = "data"
        val outpath = "s3://<bucket>/out/path/"

        val github_events = glueContext
                            .getCatalogSource(database = dbname, tableName = tblname)
                            .getDynamicFrame()

        val issue_events =  github_events.filter((rec: DynamicRecord) => {
            rec.getField("type").exists(_ == "IssuesEvent")
        })

        val issue_titles = issue_events.applyMapping(Seq(("id", "string", "id", "string"),
                                                         ("actor.login", "string", "actor", "string"), 
                                                         ("repo.name", "string", "repo", "string"),
                                                         ("payload.action", "string", "action", "string"),
                                                         ("payload.issue.title", "string", "title", "string")))

        val issue_sentiments = issue_titles.map((rec: DynamicRecord) => { 
            val mbody = rec.getField("title")
            mbody match {
                case Some(mval: String) => { 
                    rec.addField("sentiment", ScalarNode(estimatedSentiment(mval)))
                    rec }
                case _ => rec
            }
        })

        val pressing_issues = issue_sentiments.filter(_.getField("sentiment").exists(_.asInstanceOf[Double] < 1.5))

        glueContext.getSinkWithFormat(connectionType = "s3", 
                              options = JsonOptions(s"""{"path": "$outpath"}"""), 
                              format = "json")
                    .writeDynamicFrame(pressing_issues)
    }
}

Notice that the script is enclosed in a top-level object called GlueApp, which serves as the script’s entry point for the job. (You’ll need to replace the output path with your own.) Upload the script to an Amazon S3 location so that AWS Glue can load it when needed.

To create the job, open the AWS Glue console. Choose Jobs in the left navigation pane, and then choose Add job. Create a name for the job, and specify a role with permissions to access the data. Choose An existing script that you provide, and choose Scala as the language.

For the Scala class name, type GlueApp to indicate the script’s entry point. Specify the Amazon S3 location of the script.

Choose Script libraries and job parameters. In the Dependent jars path field, enter the Amazon S3 locations of the Stanford CoreNLP libraries from earlier as a comma-separated list (without spaces). Then choose Next.

No connections are needed for this job, so choose Next again. Review the job properties, and choose Finish. Finally, choose Run job to execute the job.

You can simply edit the script’s input table and output path to run this job on whatever GitHub timeline datasets that you might have.

Conclusion

In this post, we showed how to write AWS Glue ETL scripts in Scala via notebooks and how to run them as jobs. Scala has the advantage that it is the native language for the Spark runtime. With Scala, it is easier to call Scala or Java functions and third-party libraries for analyses. Moreover, data processing is faster in Scala because there’s no need to convert records from one language runtime to another.

You can find more example of Scala scripts in our GitHub examples repository: https://github.com/awslabs/aws-glue-samples. We encourage you to experiment with Scala scripts and let us know about any interesting ETL flows that you want to share.

Happy Glue-ing!

 


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Simplify Querying Nested JSON with the AWS Glue Relationalize Transform and Genomic Analysis with Hail on Amazon EMR and Amazon Athena.

 


About the Authors

Mehul Shah is a senior software manager for AWS Glue. His passion is leveraging the cloud to build smarter, more efficient, and easier to use data systems. He has three girls, and, therefore, he has no spare time.

 

 

 

Ben Sowell is a software development engineer at AWS Glue.

 

 

 

 
Vinay Vivili is a software development engineer for AWS Glue.