Tag Archives: data

Tourists on GrabChat!

Post Syndicated from Grab Tech original https://engineering.grab.com/tourist-chat-data-story

Just over two years ago we introduced GrabChat, Southeast Asia’s first of its kind in-app messaging platform. Since then we’ve added all sorts of useful features to it. Auto-translated messages, the ability to send photos, and even voice messages! It’s been a great tool to facilitate smoother communications between our driver-partners and our passengers, and one group in particular has found it incredibly useful: tourists!

Now, we’ve analysed tourist data before, but we were curious about how GrabChat in particular has served this demographic. So we looked for interesting insights using sampled tourist chat data from Singapore, Malaysia, and Indonesia for the period of December 2018 to March 2019. That’s more than 3.7 million individual GrabChat messages sent by tourists! Here’s what we found.

Average chats per booking per country

Looking at the volume of the chats being transmitted per booking, we can see that the “chattiest” tourists are from East Timor, Nigeria, and Ukraine with averages of 6.0, 5.6, and 5.1 chats per booking respectively.

Then we wondered: if tourists from all over the world are talking this much to our driver-partners, how are they actually communicating if their mother-tongue is not the local language?

Need a Translator?

When we go to another country, we eat all the heavenly good food, fall in love with the culture, and admire the scenery. Language and communication barriers shouldn’t get in the way of all of that. That’s why Grab’s Chat feature has got it covered!

With Grab’s in-house translation solutions, any Grab passenger can send messages in their preferred language without fear of being misunderstood – or not understood at all! Their messages will be automatically translated into Bahasa Indonesia, Bahasa Melayu, Simplified Chinese, Thai, or Vietnamese depending on where they are. This applies not only apply to Grab’s transport services- GrabChat can be used when ordering GrabFood too!

Percentage of translated GrabChat messages
Indonesia saw the highest usage of translations on a by-booking basis!

 

Let’s look deeper into the tourist translation statistics for each country with the donut charts below. We can see that the most popular translation route for tourists in Indonesia was from English to Indonesian. The story is different for Singapore and Malaysia: we can see that there are translations to and from a more diverse set of languages, reflecting a more multicultural demographic.

Percentage of translated GrabChat messages
The most popular translation routes for tourist bookings in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore.

 

Tap for Templates!

GrabChat also provides achat template feature. Templates are prewritten messages that you can send with just one tap! Did we mention that they are translated automatically too? Passengers and drivers can have a fast, simple, and translated conversation with each other without typing a single word- and sometimes, templates are really all you need.

Examples of chat templates, as they appear in GrabChat!
Examples of chat templates, as they appear in GrabChat!

 

As if all this wasn’t convenient enough, you can also make your own custom templates! Use them for those repetitive, identical messages you always seem to be sending out like telling your drivers where the hotel lobby is, or how to navigate right to your doorstep, or even to send a quick description of what you look like to make it easier for a driver to find you!

Template message usage

Taking a look at individual country data, tourists in Indonesia used templates the most with almost 60% of all of them using a template in their conversations at least once. Malaysia and Singapore saw lower but still sizeable utilisation rates of this feature, at 53% and 33% respectively.

Template message usage percentage
Indonesia saw the highest usage of templates on a by-booking basis.

 

In our analysis, we found an interesting insight! There was a positive correlation between template usage and the success rate of rides. Overall, bookings that used templates in their conversations saw 10% more completions over bookings that didn’t.

Template vs completed bookings

Picture this: a hassle-free experience

A picture says a thousand words, and for tourists using GrabChat’s image feature, those thousand words don’t even need to be translated. Instead of typing out a description of where they are standing for pickup, they can just click, snap, and send an image!

Our data revealed that GrabChat’s image functionality is most frequently used in areas where the tourist traffic is the highest. In fact, image function in GrabChat saw the most use in pickup areas such as airports, large shopping malls, public transport stations, and hotels, because it was harder for drivers to find their passengers in these crowded areas. Even with our super convenient Entrances feature, every little bit of information goes a long way to help your driver find you!

Pickup locations

If we take it a step further and look at the actual areas  within the cities where images were sent the most, we see that our initial hypothesis still holds fast.

Pickup locations
The top 5 pickup areas per country in which images were the most prevalent in GrabChat (for tourists).

 

In Singapore, we see the most images being sent out at the Downtown Core area- this area contains the majestic Marina Bay Sands, the Merlion statue, and the Esplanade, amongst other iconic attractions.

In Malaysia, the highest image usage occurs at none other than the Kuala Lumpur City Centre (KLCC) itself. This area includes the Twin Towers, a plethora of malls and hotels, Bukit Bintang (a bustling and lively night-life zone), and even an aquarium.

Indonesia’s top location for image chats is Kuta. A beach village in Bali, Kuta is a tourist hotspot with surfing, water parks, bars, budget-friendly yet delicious food, and numerous cultural attractions.

Speak up!

Allowing for two-way communication via GrabChat empowers both passengers and drivers to improve their journeys by divulging useful information, and asking clarifying questions: how many bags do you have? Does your car accommodate my pet dog? I’m standing by the lobby with my two kids- these are the sorts of things that are talked about in GrabChat messages.

During the analysis of our multitudes of wide-ranging GrabChat conversations, we picked up some pro-tips for you to get a Grab ride with even more convenience and ease, whether you’re a tourist or not:

Tip #1: Did some shopping on your trip? Swamped with bags? Send a message to your driver to let them know how many pieces of luggage you have with you.

As one might expect, chats that have keywords such as “luggage” or “baggage” (or any other related term) occur the most when riders are going to, or leaving, an airport. Most of the tourists on GrabChat asked the drivers if there was space for all of their things in the car. Interestingly, some of them also told the drivers how to recognise them for pickup based off of the descriptions of their bags!

Tip #2: Your children make good landmarks! If you’re in a crowded spot and you’re worried your driver can’t find you, drop them a message to let them know you’re that family with a baby and a little girl in pigtails.

When it comes to children, we found that passengers mainly use them to help identify themselves to the driver. Messages like “I’m with my two kids” or “We are a family with a baby” came up numerous times, and served as descriptions to facilitate fast pickup. These sorts of chats were the most prevalent in crowded areas like airports and shopping centres.

Tip #3: Don’t get caught off guard- be sure your furry friends have a seat!

Taking a look at pet related chats, we learned that our tourists have used GrabChat to ask clarifying questions to the driver. Passengers have likely considered that not every driver or vehicle is accommodating towards animals. The most common type of message was about whether pets are allowed in the vehicle. For example: “Is it okay if I bring a puppy?” or “I have a dog with me in a carrier, is that alright?”. Better safe than sorry! Alternatively, if you’re travelling with a pet, why not see if GrabPet is available in your country?

From the chat content analysis we have learned that tourists do indeed use GrabChat to talk to their drivers about specific details of their trip. We see that the chat feature is an invaluable tool that anyone can use to clear up any ambiguities and make their journeys more pleasant.

Bubble Tea Craze on GrabFood!

Post Syndicated from Grab Tech original https://engineering.grab.com/bubble-tea-craze-on-grabfood

Bigger and More Bubble Tea!

Bubble tea orders on GrabFood has been constantly and dramatically increasing with an impressive regional average growth rate of 3,000% in the year of 2018!  Just look at the percentage increase over the year of 2018, across all countries!

CountriesBubble tea growth by percentage in 2018*
Indonesia>8500% growth from Jan 2018 to Dec 2018
Philippines>3,500% growth from June 2018 to Dec 2018
Thailand>3,000% growth from Jan 21018 to Dec 2018
Vietnam>1,500% growth from May 2018 to Dec 2018
Singapore>700% growth from May 2018 to Dec 2018
Malaysia>250% growth from May 2018 to Dec 2018

*Time period: January 2018 to December 2018, or from the time GrabFood was launched.

What’s driving this growth is not just die-hard bubble tea fans who can’t go a week without drinking this sweet treat, but a growing bubble tea fan club in Southeast Asia. The number of bubble tea lovers on GrabFood grew over 12,000% in 2018 – and there’s no sign of stopping!

With increasing consumer demand, how is Southeast Asia’s bubble tea supply catching up?  As of December 2018, GrabFood has close to 4,000 bubble tea outlets from a network of over 1,500 brands – a 200% growth in bubble tea outlets in Southeast Asia!

Bubble-Tea-Lover growth on GrabFood

If this stat doesn’t stick, here is a map to show you how much bubble tea orders in different Southeast Asian cities have grown!

Maps of bubble tea merchants on GrabFood

And here is a little shoutout to our star merchants including Chatime, Coco Fresh Tea & Juice, Macao Imperial Tea, Ochaya, Koi Tea, Cafe Amazon, The Alley, iTEA, Gong Cha, and Serenitea.

Just how much do you drink?

On average, Southeast Asians drink  4 cups of bubble tea per person per month on GrabFood. Thai consumers top the regional average by 2 cups, consuming about six cups of bubble tea per person per month. This is closely followed by Filipino consumers who drink an average of 5 cups per person per month.

Average bubble tea consumption by cups per person per month

Favourite Flavours!

Have a look at the dazzling array of Bubble Tea flavours available on GrabFood today and you’ll find some uniquely Southeast Asian flavours like Chendol, Durian, and Gula Melaka, as well as rare flavours like salted cream and cheese! Can you spot your favourite flavours here?

Bubble tea flavour consumption per month

Let’s break it down by the country that GrabFood serves, and see who likes which flavours of Bubble Tea more!

Bubble tea flavour consumption per month by country

Top the Toppings!

Pearl seems to be the unbeatable best topping of most of the countries, except Vietnam whose No. 1 topping turned out to be Cheese Pudding! Top 3 toppings that topped your favorite bubble tea are:

Top list of toppings

Best Time for Bubble Tea!

Don’t we all need a cup of sweet Bubble Tea in the afternoon to get us through the day?  Across Southeast Asia, GrabFood’s data reveals that most people order bubble tea to accompany their meals at lunch, or as a  perfect midday energizer!

Times of the day when most people order bubble tea

Conclusion

So hazelnut or chocolate, pearl or (and) pudding (who says we can’t have the best of both worlds!)? The options are abundant and the choice is yours to enjoy!

If you have a sweet tooth, or simply want to reward yourself with Southeast Asia’s most popular drink, go ahead – you are only a couple of taps away from savouring this cup full of delight

Guiding you Door-to-Door via our Super App!

Post Syndicated from Grab Tech original https://engineering.grab.com/poi-entrances-venues-door-to-door

Remember landing at an airport or going to your favourite mall and the hassle of finding the pickup spot when you booked a cab? When there are about a million entrances, it can get particularly annoying trying to find the right pickup location!

Rolling out across South East Asia  is a brand new booking experience from Grab, designed  to make it easier for you to make a booking at large venues like airports, shopping centers, and tourist destinations! With the new booking flow, it will not only be easier to select one of the pre-designated Grab pickup points, you can also find text and image directions to help you navigate your way through the venue for a smoother rendezvous with your driver!

Inspiration behind the work

Finding your pick-up point closest to you, let alone predicting it, is incredibly challenging, especially when you are inside huge buildings or in crowded areas. Neeraj Mishra, Product Owner for Places at Grab explains: “We rely on GPS-data to understand user’s location which can be tricky when you are indoors or surrounded by skyscrapers. Since the satellite signal has to go through layers of concrete and steel, it becomes weak which adds to the inaccuracy. Furthermore, ensuring that passengers and drivers have the same pick-up point in mind can be tricky, especially with venues that have multiple entrances. ”  

Marina One POI

Grab’s data analysis revealed that “rendezvous distance” (walking distance between the selected pick-up point and where the car is waiting) is more than twice the Grab average when the booking is made from large venues such as airports.

To solve this issue, Grab launched “Entrances” (the green dots on the map) last year, which lists the various pick-up points available at a particular building, and shows them on the map, allowing users to easily choose the one closest to them, and ensuring their drivers know exactly where they want to be picked up from. Since then, Grab has created more than 120,000 such entrances, and we are delighted to inform you that average of rendezvous distances across all  countries have been steadily going down!

Decreasing rendezvous distance across region

One problem remained

But there was still one common pain-point to be solved. Just because a passenger has selected the pick-up point closest to them, doesn’t mean it’s easy for them to find it. This is particularly challenging at very large venues like airports and shopping centres, and especially difficult if the passenger is unfamiliar with the venue, for example – a tourist landing at Jakarta Airport for the very first time. To deliver an even smoother booking and pick-up experience, Grab has rolled out a new feature called Venues – the first in the region – that will give passengers in-app photo and text directions to the pick-up point closest to them.

Let’s break it down! How does it work?

Whether you are a local or a foreigner on holiday or business trip, fret not if you are not too familiar with the place that you are in!

Let’s imagine that you are now at Singapore Changi Airport: your new booking experience will look something like this!

Step 1: Fire the Grab app and click on Transport. You will see a welcome screen showing you where you are!

Welcome to Changi Airport

Step 2: On booking screen, you will see a new pickup menu with a list of available pickup points. Confirm the pickup point you want and make the booking!

Booking screen at Changi Airport

Step 3: Once you’ve been allocated a driver, tap on the bubble to get directions to your pick-up point!

Driver allocated at Changi Airport

Step 4: Follow the landmarks and walking instructions and you’ve arrived at your pick-up point!

Directions to pick-up point at Changi Airport

Curious about how we got this done?

Data-Driven Decisions

Based on a thorough data analysis of historical bookings, Grab identified key venues across our markets in Southeast Asia. Then we dispatched our Operations team to the ground, to identify all pick up points and perform detailed on-ground survey of the venue.

Operations Team’s Leg Work

Nagur Hassan, Operations Manager at Grab, explains the process: “For the venue survey process, we send a team equipped with the tools required to capture the details, like cameras, wifi and bluetooth scanners etc. Once inside the venue, the team identifies strategic landmarks and clear direction signs that are related to drop-off and pick-up points. Team also captures turn-by-turn walking directions to make it easier for Grab users to navigate – For instance, walk towards Starbucks and take a left near H&M store. All the photos and documentations taken on the sites are then brought back to the office for further processing.”

Quality Assurance

Once the data is collected, our in-house team checks the quality of the images and data. We also mask people’s faces and number plates of the vehicles to hide any identity-related information. As of today, we have collected 3400+ images for 1900+ pick up points belonging to 600 key venues! This effort took more than 3000 man-hours in total! And we aim to cover more than 10,000 such venues across the region in the next few months.

This is only the beginning

We’re constantly striving to improve the location accuracy of our passengers by using advanced Machine Learning and constant feedback mechanism. We understand GPS may not always be the most accurate determination of your current location, especially in crowded areas and skyscraper districts. This is just the beginning and we’re planning to launch some very innovative features in the coming months! So stay tuned for more!

Recipe for building a widget: How we helped to “peak-shift” demand by helping passengers understand travel trends

Post Syndicated from Grab Tech original https://engineering.grab.com/peak-shift-demand-travel-trends

Credits: Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

 

Stuck in traffic in a Grab ride? Pass the time by opening your Grab app and checking out the Feed – just scroll down! You’ll find widgets for games, polls, videos, news and even food recommendations!

Beyond serving your everyday needs, we want to provide our users with information that is interesting, useful and relevant. That’s why we’re always coming up with new widgets.

Building each widget takes close collaboration across multiple different teams – from Product Management to Design, Engineering, Behavioral Science, and Data Science and Analytics. Sounds like a lot of people, doesn’t it? But you’ll be surprised to hear that this behind-the-scenes collaboration works rapidly, usually in the span of one month! Which means we’re often moving from ideation phase to product release in just a few weeks.

Travel Trends Widget

This fast-and-furious process is anchored on one word – “customer-centric”. And that’s how it all began with our  “Travel Trends Widget” – a widget that provides passengers with an overview of historical supply and demand trends for their current location and nearby time periods.

Because we had so much fun developing this widget, we wanted to write a blog post to share with you what we did and how we did it!

Inspiration: Where it all started

Transport demand can be rather lumpy. Owing to organic patterns (e.g. office hours), a lot of passengers tend to request for cars around the same time. In periods like this, the increase in demand could outpace the arrival of driver supply, increasing the waiting time for passengers.

Our goal at Grab is to make sure people get a ride when they want it and at the price they want, so we got to thinking about how we can ease this friction by leveraging our treasure trove – Big Data! – to help our passengers better plan their trips.

As we were looking at the data, we noticed that there is a seasonality to demand and supply: at certain times and days, imbalances appear, peak and disappear, and the process repeats itself. Studies say that humans in general, unless shown a compelling reason or benefit for change, are habitual beings subject to inertia. So we set out to achieve exactly that: To create a widget to surface information to our passengers that may help them alter their decisions on when they choose to book a ride, thereby redistributing some of the present peak demands to periods just before and after peak – also known as “peak shifting the demand”!

While this widget is the first-of-its-kind in the ride-hailing industry, “peak-shifting” was actually coined and introduced long ago!

London Transport Museum Trends

As you can see from this post from the London Transport Museum (Source: Transport for London), London tube tried peak-shifting long before anyone else: Original Ad from 1928 displayed on the left, and Ad from 2015 displayed on the right, comparing the trends to 1928.

Trends from a hotel in Beijing

You may also have seen something similar at the last hotel you stayed at. Notice here a poster in an elevator at a Beijing hotel, announcing the best times to eat breakfast in comfort and avoid the crowd. (Photo credits to Prashant, our Product Manager, who saw this on holiday.)

To apply “peak-shifting” and help our users better plan their trips, we decided to dig in and leverage our data. It was way more complex than we had initially thought, as market conditions could be different on different days. This meant that  generic statements like “5PM-8PM are peak hours and prices will be hight” would not hold true. Contrary to general perception, we observed that even during peak hours, there are buckets of time when there is no surge or low surge.

For instance, plot 1 and plot 2 below shows how a typical Monday and Tuesday surge looks like in a given month respectively. One of the key insights is that the surge trends during peak hour is different on Monday from Tuesday. It reinforces our initial hypothesis that every day is unique.

So we used machine learning techniques to build a forecasting widget which can help our users and give them the power to plan their trips beforehand. This widget is able to provide the pricing trends for the next 2 hours. So with a bit of flexibility, riders can ride the tide!

Grab trends

So how exactly does this widget work?!

Historical trends for Monday

It pulls together historically observed imbalances between supply and demand, for the consumer’s current location and nearby time periods. Aggregated data is displayed to consumers in easily interpreted visualisations, so that they can plan to leave at times when there are more supply, and with potentially more savings for fares.

How did we build the widget? Loop, agile working process, POC & workstream

Widget-building is an agile, collaborative, and simultaneous process. First, we started the process with analysis from Product Analytics team, pulling out data on traffic trends, surge patterns, and behavioral insights of both passengers and drivers in Singapore.

When we noticed the existence of seasonality for each day of the week, we came up with more precise analytical and business questions to dig deeper into the data. Upon verification of hypotheses, we decided that we will build a widget.

Then joined the Behavioural Science, UX (User Experience) Design and the Product Management teams, who started giving shape to the problem we are solving. Our Behavioural Scientists shared their expertise on how information, suggestions and choices should be presented to enable easy assimilation and beneficial action. Daily whiteboarding breakouts, endless back-and forth conversations, and a healthy amount of challenge-and-accept culture ensured that we distilled the idea down to its core. We then presented the relevant information with just the right level of detail, and with the right amount of messaging, to allow users to take the intended action i.e. shift his/her demand outside of peak periods if possible.

Our amazing regional Copywriting team then swung in to put our intent into words in 7 different languages for our users across South-East Asia. Simultaneously, our UX designers and Full-stack Engineers started exploring the best visual components to communicate data on time trends to users. More on this later, but suffice to say that plenty of ideas were explored and discarded in a collaborative process, which aimed to create something that’s intuitive and engaging while being robust and scalable to work across all types of devices.

While these designs made their way up to engineering, the Data Science team worked on finding the most rigorous method to deduce the historical trend of surge across all our cities and areas, and time periods within them. There were discussions on how to best store and update this data reliably so that the widget itself can access it with great performance.

Soon after, we went into the development process, and voila! We had the first iteration of the widget ready on our staging (internal testing) servers in just 2 weeks! This prototype was opened up to the core team for influx of feedback.

And just two weeks later, the widget made its way to our Singapore and Jakarta Feeds, accessible to the world at large! Feedback from our users started pouring in almost immediately (thanks to the rich feedback functionality that comes with each widget), ranging from great to sometimes not-so-great, and we listened to all of it with a keen ear! And thus began a new cycle of iterations and continuous improvement, more of which we will share in a subsequent post.

In the trenches with the creators: How multiple teams got together to make this come true

Various disciplines within our cross functional team came together to whip out this widget by quipping their expertise to the end product.

Using Behavioural Science to simplify choices and design good outcomes

Behavioural Science helped to explore many facets of consumer behaviour in order to plan and design the widget: understanding how consumers think and conceptualizing a widget that can be easily understood and used by the consumers.

While fares are governed entirely by market conditions, it’s important for us to explain the economics to customers. As a customer-centric company, we aim to make the consumers feel like they own their decisions, which they can take based on full information. And this is the role of Behavioral Scientists at Grab!

In guiding the customers through the information, Behavioural Science team had the following three objectives in mind while building this Travel Trends widget:

  1. Offer transparency on the fares: By exposing our historic surge levels for a 4 hour period, we wanted to ensure that the passenger is aware of the surge levels and does not treat the fare as a nasty shock.
  2. Give information that helps them plan: By showing them surge levels for the future 2 hours, we wanted to help customers who have the flexibility, plan for a better time, hence, giving them the power to decide based on transparent information.
  3. Provide helpful tips: Every bar gives users tips on the conditions at that time and the immediate future. For instance, a low surge bar, followed by a high surge bar gives the tip “Psst… Leave now, It might get busy later!”, helping people understand the graph better and nudging them to take an action. If you are interested in saving fares, may we suggest tapping around all the bars to reveal the secret pro-tips?

Designing interfaces that lead to consumer success by abstracting complexity

Design team is the one behind the colors and shapes that make up the widget that you see and interact with! The team took inspiration from Google’s Popular Times.

Source/Credits: Google Live Popular Times
Source/Credits: Google Live Popular Times

 

Right from the offset, our content and product teams were keen to surface additional information and actions with each bar to keep the widget interactive and useful. One of the early challenges was to arrive at the right gesture that invites the user to interact and intuitively navigate the bars on the widget but also does not conflict with other gestures (eg scrolling and scrubbing) that the user was pre-trained to perform on the feed. We found out that tapping was simultaneously an unused and yet intuitive gesturethat we could use for interaction with the bars.

We then went into rounds of iteration on the visual design of the widget. In this process, multiple stakeholders were involved ranging from Product to Content to Engineering. We had to overcome a number of constraints i.e. the limited canvas of a widget and the context of a user when she is exploring the feed. By re-using existing libraries and components, we managed to keep the development light and ship something fast.

GrabCar trends near you

Dozens of revisions and four iterations later, we landed with a design that we felt equipped the feature for its user-facing goal, and did so in a manner which was aesthetically appealing!

And finally we managed to deliver on the feature’s goal, by surfacing just the right detail of information in a manner that is intuitive yet effective to peak-shift demand.  

Bringing all of this to fruition through high performance engineering

Our Development Engineering team was in charge of developing the widget and making it available to our users in just a few weeks’ time – materialising the work of the other teams.

One of their challenges was to find the best way to process the vast amount of data (millions of database entries) so it can be visualized simply as bar charts. Grab’s engineers had to achieve this while making sure performance is as resilient as possible.

There were two options in doing this:

a) Fetch the data directly from the DB for each API call; or

b) Store the data in an in-memory data structure on a timely basis, so when a user calls the API will no longer have to hit the DB.

After considering that this feature will likely expect a lot of traffic thus high QPS, we decided that the former option would be too costly. Ultimately, we chose the latter option since it is more performant and more scalable.

At the frontend, the challenge was to cater to the intricate request from our designers. We use chart libraries to increase our development speed, and not all of the requirements were readily supported by these libraries.

For instance, let’s say this library makes visualising charts easy, but not so much for customising them. If designers wanted to have an average line in a dotted form, the library did not support this so easily. Also, the moving arrow pointers as you move between bar chart, changing colors of the bars changes when clicked – all required countless CSS tweaks.

CSS tweak on trends widget
CSS tweak on trends widget

Closing the product loop with user feedback and data driven insights

One of the most crucial parts of launching any product is to ensure that customers are engaging with the widget and finding it useful.

To understand what customers think about the widget, whether they find it useful and whether it is helping them to plan better,  we delved into the huge mine of clickstream data.

User feedback on the trends widget

We found that 1 in 3 users who make a booking everyday interact with the widget. And of these people, more than 70% users have given positive rating for the widget. This validates our initial hypothesis that if given an option, our customers will love the freedom to plan their trips and inculcate more transparent ecosystem.

These users also indicate the things they like most about the widget. 61% of users gave positive rating for usefulness, 20% were impressed by the design (Kudos to our fantastic designer Ajmal!!) and 13% for usability.

Tweet about the widget

Beyond internal data, our widget made some rounds on social media channels. For Example, here is screenshot of what our users have to say on Twitter.

We closely track these metrics on user engagement and feedback to ensure that we keep improving and coming up with new iterations which helps us to serve our customers in a better way.

Conclusion

We hope you enjoyed reading about how we went from ideation, through iterations to a finished widget in the hands of the user, all in 1 month! Many hands helped along the way. If you are interested in joining this hyper-proactive problem-solving team, please check out Grab’s career site!

And if you have feedback for us, we are here to listen! While we cannot be happier to see some positive reaction from the public, we are also thrilled to hear your suggestions and advice. Please leave us a memo using the Widget’s comment function!

Epilogue

We just released an upgrade to this widget which allows users to set reminders and be notified about availability of good fares in a time period of their choosing. We will keep a watch and come knocking! Go ahead, find the widget on your Grab feed, set a reminder and save on fares on your next ride!

AWS Online Tech Talks – June 2018

Post Syndicated from Devin Watson original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-online-tech-talks-june-2018/

AWS Online Tech Talks – June 2018

Join us this month to learn about AWS services and solutions. New this month, we have a fireside chat with the GM of Amazon WorkSpaces and our 2nd episode of the “How to re:Invent” series. We’ll also cover best practices, deep dives, use cases and more! Join us and register today!

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks featured this month:

 

Analytics & Big Data

June 18, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTGet Started with Real-Time Streaming Data in Under 5 Minutes – Learn how to use Amazon Kinesis to capture, store, and analyze streaming data in real-time including IoT device data, VPC flow logs, and clickstream data.
June 20, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PT – Insights For Everyone – Deploying Data across your Organization – Learn how to deploy data at scale using AWS Analytics and QuickSight’s new reader role and usage based pricing.

 

AWS re:Invent
June 13, 2018 | 05:00 PM – 05:30 PM PTEpisode 2: AWS re:Invent Breakout Content Secret Sauce – Hear from one of our own AWS content experts as we dive deep into the re:Invent content strategy and how we maintain a high bar.
Compute

June 25, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTAccelerating Containerized Workloads with Amazon EC2 Spot Instances – Learn how to efficiently deploy containerized workloads and easily manage clusters at any scale at a fraction of the cost with Spot Instances.

June 26, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTEnsuring Your Windows Server Workloads Are Well-Architected – Get the benefits, best practices and tools on running your Microsoft Workloads on AWS leveraging a well-architected approach.

 

Containers
June 25, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTRunning Kubernetes on AWS – Learn about the basics of running Kubernetes on AWS including how setup masters, networking, security, and add auto-scaling to your cluster.

 

Databases

June 18, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTOracle to Amazon Aurora Migration, Step by Step – Learn how to migrate your Oracle database to Amazon Aurora.
DevOps

June 20, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTSet Up a CI/CD Pipeline for Deploying Containers Using the AWS Developer Tools – Learn how to set up a CI/CD pipeline for deploying containers using the AWS Developer Tools.

 

Enterprise & Hybrid
June 18, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTDe-risking Enterprise Migration with AWS Managed Services – Learn how enterprise customers are de-risking cloud adoption with AWS Managed Services.

June 19, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTLaunch AWS Faster using Automated Landing Zones – Learn how the AWS Landing Zone can automate the set up of best practice baselines when setting up new

 

AWS Environments

June 21, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTLeading Your Team Through a Cloud Transformation – Learn how you can help lead your organization through a cloud transformation.

June 21, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTEnabling New Retail Customer Experiences with Big Data – Learn how AWS can help retailers realize actual value from their big data and deliver on differentiated retail customer experiences.

June 28, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTFireside Chat: End User Collaboration on AWS – Learn how End User Compute services can help you deliver access to desktops and applications anywhere, anytime, using any device.
IoT

June 27, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTAWS IoT in the Connected Home – Learn how to use AWS IoT to build innovative Connected Home products.

 

Machine Learning

June 19, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTIntegrating Amazon SageMaker into your Enterprise – Learn how to integrate Amazon SageMaker and other AWS Services within an Enterprise environment.

June 21, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTBuilding Text Analytics Applications on AWS using Amazon Comprehend – Learn how you can unlock the value of your unstructured data with NLP-based text analytics.

 

Management Tools

June 20, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTOptimizing Application Performance and Costs with Auto Scaling – Learn how selecting the right scaling option can help optimize application performance and costs.

 

Mobile
June 25, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTDrive User Engagement with Amazon Pinpoint – Learn how Amazon Pinpoint simplifies and streamlines effective user engagement.

 

Security, Identity & Compliance

June 26, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTUnderstanding AWS Secrets Manager – Learn how AWS Secrets Manager helps you rotate and manage access to secrets centrally.
June 28, 2018 | 09:00 AM – 09:45 AM PTUsing Amazon Inspector to Discover Potential Security Issues – See how Amazon Inspector can be used to discover security issues of your instances.

 

Serverless

June 19, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTProductionize Serverless Application Building and Deployments with AWS SAM – Learn expert tips and techniques for building and deploying serverless applications at scale with AWS SAM.

 

Storage

June 26, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTDeep Dive: Hybrid Cloud Storage with AWS Storage Gateway – Learn how you can reduce your on-premises infrastructure by using the AWS Storage Gateway to connecting your applications to the scalable and reliable AWS storage services.
June 27, 2018 | 01:00 PM – 01:45 PM PTChanging the Game: Extending Compute Capabilities to the Edge – Discover how to change the game for IIoT and edge analytics applications with AWS Snowball Edge plus enhanced Compute instances.
June 28, 2018 | 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM PTBig Data and Analytics Workloads on Amazon EFS – Get best practices and deployment advice for running big data and analytics workloads on Amazon EFS.

AWS Resources Addressing Argentina’s Personal Data Protection Law and Disposition No. 11/2006

Post Syndicated from Leandro Bennaton original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-and-resources-addressing-argentinas-personal-data-protection-law-and-disposition-no-112006/

We have two new resources to help customers address their data protection requirements in Argentina. These resources specifically address the needs outlined under the Personal Data Protection Law No. 25.326, as supplemented by Regulatory Decree No. 1558/2001 (“PDPL”), including Disposition No. 11/2006. For context, the PDPL is an Argentine federal law that applies to the protection of personal data, including during transfer and processing.

A new webpage focused on data privacy in Argentina features FAQs, helpful links, and whitepapers that provide an overview of PDPL considerations, as well as our security assurance frameworks and international certifications, including ISO 27001, ISO 27017, and ISO 27018. You’ll also find details about our Information Request Report and the high bar of security at AWS data centers.

Additionally, we’ve released a new workbook that offers a detailed mapping as to how customers can operate securely under the Shared Responsibility Model while also aligning with Disposition No. 11/2006. The AWS Disposition 11/2006 Workbook can be downloaded from the Argentina Data Privacy page or directly from this link. Both resources are also available in Spanish from the Privacidad de los datos en Argentina page.

Want more AWS Security news? Follow us on Twitter.

 

Build your own weather station with our new guide!

Post Syndicated from Richard Hayler original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-your-own-weather-station/

One of the most common enquiries I receive at Pi Towers is “How can I get my hands on a Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station?” Now the answer is: “Why not build your own version using our guide?”

Build Your Own weather station kit assembled

Tadaaaa! The BYO weather station fully assembled.

Our Oracle Weather Station

In 2016 we sent out nearly 1000 Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station kits to schools from around the world who had applied to be part of our weather station programme. In the original kit was a special HAT that allows the Pi to collect weather data with a set of sensors.

The original Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station HAT – Build Your Own Raspberry Pi weather station

The original Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station HAT

We designed the HAT to enable students to create their own weather stations and mount them at their schools. As part of the programme, we also provide an ever-growing range of supporting resources. We’ve seen Oracle Weather Stations in great locations with a huge differences in climate, and they’ve even recorded the effects of a solar eclipse.

Our new BYO weather station guide

We only had a single batch of HATs made, and unfortunately we’ve given nearly* all the Weather Station kits away. Not only are the kits really popular, we also receive lots of questions about how to add extra sensors or how to take more precise measurements of a particular weather phenomenon. So today, to satisfy your demand for a hackable weather station, we’re launching our Build your own weather station guide!

Build Your Own Raspberry Pi weather station

Fun with meteorological experiments!

Our guide suggests the use of many of the sensors from the Oracle Weather Station kit, so can build a station that’s as close as possible to the original. As you know, the Raspberry Pi is incredibly versatile, and we’ve made it easy to hack the design in case you want to use different sensors.

Many other tutorials for Pi-powered weather stations don’t explain how the various sensors work or how to store your data. Ours goes into more detail. It shows you how to put together a breadboard prototype, it describes how to write Python code to take readings in different ways, and it guides you through recording these readings in a database.

Build Your Own Raspberry Pi weather station on a breadboard

There’s also a section on how to make your station weatherproof. And in case you want to move past the breadboard stage, we also help you with that. The guide shows you how to solder together all the components, similar to the original Oracle Weather Station HAT.

Who should try this build

We think this is a great project to tackle at home, at a STEM club, Scout group, or CoderDojo, and we’re sure that many of you will be chomping at the bit to get started. Before you do, please note that we’ve designed the build to be as straight-forward as possible, but it’s still fairly advanced both in terms of electronics and programming. You should read through the whole guide before purchasing any components.

Build Your Own Raspberry Pi weather station – components

The sensors and components we’re suggesting balance cost, accuracy, and easy of use. Depending on what you want to use your station for, you may wish to use different components. Similarly, the final soldered design in the guide may not be the most elegant, but we think it is achievable for someone with modest soldering experience and basic equipment.

You can build a functioning weather station without soldering with our guide, but the build will be more durable if you do solder it. If you’ve never tried soldering before, that’s OK: we have a Getting started with soldering resource plus video tutorial that will walk you through how it works step by step.

Prototyping HAT for Raspberry Pi weather station sensors

For those of you who are more experienced makers, there are plenty of different ways to put the final build together. We always like to hear about alternative builds, so please post your designs in the Weather Station forum.

Our plans for the guide

Our next step is publishing supplementary guides for adding extra functionality to your weather station. We’d love to hear which enhancements you would most like to see! Our current ideas under development include adding a webcam, making a tweeting weather station, adding a light/UV meter, and incorporating a lightning sensor. Let us know which of these is your favourite, or suggest your own amazing ideas in the comments!

*We do have a very small number of kits reserved for interesting projects or locations: a particularly cool experiment, a novel idea for how the Oracle Weather Station could be used, or places with specific weather phenomena. If have such a project in mind, please send a brief outline to [email protected], and we’ll consider how we might be able to help you.

The post Build your own weather station with our new guide! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Flight Sim Company Threatens Reddit Mods Over “Libelous” DRM Posts

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/flight-sim-company-threatens-reddit-mods-over-libellous-drm-posts-180604/

Earlier this year, in an effort to deal with piracy of their products, flight simulator company FlightSimLabs took drastic action by installing malware on customers’ machines.

The story began when a Reddit user reported something unusual in his download of FlightSimLabs’ A320X module. A file – test.exe – was being flagged up as a ‘Chrome Password Dump’ tool, something which rang alarm bells among flight sim fans.

As additional information was made available, the story became even more sensational. After first dodging the issue with carefully worded statements, FlightSimLabs admitted that it had installed a password dumper onto ALL users’ machines – whether they were pirates or not – in an effort to catch a particular software cracker and launch legal action.

It was an incredible story that no doubt did damage to FlightSimLabs’ reputation. But the now the company is at the center of a new storm, again centered around anti-piracy measures and again focused on Reddit.

Just before the weekend, Reddit user /u/walkday reported finding something unusual in his A320X module, the same module that caused the earlier controversy.

“The latest installer of FSLabs’ A320X puts two cmdhost.exe files under ‘system32\’ and ‘SysWOW64\’ of my Windows directory. Despite the name, they don’t open a command-line window,” he reported.

“They’re a part of the authentication because, if you remove them, the A320X won’t get loaded. Does someone here know more about cmdhost.exe? Why does FSLabs give them such a deceptive name and put them in the system folders? I hate them for polluting my system folder unless, of course, it is a dll used by different applications.”

Needless to say, the news that FSLabs were putting files into system folders named to make them look like system files was not well received.

“Hiding something named to resemble Window’s “Console Window Host” process in system folders is a huge red flag,” one user wrote.

“It’s a malware tactic used to deceive users into thinking the executable is a part of the OS, thus being trusted and not deleted. Really dodgy tactic, don’t trust it and don’t trust them,” opined another.

With a disenchanted Reddit userbase simmering away in the background, FSLabs took to Facebook with a statement to quieten down the masses.

“Over the past few hours we have become aware of rumors circulating on social media about the cmdhost file installed by the A320-X and wanted to clear up any confusion or misunderstanding,” the company wrote.

“cmdhost is part of our eSellerate infrastructure – which communicates between the eSellerate server and our product activation interface. It was designed to reduce the number of product activation issues people were having after the FSX release – which have since been resolved.”

The company noted that the file had been checked by all major anti-virus companies and everything had come back clean, which does indeed appear to be the case. Nevertheless, the critical Reddit thread remained, bemoaning the actions of a company which probably should have known better than to irritate fans after February’s debacle. In response, however, FSLabs did just that once again.

In private messages to the moderators of the /r/flightsim sub-Reddit, FSLabs’ Marketing and PR Manager Simon Kelsey suggested that the mods should do something about the thread in question or face possible legal action.

“Just a gentle reminder of Reddit’s obligations as a publisher in order to ensure that any libelous content is taken down as soon as you become aware of it,” Kelsey wrote.

Noting that FSLabs welcomes “robust fair comment and opinion”, Kelsey gave the following advice.

“The ‘cmdhost.exe’ file in question is an entirely above board part of our anti-piracy protection and has been submitted to numerous anti-virus providers in order to verify that it poses no threat. Therefore, ANY suggestion that current or future products pose any threat to users is absolutely false and libelous,” he wrote, adding:

“As we have already outlined in the past, ANY suggestion that any user’s data was compromised during the events of February is entirely false and therefore libelous.”

Noting that FSLabs would “hate for lawyers to have to get involved in this”, Kelsey advised the /r/flightsim mods to ensure that no such claims were allowed to remain on the sub-Reddit.

But after not receiving the response he would’ve liked, Kelsey wrote once again to the mods. He noted that “a number of unsubstantiated and highly defamatory comments” remained online and warned that if something wasn’t done to clean them up, he would have “no option” than to pass the matter to FSLabs’ legal team.

Like the first message, this second effort also failed to have the desired effect. In fact, the moderators’ response was to post an open letter to Kelsey and FSLabs instead.

“We sincerely disagree that you ‘welcome robust fair comment and opinion’, demonstrated by the censorship on your forums and the attempted censorship on our subreddit,” the mods wrote.

“While what you do on your forum is certainly your prerogative, your rules do not extend to Reddit nor the r/flightsim subreddit. Removing content you disagree with is simply not within our purview.”

The letter, which is worth reading in full, refutes Kelsey’s claims and also suggests that critics of FSLabs may have been subjected to Reddit vote manipulation and coordinated efforts to discredit them.

What will happen next is unclear but the matter has now been placed in the hands of Reddit’s administrators who have agreed to deal with Kelsey and FSLabs’ personally.

It’s a little early to say for sure but it seems unlikely that this will end in a net positive for FSLabs, no matter what decision Reddit’s admins take.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

Storing Encrypted Credentials In Git

Post Syndicated from Bozho original https://techblog.bozho.net/storing-encrypted-credentials-in-git/

We all know that we should not commit any passwords or keys to the repo with our code (no matter if public or private). Yet, thousands of production passwords can be found on GitHub (and probably thousands more in internal company repositories). Some have tried to fix that by removing the passwords (once they learned it’s not a good idea to store them publicly), but passwords have remained in the git history.

Knowing what not to do is the first and very important step. But how do we store production credentials. Database credentials, system secrets (e.g. for HMACs), access keys for 3rd party services like payment providers or social networks. There doesn’t seem to be an agreed upon solution.

I’ve previously argued with the 12-factor app recommendation to use environment variables – if you have a few that might be okay, but when the number of variables grow (as in any real application), it becomes impractical. And you can set environment variables via a bash script, but you’d have to store it somewhere. And in fact, even separate environment variables should be stored somewhere.

This somewhere could be a local directory (risky), a shared storage, e.g. FTP or S3 bucket with limited access, or a separate git repository. I think I prefer the git repository as it allows versioning (Note: S3 also does, but is provider-specific). So you can store all your environment-specific properties files with all their credentials and environment-specific configurations in a git repo with limited access (only Ops people). And that’s not bad, as long as it’s not the same repo as the source code.

Such a repo would look like this:

project
└─── production
|   |   application.properites
|   |   keystore.jks
└─── staging
|   |   application.properites
|   |   keystore.jks
└─── on-premise-client1
|   |   application.properites
|   |   keystore.jks
└─── on-premise-client2
|   |   application.properites
|   |   keystore.jks

Since many companies are using GitHub or BitBucket for their repositories, storing production credentials on a public provider may still be risky. That’s why it’s a good idea to encrypt the files in the repository. A good way to do it is via git-crypt. It is “transparent” encryption because it supports diff and encryption and decryption on the fly. Once you set it up, you continue working with the repo as if it’s not encrypted. There’s even a fork that works on Windows.

You simply run git-crypt init (after you’ve put the git-crypt binary on your OS Path), which generates a key. Then you specify your .gitattributes, e.g. like that:

secretfile filter=git-crypt diff=git-crypt
*.key filter=git-crypt diff=git-crypt
*.properties filter=git-crypt diff=git-crypt
*.jks filter=git-crypt diff=git-crypt

And you’re done. Well, almost. If this is a fresh repo, everything is good. If it is an existing repo, you’d have to clean up your history which contains the unencrypted files. Following these steps will get you there, with one addition – before calling git commit, you should call git-crypt status -f so that the existing files are actually encrypted.

You’re almost done. We should somehow share and backup the keys. For the sharing part, it’s not a big issue to have a team of 2-3 Ops people share the same key, but you could also use the GPG option of git-crypt (as documented in the README). What’s left is to backup your secret key (that’s generated in the .git/git-crypt directory). You can store it (password-protected) in some other storage, be it a company shared folder, Dropbox/Google Drive, or even your email. Just make sure your computer is not the only place where it’s present and that it’s protected. I don’t think key rotation is necessary, but you can devise some rotation procedure.

git-crypt authors claim to shine when it comes to encrypting just a few files in an otherwise public repo. And recommend looking at git-remote-gcrypt. But as often there are non-sensitive parts of environment-specific configurations, you may not want to encrypt everything. And I think it’s perfectly fine to use git-crypt even in a separate repo scenario. And even though encryption is an okay approach to protect credentials in your source code repo, it’s still not necessarily a good idea to have the environment configurations in the same repo. Especially given that different people/teams manage these credentials. Even in small companies, maybe not all members have production access.

The outstanding questions in this case is – how do you sync the properties with code changes. Sometimes the code adds new properties that should be reflected in the environment configurations. There are two scenarios here – first, properties that could vary across environments, but can have default values (e.g. scheduled job periods), and second, properties that require explicit configuration (e.g. database credentials). The former can have the default values bundled in the code repo and therefore in the release artifact, allowing external files to override them. The latter should be announced to the people who do the deployment so that they can set the proper values.

The whole process of having versioned environment-speific configurations is actually quite simple and logical, even with the encryption added to the picture. And I think it’s a good security practice we should try to follow.

The post Storing Encrypted Credentials In Git appeared first on Bozho's tech blog.

ISP Questions Impartiality of Judges in Copyright Troll Cases

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/isp-questions-impartiality-of-judges-in-copyright-troll-cases-180602/

Following in the footsteps of similar operations around the world, two years ago the copyright trolling movement landed on Swedish shores.

The pattern was a familiar one, with trolls harvesting IP addresses from BitTorrent swarms and tracing them back to Internet service providers. Then, after presenting evidence to a judge, the trolls obtained orders that compelled ISPs to hand over their customers’ details. From there, the trolls demanded cash payments to make supposed lawsuits disappear.

It’s a controversial business model that rarely receives outside praise. Many ISPs have tried to slow down the flood but most eventually grow tired of battling to protect their customers. The same cannot be said of Swedish ISP Bahnhof.

The ISP, which is also a strong defender of privacy, has become known for fighting back against copyright trolls. Indeed, to thwart them at the very first step, the company deletes IP address logs after just 24 hours, which prevents its customers from being targeted.

Bahnhof says that the copyright business appeared “dirty and corrupt” right from the get go, so it now operates Utpressningskollen.se, a web portal where the ISP publishes data on Swedish legal cases in which copyright owners demand customer data from ISPs through the Patent and Market Courts.

Over the past two years, Bahnhof says it has documented 76 cases of which six are still ongoing, 11 have been waived and a majority 59 have been decided in favor of mainly movie companies. Bahnhof says that when it discovered that 59 out of the 76 cases benefited one party, it felt a need to investigate.

In a detailed report compiled by Bahnhof Communicator Carolina Lindahl and sent to TF, the ISP reveals that it examined the individual decision-makers in the cases before the Courts and found five judges with “questionable impartiality.”

“One of the judges, we can call them Judge 1, has closed 12 of the cases, of which two have been waived and the other 10 have benefitted the copyright owner, mostly movie companies,” Lindahl notes.

“Judge 1 apparently has written several articles in the magazine NIR – Nordiskt Immateriellt Rättsskydd (Nordic Intellectual Property Protection) – which is mainly supported by Svenska Föreningen för Upphovsrätt, the Swedish Association for Copyright (SFU).

“SFU is a member-financed group centered around copyright that publishes articles, hands out scholarships, arranges symposiums, etc. On their website they have a public calendar where Judge 1 appears regularly.”

Bahnhof says that the financiers of the SFU are Sveriges Television AB (Sweden’s national public TV broadcaster), Filmproducenternas Rättsförening (a legally-oriented association for filmproducers), BMG Chrysalis Scandinavia (a media giant) and Fackförbundet för Film och Mediabranschen (a union for the movie and media industry).

“This means that Judge 1 is involved in a copyright association sponsored by the film and media industry, while also judging in copyright cases with the film industry as one of the parties,” the ISP says.

Bahnhof’s also has criticism for Judge 2, who participated as an event speaker for the Swedish Association for Copyright, and Judge 3 who has written for the SFU-supported magazine NIR. According to Lindahl, Judge 4 worked for a bureau that is partly owned by a board member of SFU, who also defended media companies in a “high-profile” Swedish piracy case.

That leaves Judge 5, who handled 10 of the copyright troll cases documented by Bahnhof, waiving one and deciding the remaining nine in favor of a movie company plaintiff.

“Judge 5 has been questioned before and even been accused of bias while judging a high-profile piracy case almost ten years ago. The accusations of bias were motivated by the judge’s membership of SFU and the Swedish Association for Intellectual Property Rights (SFIR), an association with several important individuals of the Swedish copyright community as members, who all defend, represent, or sympathize with the media industry,” Lindahl says.

Bahnhof hasn’t named any of the judges nor has it provided additional details on the “high-profile” case. However, anyone who remembers the infamous trial of ‘The Pirate Bay Four’ a decade ago might recall complaints from the defense (1,2,3) that several judges involved in the case were members of pro-copyright groups.

While there were plenty of calls to consider them biased, in May 2010 the Supreme Court ruled otherwise, a fact Bahnhof recognizes.

“Judge 5 was never sentenced for bias by the court, but regardless of the court’s decision this is still a judge who shares values and has personal connections with [the media industry], and as if that weren’t enough, the judge has induced an additional financial aspect by participating in events paid for by said party,” Lindahl writes.

“The judge has parties and interest holders in their personal network, a private engagement in the subject and a financial connection to one party – textbook characteristics of bias which would make anyone suspicious.”

The decision-makers of the Patent and Market Court and their relations.

The ISP notes that all five judges have connections to the media industry in the cases they judge, which isn’t a great starting point for returning “objective and impartial” results. In its summary, however, the ISP is scathing of the overall system, one in which court cases “almost looked rigged” and appear to be decided in favor of the movie company even before reaching court.

In general, however, Bahnhof says that the processes show a lack of individual attention, such as the court blindly accepting questionable IP address evidence supplied by infamous anti-piracy outfit MaverickEye.

“The court never bothers to control the media company’s only evidence (lists generated by MaverickMonitor, which has proven to be an unreliable software), the court documents contain several typos of varying severity, and the same standard texts are reused in several different cases,” the ISP says.

“The court documents show a lack of care and control, something that can easily be taken advantage of by individuals with shady motives. The findings and discoveries of this investigation are strengthened by the pure numbers mentioned in the beginning which clearly show how one party almost always wins.

“If this is caused by bias, cheating, partiality, bribes, political agenda, conspiracy or pure coincidence we can’t say for sure, but the fact that this process has mainly generated money for the film industry, while citizens have been robbed of their personal integrity and legal certainty, indicates what forces lie behind this machinery,” Bahnhof’s Lindahl concludes.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

Friday Squid Blogging: Do Cephalopods Contain Alien DNA?

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/06/friday_squid_bl_627.html

Maybe not DNA, but biological somethings.

Cause of Cambrian explosion — Terrestrial or Cosmic?“:

Abstract: We review the salient evidence consistent with or predicted by the Hoyle-Wickramasinghe (H-W) thesis of Cometary (Cosmic) Biology. Much of this physical and biological evidence is multifactorial. One particular focus are the recent studies which date the emergence of the complex retroviruses of vertebrate lines at or just before the Cambrian Explosion of ~500 Ma. Such viruses are known to be plausibly associated with major evolutionary genomic processes. We believe this coincidence is not fortuitous but is consistent with a key prediction of H-W theory whereby major extinction-diversification evolutionary boundaries coincide with virus-bearing cometary-bolide bombardment events. A second focus is the remarkable evolution of intelligent complexity (Cephalopods) culminating in the emergence of the Octopus. A third focus concerns the micro-organism fossil evidence contained within meteorites as well as the detection in the upper atmosphere of apparent incoming life-bearing particles from space. In our view the totality of the multifactorial data and critical analyses assembled by Fred Hoyle, Chandra Wickramasinghe and their many colleagues since the 1960s leads to a very plausible conclusion — life may have been seeded here on Earth by life-bearing comets as soon as conditions on Earth allowed it to flourish (about or just before 4.1 Billion years ago); and living organisms such as space-resistant and space-hardy bacteria, viruses, more complex eukaryotic cells, fertilised ova and seeds have been continuously delivered ever since to Earth so being one important driver of further terrestrial evolution which has resulted in considerable genetic diversity and which has led to the emergence of mankind.

Two commentaries.

This is almost certainly not true.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

Protecting coral reefs with Nemo-Pi, the underwater monitor

Post Syndicated from Janina Ander original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/coral-reefs-nemo-pi/

The German charity Save Nemo works to protect coral reefs, and they are developing Nemo-Pi, an underwater “weather station” that monitors ocean conditions. Right now, you can vote for Save Nemo in the Google.org Impact Challenge.

Nemo-Pi — Save Nemo

Save Nemo

The organisation says there are two major threats to coral reefs: divers, and climate change. To make diving saver for reefs, Save Nemo installs buoy anchor points where diving tour boats can anchor without damaging corals in the process.

reef damaged by anchor
boat anchored at buoy

In addition, they provide dos and don’ts for how to behave on a reef dive.

The Nemo-Pi

To monitor the effects of climate change, and to help divers decide whether conditions are right at a reef while they’re still on shore, Save Nemo is also in the process of perfecting Nemo-Pi.

Nemo-Pi schematic — Nemo-Pi — Save Nemo

This Raspberry Pi-powered device is made up of a buoy, a solar panel, a GPS device, a Pi, and an array of sensors. Nemo-Pi measures water conditions such as current, visibility, temperature, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide concentrations, and pH. It also uploads its readings live to a public webserver.

Inside the Nemo-Pi device — Save Nemo
Inside the Nemo-Pi device — Save Nemo
Inside the Nemo-Pi device — Save Nemo

The Save Nemo team is currently doing long-term tests of Nemo-Pi off the coast of Thailand and Indonesia. They are also working on improving the device’s power consumption and durability, and testing prototypes with the Raspberry Pi Zero W.

web dashboard — Nemo-Pi — Save Nemo

The web dashboard showing live Nemo-Pi data

Long-term goals

Save Nemo aims to install a network of Nemo-Pis at shallow reefs (up to 60 metres deep) in South East Asia. Then diving tour companies can check the live data online and decide day-to-day whether tours are feasible. This will lower the impact of humans on reefs and help the local flora and fauna survive.

Coral reefs with fishes

A healthy coral reef

Nemo-Pi data may also be useful for groups lobbying for reef conservation, and for scientists and activists who want to shine a spotlight on the awful effects of climate change on sea life, such as coral bleaching caused by rising water temperatures.

Bleached coral

A bleached coral reef

Vote now for Save Nemo

If you want to help Save Nemo in their mission today, vote for them to win the Google.org Impact Challenge:

  1. Head to the voting web page
  2. Click “Abstimmen” in the footer of the page to vote
  3. Click “JA” in the footer to confirm

Voting is open until 6 June. You can also follow Save Nemo on Facebook or Twitter. We think this organisation is doing valuable work, and that their projects could be expanded to reefs across the globe. It’s fantastic to see the Raspberry Pi being used to help protect ocean life.

The post Protecting coral reefs with Nemo-Pi, the underwater monitor appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Amazon SageMaker Updates – Tokyo Region, CloudFormation, Chainer, and GreenGrass ML

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/sagemaker-tokyo-summit-2018/

Today, at the AWS Summit in Tokyo we announced a number of updates and new features for Amazon SageMaker. Starting today, SageMaker is available in Asia Pacific (Tokyo)! SageMaker also now supports CloudFormation. A new machine learning framework, Chainer, is now available in the SageMaker Python SDK, in addition to MXNet and Tensorflow. Finally, support for running Chainer models on several devices was added to AWS Greengrass Machine Learning.

Amazon SageMaker Chainer Estimator


Chainer is a popular, flexible, and intuitive deep learning framework. Chainer networks work on a “Define-by-Run” scheme, where the network topology is defined dynamically via forward computation. This is in contrast to many other frameworks which work on a “Define-and-Run” scheme where the topology of the network is defined separately from the data. A lot of developers enjoy the Chainer scheme since it allows them to write their networks with native python constructs and tools.

Luckily, using Chainer with SageMaker is just as easy as using a TensorFlow or MXNet estimator. In fact, it might even be a bit easier since it’s likely you can take your existing scripts and use them to train on SageMaker with very few modifications. With TensorFlow or MXNet users have to implement a train function with a particular signature. With Chainer your scripts can be a little bit more portable as you can simply read from a few environment variables like SM_MODEL_DIR, SM_NUM_GPUS, and others. We can wrap our existing script in a if __name__ == '__main__': guard and invoke it locally or on sagemaker.


import argparse
import os

if __name__ =='__main__':

    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()

    # hyperparameters sent by the client are passed as command-line arguments to the script.
    parser.add_argument('--epochs', type=int, default=10)
    parser.add_argument('--batch-size', type=int, default=64)
    parser.add_argument('--learning-rate', type=float, default=0.05)

    # Data, model, and output directories
    parser.add_argument('--output-data-dir', type=str, default=os.environ['SM_OUTPUT_DATA_DIR'])
    parser.add_argument('--model-dir', type=str, default=os.environ['SM_MODEL_DIR'])
    parser.add_argument('--train', type=str, default=os.environ['SM_CHANNEL_TRAIN'])
    parser.add_argument('--test', type=str, default=os.environ['SM_CHANNEL_TEST'])

    args, _ = parser.parse_known_args()

    # ... load from args.train and args.test, train a model, write model to args.model_dir.

Then, we can run that script locally or use the SageMaker Python SDK to launch it on some GPU instances in SageMaker. The hyperparameters will get passed in to the script as CLI commands and the environment variables above will be autopopulated. When we call fit the input channels we pass will be populated in the SM_CHANNEL_* environment variables.


from sagemaker.chainer.estimator import Chainer
# Create my estimator
chainer_estimator = Chainer(
    entry_point='example.py',
    train_instance_count=1,
    train_instance_type='ml.p3.2xlarge',
    hyperparameters={'epochs': 10, 'batch-size': 64}
)
# Train my estimator
chainer_estimator.fit({'train': train_input, 'test': test_input})

# Deploy my estimator to a SageMaker Endpoint and get a Predictor
predictor = chainer_estimator.deploy(
    instance_type="ml.m4.xlarge",
    initial_instance_count=1
)

Now, instead of bringing your own docker container for training and hosting with Chainer, you can just maintain your script. You can see the full sagemaker-chainer-containers on github. One of my favorite features of the new container is built-in chainermn for easy multi-node distribution of your chainer training jobs.

There’s a lot more documentation and information available in both the README and the example notebooks.

AWS GreenGrass ML with Chainer

AWS GreenGrass ML now includes a pre-built Chainer package for all devices powered by Intel Atom, NVIDIA Jetson, TX2, and Raspberry Pi. So, now GreenGrass ML provides pre-built packages for TensorFlow, Apache MXNet, and Chainer! You can train your models on SageMaker then easily deploy it to any GreenGrass-enabled device using GreenGrass ML.

JAWS UG

I want to give a quick shout out to all of our wonderful and inspirational friends in the JAWS UG who attended the AWS Summit in Tokyo today. I’ve very much enjoyed seeing your pictures of the summit. Thanks for making Japan an amazing place for AWS developers! I can’t wait to visit again and meet with all of you.

Randall

1834: The First Cyberattack

Post Syndicated from Bruce Schneier original https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2018/05/1834_the_first_.html

Tom Standage has a great story of the first cyberattack against a telegraph network.

The Blanc brothers traded government bonds at the exchange in the city of Bordeaux, where information about market movements took several days to arrive from Paris by mail coach. Accordingly, traders who could get the information more quickly could make money by anticipating these movements. Some tried using messengers and carrier pigeons, but the Blanc brothers found a way to use the telegraph line instead. They bribed the telegraph operator in the city of Tours to introduce deliberate errors into routine government messages being sent over the network.

The telegraph’s encoding system included a “backspace” symbol that instructed the transcriber to ignore the previous character. The addition of a spurious character indicating the direction of the previous day’s market movement, followed by a backspace, meant the text of the message being sent was unaffected when it was written out for delivery at the end of the line. But this extra character could be seen by another accomplice: a former telegraph operator who observed the telegraph tower outside Bordeaux with a telescope, and then passed on the news to the Blancs. The scam was only uncovered in 1836, when the crooked operator in Tours fell ill and revealed all to a friend, who he hoped would take his place. The Blanc brothers were put on trial, though they could not be convicted because there was no law against misuse of data networks. But the Blancs’ pioneering misuse of the French network qualifies as the world’s first cyber-attack.

New – Pay-per-Session Pricing for Amazon QuickSight, Another Region, and Lots More

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-pay-per-session-pricing-for-amazon-quicksight-another-region-and-lots-more/

Amazon QuickSight is a fully managed cloud business intelligence system that gives you Fast & Easy to Use Business Analytics for Big Data. QuickSight makes business analytics available to organizations of all shapes and sizes, with the ability to access data that is stored in your Amazon Redshift data warehouse, your Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) relational databases, flat files in S3, and (via connectors) data stored in on-premises MySQL, PostgreSQL, and SQL Server databases. QuickSight scales to accommodate tens, hundreds, or thousands of users per organization.

Today we are launching a new, session-based pricing option for QuickSight, along with additional region support and other important new features. Let’s take a look at each one:

Pay-per-Session Pricing
Our customers are making great use of QuickSight and take full advantage of the power it gives them to connect to data sources, create reports, and and explore visualizations.

However, not everyone in an organization needs or wants such powerful authoring capabilities. Having access to curated data in dashboards and being able to interact with the data by drilling down, filtering, or slicing-and-dicing is more than adequate for their needs. Subscribing them to a monthly or annual plan can be seen as an unwarranted expense, so a lot of such casual users end up not having access to interactive data or BI.

In order to allow customers to provide all of their users with interactive dashboards and reports, the Enterprise Edition of Amazon QuickSight now allows Reader access to dashboards on a Pay-per-Session basis. QuickSight users are now classified as Admins, Authors, or Readers, with distinct capabilities and prices:

Authors have access to the full power of QuickSight; they can establish database connections, upload new data, create ad hoc visualizations, and publish dashboards, all for $9 per month (Standard Edition) or $18 per month (Enterprise Edition).

Readers can view dashboards, slice and dice data using drill downs, filters and on-screen controls, and download data in CSV format, all within the secure QuickSight environment. Readers pay $0.30 for 30 minutes of access, with a monthly maximum of $5 per reader.

Admins have all authoring capabilities, and can manage users and purchase SPICE capacity in the account. The QuickSight admin now has the ability to set the desired option (Author or Reader) when they invite members of their organization to use QuickSight. They can extend Reader invites to their entire user base without incurring any up-front or monthly costs, paying only for the actual usage.

To learn more, visit the QuickSight Pricing page.

A New Region
QuickSight is now available in the Asia Pacific (Tokyo) Region:

The UI is in English, with a localized version in the works.

Hourly Data Refresh
Enterprise Edition SPICE data sets can now be set to refresh as frequently as every hour. In the past, each data set could be refreshed up to 5 times a day. To learn more, read Refreshing Imported Data.

Access to Data in Private VPCs
This feature was launched in preview form late last year, and is now available in production form to users of the Enterprise Edition. As I noted at the time, you can use it to implement secure, private communication with data sources that do not have public connectivity, including on-premises data in Teradata or SQL Server, accessed over an AWS Direct Connect link. To learn more, read Working with AWS VPC.

Parameters with On-Screen Controls
QuickSight dashboards can now include parameters that are set using on-screen dropdown, text box, numeric slider or date picker controls. The default value for each parameter can be set based on the user name (QuickSight calls this a dynamic default). You could, for example, set an appropriate default based on each user’s office location, department, or sales territory. Here’s an example:

To learn more, read about Parameters in QuickSight.

URL Actions for Linked Dashboards
You can now connect your QuickSight dashboards to external applications by defining URL actions on visuals. The actions can include parameters, and become available in the Details menu for the visual. URL actions are defined like this:

You can use this feature to link QuickSight dashboards to third party applications (e.g. Salesforce) or to your own internal applications. Read Custom URL Actions to learn how to use this feature.

Dashboard Sharing
You can now share QuickSight dashboards across every user in an account.

Larger SPICE Tables
The per-data set limit for SPICE tables has been raised from 10 GB to 25 GB.

Upgrade to Enterprise Edition
The QuickSight administrator can now upgrade an account from Standard Edition to Enterprise Edition with a click. This enables provisioning of Readers with pay-per-session pricing, private VPC access, row-level security for dashboards and data sets, and hourly refresh of data sets. Enterprise Edition pricing applies after the upgrade.

Available Now
Everything I listed above is available now and you can start using it today!

You can try QuickSight for 60 days at no charge, and you can also attend our June 20th Webinar.

Jeff;

 

Hiring a Director of Sales

Post Syndicated from Yev original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hiring-a-director-of-sales/

Backblaze is hiring a Director of Sales. This is a critical role for Backblaze as we continue to grow the team. We need a strong leader who has experience in scaling a sales team and who has an excellent track record for exceeding goals by selling Software as a Service (SaaS) solutions. In addition, this leader will need to be highly motivated, as well as able to create and develop a highly-motivated, success oriented sales team that has fun and enjoys what they do.

The History of Backblaze from our CEO
In 2007, after a friend’s computer crash caused her some suffering, we realized that with every photo, video, song, and document going digital, everyone would eventually lose all of their information. Five of us quit our jobs to start a company with the goal of making it easy for people to back up their data.

Like many startups, for a while we worked out of a co-founder’s one-bedroom apartment. Unlike most startups, we made an explicit agreement not to raise funding during the first year. We would then touch base every six months and decide whether to raise or not. We wanted to focus on building the company and the product, not on pitching and slide decks. And critically, we wanted to build a culture that understood money comes from customers, not the magical VC giving tree. Over the course of 5 years we built a profitable, multi-million dollar revenue business — and only then did we raise a VC round.

Fast forward 10 years later and our world looks quite different. You’ll have some fantastic assets to work with:

  • A brand millions recognize for openness, ease-of-use, and affordability.
  • A computer backup service that stores over 500 petabytes of data, has recovered over 30 billion files for hundreds of thousands of paying customers — most of whom self-identify as being the people that find and recommend technology products to their friends.
  • Our B2 service that provides the lowest cost cloud storage on the planet at 1/4th the price Amazon, Google or Microsoft charges. While being a newer product on the market, it already has over 100,000 IT and developers signed up as well as an ecosystem building up around it.
  • A growing, profitable and cash-flow positive company.
  • And last, but most definitely not least: a great sales team.

You might be saying, “sounds like you’ve got this under control — why do you need me?” Don’t be misled. We need you. Here’s why:

  • We have a great team, but we are in the process of expanding and we need to develop a structure that will easily scale and provide the most success to drive revenue.
  • We just launched our outbound sales efforts and we need someone to help develop that into a fully successful program that’s building a strong pipeline and closing business.
  • We need someone to work with the marketing department and figure out how to generate more inbound opportunities that the sales team can follow up on and close.
  • We need someone who will work closely in developing the skills of our current sales team and build a path for career growth and advancement.
  • We want someone to manage our Customer Success program.

So that’s a bit about us. What are we looking for in you?

Experience: As a sales leader, you will strategically build and drive the territory’s sales pipeline by assembling and leading a skilled team of sales professionals. This leader should be familiar with generating, developing and closing software subscription (SaaS) opportunities. We are looking for a self-starter who can manage a team and make an immediate impact of selling our Backup and Cloud Storage solutions. In this role, the sales leader will work closely with the VP of Sales, marketing staff, and service staff to develop and implement specific strategic plans to achieve and exceed revenue targets, including new business acquisition as well as build out our customer success program.

Leadership: We have an experienced team who’s brought us to where we are today. You need to have the people and management skills to get them excited about working with you. You need to be a strong leader and compassionate about developing and supporting your team.

Data driven and creative: The data has to show something makes sense before we scale it up. However, without creativity, it’s easy to say “the data shows it’s impossible” or to find a local maximum. Whether it’s deciding how to scale the team, figuring out what our outbound sales efforts should look like or putting a plan in place to develop the team for career growth, we’ve seen a bit of creativity get us places a few extra dollars couldn’t.

Jive with our culture: Strong leaders affect culture and the person we hire for this role may well shape, not only fit into, ours. But to shape the culture you have to be accepted by the organism, which means a certain set of shared values. We default to openness with our team, our customers, and everyone if possible. We love initiative — without arrogance or dictatorship. We work to create a place people enjoy showing up to work. That doesn’t mean ping pong tables and foosball (though we do try to have perks & fun), but it means people are friendly, non-political, working to build a good service but also a good place to work.

Do the work: Ideas and strategy are critical, but good execution makes them happen. We’re looking for someone who can help the team execute both from the perspective of being capable of guiding and organizing, but also someone who is hands-on themselves.

Additional Responsibilities needed for this role:

  • Recruit, coach, mentor, manage and lead a team of sales professionals to achieve yearly sales targets. This includes closing new business and expanding upon existing clientele.
  • Expand the customer success program to provide the best customer experience possible resulting in upsell opportunities and a high retention rate.
  • Develop effective sales strategies and deliver compelling product demonstrations and sales pitches.
  • Acquire and develop the appropriate sales tools to make the team efficient in their daily work flow.
  • Apply a thorough understanding of the marketplace, industry trends, funding developments, and products to all management activities and strategic sales decisions.
  • Ensure that sales department operations function smoothly, with the goal of facilitating sales and/or closings; operational responsibilities include accurate pipeline reporting and sales forecasts.
  • This position will report directly to the VP of Sales and will be staffed in our headquarters in San Mateo, CA.

Requirements:

  • 7 – 10+ years of successful sales leadership experience as measured by sales performance against goals.
    Experience in developing skill sets and providing career growth and opportunities through advancement of team members.
  • Background in selling SaaS technologies with a strong track record of success.
  • Strong presentation and communication skills.
  • Must be able to travel occasionally nationwide.
  • BA/BS degree required

Think you want to join us on this adventure?
Send an email to jobscontact@backblaze.com with the subject “Director of Sales.” (Recruiters and agencies, please don’t email us.) Include a resume and answer these two questions:

  1. How would you approach evaluating the current sales team and what is your process for developing a growth strategy to scale the team?
  2. What are the goals you would set for yourself in the 3 month and 1-year timeframes?

Thank you for taking the time to read this and I hope that this sounds like the opportunity for which you’ve been waiting.

Backblaze is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

The post Hiring a Director of Sales appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Amazon Neptune Generally Available

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-neptune-generally-available/

Amazon Neptune is now Generally Available in US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), and EU (Ireland). Amazon Neptune is a fast, reliable, fully-managed graph database service that makes it easy to build and run applications that work with highly connected datasets. At the core of Neptune is a purpose-built, high-performance graph database engine optimized for storing billions of relationships and querying the graph with millisecond latencies. Neptune supports two popular graph models, Property Graph and RDF, through Apache TinkerPop Gremlin and SPARQL, allowing you to easily build queries that efficiently navigate highly connected datasets. Neptune can be used to power everything from recommendation engines and knowledge graphs to drug discovery and network security. Neptune is fully-managed with automatic minor version upgrades, backups, encryption, and fail-over. I wrote about Neptune in detail for AWS re:Invent last year and customers have been using the preview and providing great feedback that the team has used to prepare the service for GA.

Now that Amazon Neptune is generally available there are a few changes from the preview:

Launching an Amazon Neptune Cluster

Launching a Neptune cluster is as easy as navigating to the AWS Management Console and clicking create cluster. Of course you can also launch with CloudFormation, the CLI, or the SDKs.

You can monitor your cluster health and the health of individual instances through Amazon CloudWatch and the console.

Additional Resources

We’ve created two repos with some additional tools and examples here. You can expect continuous development on these repos as we add additional tools and examples.

  • Amazon Neptune Tools Repo
    This repo has a useful tool for converting GraphML files into Neptune compatible CSVs for bulk loading from S3.
  • Amazon Neptune Samples Repo
    This repo has a really cool example of building a collaborative filtering recommendation engine for video game preferences.

Purpose Built Databases

There’s an industry trend where we’re moving more and more onto purpose-built databases. Developers and businesses want to access their data in the format that makes the most sense for their applications. As cloud resources make transforming large datasets easier with tools like AWS Glue, we have a lot more options than we used to for accessing our data. With tools like Amazon Redshift, Amazon Athena, Amazon Aurora, Amazon DynamoDB, and more we get to choose the best database for the job or even enable entirely new use-cases. Amazon Neptune is perfect for workloads where the data is highly connected across data rich edges.

I’m really excited about graph databases and I see a huge number of applications. Looking for ideas of cool things to build? I’d love to build a web crawler in AWS Lambda that uses Neptune as the backing store. You could further enrich it by running Amazon Comprehend or Amazon Rekognition on the text and images found and creating a search engine on top of Neptune.

As always, feel free to reach out in the comments or on twitter to provide any feedback!

Randall