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Talk Transcript: How Cloudflare Thinks About Security

Post Syndicated from John Graham-Cumming original https://blog.cloudflare.com/talk-transcript-how-cloudflare-thinks-about-security/

Talk Transcript: How Cloudflare Thinks About Security
Image courtesy of Unbabel

Talk Transcript: How Cloudflare Thinks About Security

This is the text I used for a talk at artificial intelligence powered translation platform, Unbabel, in Lisbon on September 25, 2019.

Bom dia. Eu sou John Graham-Cumming o CTO do Cloudflare. E agora eu vou falar em inglês.

Thanks for inviting me to talk about Cloudflare and how we think about security. I’m about to move to Portugal permanently so I hope I’ll be able to do this talk in Portuguese in a few months.

I know that most of you don’t have English as a first language so I’m going to speak a little more deliberately than usual. And I’ll make the text of this talk available for you to read.

But there are no slides today.

I’m going to talk about how Cloudflare thinks about internal security, how we protect ourselves and how we secure our day to day work. This isn’t a talk about Cloudflare’s products.

Culture

Let’s begin with culture.

Many companies have culture statements. I think almost 100% of these are pure nonsense. Culture is how you act every day, not words written in the wall.

One significant piece of company culture is the internal Security Incident mailing list which anyone in the company can send a message to. And they do! So far this month there have been 55 separate emails to that list reporting a security problem.

These mails come from all over the company, from every department. Two to three per day. And each mail is investigated by the internal security team. Each mail is assigned a Security Incident issue in our internal Atlassian Jira instance.

People send: reports that their laptop or phone has been stolen (their credentials get immediately invalidated), suspicions about a weird email that they’ve received (it might be phishing or malware in an attachment), a concern about physical security (for example, someone wanders into the office and starts asking odd questions), that they clicked on a bad link, that they lost their access card, and, occasionally, a security concern about our product.

Things like stolen or lost laptops and phones happen way more often than you’d imagine. We seem to lose about two per month. For that reason and many others we use full disk encryption on devices, complex passwords and two factor auth on every service employees need to access. And we discourage anyone storing anything on my laptop and ask them to primarily use cloud apps for work. Plus we centrally manage machines and can remote wipe.

We have a 100% blame free culture. You clicked on a weird link? We’ll help you. Lost your phone? We’ll help you. Think you might have been phished? We’ll help you.

This has led to a culture of reporting problems, however minor, when they occur. It’s our first line of internal defense.

Just this month I clicked on a link that sent my web browser crazy hopping through redirects until I ended up at a bad place. I reported that to the mailing list.

I’ve never worked anywhere with such a strong culture of reporting security problems big and small.

Hackers

We also use HackerOne to let people report security problems from the outside. This month we’ve received 14 reports of security problems. To be honest, most of what we receive through HackerOne is very low priority. People run automated scanning tools and report the smallest of configuration problems, or, quite often, things that they don’t understand but that look like security problems to them. But we triage and handle them all.

And people do on occasion report things that we need to fix.

We also have a private paid bug bounty program where we work with a group of individual hackers (around 150 right now) who get paid for the vulnerabilities that they’ve found.

We’ve found that this combination of a public responsible disclosure program and then a private paid program is working well. We invite the best hackers who come in through the public program to work with us closely in the private program.

Identity

So, that’s all about people, internal and external, reporting problems, vulnerabilities, or attacks. A very short step from that is knowing who the people are.

And that’s where identity and authentication become critical. In fact, as an industry trend identity management and authentication are one of the biggest areas of spending by CSOs and CISOs. And Cloudflare is no different.

OK, well it is different, instead of spending a lot of identity and authentication we’ve built our own solutions.

We did not always have good identity practices. In fact, for many years our systems had different logins and passwords and it was a complete mess. When a new employee started accounts had to be made on Google for email and calendar, on Atlassian for Jira and Wiki, on the VPN, on the WiFi network and then on a myriad of other systems for the blog, HR, SSH, build systems, etc. etc.

And when someone left all that had to be undone. And frequently this was done incorrectly. People would leave and accounts would still be left running for a period of time. This was a huge headache for us and is a huge headache for literally every company.

If I could tell companies one thing they can do to improve their security it would be: sort out identity and authentication. We did and it made things so much better.

This makes the process of bringing someone on board much smoother and the same when they leave. We can control who accesses what systems from a single control panel.

I have one login via a product we built called Cloudflare Access and I can get access to pretty much everything. I looked in my LastPass Vault while writing this talk and there are a total of just five username and password combination and two of those needed deleting because we’ve migrated those systems to Access.

So, yes, we use password managers. And we lock down everything with high quality passwords and two factor authentication. Everyone at Cloudflare has a Yubikey and access to TOTP (such as Google Authenticator). There are three golden rules: all passwords should be created by the password manager, all authentication has to have a second factor and the second factor cannot be SMS.

We had great fun rolling out Yubikeys to the company because we did it during our annual retreat in a single company wide sitting. Each year Cloudflare gets the entire company together (now over 1,000 people) in a hotel for two to three days of working together, learning from outside experts and physical and cultural activities.

Last year the security team gave everyone a pair of physical security tokens (a Yubikey and a Titan Key from Google for Bluetooth) and in an epic session configured everyone’s accounts to use them.

Note: do not attempt to get 500 people to sync Bluetooth devices in the same room at the same time. Bluetooth cannot cope.

Another important thing we implemented is automatic timeout of access to a system. If you don’t use access to a system you lose it. That way we don’t have accounts that might have access to sensitive systems that could potentially be exploited.

Openness

To return to the subject of Culture for a moment an important Cloudflare trait is openness.

Some of you may know that back in 2017 Cloudflare had a horrible bug in our software that became called Cloudbleed. This bug leaked memory from inside our servers into people’s web browsing. Some of that web browsing was being done by search engine crawlers and ended up in the caches of search engines like Google.

We had to do two things: stop the actual bug (this was relatively easy and was done in under an hour) and then clean up the equivalent of an oil spill of data. That took longer (about a week to ten days) and was very complicated.

But from the very first night when we were informed of the problem we began documenting what had happened and what were doing. I opened an EMACS buffer in the dead of night and started keeping a record.

That record turned into a giant disclosure blog post that contained the gory details of the error we made, its consequences and how we reacted once the error was known.

We followed up a few days later with a further long blog post assessing the impact and risk associated with the problem.

This approach to being totally open ended up being a huge success for us. It increased trust in our product and made people want to work with us more.

I was on my way to Berlin to give a talk to a large retailer about Cloudbleed when I suddenly realized that the company I was giving the talk at was NOT a customer. And I asked the salesperson I was with what I was doing.

I walked in to their 1,000 person engineering team all assembled to hear my talk. Afterwards the VP of Engineering thanked me saying that our transparency had made them want to work with us rather than their current vendor. My talk was really a sales pitch.

Similarly, at RSA last year I gave a talk about Cloudbleed and a very large company’s CSO came up and asked to use my talk internally to try to encourage their company to be so open.

When on July 2 this year we had an outage, which wasn’t security related, we once again blogged in incredible detail about what happened. And once again we heard from people about how our transparency mattered to them.

The lesson is that being open about mistakes increases trust. And if people trust you then they’ll tend to tell you when there are problems. I get a ton of reports of potential security problems via Twitter or email.

Change

After Cloudbleed we started changing how we write software. Cloudbleed was caused, in part, by the use of memory-unsafe languages. In that case it was C code that could run past the end of a buffer.

We didn’t want that to happen again and so we’ve prioritized languages where that simply cannot happen. Such as Go and Rust. We were very well known for using Go. If you’ve ever visited a Cloudflare website, or used an app (and you have because of our scale) that uses us for its API then you’ve first done a DNS query to one of our servers.

That DNS query will have been responded to by a Go program called RRDNS.

There’s also a lot of Rust being written at Cloudflare and some of our newer products are being created using it. For example, Firewall Rules which do arbitrary filtering of requests to our customers are handled by a Rust program that needs to be low latency, stable and secure.

Security is a company wide commitment

The other post-Cloudbleed change was that any crashes on our machines came under the spotlight from the very top. If a process crashes I personally get emailed about it. And if the team doesn’t take those crashes seriously they get me poking at them until they do.

We missed the fact that Cloudbleed was crashing our machines and we won’t let that happen again. We use Sentry to correlate information about crashes and the Sentry output is one of the first things I look at in the morning.

Which, I think, brings up an important point. I spoke earlier about our culture of “If you see something weird, say something” but it’s equally important that security comes from the top down.

Our CSO, Joe Sullivan, doesn’t report to me, he reports to the CEO. That sends a clear message about where security sits in the company. But, also, the security team itself isn’t sitting quietly in the corner securing everything.

They are setting standards, acting as trusted advisors, and helping deal with incidents. But their biggest role is to be a source of knowledge for the rest of the company. Everyone at Cloudflare plays a role in keeping us secure.

You might expect me to have access to our all our systems, a passcard that gets me into any room, a login for any service. But the opposite is true: I don’t have access to most things. I don’t need it to get my job done and so I don’t have it.

This makes me a less attractive target for hackers, and we apply the same rule to everyone. If you don’t need access for your job you don’t get it. That’s made a lot easier by the identity and authentication systems and by our rule about timing out access if you don’t use a service. You probably didn’t need it in the first place.

The flip side of all of us owning security is that deliberately doing the wrong thing has severe consequences.

Making a mistake is just fine. The person who wrote the bad line of code that caused Cloudbleed didn’t get fired, the person who wrote the bad regex that brought our service to a halt on July 2 is still with us.‌‌

Detection and Response‌‌

Naturally, things do go wrong internally. Things that didn’t get reported. To do with them we need to detect problems quickly. This is an area where the security team does have real expertise and data.‌‌

We do this by collecting data about how our endpoints (my laptop, a company phone, servers on the edge of our network) are behaving. And this is fed into a homebuilt data platform that allows the security team to alert on anomalies.‌‌

It also allows them to look at historical data in case of a problem that occurred in the past, or to understand when a problem started. ‌‌

Initially the team was going to use a commercial data platform or SIEM but they quickly realized that these platforms are incredibly expensive and they could build their own at a considerably lower price.‌‌

Also, Cloudflare handles a huge amount of data. When you’re looking at operating system level events on machines in 194 cities plus every employee you’re dealing with a huge stream. And the commercial data platforms love to charge by the size of that stream.‌‌

We are integrating internal DNS data, activity on individual machines, network netflow information, badge reader logs and operating system level events to get a complete picture of what’s happening on any machine we own.‌‌

When someone joins Cloudflare they travel to our head office in San Francisco for a week of training. Part of that training involves getting their laptop and setting it up and getting familiar with our internal systems and security.‌‌

During one of these orientation weeks a new employee managed to download malware while setting up their laptop. Our internal detection systems spotted this happening and the security team popped over to the orientation room and helped the employee get a fresh laptop.‌‌

The time between the malware being downloaded and detected was about 40 minutes.‌‌

If you don’t want to build something like this yourself, take a look at Google’s Chronicle product. It’s very cool. ‌‌

One really rich source of data about your organization is DNS. For example, you can often spot malware just by the DNS queries it makes from a machine. If you do one thing then make sure all your machines use a single DNS resolver and get its logs.‌‌‌‌

Edge Security‌‌

In some ways the most interesting part of Cloudflare is the least interesting from a security perspective. Not because there aren’t great technical challenges to securing machines in 194 cities but because some of the more apparently mundane things I’ve talked about how such huge impact.‌‌

Identity, Authentication, Culture, Detection and Response.‌‌

But, of course, the edge needs securing. And it’s a combination of physical data center security and software. ‌‌

To give you one example let’s talk about SSL private keys. Those keys need to be distributed to our machines so that when an SSL connection is made to one of our servers we can respond. But SSL private keys are… private!‌‌

And we have a lot of them. So we have to distribute private key material securely. This is a hard problem. We encrypt the private keys while at rest and in transport with a separate key that is distributed to our edge machines securely. ‌‌

Access to that key is tightly controlled so that no one can start decrypting keys in our database. And if our database leaked then the keys couldn’t be decrypted since the key needed is stored separately.‌‌

And that key is itself GPG encrypted.‌‌

But wait… there’s more!‌‌

We don’t actually want to have decrypted keys stored in any process that accessible from the Internet. So we use a technology called Keyless SSL where the keys are kept by a separate process and accessed only when needed to perform operations.‌‌

And Keyless SSL can run anywhere. For example, it doesn’t have to be on the same machine as the machine handling an SSL connection. It doesn’t even have to be in the same country. Some of our customers make use of that to specify where their keys are distributed to).

Use Cloudflare to secure Cloudflare

One key strategy of Cloudflare is to eat our own dogfood. If you’ve not heard that term before it’s quite common in the US. The idea is that if you’re making food for dogs you should be so confident in its quality that you’d eat it yourself.

Cloudflare does the same for security. We use our own products to secure ourselves. But more than that if we see that there’s a product we don’t currently have in our security toolkit then we’ll go and build it.

Since Cloudflare is a cybersecurity company we face the same challenges as our customers, but we can also build our way out of those challenges. In  this way, our internal security team is also a product team. They help to build or influence the direction of our own products.

The team is also a Cloudflare customer using our products to secure us and we get feedback internally on how well our products work. That makes us more secure and our products better.

Our customers data is more precious than ours‌‌

The data that passes through Cloudflare’s network is private and often very personal. Just think of your web browsing or app use. So we take great care of it.‌‌

We’re handling that data on behalf of our customers. They are trusting us to handle it with care and so we think of it as more precious than our own internal data.‌‌

Of course, we secure both because the security of one is related to the security of the other. But it’s worth thinking about the data you have that, in a way, belongs to your customer and is only in your care.‌‌‌‌

Finally‌‌

I hope this talk has been useful. I’ve tried to give you a sense of how Cloudflare thinks about security and operates. We don’t claim to be the ultimate geniuses of security and would love to hear your thoughts, ideas and experiences so we can improve.‌‌

Security is not static and requires constant attention and part of that attention is listening to what’s worked for others.‌‌

Thank you.‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌

Cloudflare’s new Lisbon office

Post Syndicated from John Graham-Cumming original https://blog.cloudflare.com/cloudflare-lisbon-office/

Cloudflare's new Lisbon office

I was the 24th employee of Cloudflare and the first outside of San Francisco. Working out of my spare bedroom, I wrote a chunk of Cloudflare’s software before starting to recruit a team in London. Today, Cloudflare London, our EMEA headquarters, has more than 200 people working in the historic County Hall building opposite the Houses of Parliament. My spare bedroom is ancient history.

Cloudflare's new Lisbon office
CC BY-SA 2.0 image by Sridhar Saraf

And Cloudflare didn’t stop at London. We now have people in Munich, Singapore, Beijing, Austin, TX, Chicago and Champaign, IL, New York, Washington, DC, San Jose, CA, Miami, FL, and Sydney, Australia, as well as San Francisco and London. And today we’re announcing the establishment of a new technical hub in Lisbon, Portugal. As part of that office opening I will be relocating to Lisbon this summer along with a small number of technical folks from other Cloudflare offices.

We’re recruiting in Lisbon starting today. Go here to see all the current opportunities. We’re looking for people to fill roles in Engineering, Security, Product, Product Strategy, Technology Research, and Customer Support.

Cloudflare's new Lisbon office
CC BY-SA 2.0 Image by Rustam Aliyev

My first real idea of Lisbon dates to 30 years ago with the 1989 publication of John Le Carré’s The Russia House. As real, of course, as any Le Carré view of the world:

[…] ten years ago on a whim Barley Blair, having inherited a stray couple of thousand from a remote aunt, bought himself a scruffy pied-a-terre in Lisbon, where he was accustomed to take periodic rests from the burden of his many-sided soul. It could have been Cornwall, it could have been Provence or Timbuktu. But Lisbon by an accident had got him […]

Cloudflare’s choice of Lisbon, however, came not by way of an accident but a careful search for a new continental European city in which to locate a technical office. I had been invited to Lisbon back in 2014 to speak at SAPO Codebits and been impressed by the size and range of technical talent present at the event. Subsequently, we looked at 45 cities across 29 countries, narrowing down to a final list of three.

Lisbon’s combination of a large and growing existing tech ecosystem, attractive immigration policy, political stability, high standard of living, as well as logistical factors like time zone (the same as the UK) and direct flights to San Francisco made it the clear winner.

Eu começei a aprender Português há três meses… and I’m looking forward to discovering a country and a culture, and building a new technical hub for Cloudflare. We have found a thriving local technology ecosystem, supported both by the government and a myriad of exciting startups, and we look forward to collaborating with them to continue to raise Lisbon’s profile.

BPI Wants Piracy Dealt With Under New UK Internet ‘Clean-Up’ Laws

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/bpi-wants-music-piracy-dealt-with-under-uk-internet-clean-up-laws-180523/

For the past several years, the UK Government has expressed a strong desire to “clean up” the Internet.

Strong emphasis has been placed on making the Internet safer for children but that’s just the tip of a much larger iceberg.

This week, the Government published its response to the Internet Safety Strategy green paper, stating unequivocally that more needs to be done to tackle “online harm”.

Noting that six out of ten people report seeing inappropriate or harmful content online, the Government said that work already underway with social media companies to protect users had borne fruit but overall industry response has been less satisfactory.

As a result, the Government will now carry through with its threat to introduce new legislation, albeit with the assistance of technology companies, children’s charities and other stakeholders.

“Digital technology is overwhelmingly a force for good across the world and we must always champion innovation and change for the better,” said Matt Hancock, Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.

“At the same time I have been clear that we have to address the Wild West elements of the Internet through legislation, in a way that supports innovation. We strongly support technology companies to start up and grow, and we want to work with them to keep our citizens safe.”

While emphasis is being placed on hot-button topics such as cyberbullying and online child exploitation, the Government is clear that it wishes to tackle “the full range” of online harms. That has been greeted by UK music group BPI with a request that the Government introduces new measures to tackle Internet piracy.

In a statement issued this week, BPI chief executive Geoff Taylor welcomed the move towards legislative change and urged the Government to encompass the music industry and beyond.

“This is a vital opportunity to protect consumers and boost the UK’s music and creative industries. The BPI has long pressed for internet intermediaries and online platforms to take responsibility for the content that they promote to users,” Taylor said.

“Government should now take the power in legislation to require online giants to take effective, proactive measures to clean illegal content from their sites and services. This will keep fans away from dodgy sites full of harmful content and prevent criminals from undermining creative businesses that create UK jobs.”

The BPI has published four initial requests, each of which provides food for thought.

The demand to “establish a new fast-track process for blocking illegal sites” is not entirely unexpected, particularly given the expense of launching applications for blocking injunctions at the High Court.

“The BPI has taken a large number of actions against individual websites – 63 injunctions are in place against sites that are wholly or mainly infringing and whose business is simply to profit from criminal activity,” the BPI says.

Those injunctions can be expanded fairly easily to include new sites operating under similar banners or facilitating access to those already covered, but it’s clear the BPI would like something more streamlined. Voluntary schemes, such as the one in place in Portugal, could be an option but it’s unclear how troublesome that could be for ISPs. New legislation could solve that dilemma, however.

Another big thorn in the side for groups like the BPI are people and entities that post infringing content. The BPI is very good at taking these listings down from sites and search engines in particular (more than 600 million requests to date) but it’s a game of whac-a-mole the group would rather not engage in.

With that in mind, the BPI would like the Government to impose new rules that would compel online platforms to stop content from being re-posted after it’s been taken down while removing the accounts of repeat infringers.

Thirdly, the BPI would like the Government to introduce penalties for “online operators” who do not provide “transparent contact and ownership information.” The music group isn’t any more specific than that, but the suggestion is that operators of some sites have a tendency to hide in the shadows, something which frustrates enforcement activity.

Finally, and perhaps most interestingly, the BPI is calling on the Government to legislate for a new “duty of care” for online intermediaries and platforms. Specifically, the BPI wants “effective action” taken against businesses that use the Internet to “encourage” consumers to access content illegally.

While this could easily encompass pirate sites and services themselves, this proposal has the breadth to include a wide range of offenders, from people posting piracy-focused tutorials on monetized YouTube channels to those selling fully-loaded Kodi devices on eBay or social media.

Overall, the BPI clearly wants to place pressure on intermediaries to take action against piracy when they’re in a position to do so, and particularly those who may not have shown much enthusiasm towards industry collaboration in the past.

“Legislation in this Bill, to take powers to intervene with respect to operators that do not co-operate, would bring focus to the roundtable process and ensure that intermediaries take their responsibilities seriously,” the BPI says.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport and the Home Office will now work on a White Paper, to be published later this year, to set out legislation to tackle “online harms”. The BPI and similar entities will hope that the Government takes their concerns on board.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

Singapore ISPs Block 53 Pirate Sites Following MPAA Legal Action

Post Syndicated from Andy original https://torrentfreak.com/singapore-isps-block-53-pirate-sites-following-mpaa-legal-action-180521/

Under increasing pressure from copyright holders, in 2014 Singapore passed amendments to copyright law that allow ISPs to block ‘pirate’ sites.

“The prevalence of online piracy in Singapore turns customers away from legitimate content and adversely affects Singapore’s creative sector,” said then Senior Minister of State for Law Indranee Rajah.

“It can also undermine our reputation as a society that respects the protection of intellectual property.”

After the amendments took effect in December 2014, there was a considerable pause before any websites were targeted. However, in September 2016, at the request of the MPA(A), Solarmovie.ph became the first website ordered to be blocked under Singapore’s amended Copyright Act. The High Court subsequently ordering several major ISPs to disable access to the site.

A new wave of blocks announced this morning are the country’s most significant so far, with dozens of ‘pirate’ sites targeted following a successful application by the MPAA earlier this year.

In total, 53 sites across 154 domains – including those operated by The Pirate Bay plus KickassTorrents and Solarmovie variants – have been rendered inaccessible by ISPs including Singtel, StarHub, M1, MyRepublic and ViewQwest.

“In Singapore, these sites are responsible for a major portion of copyright infringement of films and television shows,” an MPAA spokesman told The Straits Times (paywall).

“This action by rights owners is necessary to protect the creative industry, enabling creators to create and keep their jobs, protect their works, and ensure the continued provision of high-quality content to audiences.”

Before granting a blocking injunction, the High Court must satisfy itself that the proposed online locations meet the threshold of being “flagrantly infringing”. This means that a site like YouTube, which carries a lot of infringing content but is not dedicated to infringement, would not ordinarily get caught up in the dragnet.

Sites considered for blocking must have a primary purpose to infringe, a threshold that is tipped in copyright holders’ favor when the sites’ operators display a lack of respect for copyright law and have already had their domains blocked in other jurisdictions.

The Court also weighs a number of additional factors including whether blocking would place an unacceptable burden on the shoulders of ISPs, whether the blocking demand is technically possible, and whether it will be effective.

In common with other regions such as the UK and Australia, for example, sites targeted for blocking must be informed of the applications made against them, to ensure they’re given a chance to defend themselves in court. No fully-fledged ‘pirate’ site has ever defended a blocking application in Singapore or indeed any jurisdiction in the world.

Finally, should any measures be taken by ‘pirate’ sites to evade an ISP blockade, copyright holders can apply to the Singapore High Court to amend the blocking order. This is similar to the Australian model where each application must be heard on its merits, rather than the UK model where a more streamlined approach is taken.

According to a recent report by Motion Picture Association Canada, at least 42 countries are now obligated to block infringing sites. In Europe alone, 1,800 sites and 5,300 domains have been rendered inaccessible, with Portugal, Italy, the UK, and Denmark leading the way.

In Canada, where copyright holders are lobbying hard for a site-blocking regime of their own, there’s pressure to avoid the “uncertain, slow and expensive” route of going through the courts.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

Mission Space Lab flight status announced!

Post Syndicated from Erin Brindley original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/mission-space-lab-flight-status-announced/

In September of last year, we launched our 2017/2018 Astro Pi challenge with our partners at the European Space Agency (ESA). Students from ESA membership and associate countries had the chance to design science experiments and write code to be run on one of our two Raspberry Pis on the International Space Station (ISS).

Astro Pi Mission Space Lab logo

Submissions for the Mission Space Lab challenge have just closed, and the results are in! Students had the opportunity to design an experiment for one of the following two themes:

  • Life in space
    Making use of Astro Pi Vis (Ed) in the European Columbus module to learn about the conditions inside the ISS.
  • Life on Earth
    Making use of Astro Pi IR (Izzy), which will be aimed towards the Earth through a window to learn about Earth from space.

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst, speaking from the replica of the Columbus module at the European Astronaut Center in Cologne, has a message for all Mission Space Lab participants:

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst congratulates Astro Pi 2017-18 winners

Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://rpf.io/ytsub Help us reach a wider audience by translating our video content: http://rpf.io/yttranslate Buy a Raspberry Pi from one of our Approved Resellers: http://rpf.io/ytproducts Find out more about the Raspberry Pi Foundation: Raspberry Pi http://rpf.io/ytrpi Code Club UK http://rpf.io/ytccuk Code Club International http://rpf.io/ytcci CoderDojo http://rpf.io/ytcd Check out our free online training courses: http://rpf.io/ytfl Find your local Raspberry Jam event: http://rpf.io/ytjam Work through our free online projects: http://rpf.io/ytprojects Do you have a question about your Raspberry Pi?

Flight status

We had a total of 212 Mission Space Lab entries from 22 countries. Of these, a 114 fantastic projects have been given flight status, and the teams’ project code will run in space!

But they’re not winners yet. In April, the code will be sent to the ISS, and then the teams will receive back their experimental data. Next, to get deeper insight into the process of scientific endeavour, they will need produce a final report analysing their findings. Winners will be chosen based on the merit of their final report, and the winning teams will get exclusive prizes. Check the list below to see if your team got flight status.

Belgium

Flight status achieved:

  • Team De Vesten, Campus De Vesten, Antwerpen
  • Ursa Major, CoderDojo Belgium, West-Vlaanderen
  • Special operations STEM, Sint-Claracollege, Antwerpen

Canada

Flight status achieved:

  • Let It Grow, Branksome Hall, Toronto
  • The Dark Side of Light, Branksome Hall, Toronto
  • Genie On The ISS, Branksome Hall, Toronto
  • Byte by PIthons, Youth Tech Education Society & Kid Code Jeunesse, Edmonton
  • The Broadviewnauts, Broadview, Ottawa

Czech Republic

Flight status achieved:

  • BLEK, Střední Odborná Škola Blatná, Strakonice

Denmark

Flight status achieved:

  • 2y Infotek, Nærum Gymnasium, Nærum
  • Equation Quotation, Allerød Gymnasium, Lillerød
  • Team Weather Watchers, Allerød Gymnasium, Allerød
  • Space Gardners, Nærum Gymnasium, Nærum

Finland

Flight status achieved:

  • Team Aurora, Hyvinkään yhteiskoulun lukio, Hyvinkää

France

Flight status achieved:

  • INC2, Lycée Raoul Follereau, Bourgogne
  • Space Project SP4, Lycée Saint-Paul IV, Reunion Island
  • Dresseurs2Python, clg Albert CAMUS, essonne
  • Lazos, Lycée Aux Lazaristes, Rhone
  • The space nerds, Lycée Saint André Colmar, Alsace
  • Les Spationautes Valériquais, lycée de la Côte d’Albâtre, Normandie
  • AstroMega, Institut de Genech, north
  • Al’Crew, Lycée Algoud-Laffemas, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes
  • AstroPython, clg Albert CAMUS, essonne
  • Aruden Corp, Lycée Pablo Neruda, Normandie
  • HeroSpace, clg Albert CAMUS, essonne
  • GalaXess [R]evolution, Lycée Saint Cricq, Nouvelle-Aquitaine
  • AstroBerry, clg Albert CAMUS, essonne
  • Ambitious Girls, Lycée Adam de Craponne, PACA

Germany

Flight status achieved:

  • Uschis, St. Ursula Gymnasium Freiburg im Breisgau, Breisgau
  • Dosi-Pi, Max-Born-Gymnasium Germering, Bavaria

Greece

Flight status achieved:

  • Deep Space Pi, 1o Epal Grevenon, Grevena
  • Flox Team, 1st Lyceum of Kifissia, Attiki
  • Kalamaria Space Team, Second Lyceum of Kalamaria, Central Macedonia
  • The Earth Watchers, STEM Robotics Academy, Thessaly
  • Celestial_Distance, Gymnasium of Kanithos, Sterea Ellada – Evia
  • Pi Stars, Primary School of Rododaphne, Achaias
  • Flarions, 5th Primary School of Salamina, Attica

Ireland

Flight status achieved:

  • Plant Parade, Templeogue College, Leinster
  • For Peats Sake, Templeogue College, Leinster
  • CoderDojo Clonakilty, Co. Cork

Italy

Flight status achieved:

  • Trentini DOP, CoderDojo Trento, TN
  • Tarantino Space Lab, Liceo G. Tarantino, BA
  • Murgia Sky Lab, Liceo G. Tarantino, BA
  • Enrico Fermi, Liceo XXV Aprile, Veneto
  • Team Lampone, CoderDojoTrento, TN
  • GCC, Gali Code Club, Trentino Alto Adige/Südtirol
  • Another Earth, IISS “Laporta/Falcone-Borsellino”
  • Anti Pollution Team, IIS “L. Einaudi”, Sicily
  • e-HAND, Liceo Statale Scientifico e Classico ‘Ettore Majorana’, Lombardia
  • scossa team, ITTS Volterra, Venezia
  • Space Comet Sisters, Scuola don Bosco, Torino

Luxembourg

Flight status achieved:

  • Spaceballs, Atert Lycée Rédange, Diekirch
  • Aline in space, Lycée Aline Mayrisch Luxembourg (LAML)

Poland

Flight status achieved:

  • AstroLeszczynPi, I Liceum Ogolnoksztalcace im. Krola Stanislawa Leszczynskiego w Jasle, podkarpackie
  • Astrokompasy, High School nr XVII in Wrocław named after Agnieszka Osiecka, Lower Silesian
  • Cosmic Investigators, Publiczna Szkoła Podstawowa im. Św. Jadwigi Królowej w Rzezawie, Małopolska
  • ApplePi, III Liceum Ogólnokształcące im. prof. T. Kotarbińskiego w Zielonej Górze, Lubusz Voivodeship
  • ELE Society 2, Zespol Szkol Elektronicznych i Samochodowych, Lubuskie
  • ELE Society 1, Zespol Szkol Elektronicznych i Samochodowych, Lubuskie
  • SpaceOn, Szkola Podstawowa nr 12 w Jasle – Gimnazjum Nr 2, Podkarpackie
  • Dewnald Ducks, III Liceum Ogólnokształcące w Zielonej Górze, lubuskie
  • Nova Team, III Liceum Ogolnoksztalcace im. prof. T. Kotarbinskiego, lubuskie district
  • The Moons, Szkola Podstawowa nr 12 w Jasle – Gimnazjum Nr 2, Podkarpackie
  • Live, Szkoła Podstawowa nr 1 im. Tadeusza Kościuszki w Zawierciu, śląskie
  • Storm Hunters, I Liceum Ogolnoksztalcace im. Krola Stanislawa Leszczynskiego w Jasle, podkarpackie
  • DeepSky, Szkoła Podstawowa nr 1 im. Tadeusza Kościuszki w Zawierciu, śląskie
  • Small Explorers, ZPO Konina, Malopolska
  • AstroZSCL, Zespół Szkół w Czerwionce-Leszczynach, śląskie
  • Orchestra, Szkola Podstawowa nr 12 w Jasle, Podkarpackie
  • ApplePi, I Liceum Ogolnoksztalcace im. Krola Stanislawa Leszczynskiego w Jasle, podkarpackie
  • Green Crew, Szkoła Podstawowa nr 2 w Czeladzi, Silesia

Portugal

Flight status achieved:

  • Magnetics, Escola Secundária João de Deus, Faro
  • ECA_QUEIROS_PI, Secondary School Eça de Queirós, Lisboa
  • ESDMM Pi, Escola Secundária D. Manuel Martins, Setúbal
  • AstroPhysicists, EB 2,3 D. Afonso Henriques, Braga

Romania

Flight status achieved:

  • Caelus, “Tudor Vianu” National High School of Computer Science, District One
  • CodeWarriors, “Tudor Vianu” National High School of Computer Science, District One
  • Dark Phoenix, “Tudor Vianu” National High School of Computer Science, District One
  • ShootingStars, “Tudor Vianu” National High School of Computer Science, District One
  • Astro Pi Carmen Sylva 2, Liceul Teoretic “Carmen Sylva”, Constanta
  • Astro Meridian, Astro Club Meridian 0, Bihor

Slovenia

Flight status achieved:

  • astrOSRence, OS Rence
  • Jakopičevca, Osnovna šola Riharda Jakopiča, Ljubljana

Spain

Flight status achieved:

  • Exea in Orbit, IES Cinco Villas, Zaragoza
  • Valdespartans, IES Valdespartera, Zaragoza
  • Valdespartans2, IES Valdespartera, Zaragoza
  • Astropithecus, Institut de Bruguers, Barcelona
  • SkyPi-line, Colegio Corazón de María, Asturias
  • ClimSOLatic, Colegio Corazón de María, Asturias
  • Científicosdelsaz, IES Profesor Pablo del Saz, Málaga
  • Canarias 2, IES El Calero, Las Palmas
  • Dreamers, M. Peleteiro, A Coruña
  • Canarias 1, IES El Calero, Las Palmas

The Netherlands

Flight status achieved:

  • Team Kaki-FM, Rkbs De Reiger, Noord-Holland

United Kingdom

Flight status achieved:

  • Binco, Teignmouth Community School, Devon
  • 2200 (Saddleworth), Detached Flight Royal Air Force Air Cadets, Lanchashire
  • Whatevernext, Albyn School, Highlands
  • GraviTeam, Limehurst Academy, Leicestershire
  • LSA Digital Leaders, Lytham St Annes Technology and Performing Arts College, Lancashire
  • Mead Astronauts, Mead Community Primary School, Wiltshire
  • STEAMCademy, Castlewood Primary School, West Sussex
  • Lux Quest, CoderDojo Banbridge, Co. Down
  • Temparatus, Dyffryn Taf, Carmarthenshire
  • Discovery STEMers, Discovery STEM Education, South Yorkshire
  • Code Inverness, Code Club Inverness, Highland
  • JJB, Ashton Sixth Form College, Tameside
  • Astro Lab, East Kent College, Kent
  • The Life Savers, Scratch and Python, Middlesex
  • JAAPiT, Taylor Household, Nottingham
  • The Heat Guys, The Archer Academy, Greater London
  • Astro Wantenauts, Wantage C of E Primary School, Oxfordshire
  • Derby Radio Museum, Radio Communication Museum of Great Britain, Derbyshire
  • Bytesyze, King’s College School, Cambridgeshire

Other

Flight status achieved:

  • Intellectual Savage Stars, Lycée français de Luanda, Luanda

 

Congratulations to all successful teams! We are looking forward to reading your reports.

The post Mission Space Lab flight status announced! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

ЕСПЧ: висока степен на защита на свободата на словото при отразяване на съдебната система

Post Syndicated from nellyo original https://nellyo.wordpress.com/2017/09/13/echr_10/

Още едно решение на Съда за правата на човека, в което се обсъжда критичната функция на медиите по отношение на лица от съдебната система. И отново тази предметна област е подчертана като област, представляваща значителен обществен интерес.

*

В решението   по делото Tavares de Almeida Fernandes and Almeida Fernandes v. Portugal  ЕСПЧ констатира нарушение на чл.10 – свобода на изразяване.

В началото са припомнени общи принципи, които Съдът прилага при решенията по чл.10 ЕКПЧ, като се казва [53-59], че

  • Общите принципи за преценка дали намесата в упражняването на правото на свобода на изразяване е “необходима в едно демократично общество” по смисъла на член 10 § 2 от Конвенцията са добре установени в съдебната практика на Съда. Наскоро те бяха обобщени в решенията по дела Bédat v Switzerland   (2016 г.) и Pentikäinen v. Finland [GC] ( 2015 г. ).
  • Журналистическата свобода   обхваща евентуално преувеличаване или дори провокация (вж. Prager и Oberschlick).
  • Чл.10 няма указания за ограничаване на политическото слово или за дебатите по въпроси от обществен интерес (виж Morice  v France 2015 г., с по-нататъшни препратки). Висока степен на защита на свободата на изразяване  обикновено се предоставя, когато се засяга въпрос от обществен интерес, какъвто е случаят по-специално с функционирането на съдебната система (пак там).
  • Съдът   винаги е правил разграничение между твърдения за факти, от една страна,  и оценки. Съществуването на факти може да се докаже, истинността на оценките  – не. Ако обаче дадено твърдение представлява оценка, пропорционалността на намесата зависи от това дали има достатъчна  фактическа основа  за оспорваното твърдение: ако не, тази оценка може да се окаже прекомерна (вж. Lindon, Otchakovsky- Laurens и др. срещу Франция).
  • Защитата, предоставена от член 10 на журналисти във връзка с  въпроси от обществен интерес, е подчинена на условието те да действат добросъвестно и  да предоставят точна и надеждна информация в съответствие с етиката на журналистиката ( виж Божков срещу България 2011 г.). В ситуации, в които има твърдение за факт без достатъчно доказателства  – но журналистът обсъжда въпрос от истински обществен интерес – се проверява дали журналистът е действал професионално и добросъвестно (Касабова срещу България).
  •  Съдът  проверява дали  е постигнат справедлив баланс между защитата на свободата на изразяване  и защитата на доброто име на засегнатите лица. В два съвсем неотдавнашни случая ЕСПЧ продължи да определя  критерии, които трябва да бъдат взети предвид, когато правото на свобода на изразяване се балансира спрямо правото на зачитане на личния живот (Axel Springer AG v Germany  и Von Hannover v Germany (№ 2).
  •  На последно място, естеството и тежестта на наложените санкции са също фактори, които трябва да бъдат взети предвид при оценката на пропорционалността на намесата. Както вече изтъква Съдът, намесата в свободата на изразяване може да има смразяващ ефект върху упражняването на тази свобода (вж. Morice ).
  • Накрая  Съдът напомня, че  взема предвид обстоятелствата и цялостния контекст, в който са били направени съответните изявления (вж.  Morice,  § 162).

Случаят:

португалски журналист пише редакционна статия, озаглавена “Стратегията на паяка”, в която дава мнението си за избора на съдия  на поста председател на Върховния съд.Той е осъден да плати неимуществени вреди за  нарушаване  на доброто име на съдията – постъпка “с отрицателно въздействие върху личната сфера, включително   семейния и професионалния кръг на ищеца”.

Въпросът е в центъра на оживени дебати в Португалия, което националните съдилища пропускат да вземат предвид.  Няма съмнение, че към този въпрос има значителен обществен интерес. Съдът отбелязва изрично, че функционирането на съдебната система,  която е от съществено значение за всяко демократично общество,  е въпрос от обществен интерес (пак там, § 128). Лицата, които са избрани да представляват различните институции в съдебната система, също представляват значителен интерес. Следователно  ограниченията на свободата на изразяване в тази сфера трябва да се тълкуват стриктно.

Според решението вече е добре установено в практиката на Съда, че членовете на съдебната власт, които действат в качеството си на длъжностни лица, могат да бъдат подложени  на  критика в по-широки граници в сравнение с   обикновените граждани (виж  SARL Libération  § 74 , ЕКПЧ 2008). В същото време Съдът многократно подчертава особената роля   на съдебната власт, която като гарант на справедливостта е фундаментална ценност в държава, ръководена от върховенството на закона. Може да се окаже необходимо съдебната власт да бъде защитавана срещу разрушителните атаки, когато са необосновани.

Португалските съдилища приемат, че личният интерес на ищеца за защитата на репутацията му надхвърля правото  на свобода на изразяване. Те намират, inter alia, че някои твърдения в статията  са  прекомерни, надхвърлят границите на приемливата критика и правото на информиране и представляват атака срещу правата на личността на новия председател на ВС.

Според ЕСПЧ:

На първо място  Съдът отбелязва, че тези изявления представляват оценки, при това с достатъчна фактическа основа.

На второ място Съдът приема, че националните съдилища не са коментирали метафоричния тон на оспорваните твърдения и не е обсъдено съдържанието и смисъла им. Те като че ли са разглеждали твърденията изолирано от останалата част от статията. За ЕСПЧ твърденията остават в рамките на допустимите критики и преувеличения. Португалските  съдилища не обясняват в достатъчна степен как журналистът е надхвърлил правото си на критика и защо правото му да изразява своето мнение е трябвало да бъде ограничено.

На последно място, що се отнася до наложеното наказание, Съдът подчертава, че съгласно Конвенцията присъждането на обезщетение   за обида или клевета трябва да е разумно  пропорционално на претърпяната вреда.

В заключение: Съдът не намира,   че намесата “е необходима в едно демократично общество”. Според ЕСПЧ португалските съдилища са превишили предоставената им свобода на преценка по отношение на възможното ограничаване на дебатите от обществен интерес.

Нарушение на член 10 от Конвенцията.

Filed under: Media Law Tagged: еспч

Approved Reseller programme launch PLUS more Pi Zero resellers

Post Syndicated from Mike Buffham original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/approved-reseller/

Ever since the launch of the first Raspberry Pi back in 2012, one thing that has been critical to us is to make our products easy to buy in as many countries as possible.

Buying a Raspberry Pi is certainly much simpler nowadays than it was when we were just starting out. Nevertheless, we want to go even further, and so today we are introducing an Approved Reseller programme. With this programme, we aim to recognise those resellers that represent Raspberry Pi products well, and make purchasing them easy for their customers.

The Raspberry Pi Approved Reseller programme

We’re launching the programme in eleven countries today: the UK, Ireland, France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Greece and South Africa. Over the next few weeks, you will see us expand it to at least 50 countries.

We will link to the Approved Resellers’ websites directly from our Products page via the “Buy now” button. For customers who want to buy for business applications we have also added a “Buy for business” button. After clicking it, you will be able to select your country from a drop down menu. Doing so will link you directly to the local websites of our two licensed partners, Premier Farnell and Electrocomponents.

Our newest Raspberry Pi Zero resellers

On top of this we are also adding 6 new Raspberry Pi Zero resellers, giving 13 countries direct access to the Raspberry Pi Zero for the first time. We are particularly excited that these countries include Brazil and India, since they both have proved difficult to supply in the past.

The full list of new resellers is:

Hong Kong and China

Brazil

Raspberry Pi Brazil

India

Raspberry Pi India

Czech Republic and Slovakia

Raspberry Pi Czech Republic and Slovakia

Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina

Raspberry Pi Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia

Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary

Raspberry Pi Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary

Mexico

Raspberry Pi Mexico

The post Approved Reseller programme launch PLUS more Pi Zero resellers appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

European Astro Pi Challenge winners

Post Syndicated from David Honess original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/european-astro-pi-winners/

In October last year, with the European Space Agency and CNES, we launched the first ever European Astro Pi challenge. We asked students from all across Europe to write code for the flight of French ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet to the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the Proxima mission. Today, we are very excited to announce the winners! First of all, though, we have a very special message from Thomas Pesquet himself, which comes all the way from space…

Thomas Pesquet congratulates Astro Pi participants from space

French ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet floats in to thank all participants in the European Astro Pi challenge. In October last year, together with the European Space Agency, we launched the first ever European Astro Pi challenge for the flight of French ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet to the International Space Station (ISS) as part of mission Proxima.

Thomas also recorded a video in French: you can click here to see it and to enjoy some more of his excellent microgravity acrobatics.

A bit of background

This year’s competition expands on our previous work with British ESA astronaut Tim Peake, in which, together with the UK Space Agency and ESA, we invited UK students to design software experiments to run on board the ISS.

Astro Pi Vis (AKA Ed) on board the ISS. Image from ESA.

In 2015, we built two space-hardened Raspberry Pi units, or Astro Pis, to act as the platform on which to run the students’ code. Affectionately nicknamed Ed and Izzy, the units were launched into space on an Atlas V rocket, arriving at the ISS a few days before Tim Peake. He had a great time running all of the programs, and the data collected was transmitted back to Earth so that the winners could analyse their results and share them with the public.

The European challenge provides the opportunity to design code to be run in space to school students from every ESA member country. To support the participants, we worked with ESA and CPC to design, manufacture, and distribute several hundred free Astro Pi activity kits to the teams who registered. Further support for teachers was provided in the form of three live webinars, a demonstration video, and numerous free educational resources.

Image of Astro Pi kit box

The Astro Pi activity kit used by participants in the European challenge.

The challenge

Thomas Pesquet assigned two missions to the teams:

  • A primary mission, for which teams needed to write code to detect when the crew are working in the Columbus module near the Astro Pi units.
  • A secondary mission, for which teams needed to come up with their own scientific investigation and write the code to execute it.

The deadline for code submissions was 28 February 2017, with the judging taking place the following week. We can now reveal which schools will have the privilege of having their code uploaded to the ISS and run in space.

The proud winners!

Everyone produced great work and the judges found it really tough to narrow the entries down. In addition to the winning submissions, there were a number of teams who had put a great deal of work into their projects, and whose entries have been awarded ‘Highly Commended’ status. These teams will also have their code run on the ISS.

We would like to say a big thank you to everyone who participated. Massive congratulations are due to the winners! We will upload your code digitally using the space-to-ground link over the next few weeks. Your code will be executed, and any files created will be downloaded from space and returned to you via email for analysis.

In no particular order, the winners are:

France

  • Winners
    • @stroteam, Institut de Genech, Hauts-de-France
    • Wierzbinski, École à la maison, Occitanie
    • Les Marsilyens, École J. M. Marsily, PACA
    • MauriacSpaceCoders, Lycée François Mauriac, Nouvelle-Aquitaine
    • Ici-bas, École de Saint-André d’Embrun, PACA
    • Les Astrollinaires, Lycée général et technologique Guillaume Apollinaire, PACA
  • Highly Commended
    • ALTAÏR, Lycée Albert Claveille, Nouvelle Aquitaine
    • GalaXess Reloaded, Lycée Saint-Cricq, Nouvelle Aquitaine
    • Les CM de Neffiès, École Louis Authie, Occitanie
    • Équipe Sciences, Collège Léonce Bourliaguet, Nouvelle Aquitaine
    • Maurois ICN, Lycée André Maurois, Normandie
    • Space Project SP4, Lycée Saint-Paul IV, Île de la Réunion
    • 4eme2 Gymnase Jean Sturm, Gymnase Jean Sturm, Grand Est
    • Astro Pascal dans les étoiles, École Pascal, Île-de-France
    • les-4mis, EREA Alexandre Vialatte, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes
    • Space Cavenne Oddity, École Cavenne, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes
    • Luanda for Space, Lycée Français de Luanda, Angola
      (Note: this is a French international school and the team members have French nationality/citizenship)
    • François Detrille, Lycée Langevin-Wallon, Île-de-France

Greece

  • Winners
    • Delta, TALOS ed-UTH-robotix, Magnesia
    • Weightless Mass, Intercultural Junior High School of Evosmos, Macedonia
    • 49th Astro Pi Teamwork, 49th Elementary School of Patras, Achaia
    • Astro Travellers, 12th Primary School of Petroupolis, Attiki
    • GKGF-1, Gymnasium of Kanithos, Sterea Ellada
  • Highly Commended
    • AstroShot, Lixouri High School, Kefalonia
    • Salamina Rockets Pi, 1st Senior High School of Salamina, Attiki
    • The four Astro-fans, 6th Gymnasio of Veria, Macedonia
    • Samians, 2nd Gymnasio Samou, North Eastern Aegean

United Kingdom

  • Winners
    • Madeley Ad Astra, Madeley Academy, Shropshire
    • Team Dexterity, Dyffryn Taf School, Carmarthenshire
    • The Kepler Kids, St Nicolas C of E Junior School, Berkshire
    • Catterline Pi Bugs, Catterline Primary, Aberdeenshire
    • smileyPi, Westminster School, London
  • Highly Commended
    • South London Raspberry Jam, South London Raspberry Jam, London

Italy

  • Winners
    • Garibaldini, Istituto Comprensivo Rapisardi-Garibaldi, Sicilia
    • Buzz, IIS Verona-Trento, Sicilia
    • Water warmers, Liceo Scientifico Galileo Galilei, Abruzzo
    • Juvara/Einaudi Siracusa, IIS L. Einaudi, Sicilia
    • AstroTeam, IIS Arimondi-Eula, Piemonte

Poland

  • Winners
    • Birnam, Zespół Szkoły i Gimnazjum im. W. Orkana w Niedźwiedziu, Malopolska
    • TechnoZONE, Zespół Szkół nr 2 im. Eugeniusza Kwiatkowskiego, Podkarpacie
    • DeltaV, Gimnazjum nr 49, Województwo śląskie
    • The Safety Crew, MZS Gimnazjum nr 1, Województwo śląskie
    • Warriors, Zespół Szkół Miejskich nr 3 w Jaśle, Podkarpackie
  • Highly Commended
    • The Young Cuiavian Astronomers, Gimnazjum im. Stefana Kardynała Wyszyńskiego w Piotrkowie Kujawskim, Kujawsko-pomorskie
    • AstroLeszczynPi, I Liceum Ogolnokształcace w Jasle im. Krola Stanislawa Leszczynskiego, Podkarpackie

Portugal

  • Winners
    • Sampaionautas, Escola Secundária de Sampaio, Setúbal
    • Labutes Pi, Escola Secundária D. João II, Setúbal
    • AgroSpace Makers, EB 2/3 D. Afonso Henriques, Cávado
    • Zero Gravity, EB 2/3 D. Afonso Henriques, Cávado
    • Lua, Agrupamento de Escolas José Belchior Viegas, Algarve

Romania

  • Winners
    • AstroVianu, Tudor Vianu National High School of Computer Science, Bucharest
    • MiBus Researchers, Mihai Busuioc High School, Iași
    • Cosmos Dreams, Nicolae Balcescu High School, Cluj
    • Carmen Sylva Astro Pi, Liceul Teoretic Carmen Sylva Eforie, Constanța
    • Stargazers, Tudor Vianu National High School of Computer Science, Bucharest

Spain

  • Winners
    • Papaya, IES Sopela, Vizcaya
    • Salesianos-Ubeda, Salesianos Santo Domingo Savio, Andalusia
    • Valdespartans, IES Valdespartera, Aragón
    • Ins Terrassa, Institut Terrassa, Cataluña

Ireland

  • Winner
    • Moonty1, Mayfield Community School, Cork

Germany

  • Winner
    • BSC Behringersdorf Space Center, Labenwolf-Gymnasium, Bayern

Norway

  • Winner
    • Skedsmo Kodeklubb, Kjeller Skole, Akershus

Hungary

  • Winner
    • UltimaSpace, Mihaly Tancsics Grammar School of Kaposvár, Somogy

Belgium

  • Winner
    • Lambda Voyager, Stedelijke Humaniora Dilsen, Limburg

FAQ

Why aren’t all 22 ESA member states listed?

  • Because some countries did not have teams participating in the challenge.

Why do some countries have fewer than five teams?

  • Either because those countries had fewer than five teams qualifying for space flight, or because they had fewer than five teams participating in the challenge.

How will I get my results back from space?

  • After your code has run on the ISS, we will download any files you created and they will be emailed to your teacher.

The post European Astro Pi Challenge winners appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

New product! Raspberry Pi Zero W joins the family

Post Syndicated from Eben Upton original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-zero-w-joins-family/

Today is Raspberry Pi’s fifth birthday: it’s five years since we launched the original Raspberry Pi, selling a hundred thousand units in the first day, and setting us on the road to a lifetime total (so far) of over twelve million units. To celebrate, we’re announcing a new product: meet Raspberry Pi Zero W, a new variant of Raspberry Pi Zero with wireless LAN and Bluetooth, priced at only $10.

Multum in parvo

So what’s the story?

In November 2015, we launched Raspberry Pi Zero, the diminutive $5 entry-level Raspberry Pi. This represented a fivefold reduction in cost over the original Model A: it was cheap enough that we could even stick it on the front cover of The MagPi, risking civil insurrection in newsagents throughout the land.

MagPi issue 40: causing trouble for WHSmith (credit: Adam Nicholls)

Over the ensuing fifteen months, Zero grew a camera connector and found its way into everything from miniature arcade cabinets to electric skateboards. Many of these use cases need wireless connectivity. The homebrew “People in Space” indicator in the lobby at Pi Towers is a typical example, with an official wireless dongle hanging off the single USB port: users often end up adding a USB hub to allow them to connect a keyboard, a mouse and a network adapter, and this hub can easily cost more than the Zero itself.

People in SPAAAAAACE

Zero W fixes this problem by integrating more functionality into the core product. It uses the same Cypress CYW43438 wireless chip as Raspberry Pi 3 Model B to provide 802.11n wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity.

Pi Zero Announcement Video

Music: Orqestruh by SAFAKASH – https://soundcloud.com/safakash

To recap, here’s the full feature list for Zero W:

  • 1GHz, single-core CPU
  • 512MB RAM
  • Mini-HDMI port
  • Micro-USB On-The-Go port
  • Micro-USB power
  • HAT-compatible 40-pin header
  • Composite video and reset headers
  • CSI camera connector
  • 802.11n wireless LAN
  • Bluetooth 4.0

We imagine you’ll find all sorts of uses for Zero W. It makes a better general-purpose computer because you’re less likely to need a hub: if you’re using Bluetooth peripherals you might well end up with nothing at all plugged into the USB port. And of course it’s a great platform for experimenting with IoT applications.

Official case

To accompany Raspberry Pi Zero W, we’ve been working with our friends at Kinneir Dufort and T-Zero to create an official injection-moulded case. This shares the same design language as the official case for the Raspberry Pi 3, and features three interchangeable lids:

  • A blank one
  • One with an aperture to let you access the GPIOs
  • One with an aperture and mounting point for a camera

Three cases for the price of one

The case set also includes a short camera adapter flexi, and a set of rubber feet to make sure your cased Zero or Zero W doesn’t slide off the desk.

New distributors

You may have noticed that we’ve added several new Zero distributors recently: ModMyPi in the UK, pi3g in Germany, Samm Teknoloji in Turkey, Kubii in France, Spain, Italy and Portugal, and Kiwi Electronics in the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg.

Raspberry Pi Zero W is available from all Zero distributors today, with the exception of Micro Center, who should have stock in stores by the end of this week. Check the icons below to find the stockist that’s best for you!

UK, Ireland

PimoroniThe Pi Hut

United States

AdafruitCanakitMicrocenter

Canada

Canakit

Germany, Austria, Switzerland

France, Spain, Italy, Portugal

Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg

Turkey

Global

PimoroniThe Pi HutAdafruit
Canakit

The post New product! Raspberry Pi Zero W joins the family appeared first on Raspberry Pi.