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Analyze data in Amazon DynamoDB using Amazon SageMaker for real-time prediction

Post Syndicated from YongSeong Lee original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/analyze-data-in-amazon-dynamodb-using-amazon-sagemaker-for-real-time-prediction/

Many companies across the globe use Amazon DynamoDB to store and query historical user-interaction data. DynamoDB is a fast NoSQL database used by applications that need consistent, single-digit millisecond latency.

Often, customers want to turn their valuable data in DynamoDB into insights by analyzing a copy of their table stored in Amazon S3. Doing this separates their analytical queries from their low-latency critical paths. This data can be the primary source for understanding customers’ past behavior, predicting future behavior, and generating downstream business value. Customers often turn to DynamoDB because of its great scalability and high availability. After a successful launch, many customers want to use the data in DynamoDB to predict future behaviors or provide personalized recommendations.

DynamoDB is a good fit for low-latency reads and writes, but it’s not practical to scan all data in a DynamoDB database to train a model. In this post, I demonstrate how you can use DynamoDB table data copied to Amazon S3 by AWS Data Pipeline to predict customer behavior. I also demonstrate how you can use this data to provide personalized recommendations for customers using Amazon SageMaker. You can also run ad hoc queries using Amazon Athena against the data. DynamoDB recently released on-demand backups to create full table backups with no performance impact. However, it’s not suitable for our purposes in this post, so I chose AWS Data Pipeline instead to create managed backups are accessible from other services.

To do this, I describe how to read the DynamoDB backup file format in Data Pipeline. I also describe how to convert the objects in S3 to a CSV format that Amazon SageMaker can read. In addition, I show how to schedule regular exports and transformations using Data Pipeline. The sample data used in this post is from Bank Marketing Data Set of UCI.

The solution that I describe provides the following benefits:

  • Separates analytical queries from production traffic on your DynamoDB table, preserving your DynamoDB read capacity units (RCUs) for important production requests
  • Automatically updates your model to get real-time predictions
  • Optimizes for performance (so it doesn’t compete with DynamoDB RCUs after the export) and for cost (using data you already have)
  • Makes it easier for developers of all skill levels to use Amazon SageMaker

All code and data set in this post are available in this .zip file.

Solution architecture

The following diagram shows the overall architecture of the solution.

The steps that data follows through the architecture are as follows:

  1. Data Pipeline regularly copies the full contents of a DynamoDB table as JSON into an S3
  2. Exported JSON files are converted to comma-separated value (CSV) format to use as a data source for Amazon SageMaker.
  3. Amazon SageMaker renews the model artifact and update the endpoint.
  4. The converted CSV is available for ad hoc queries with Amazon Athena.
  5. Data Pipeline controls this flow and repeats the cycle based on the schedule defined by customer requirements.

Building the auto-updating model

This section discusses details about how to read the DynamoDB exported data in Data Pipeline and build automated workflows for real-time prediction with a regularly updated model.

Download sample scripts and data

Before you begin, take the following steps:

  1. Download sample scripts in this .zip file.
  2. Unzip the src.zip file.
  3. Find the automation_script.sh file and edit it for your environment. For example, you need to replace 's3://<your bucket>/<datasource path>/' with your own S3 path to the data source for Amazon ML. In the script, the text enclosed by angle brackets—< and >—should be replaced with your own path.
  4. Upload the json-serde-1.3.6-SNAPSHOT-jar-with-dependencies.jar file to your S3 path so that the ADD jar command in Apache Hive can refer to it.

For this solution, the banking.csv  should be imported into a DynamoDB table.

Export a DynamoDB table

To export the DynamoDB table to S3, open the Data Pipeline console and choose the Export DynamoDB table to S3 template. In this template, Data Pipeline creates an Amazon EMR cluster and performs an export in the EMRActivity activity. Set proper intervals for backups according to your business requirements.

One core node(m3.xlarge) provides the default capacity for the EMR cluster and should be suitable for the solution in this post. Leave the option to resize the cluster before running enabled in the TableBackupActivity activity to let Data Pipeline scale the cluster to match the table size. The process of converting to CSV format and renewing models happens in this EMR cluster.

For a more in-depth look at how to export data from DynamoDB, see Export Data from DynamoDB in the Data Pipeline documentation.

Add the script to an existing pipeline

After you export your DynamoDB table, you add an additional EMR step to EMRActivity by following these steps:

  1. Open the Data Pipeline console and choose the ID for the pipeline that you want to add the script to.
  2. For Actions, choose Edit.
  3. In the editing console, choose the Activities category and add an EMR step using the custom script downloaded in the previous section, as shown below.

Paste the following command into the new step after the data ­­upload step:

s3://#{myDDBRegion}.elasticmapreduce/libs/script-runner/script-runner.jar,s3://<your bucket name>/automation_script.sh,#{output.directoryPath},#{myDDBRegion}

The element #{output.directoryPath} references the S3 path where the data pipeline exports DynamoDB data as JSON. The path should be passed to the script as an argument.

The bash script has two goals, converting data formats and renewing the Amazon SageMaker model. Subsequent sections discuss the contents of the automation script.

Automation script: Convert JSON data to CSV with Hive

We use Apache Hive to transform the data into a new format. The Hive QL script to create an external table and transform the data is included in the custom script that you added to the Data Pipeline definition.

When you run the Hive scripts, do so with the -e option. Also, define the Hive table with the 'org.openx.data.jsonserde.JsonSerDe' row format to parse and read JSON format. The SQL creates a Hive EXTERNAL table, and it reads the DynamoDB backup data on the S3 path passed to it by Data Pipeline.

Note: You should create the table with the “EXTERNAL” keyword to avoid the backup data being accidentally deleted from S3 if you drop the table.

The full automation script for converting follows. Add your own bucket name and data source path in the highlighted areas.

#!/bin/bash
hive -e "
ADD jar s3://<your bucket name>/json-serde-1.3.6-SNAPSHOT-jar-with-dependencies.jar ; 
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS blog_backup_data ;
CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE blog_backup_data (
 customer_id map<string,string>,
 age map<string,string>, job map<string,string>, 
 marital map<string,string>,education map<string,string>, 
 default map<string,string>, housing map<string,string>,
 loan map<string,string>, contact map<string,string>, 
 month map<string,string>, day_of_week map<string,string>, 
 duration map<string,string>, campaign map<string,string>,
 pdays map<string,string>, previous map<string,string>, 
 poutcome map<string,string>, emp_var_rate map<string,string>, 
 cons_price_idx map<string,string>, cons_conf_idx map<string,string>,
 euribor3m map<string,string>, nr_employed map<string,string>, 
 y map<string,string> ) 
ROW FORMAT SERDE 'org.openx.data.jsonserde.JsonSerDe' 
LOCATION '$1/';

INSERT OVERWRITE DIRECTORY 's3://<your bucket name>/<datasource path>/' 
SELECT concat( customer_id['s'],',', 
 age['n'],',', job['s'],',', 
 marital['s'],',', education['s'],',', default['s'],',', 
 housing['s'],',', loan['s'],',', contact['s'],',', 
 month['s'],',', day_of_week['s'],',', duration['n'],',', 
 campaign['n'],',',pdays['n'],',',previous['n'],',', 
 poutcome['s'],',', emp_var_rate['n'],',', cons_price_idx['n'],',',
 cons_conf_idx['n'],',', euribor3m['n'],',', nr_employed['n'],',', y['n'] ) 
FROM blog_backup_data
WHERE customer_id['s'] > 0 ; 

After creating an external table, you need to read data. You then use the INSERT OVERWRITE DIRECTORY ~ SELECT command to write CSV data to the S3 path that you designated as the data source for Amazon SageMaker.

Depending on your requirements, you can eliminate or process the columns in the SELECT clause in this step to optimize data analysis. For example, you might remove some columns that have unpredictable correlations with the target value because keeping the wrong columns might expose your model to “overfitting” during the training. In this post, customer_id  columns is removed. Overfitting can make your prediction weak. More information about overfitting can be found in the topic Model Fit: Underfitting vs. Overfitting in the Amazon ML documentation.

Automation script: Renew the Amazon SageMaker model

After the CSV data is replaced and ready to use, create a new model artifact for Amazon SageMaker with the updated dataset on S3.  For renewing model artifact, you must create a new training job.  Training jobs can be run using the AWS SDK ( for example, Amazon SageMaker boto3 ) or the Amazon SageMaker Python SDK that can be installed with “pip install sagemaker” command as well as the AWS CLI for Amazon SageMaker described in this post.

In addition, consider how to smoothly renew your existing model without service impact, because your model is called by applications in real time. To do this, you need to create a new endpoint configuration first and update a current endpoint with the endpoint configuration that is just created.

#!/bin/bash
## Define variable 
REGION=$2
DTTIME=`date +%Y-%m-%d-%H-%M-%S`
ROLE="<your AmazonSageMaker-ExecutionRole>" 


# Select containers image based on region.  
case "$REGION" in
"us-west-2" )
    IMAGE="174872318107.dkr.ecr.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/linear-learner:latest"
    ;;
"us-east-1" )
    IMAGE="382416733822.dkr.ecr.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/linear-learner:latest" 
    ;;
"us-east-2" )
    IMAGE="404615174143.dkr.ecr.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/linear-learner:latest" 
    ;;
"eu-west-1" )
    IMAGE="438346466558.dkr.ecr.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/linear-learner:latest" 
    ;;
 *)
    echo "Invalid Region Name"
    exit 1 ;  
esac

# Start training job and creating model artifact 
TRAINING_JOB_NAME=TRAIN-${DTTIME} 
S3OUTPUT="s3://<your bucket name>/model/" 
INSTANCETYPE="ml.m4.xlarge"
INSTANCECOUNT=1
VOLUMESIZE=5 
aws sagemaker create-training-job --training-job-name ${TRAINING_JOB_NAME} --region ${REGION}  --algorithm-specification TrainingImage=${IMAGE},TrainingInputMode=File --role-arn ${ROLE}  --input-data-config '[{ "ChannelName": "train", "DataSource": { "S3DataSource": { "S3DataType": "S3Prefix", "S3Uri": "s3://<your bucket name>/<datasource path>/", "S3DataDistributionType": "FullyReplicated" } }, "ContentType": "text/csv", "CompressionType": "None" , "RecordWrapperType": "None"  }]'  --output-data-config S3OutputPath=${S3OUTPUT} --resource-config  InstanceType=${INSTANCETYPE},InstanceCount=${INSTANCECOUNT},VolumeSizeInGB=${VOLUMESIZE} --stopping-condition MaxRuntimeInSeconds=120 --hyper-parameters feature_dim=20,predictor_type=binary_classifier  

# Wait until job completed 
aws sagemaker wait training-job-completed-or-stopped --training-job-name ${TRAINING_JOB_NAME}  --region ${REGION}

# Get newly created model artifact and create model
MODELARTIFACT=`aws sagemaker describe-training-job --training-job-name ${TRAINING_JOB_NAME} --region ${REGION}  --query 'ModelArtifacts.S3ModelArtifacts' --output text `
MODELNAME=MODEL-${DTTIME}
aws sagemaker create-model --region ${REGION} --model-name ${MODELNAME}  --primary-container Image=${IMAGE},ModelDataUrl=${MODELARTIFACT}  --execution-role-arn ${ROLE}

# create a new endpoint configuration 
CONFIGNAME=CONFIG-${DTTIME}
aws sagemaker  create-endpoint-config --region ${REGION} --endpoint-config-name ${CONFIGNAME}  --production-variants  VariantName=Users,ModelName=${MODELNAME},InitialInstanceCount=1,InstanceType=ml.m4.xlarge

# create or update the endpoint
STATUS=`aws sagemaker describe-endpoint --endpoint-name  ServiceEndpoint --query 'EndpointStatus' --output text --region ${REGION} `
if [[ $STATUS -ne "InService" ]] ;
then
    aws sagemaker  create-endpoint --endpoint-name  ServiceEndpoint  --endpoint-config-name ${CONFIGNAME} --region ${REGION}    
else
    aws sagemaker  update-endpoint --endpoint-name  ServiceEndpoint  --endpoint-config-name ${CONFIGNAME} --region ${REGION}
fi

Grant permission

Before you execute the script, you must grant proper permission to Data Pipeline. Data Pipeline uses the DataPipelineDefaultResourceRole role by default. I added the following policy to DataPipelineDefaultResourceRole to allow Data Pipeline to create, delete, and update the Amazon SageMaker model and data source in the script.

{
 "Version": "2012-10-17",
 "Statement": [
 {
 "Effect": "Allow",
 "Action": [
 "sagemaker:CreateTrainingJob",
 "sagemaker:DescribeTrainingJob",
 "sagemaker:CreateModel",
 "sagemaker:CreateEndpointConfig",
 "sagemaker:DescribeEndpoint",
 "sagemaker:CreateEndpoint",
 "sagemaker:UpdateEndpoint",
 "iam:PassRole"
 ],
 "Resource": "*"
 }
 ]
}

Use real-time prediction

After you deploy a model into production using Amazon SageMaker hosting services, your client applications use this API to get inferences from the model hosted at the specified endpoint. This approach is useful for interactive web, mobile, or desktop applications.

Following, I provide a simple Python code example that queries against Amazon SageMaker endpoint URL with its name (“ServiceEndpoint”) and then uses them for real-time prediction.

=== Python sample for real-time prediction ===

#!/usr/bin/env python
import boto3
import json 

client = boto3.client('sagemaker-runtime', region_name ='<your region>' )
new_customer_info = '34,10,2,4,1,2,1,1,6,3,190,1,3,4,3,-1.7,94.055,-39.8,0.715,4991.6'
response = client.invoke_endpoint(
    EndpointName='ServiceEndpoint',
    Body=new_customer_info, 
    ContentType='text/csv'
)
result = json.loads(response['Body'].read().decode())
print(result)
--- output(response) ---
{u'predictions': [{u'score': 0.7528127431869507, u'predicted_label': 1.0}]}

Solution summary

The solution takes the following steps:

  1. Data Pipeline exports DynamoDB table data into S3. The original JSON data should be kept to recover the table in the rare event that this is needed. Data Pipeline then converts JSON to CSV so that Amazon SageMaker can read the data.Note: You should select only meaningful attributes when you convert CSV. For example, if you judge that the “campaign” attribute is not correlated, you can eliminate this attribute from the CSV.
  2. Train the Amazon SageMaker model with the new data source.
  3. When a new customer comes to your site, you can judge how likely it is for this customer to subscribe to your new product based on “predictedScores” provided by Amazon SageMaker.
  4. If the new user subscribes your new product, your application must update the attribute “y” to the value 1 (for yes). This updated data is provided for the next model renewal as a new data source. It serves to improve the accuracy of your prediction. With each new entry, your application can become smarter and deliver better predictions.

Running ad hoc queries using Amazon Athena

Amazon Athena is a serverless query service that makes it easy to analyze large amounts of data stored in Amazon S3 using standard SQL. Athena is useful for examining data and collecting statistics or informative summaries about data. You can also use the powerful analytic functions of Presto, as described in the topic Aggregate Functions of Presto in the Presto documentation.

With the Data Pipeline scheduled activity, recent CSV data is always located in S3 so that you can run ad hoc queries against the data using Amazon Athena. I show this with example SQL statements following. For an in-depth description of this process, see the post Interactive SQL Queries for Data in Amazon S3 on the AWS News Blog. 

Creating an Amazon Athena table and running it

Simply, you can create an EXTERNAL table for the CSV data on S3 in Amazon Athena Management Console.

=== Table Creation ===
CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE datasource (
 age int, 
 job string, 
 marital string , 
 education string, 
 default string, 
 housing string, 
 loan string, 
 contact string, 
 month string, 
 day_of_week string, 
 duration int, 
 campaign int, 
 pdays int , 
 previous int , 
 poutcome string, 
 emp_var_rate double, 
 cons_price_idx double,
 cons_conf_idx double, 
 euribor3m double, 
 nr_employed double, 
 y int 
)
ROW FORMAT DELIMITED 
FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' ESCAPED BY '\\' LINES TERMINATED BY '\n' 
LOCATION 's3://<your bucket name>/<datasource path>/';

The following query calculates the correlation coefficient between the target attribute and other attributes using Amazon Athena.

=== Sample Query ===

SELECT corr(age,y) AS correlation_age_and_target, 
 corr(duration,y) AS correlation_duration_and_target, 
 corr(campaign,y) AS correlation_campaign_and_target,
 corr(contact,y) AS correlation_contact_and_target
FROM ( SELECT age , duration , campaign , y , 
 CASE WHEN contact = 'telephone' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS contact 
 FROM datasource 
 ) datasource ;

Conclusion

In this post, I introduce an example of how to analyze data in DynamoDB by using table data in Amazon S3 to optimize DynamoDB table read capacity. You can then use the analyzed data as a new data source to train an Amazon SageMaker model for accurate real-time prediction. In addition, you can run ad hoc queries against the data on S3 using Amazon Athena. I also present how to automate these procedures by using Data Pipeline.

You can adapt this example to your specific use case at hand, and hopefully this post helps you accelerate your development. You can find more examples and use cases for Amazon SageMaker in the video AWS 2017: Introducing Amazon SageMaker on the AWS website.

 


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Serving Real-Time Machine Learning Predictions on Amazon EMR and Analyzing Data in S3 using Amazon Athena.

 


About the Author

Yong Seong Lee is a Cloud Support Engineer for AWS Big Data Services. He is interested in every technology related to data/databases and helping customers who have difficulties in using AWS services. His motto is “Enjoy life, be curious and have maximum experience.”

 

 

10 visualizations to try in Amazon QuickSight with sample data

Post Syndicated from Karthik Kumar Odapally original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/10-visualizations-to-try-in-amazon-quicksight-with-sample-data/

If you’re not already familiar with building visualizations for quick access to business insights using Amazon QuickSight, consider this your introduction. In this post, we’ll walk through some common scenarios with sample datasets to provide an overview of how you can connect yuor data, perform advanced analysis and access the results from any web browser or mobile device.

The following visualizations are built from the public datasets available in the links below. Before we jump into that, let’s take a look at the supported data sources, file formats and a typical QuickSight workflow to build any visualization.

Which data sources does Amazon QuickSight support?

At the time of publication, you can use the following data methods:

  • Connect to AWS data sources, including:
    • Amazon RDS
    • Amazon Aurora
    • Amazon Redshift
    • Amazon Athena
    • Amazon S3
  • Upload Excel spreadsheets or flat files (CSV, TSV, CLF, and ELF)
  • Connect to on-premises databases like Teradata, SQL Server, MySQL, and PostgreSQL
  • Import data from SaaS applications like Salesforce and Snowflake
  • Use big data processing engines like Spark and Presto

This list is constantly growing. For more information, see Supported Data Sources.

Answers in instants

SPICE is the Amazon QuickSight super-fast, parallel, in-memory calculation engine, designed specifically for ad hoc data visualization. SPICE stores your data in a system architected for high availability, where it is saved until you choose to delete it. Improve the performance of database datasets by importing the data into SPICE instead of using a direct database query. To calculate how much SPICE capacity your dataset needs, see Managing SPICE Capacity.

Typical Amazon QuickSight workflow

When you create an analysis, the typical workflow is as follows:

  1. Connect to a data source, and then create a new dataset or choose an existing dataset.
  2. (Optional) If you created a new dataset, prepare the data (for example, by changing field names or data types).
  3. Create a new analysis.
  4. Add a visual to the analysis by choosing the fields to visualize. Choose a specific visual type, or use AutoGraph and let Amazon QuickSight choose the most appropriate visual type, based on the number and data types of the fields that you select.
  5. (Optional) Modify the visual to meet your requirements (for example, by adding a filter or changing the visual type).
  6. (Optional) Add more visuals to the analysis.
  7. (Optional) Add scenes to the default story to provide a narrative about some aspect of the analysis data.
  8. (Optional) Publish the analysis as a dashboard to share insights with other users.

The following graphic illustrates a typical Amazon QuickSight workflow.

Visualizations created in Amazon QuickSight with sample datasets

Visualizations for a data analyst

Source:  https://data.worldbank.org/

Download and Resources:  https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/dataset/world-development-indicators

Data catalog:  The World Bank invests into multiple development projects at the national, regional, and global levels. It’s a great source of information for data analysts.

The following graph shows the percentage of the population that has access to electricity (rural and urban) during 2000 in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America.

The following graph shows the share of healthcare costs that are paid out-of-pocket (private vs. public). Also, you can maneuver over the graph to get detailed statistics at a glance.

Visualizations for a trading analyst

Source:  Deutsche Börse Public Dataset (DBG PDS)

Download and resources:  https://aws.amazon.com/public-datasets/deutsche-boerse-pds/

Data catalog:  The DBG PDS project makes real-time data derived from Deutsche Börse’s trading market systems available to the public for free. This is the first time that such detailed financial market data has been shared freely and continually from the source provider.

The following graph shows the market trend of max trade volume for different EU banks. It builds on the data available on XETRA engines, which is made up of a variety of equities, funds, and derivative securities. This graph can be scrolled to visualize trade for a period of an hour or more.

The following graph shows the common stock beating the rest of the maximum trade volume over a period of time, grouped by security type.

Visualizations for a data scientist

Source:  https://catalog.data.gov/

Download and resources:  https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/road-weather-information-stations-788f8

Data catalog:  Data derived from different sensor stations placed on the city bridges and surface streets are a core information source. The road weather information station has a temperature sensor that measures the temperature of the street surface. It also has a sensor that measures the ambient air temperature at the station each second.

The following graph shows the present max air temperature in Seattle from different RWI station sensors.

The following graph shows the minimum temperature of the road surface at different times, which helps predicts road conditions at a particular time of the year.

Visualizations for a data engineer

Source:  https://www.kaggle.com/

Download and resources:  https://www.kaggle.com/datasnaek/youtube-new/data

Data catalog:  Kaggle has come up with a platform where people can donate open datasets. Data engineers and other community members can have open access to these datasets and can contribute to the open data movement. They have more than 350 datasets in total, with more than 200 as featured datasets. It has a few interesting datasets on the platform that are not present at other places, and it’s a platform to connect with other data enthusiasts.

The following graph shows the trending YouTube videos and presents the max likes for the top 20 channels. This is one of the most popular datasets for data engineers.

The following graph shows the YouTube daily statistics for the max views of video titles published during a specific time period.

Visualizations for a business user

Source:  New York Taxi Data

Download and resources:  https://data.cityofnewyork.us/Transportation/2016-Green-Taxi-Trip-Data/hvrh-b6nb

Data catalog: NYC Open data hosts some very popular open data sets for all New Yorkers. This platform allows you to get involved in dive deep into the data set to pull some useful visualizations. 2016 Green taxi trip dataset includes trip records from all trips completed in green taxis in NYC in 2016. Records include fields capturing pick-up and drop-off dates/times, pick-up and drop-off locations, trip distances, itemized fares, rate types, payment types, and driver-reported passenger counts.

The following graph presents maximum fare amount grouped by the passenger count during a period of time during a day. This can be further expanded to follow through different day of the month based on the business need.

The following graph shows the NewYork taxi data from January 2016, showing the dip in the number of taxis ridden on January 23, 2016 across all types of taxis.

A quick search for that date and location shows you the following news report:

Summary

Using Amazon QuickSight, you can see patterns across a time-series data by building visualizations, performing ad hoc analysis, and quickly generating insights. We hope you’ll give it a try today!

 


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Amazon QuickSight Adds Support for Combo Charts and Row-Level Security and Visualize AWS Cloudtrail Logs Using AWS Glue and Amazon QuickSight.


Karthik Odapally is a Sr. Solutions Architect in AWS. His passion is to build cost effective and highly scalable solutions on the cloud. In his spare time, he bakes cookies and cupcakes for family and friends here in the PNW. He loves vintage racing cars.

 

 

 

Pranabesh Mandal is a Solutions Architect in AWS. He has over a decade of IT experience. He is passionate about cloud technology and focuses on Analytics. In his spare time, he likes to hike and explore the beautiful nature and wild life of most divine national parks around the United States alongside his wife.

 

 

 

 

Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend 2018 roundup

Post Syndicated from Ben Nuttall original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/big-birthday-weekend-2018-roundup/

A couple of weekends ago, we celebrated our sixth birthday by coordinating more than 100 simultaneous Raspberry Jam events around the world. The Big Birthday Weekend was a huge success: our fantastic community organised Jams in 40 countries, covering six continents!

We sent the Jams special birthday kits to help them celebrate in style, and a video message featuring a thank you from Philip and Eben:

Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend 2018

To celebrate the Raspberry Pi’s sixth birthday, we coordinated Raspberry Jams all over the world to take place over the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend, 3-4 March 2018. A massive thank you to everyone who ran an event and attended.

The Raspberry Jam photo booth

I put together code for a Pi-powered photo booth which overlaid the Big Birthday Weekend logo onto photos and (optionally) tweeted them. We included an arcade button in the Jam kits so they could build one — and it seemed to be quite popular. Some Jams put great effort into housing their photo booth:



Here are some of my favourite photo booth tweets:

RGVSA on Twitter

PiParty photo booth @RGVSA & @ @Nerdvana_io #Rjam

Denis Stretton on Twitter

The @SouthendRPIJams #PiParty photo booth

rpijamtokyo on Twitter

PiParty photo booth

Preston Raspberry Jam on Twitter

Preston Raspberry Jam Photobooth #RJam #PiParty

If you want to try out the photo booth software yourself, find the code on GitHub.

The great Raspberry Jam bake-off

Traditionally, in the UK, people have a cake on their birthday. And we had a few! We saw (and tasted) a great selection of Pi-themed cakes and other baked goods throughout the weekend:






Raspberry Jams everywhere

We always say that every Jam is different, but there’s a common and recognisable theme amongst them. It was great to see so many different venues around the world filling up with like-minded Pi enthusiasts, Raspberry Jam–branded banners, and Raspberry Pi balloons!

Europe

Sergio Martinez on Twitter

Thank you so much to all the attendees of the Ikana Jam in Krakow past Saturday! We shared fun experiences, some of them… also painful 😉 A big thank you to @Raspberry_Pi for these global celebrations! And a big thank you to @hubraum for their hospitality! #PiParty #rjam

NI Raspberry Jam on Twitter

We also had a super successful set of wearables workshops using @adafruit Circuit Playground Express boards and conductive thread at today’s @Raspberry_Pi Jam! Very popular! #PiParty

Suzystar on Twitter

My SenseHAT workshop, going well! @SouthendRPiJams #PiParty

Worksop College Raspberry Jam on Twitter

Learning how to scare the zombies in case of an apocalypse- it worked on our young learners #PiParty @worksopcollege @Raspberry_Pi https://t.co/pntEm57TJl

Africa

Rita on Twitter

Being one of the two places in Kenya where the #PiParty took place, it was an amazing time spending the day with this team and getting to learn and have fun. @TaitaTavetaUni and @Raspberry_Pi thank you for your support. @TTUTechlady @mictecttu ch

GABRIEL ONIFADE on Twitter

@TheMagP1

GABRIEL ONIFADE on Twitter

@GABONIAVERACITY #PiParty Lagos Raspberry Jam 2018 Special International Celebration – 6th Raspberry-Pi Big Birthday! Lagos Nigeria @Raspberry_Pi @ben_nuttall #RJam #RaspberryJam #raspberrypi #physicalcomputing #robotics #edtech #coding #programming #edTechAfrica #veracityhouse https://t.co/V7yLxaYGNx

North America

Heidi Baynes on Twitter

The Riverside Raspberry Jam @Vocademy is underway! #piparty

Brad Derstine on Twitter

The Philly & Pi #PiParty event with @Bresslergroup and @TechGirlzorg was awesome! The Scratch and Pi workshop was amazing! It was overall a great day of fun and tech!!! Thank you everyone who came out!

Houston Raspi on Twitter

Thanks everyone who came out to the @Raspberry_Pi Big Birthday Jam! Special thanks to @PBFerrell @estefanniegg @pcsforme @pandafulmanda @colnels @bquentin3 couldn’t’ve put on this amazing community event without you guys!

Merge Robotics 2706 on Twitter

We are back at @SciTechMuseum for the second day of @OttawaPiJam! Our robot Mergius loves playing catch with the kids! #pijam #piparty #omgrobots

South America

Javier Garzón on Twitter

Así terminamos el #Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend #Bogota 2018 #PiParty de #RaspberryJamBogota 2018 @Raspberry_Pi Nos vemos el 7 de marzo en #ArduinoDayBogota 2018 y #RaspberryJamBogota 2018

Asia

Fablab UP Cebu on Twitter

Happy 6th birthday, @Raspberry_Pi! Greetings all the way from CEBU,PH! #PiParty #IoTCebu Thanks @CebuXGeeks X Ramos for these awesome pics. #Fablab #UPCebu

福野泰介 on Twitter

ラズパイ、6才のお誕生日会スタート in Tokyo PCNブースで、いろいろ展示とhttps://t.co/L6E7KgyNHFとIchigoJamつないだ、こどもIoTハッカソンmini体験やってます at 東京蒲田駅近 https://t.co/yHEuqXHvqe #piparty #pipartytokyo #rjam #opendataday

Ren Camp on Twitter

Happy birthday @Raspberry_Pi! #piparty #iotcebu @coolnumber9 https://t.co/2ESVjfRJ2d

Oceania

Glenunga Raspberry Pi Club on Twitter

PiParty photo booth

Personally, I managed to get to three Jams over the weekend: two run by the same people who put on the first two Jams to ever take place, and also one brand-new one! The Preston Raspberry Jam team, who usually run their event on a Monday evening, wanted to do something extra special for the birthday, so they came up with the idea of putting on a Raspberry Jam Sandwich — on the Friday and Monday around the weekend! This meant I was able to visit them on Friday, then attend the Manchester Raspberry Jam on Saturday, and finally drop by the new Jam at Worksop College on my way home on Sunday.

Ben Nuttall on Twitter

I’m at my first Raspberry Jam #PiParty event of the big birthday weekend! @PrestonRJam has been running for nearly 6 years and is a great place to start the celebrations!

Ben Nuttall on Twitter

Back at @McrRaspJam at @DigInnMMU for #PiParty

Ben Nuttall on Twitter

Great to see mine & @Frans_facts Balloon Pi-Tay popper project in action at @worksopjam #rjam #PiParty https://t.co/GswFm0UuPg

Various members of the Foundation team attended Jams around the UK and US, and James from the Code Club International team visited AmsterJam.

hackerfemo on Twitter

Thanks to everyone who came to our Jam and everyone who helped out. @phoenixtogether thanks for amazing cake & hosting. Ademir you’re so cool. It was awesome to meet Craig Morley from @Raspberry_Pi too. #PiParty

Stuart Fox on Twitter

Great #PiParty today at the @cotswoldjam with bloody delicious cake and lots of raspberry goodness. Great to see @ClareSutcliffe @martinohanlon playing on my new pi powered arcade build:-)

Clare Sutcliffe on Twitter

Happy 6th Birthday @Raspberry_Pi from everyone at the #PiParty at #cotswoldjam in Cheltenham!

Code Club on Twitter

It’s @Raspberry_Pi 6th birthday and we’re celebrating by taking part in @amsterjam__! Happy Birthday Raspberry Pi, we’re so happy to be a part of the family! #PiParty

For more Jammy birthday goodness, check out the PiParty hashtag on Twitter!

The Jam makers!

A lot of preparation went into each Jam, and we really appreciate all the hard work the Jam makers put in to making these events happen, on the Big Birthday Weekend and all year round. Thanks also to all the teams that sent us a group photo:

Lots of the Jams that took place were brand-new events, so we hope to see them continue throughout 2018 and beyond, growing the Raspberry Pi community around the world and giving more people, particularly youths, the opportunity to learn digital making skills.

Philip Colligan on Twitter

So many wonderful people in the @Raspberry_Pi community. Thanks to everyone at #PottonPiAndPints for a great afternoon and for everything you do to help young people learn digital making. #PiParty

Special thanks to ModMyPi for shipping the special Raspberry Jam kits all over the world!

Don’t forget to check out our Jam page to find an event near you! This is also where you can find free resources to help you get a new Jam started, and download free starter projects made especially for Jam activities. These projects are available in English, Français, Français Canadien, Nederlands, Deutsch, Italiano, and 日本語. If you’d like to help us translate more content into these and other languages, please get in touch!

PS Some of the UK Jams were postponed due to heavy snowfall, so you may find there’s a belated sixth-birthday Jam coming up where you live!

S Organ on Twitter

@TheMagP1 Ours was rescheduled until later in the Spring due to the snow but here is Babbage enjoying the snow!

The post Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend 2018 roundup appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Build a Multi-Tenant Amazon EMR Cluster with Kerberos, Microsoft Active Directory Integration and EMRFS Authorization

Post Syndicated from Songzhi Liu original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/build-a-multi-tenant-amazon-emr-cluster-with-kerberos-microsoft-active-directory-integration-and-emrfs-authorization/

One of the challenges faced by our customers—especially those in highly regulated industries—is balancing the need for security with flexibility. In this post, we cover how to enable multi-tenancy and increase security by using EMRFS (EMR File System) authorization, the Amazon S3 storage-level authorization on Amazon EMR.

Amazon EMR is an easy, fast, and scalable analytics platform enabling large-scale data processing. EMRFS authorization provides Amazon S3 storage-level authorization by configuring EMRFS with multiple IAM roles. With this functionality enabled, different users and groups can share the same cluster and assume their own IAM roles respectively.

Simply put, on Amazon EMR, we can now have an Amazon EC2 role per user assumed at run time instead of one general EC2 role at the cluster level. When the user is trying to access Amazon S3 resources, Amazon EMR evaluates against a predefined mappings list in EMRFS configurations and picks up the right role for the user.

In this post, we will discuss what EMRFS authorization is (Amazon S3 storage-level access control) and show how to configure the role mappings with detailed examples. You will then have the desired permissions in a multi-tenant environment. We also demo Amazon S3 access from HDFS command line, Apache Hive on Hue, and Apache Spark.

EMRFS authorization for Amazon S3

There are two prerequisites for using this feature:

  1. Users must be authenticated, because EMRFS needs to map the current user/group/prefix to a predefined user/group/prefix. There are several authentication options. In this post, we launch a Kerberos-enabled cluster that manages the Key Distribution Center (KDC) on the master node, and enable a one-way trust from the KDC to a Microsoft Active Directory domain.
  2. The application must support accessing Amazon S3 via Applications that have their own S3FileSystem APIs (for example, Presto) are not supported at this time.

EMRFS supports three types of mapping entries: user, group, and Amazon S3 prefix. Let’s use an example to show how this works.

Assume that you have the following three identities in your organization, and they are defined in the Active Directory:

To enable all these groups and users to share the EMR cluster, you need to define the following IAM roles:

In this case, you create a separate Amazon EC2 role that doesn’t give any permission to Amazon S3. Let’s call the role the base role (the EC2 role attached to the EMR cluster), which in this example is named EMR_EC2_RestrictedRole. Then, you define all the Amazon S3 permissions for each specific user or group in their own roles. The restricted role serves as the fallback role when the user doesn’t belong to any user/group, nor does the user try to access any listed Amazon S3 prefixes defined on the list.

Important: For all other roles, like emrfs_auth_group_role_data_eng, you need to add the base role (EMR_EC2_RestrictedRole) as the trusted entity so that it can assume other roles. See the following example:

{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "Service": "ec2.amazonaws.com"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
    },
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": {
        "AWS": "arn:aws:iam::511586466501:role/EMR_EC2_RestrictedRole"
      },
      "Action": "sts:AssumeRole"
    }
  ]
}

The following is an example policy for the admin user role (emrfs_auth_user_role_admin_user):

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": "s3:*",
            "Resource": "*"
        }
    ]
}

We are assuming the admin user has access to all buckets in this example.

The following is an example policy for the data science group role (emrfs_auth_group_role_data_sci):

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:s3:::emrfs-auth-data-science-bucket-demo/*",
                "arn:aws:s3:::emrfs-auth-data-science-bucket-demo"
            ],
            "Action": [
                "s3:*"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

This role grants all Amazon S3 permissions to the emrfs-auth-data-science-bucket-demo bucket and all the objects in it. Similarly, the policy for the role emrfs_auth_group_role_data_eng is shown below:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:s3:::emrfs-auth-data-engineering-bucket-demo/*",
                "arn:aws:s3:::emrfs-auth-data-engineering-bucket-demo"
            ],
            "Action": [
                "s3:*"
            ]
        }
    ]
}

Example role mappings configuration

To configure EMRFS authorization, you use EMR security configuration. Here is the configuration we use in this post

Consider the following scenario.

First, the admin user admin1 tries to log in and run a command to access Amazon S3 data through EMRFS. The first role emrfs_auth_user_role_admin_user on the mapping list, which is a user role, is mapped and picked up. Then admin1 has access to the Amazon S3 locations that are defined in this role.

Then a user from the data engineer group (grp_data_engineering) tries to access a data bucket to run some jobs. When EMRFS sees that the user is a member of the grp_data_engineering group, the group role emrfs_auth_group_role_data_eng is assumed, and the user has proper access to Amazon S3 that is defined in the emrfs_auth_group_role_data_eng role.

Next, the third user comes, who is not an admin and doesn’t belong to any of the groups. After failing evaluation of the top three entries, EMRFS evaluates whether the user is trying to access a certain Amazon S3 prefix defined in the last mapping entry. This type of mapping entry is called the prefix type. If the user is trying to access s3://emrfs-auth-default-bucket-demo/, then the prefix mapping is in effect, and the prefix role emrfs_auth_prefix_role_default_s3_prefix is assumed.

If the user is not trying to access any of the Amazon S3 paths that are defined on the list—which means it failed the evaluation of all the entries—it only has the permissions defined in the EMR_EC2RestrictedRole. This role is assumed by the EC2 instances in the cluster.

In this process, all the mappings defined are evaluated in the defined order, and the first role that is mapped is assumed, and the rest of the list is skipped.

Setting up an EMR cluster and mapping Active Directory users and groups

Now that we know how EMRFS authorization role mapping works, the next thing we need to think about is how we can use this feature in an easy and manageable way.

Active Directory setup

Many customers manage their users and groups using Microsoft Active Directory or other tools like OpenLDAP. In this post, we create the Active Directory on an Amazon EC2 instance running Windows Server and create the users and groups we will be using in the example below. After setting up Active Directory, we use the Amazon EMR Kerberos auto-join capability to establish a one-way trust from the KDC running on the EMR master node to the Active Directory domain on the EC2 instance. You can use your own directory services as long as it talks to the LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol).

To create and join Active Directory to Amazon EMR, follow the steps in the blog post Use Kerberos Authentication to Integrate Amazon EMR with Microsoft Active Directory.

After configuring Active Directory, you can create all the users and groups using the Active Directory tools and add users to appropriate groups. In this example, we created users like admin1, dataeng1, datascientist1, grp_data_engineering, and grp_data_science, and then add the users to the right groups.

Join the EMR cluster to an Active Directory domain

For clusters with Kerberos, Amazon EMR now supports automated Active Directory domain joins. You can use the security configuration to configure the one-way trust from the KDC to the Active Directory domain. You also configure the EMRFS role mappings in the same security configuration.

The following is an example of the EMR security configuration with a trusted Active Directory domain EMRKRB.TEST.COM and the EMRFS role mappings as we discussed earlier:

The EMRFS role mapping configuration is shown in this example:

We will also provide an example AWS CLI command that you can run.

Launching the EMR cluster and running the tests

Now you have configured Kerberos and EMRFS authorization for Amazon S3.

Additionally, you need to configure Hue with Active Directory using the Amazon EMR configuration API in order to log in using the AD users created before. The following is an example of Hue AD configuration.

[
  {
    "Classification":"hue-ini",
    "Properties":{

    },
    "Configurations":[
      {
        "Classification":"desktop",
        "Properties":{

        },
        "Configurations":[
          {
            "Classification":"ldap",
            "Properties":{

            },
            "Configurations":[
              {
                "Classification":"ldap_servers",
                "Properties":{

                },
                "Configurations":[
                  {
                    "Classification":"AWS",
                    "Properties":{
                      "base_dn":"DC=emrkrb,DC=test,DC=com",
                      "ldap_url":"ldap://emrkrb.test.com",
                      "search_bind_authentication":"false",
                      "bind_dn":"CN=adjoiner,CN=users,DC=emrkrb,DC=test,DC=com",
                      "bind_password":"Abc123456",
                      "create_users_on_login":"true",
                      "nt_domain":"emrkrb.test.com"
                    },
                    "Configurations":[

                    ]
                  }
                ]
              }
            ]
          },
          {
            "Classification":"auth",
            "Properties":{
              "backend":"desktop.auth.backend.LdapBackend"
            },
            "Configurations":[

            ]
          }
        ]
      }
    ]
  }

Note: In the preceding configuration JSON file, change the values as required before pasting it into the software setting section in the Amazon EMR console.

Now let’s use this configuration and the security configuration you created before to launch the cluster.

In the Amazon EMR console, choose Create cluster. Then choose Go to advanced options. On the Step1: Software and Steps page, under Edit software settings (optional), paste the configuration in the box.

The rest of the setup is the same as an ordinary cluster setup, except in the Security Options section. In Step 4: Security, under Permissions, choose Custom, and then choose the RestrictedRole that you created before.

Choose the appropriate subnets (these should meet the base requirement in order for a successful Active Directory join—see the Amazon EMR Management Guide for more details), and choose the appropriate security groups to make sure it talks to the Active Directory. Choose a key so that you can log in and configure the cluster.

Most importantly, choose the security configuration that you created earlier to enable Kerberos and EMRFS authorization for Amazon S3.

You can use the following AWS CLI command to create a cluster.

aws emr create-cluster --name "TestEMRFSAuthorization" \ 
--release-label emr-5.10.0 \ --instance-type m3.xlarge \ 
--instance-count 3 \ 
--ec2-attributes InstanceProfile=EMR_EC2_DefaultRole,KeyName=MyEC2KeyPair \ --service-role EMR_DefaultRole \ 
--security-configuration MyKerberosConfig \ 
--configurations file://hue-config.json \
--applications Name=Hadoop Name=Hive Name=Hue Name=Spark \ 
--kerberos-attributes Realm=EC2.INTERNAL, \ KdcAdminPassword=<YourClusterKDCAdminPassword>, \ ADDomainJoinUser=<YourADUserLogonName>,ADDomainJoinPassword=<YourADUserPassword>, \ 
CrossRealmTrustPrincipalPassword=<MatchADTrustPwd>

Note: If you create the cluster using CLI, you need to save the JSON configuration for Hue into a file named hue-config.json and place it on the server where you run the CLI command.

After the cluster gets into the Waiting state, try to connect by using SSH into the cluster using the Active Directory user name and password.

ssh -l [email protected] <EMR IP or DNS name>

Quickly run two commands to show that the Active Directory join is successful:

  1. id [user name] shows the mapped AD users and groups in Linux.
  2. hdfs groups [user name] shows the mapped group in Hadoop.

Both should return the current Active Directory user and group information if the setup is correct.

Now, you can test the user mapping first. Log in with the admin1 user, and run a Hadoop list directory command:

hadoop fs -ls s3://emrfs-auth-data-science-bucket-demo/

Now switch to a user from the data engineer group.

Retry the previous command to access the admin’s bucket. It should throw an Amazon S3 Access Denied exception.

When you try listing the Amazon S3 bucket that a data engineer group member has accessed, it triggers the group mapping.

hadoop fs -ls s3://emrfs-auth-data-engineering-bucket-demo/

It successfully returns the listing results. Next we will test Apache Hive and then Apache Spark.

 

To run jobs successfully, you need to create a home directory for every user in HDFS for staging data under /user/<username>. Users can configure a step to create a home directory at cluster launch time for every user who has access to the cluster. In this example, you use Hue since Hue will create the home directory in HDFS for the user at the first login. Here Hue also needs to be integrated with the same Active Directory as explained in the example configuration described earlier.

First, log in to Hue as a data engineer user, and open a Hive Notebook in Hue. Then run a query to create a new table pointing to the data engineer bucket, s3://emrfs-auth-data-engineering-bucket-demo/table1_data_eng/.

You can see that the table was created successfully. Now try to create another table pointing to the data science group’s bucket, where the data engineer group doesn’t have access.

It failed and threw an Amazon S3 Access Denied error.

Now insert one line of data into the successfully create table.

Next, log out, switch to a data science group user, and create another table, test2_datasci_tb.

The creation is successful.

The last task is to test Spark (it requires the user directory, but Hue created one in the previous step).

Now let’s come back to the command line and run some Spark commands.

Login to the master node using the datascientist1 user:

Start the SparkSQL interactive shell by typing spark-sql, and run the show tables command. It should list the tables that you created using Hive.

As a data science group user, try select on both tables. You will find that you can only select the table defined in the location that your group has access to.

Conclusion

EMRFS authorization for Amazon S3 enables you to have multiple roles on the same cluster, providing flexibility to configure a shared cluster for different teams to achieve better efficiency. The Active Directory integration and group mapping make it much easier for you to manage your users and groups, and provides better auditability in a multi-tenant environment.


Additional Reading

If you found this post useful, be sure to check out Use Kerberos Authentication to Integrate Amazon EMR with Microsoft Active Directory and Launching and Running an Amazon EMR Cluster inside a VPC.


About the Authors

Songzhi Liu is a Big Data Consultant with AWS Professional Services. He works closely with AWS customers to provide them Big Data & Machine Learning solutions and best practices on the Amazon cloud.

 

 

 

 

Amazon QuickSight Update – Geospatial Visualization, Private VPC Access, and More

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-quicksight-update-geospatial-visualization-private-vpc-access-and-more/

We don’t often recognize or celebrate anniversaries at AWS. With nearly 100 services on our list, we’d be eating cake and drinking champagne several times a week. While that might sound like fun, we’d rather spend our working hours listening to customers and innovating. With that said, Amazon QuickSight has now been generally available for a little over a year and I would like to give you a quick update!

QuickSight in Action
Today, tens of thousands of customers (from startups to enterprises, in industries as varied as transportation, legal, mining, and healthcare) are using QuickSight to analyze and report on their business data.

Here are a couple of examples:

Gemini provides legal evidence procurement for California attorneys who represent injured workers. They have gone from creating custom reports and running one-off queries to creating and sharing dynamic QuickSight dashboards with drill-downs and filtering. QuickSight is used to track sales pipeline, measure order throughput, and to locate bottlenecks in the order processing pipeline.

Jivochat provides a real-time messaging platform to connect visitors to website owners. QuickSight lets them create and share interactive dashboards while also providing access to the underlying datasets. This has allowed them to move beyond the sharing of static spreadsheets, ensuring that everyone is looking at the same and is empowered to make timely decisions based on current data.

Transfix is a tech-powered freight marketplace that matches loads and increases visibility into logistics for Fortune 500 shippers in retail, food and beverage, manufacturing, and other industries. QuickSight has made analytics accessible to both BI engineers and non-technical business users. They scrutinize key business and operational metrics including shipping routes, carrier efficient, and process automation.

Looking Back / Looking Ahead
The feedback on QuickSight has been incredibly helpful. Customers tell us that their employees are using QuickSight to connect to their data, perform analytics, and make high-velocity, data-driven decisions, all without setting up or running their own BI infrastructure. We love all of the feedback that we get, and use it to drive our roadmap, leading to the introduction of over 40 new features in just a year. Here’s a summary:

Looking forward, we are watching an interesting trend develop within our customer base. As these customers take a close look at how they analyze and report on data, they are realizing that a serverless approach offers some tangible benefits. They use Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) as a data lake and query it using a combination of QuickSight and Amazon Athena, giving them agility and flexibility without static infrastructure. They also make great use of QuickSight’s dashboards feature, monitoring business results and operational metrics, then sharing their insights with hundreds of users. You can read Building a Serverless Analytics Solution for Cleaner Cities and review Serverless Big Data Analytics using Amazon Athena and Amazon QuickSight if you are interested in this approach.

New Features and Enhancements
We’re still doing our best to listen and to learn, and to make sure that QuickSight continues to meet your needs. I’m happy to announce that we are making seven big additions today:

Geospatial Visualization – You can now create geospatial visuals on geographical data sets.

Private VPC Access – You can now sign up to access a preview of a new feature that allows you to securely connect to data within VPCs or on-premises, without the need for public endpoints.

Flat Table Support – In addition to pivot tables, you can now use flat tables for tabular reporting. To learn more, read about Using Tabular Reports.

Calculated SPICE Fields – You can now perform run-time calculations on SPICE data as part of your analysis. Read Adding a Calculated Field to an Analysis for more information.

Wide Table Support – You can now use tables with up to 1000 columns.

Other Buckets – You can summarize the long tail of high-cardinality data into buckets, as described in Working with Visual Types in Amazon QuickSight.

HIPAA Compliance – You can now run HIPAA-compliant workloads on QuickSight.

Geospatial Visualization
Everyone seems to want this feature! You can now take data that contains a geographic identifier (country, city, state, or zip code) and create beautiful visualizations with just a few clicks. QuickSight will geocode the identifier that you supply, and can also accept lat/long map coordinates. You can use this feature to visualize sales by state, map stores to shipping destinations, and so forth. Here’s a sample visualization:

To learn more about this feature, read Using Geospatial Charts (Maps), and Adding Geospatial Data.

Private VPC Access Preview
If you have data in AWS (perhaps in Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), or on EC2) or on-premises in Teradata or SQL Server on servers without public connectivity, this feature is for you. Private VPC Access for QuickSight uses an Elastic Network Interface (ENI) for secure, private communication with data sources in a VPC. It also allows you to use AWS Direct Connect to create a secure, private link with your on-premises resources. Here’s what it looks like:

If you are ready to join the preview, you can sign up today.

Jeff;

 

Tableau 10.4 Supports Amazon Redshift Spectrum with External Amazon S3 Tables

Post Syndicated from Robin Cottiss original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/tableau-10-4-supports-amazon-redshift-spectrum-with-external-amazon-s3-tables/

This is a guest post by Robin Cottiss, strategic customer consultant, Russell Christopher, staff product manager, and Vaidy Krishnan, senior manager of product marketing, at Tableau. Tableau, in their own words, “helps anyone quickly analyze, visualize, and share information. More than 61,000 customer accounts get rapid results with Tableau in the office and on the go. Over 300,000 people use Tableau Public to share public data in their blogs and websites.”

We’re excited to announce today an update to our Amazon Redshift connector with support for Amazon Redshift Spectrum to analyze data in external Amazon S3 tables. This feature, the direct result of joint engineering and testing work performed by the teams at Tableau and AWS, was released as part of Tableau 10.3.3 and will be available broadly in Tableau 10.4.1. With this update, you can quickly and directly connect Tableau to data in Amazon Redshift and analyze it in conjunction with data in Amazon S3—all with drag-and-drop ease.

This connector is yet another in a series of market-leading integrations of Tableau with AWS’s analytics platform, with services such as Amazon Redshift, Amazon EMR, and Amazon Athena. These integrations have allowed Tableau to become the natural choice of tool for analyzing data stored on AWS. Beyond this, Tableau Server runs seamlessly in the AWS Cloud infrastructure. If you prefer to deploy all your applications inside AWS, you have a complete solution offering from Tableau.

How does support for Amazon Redshift Spectrum help you?

If you’re like many Tableau customers, you have large buckets of data stored in Amazon S3. You might need to access this data frequently and store it in a consistent, highly structured format. If so, you can provision it to a data warehouse like Amazon Redshift. You might also want to explore this S3 data on an ad hoc basis. For example, you might want to determine whether or not to provision the data, and where—options might be Hadoop, Impala, Amazon EMR, or Amazon Redshift. To do so, you can use Amazon Athena, a serverless interactive query service from AWS that requires no infrastructure setup and management.

But what if you want to analyze both the frequently accessed data stored locally in Amazon Redshift AND your full datasets stored cost-effectively in Amazon S3? What if you want the throughput of disk and sophisticated query optimization of Amazon Redshift AND a service that combines a serverless scale-out processing capability with the massively reliable and scalable S3 infrastructure? What if you want the super-fast performance of Amazon Redshift AND support for open storage formats (for example, Parquet or ORC) in S3?

To enable these AND and resolve the tyranny of ORs, AWS launched Amazon Redshift Spectrum earlier this year.

Amazon Redshift Spectrum gives you the freedom to store your data where you want, in the format you want, and have it available for processing when you need it. Since the Amazon Redshift Spectrum launch, Tableau has worked tirelessly to provide best-in-class support for this new service. With Tableau and Redshift Spectrum, you can extend your Amazon Redshift analyses out to the entire universe of data in your S3 data lakes.

This latest update has been tested by many customers with very positive feedback. One such customer is the world’s largest food product distributor, Sysco—you can watch their session referencing the Amazon Spectrum integration at Tableau Conference 2017. Sysco also plans to reprise its “Tableau on AWS” story again in a month’s time at AWS re:Invent.

Now, I’d like to use a concrete example to demonstrate how Tableau works with Amazon Redshift Spectrum. In this example, I also show you how and why you might want to connect to your AWS data in different ways.

The setup

I use the pipeline described following to ingest, process, and analyze data with Tableau on an AWS stack. The source data is the New York City Taxi dataset, which has 9 years’ worth of taxi rides activity (including pick-up and drop-off location, amount paid, payment type, and so on) captured in 1.2 billion records.

In this pipeline, this data lands in S3, is cleansed and partitioned by using Amazon EMR, and is then converted to a columnar Parquet format that is analytically optimized. You can point Tableau to the raw data in S3 by using Amazon Athena. You can also access the cleansed data with Tableau using Presto through your Amazon EMR cluster.

Why use Tableau this early in the pipeline? Because sometimes you want to understand what’s there and what questions are worth asking before you even start the analysis.

After you find out what those questions are and determine if this sort of analysis has long-term usefulness, you can automate and optimize that pipeline. You do this to add new data as soon as possible as it arrives, to get it to the processes and people that need it. You might also want to provision this data to a highly performant “hotter” layer (Amazon Redshift or Tableau Extract) for repeated access.

In the illustration preceding, S3 contains the raw denormalized ride data at the timestamp level of granularity. This S3 data is the fact table. Amazon Redshift has the time dimensions broken out by date, month, and year, and also has the taxi zone information.

Now imagine I want to know where and when taxi pickups happen on a certain date in a certain borough. With support for Amazon Redshift Spectrum, I can now join the S3 tables with the Amazon Redshift dimensions, as shown following.

I can next analyze the data in Tableau to produce a borough-by-borough view of New York City ride density on Christmas Day 2015.

Or I can hone in on just Manhattan and identify pickup hotspots, with ride charges way above the average!

With Amazon Redshift Spectrum, you now have a fast, cost-effective engine that minimizes data processed with dynamic partition pruning. You can further improve query performance by reducing the data scanned. You do this by partitioning and compressing data and by using a columnar format for storage.

At the end of the day, which engine you use behind Tableau is a function of what you want to optimize for. Some possible engines are Amazon Athena, Amazon Redshift, and Redshift Spectrum, or you can bring a subset of data into Tableau Extract. Factors in planning optimization include these:

  • Are you comfortable with the serverless cost model of Amazon Athena and potential full scans? Or do you prefer the advantages of no setup?
  • Do you want the throughput of local disk?
  • Effort and time of setup. Are you okay with the lead-time of an Amazon Redshift cluster setup, as opposed to just bringing everything into Tableau Extract?

To meet the many needs of our customers, Tableau’s approach is simple: It’s all about choice. The choice of how you want to connect to and analyze your data. Throughout the history of our product and into the future, we have and will continue to empower choice for customers.

For more on how to deal with choice, as you go about making architecture decisions for your enterprise, watch this big data strategy session my friend Robin Cottiss and I delivered at Tableau Conference 2017. This session includes several customer examples leveraging the Tableau on AWS platform, and also a run-through of the aforementioned demonstration.

If you’re curious to learn more about analyzing data with Tableau on Amazon Redshift we encourage you to check out the following resources:

Happy Halloween!

Post Syndicated from Yev original https://www.backblaze.com/blog/happy-halloween/

Thank you so much to everyone who entered our Halloween Video Contest. We had a lot of fun watching the videos and have chosen a winner!

There were many strong entries, but in the end we gave in to our love of Stranger Things. Which fits, because after years of hearing backup stories, some of them have been strange indeed!

Congratulations to our 2017 Halloween Video Contest winner Preston! Here’s his winning video:

Thank you to everyone who participated, we loved the creativity!

The post Happy Halloween! appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

Browser hacking for 280 character tweets

Post Syndicated from Robert Graham original http://blog.erratasec.com/2017/09/browser-hacking-for-280-character-tweets.html

Twitter has raised the limit to 280 characters for a select number of people. However, they left open a hole, allowing anybody to make large tweets with a little bit of hacking. The hacking skills needed are basic hacking skills, which I thought I’d write up in a blog post.


Specifically, the skills you will exercise are:

  • basic command-line shell
  • basic HTTP requests
  • basic browser DOM editing

The short instructions

The basic instructions were found in tweets like the following:
These instructions are clear to the average hacker, but of course, a bit difficult for those learning hacking, hence this post.

The command-line

The basics of most hacking start with knowledge of the command-line. This is the “Terminal” app under macOS or cmd.exe under Windows. Almost always when you see hacking dramatized in the movies, they are using the command-line.
In the beginning, the command-line is all computers had. To do anything on a computer, you had to type a “command” telling it what to do. What we see as the modern graphical screen is a layer on top of the command-line, one that translates clicks of the mouse into the raw commands.
On most systems, the command-line is known as “bash”. This is what you’ll find on Linux and macOS. Windows historically has had a different command-line that uses slightly different syntax, though in the last couple years, they’ve also supported “bash”. You’ll have to install it first, such as by following these instructions.
You’ll see me use command that may not be yet installed on your “bash” command-line, like nc and curl. You’ll need to run a command to install them, such as:
sudo apt-get install nc curl
The thing to remember about the command-line is that the mouse doesn’t work. You can’t click to move the cursor as you normally do in applications. That’s because the command-line predates the mouse by decades. Instead, you have to use arrow keys.
I’m not going to spend much effort discussing the command-line, as a complete explanation is beyond the scope of this document. Instead, I’m assuming the reader either already knows it, or will learn-from-example as we go along.

Web requests

The basics of how the web works are really simple. A request to a web server is just a small packet of text, such as the following, which does a search on Google for the search-term “penguin” (presumably, you are interested in knowing more about penguins):
GET /search?q=penguin HTTP/1.0
Host: www.google.com
User-Agent: human
The command we are sending to the server is GET, meaning get a page. We are accessing the URL /search, which on Google’s website, is how you do a search. We are then sending the parameter q with the value penguin. We also declare that we are using version 1.0 of the HTTP (hyper-text transfer protocol).
Following the first line there are a number of additional headers. In one header, we declare the Host name that we are accessing. Web servers can contain many different websites, with different names, so this header is usually imporant.
We also add the User-Agent header. The “user-agent” means the “browser” that you use, like Edge, Chrome, Firefox, or Safari. It allows servers to send content optimized for different browsers. Since we are sending web requests without a browser here, we are joking around saying human.
Here’s what happens when we use the nc program to send this to a google web server:
The first part is us typing, until we hit the [enter] key to create a blank line. After that point is the response from the Google server. We get back a result code (OK), followed by more headers from the server, and finally the contents of the webpage, which goes on from many screens. (We’ll talk about what web pages look like below).
Note that a lot of HTTP headers are optional and really have little influence on what’s going on. They are just junk added to web requests. For example, we see Google report a P3P header is some relic of 2002 that nobody uses anymore, as far as I can tell. Indeed, if you follow the URL in the P3P header, Google pretty much says exactly that.
I point this out because the request I show above is a simplified one. In practice, most requests contain a lot more headers, especially Cookie headers. We’ll see that later when making requests.

Using cURL instead

Sending the raw HTTP request to the server, and getting raw HTTP/HTML back, is annoying. The better way of doing this is with the tool known as cURL, or plainly, just curl. You may be familiar with the older command-line tools wget. cURL is similar, but more flexible.
To use curl for the experiment above, we’d do something like the following. We are saving the web page to “penguin.html” instead of just spewing it on the screen.
Underneath, cURL builds an HTTP header just like the one we showed above, and sends it to the server, getting the response back.

Web-pages

Now let’s talk about web pages. When you look at the web page we got back from Google while searching for “penguin”, you’ll see that it’s intimidatingly complex. I mean, it intimidates me. But it all starts from some basic principles, so we’ll look at some simpler examples.
The following is text of a simple web page:
<html>
<body>
<h1>Test</h1>
<p>This is a simple web page</p>
</body>
</html>
This is HTML, “hyper-text markup language”. As it’s name implies, we “markup” text, such as declaring the first text as a level-1 header (H1), and the following text as a paragraph (P).
In a web browser, this gets rendered as something that looks like the following. Notice how a header is formatted differently from a paragraph. Also notice that web browsers can use local files as well as make remote requests to web servers:
You can right-mouse click on the page and do a “View Source”. This will show the raw source behind the web page:
Web pages don’t just contain marked-up text. They contain two other important features, style information that dictates how things appear, and script that does all the live things that web pages do, from which we build web apps.
So let’s add a little bit of style and scripting to our web page. First, let’s view the source we’ll be adding:
In our header (H1) field, we’ve added the attribute to the markup giving this an id of mytitle. In the style section above, we give that element a color of blue, and tell it to align to the center.
Then, in our script section, we’ve told it that when somebody clicks on the element “mytitle”, it should send an “alert” message of “hello”.
This is what our web page now looks like, with the center blue title:
When we click on the title, we get a popup alert:
Thus, we see an example of the three components of a webpage: markup, style, and scripting.

Chrome developer tools

Now we go off the deep end. Right-mouse click on “Test” (not normal click, but right-button click, to pull up a menu). Select “Inspect”.
You should now get a window that looks something like the following. Chrome splits the screen in half, showing the web page on the left, and it’s debug tools on the right.
This looks similar to what “View Source” shows, but it isn’t. Instead, it’s showing how Chrome interpreted the source HTML. For example, our style/script tags should’ve been marked up with a head (header) tag. We forgot it, but Chrome adds it in anyway.
What Google is showing us is called the DOM, or document object model. It shows us all the objects that make up a web page, and how they fit together.
For example, it shows us how the style information for #mytitle is created. It first starts with the default style information for an h1 tag, and then how we’ve changed it with our style specifications.
We can edit the DOM manually. Just double click on things you want to change. For example, in this screen shot, I’ve changed the style spec from blue to red, and I’ve changed the header and paragraph test. The original file on disk hasn’t changed, but I’ve changed the DOM in memory.
This is a classic hacking technique. If you don’t like things like paywalls, for example, just right-click on the element blocking your view of the text, “Inspect” it, then delete it. (This works for some paywalls).
This edits the markup and style info, but changing the scripting stuff is a bit more complicated. To do that, click on the [Console] tab. This is the scripting console, and allows you to run code directly as part of the webpage. We are going to run code that resets what happens when we click on the title. In this case, we are simply going to change the message to “goodbye”.
Now when we click on the title, we indeed get the message:
Again, a common way to get around paywalls is to run some code like that that change which functions will be called.

Putting it all together

Now let’s put this all together in order to hack Twitter to allow us (the non-chosen) to tweet 280 characters. Review Dildog’s instructions above.
The first step is to get to Chrome Developer Tools. Dildog suggests F12. I suggest right-clicking on the Tweet button (or Reply button, as I use in my example) and doing “Inspect”, as I describe above.
You’ll now see your screen split in half, with the DOM toward the right, similar to how I describe above. However, Twitter’s app is really complex. Well, not really complex, it’s all basic stuff when you come right down to it. It’s just so much stuff — it’s a large web app with lots of parts. So we have to dive in without understanding everything that’s going on.
The Tweet/Reply button we are inspecting is going to look like this in the DOM:
The Tweet/Reply button is currently greyed out because it has the “disabled” attribute. You need to double click on it and remove that attribute. Also, in the class attribute, there is also a “disabled” part. Double-click, then click on that and removed just that disabled as well, without impacting the stuff around it. This should change the button from disabled to enabled. It won’t be greyed out, and it’ll respond when you click on it.
Now click on it. You’ll get an error message, as shown below:
What we’ve done here is bypass what’s known as client-side validation. The script in the web page prevented sending Tweets longer than 140 characters. Our editing of the DOM changed that, allowing us to send a bad request to the server. Bypassing client-side validation this way is the source of a lot of hacking.
But Twitter still does server-side validation as well. They know any client-side validation can be bypassed, and are in on the joke. They tell us hackers “You’ll have to be more clever”. So let’s be more clever.
In order to make longer 280 characters tweets work for select customers, they had to change something on the server-side. The thing they added was adding a “weighted_character_count=true” to the HTTP request. We just need to repeat the request we generated above, adding this parameter.
In theory, we can do this by fiddling with the scripting. The way Dildog describes does it a different way. He copies the request out of the browser, edits it, then send it via the command-line using curl.
We’ve used the [Elements] and [Console] tabs in Chrome’s DevTools. Now we are going to use the [Network] tab. This lists all the requests the web page has made to the server. The twitter app is constantly making requests to refresh the content of the web page. The request we made trying to do a long tweet is called “create”, and is red, because it failed.
Google Chrome gives us a number of ways to duplicate the request. The most useful is that it copies it as a full cURL command we can just paste onto the command-line. We don’t even need to know cURL, it takes care of everything for us. On Windows, since you have two command-lines, it gives you a choice to use the older Windows cmd.exe, or the newer bash.exe. I use the bash version, since I don’t know where to get the Windows command-line version of cURL.exe.
There’s a lot of going on here. The first thing to notice is the long xxxxxx strings. That’s actually not in the original screenshot. I edited the picture. That’s because these are session-cookies. If inserted them into your browser, you’d hijack my Twitter session, and be able to tweet as me (such as making Carlos Danger style tweets). Therefore, I have to remove them from the example.
At the top of the screen is the URL that we are accessing, which is https://twitter.com/i/tweet/create. Much of the rest of the screen uses the cURL -H option to add a header. These are all the HTTP headers that I describe above. Finally, at the bottom, is the –data section, which contains the data bits related to the tweet, especially the tweet itself.
We need to edit either the URL above to read https://twitter.com/i/tweet/create?weighted_character_count=true, or we need to add &weighted_character_count=true to the –data section at the bottom (either works). Remember: mouse doesn’t work on command-line, so you have to use the cursor-keys to navigate backwards in the line. Also, since the line is larger than the screen, it’s on several visual lines, even though it’s all a single line as far as the command-line is concerned.
Now just hit [return] on your keyboard, and the tweet will be sent to the server, which at the moment, works. Presto!
Twitter will either enable or disable the feature for everyone in a few weeks, at which point, this post won’t work. But the reason I’m writing this is to demonstrate the basic hacking skills. We manipulate the web pages we receive from servers, and we manipulate what’s sent back from our browser back to the server.

Easier: hack the scripting

Instead of messing with the DOM and editing the HTTP request, the better solution would be to change the scripting that does both DOM client-side validation and HTTP request generation. The only reason Dildog above didn’t do that is that it’s a lot more work trying to find where all this happens.
Others have, though. @Zemnmez did just that, though his technique works for the alternate TweetDeck client (https://tweetdeck.twitter.com) instead of the default client. Go copy his code from here, then paste it into the DevTools scripting [Console]. It’ll go in an replace some scripting functions, such like my simpler example above.
The console is showing a stream of error messages, because TweetDeck has bugs, ignore those.
Now you can effortlessly do long tweets as normal, without all the messing around I’ve spent so much text in this blog post describing.
Now, as I’ve mentioned this before, you are only editing what’s going on in the current web page. If you refresh this page, or close it, everything will be lost. You’ll have to re-open the DevTools scripting console and repaste the code. The easier way of doing this is to use the [Sources] tab instead of [Console] and use the “Snippets” feature to save this bit of code in your browser, to make it easier next time.
The even easier way is to use Chrome extensions like TamperMonkey and GreaseMonkey that’ll take care of this for you. They’ll save the script, and automatically run it when they see you open the TweetDeck webpage again.
An even easier way is to use one of the several Chrome extensions written in the past day specifically designed to bypass the 140 character limit. Since the purpose of this blog post is to show you how to tamper with your browser yourself, rather than help you with Twitter, I won’t list them.

Conclusion

Tampering with the web-page the server gives you, and the data you send back, is a basic hacker skill. In truth, there is a lot to this. You have to get comfortable with the command-line, using tools like cURL. You have to learn how HTTP requests work. You have to understand how web pages are built from markup, style, and scripting. You have to be comfortable using Chrome’s DevTools for messing around with web page elements, network requests, scripting console, and scripting sources.
So it’s rather a lot, actually.
My hope with this page is to show you a practical application of all this, without getting too bogged down in fully explaining how every bit works.

Analyzing AWS Cost and Usage Reports with Looker and Amazon Athena

Post Syndicated from Dillon Morrison original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/analyzing-aws-cost-and-usage-reports-with-looker-and-amazon-athena/

This is a guest post by Dillon Morrison at Looker. Looker is, in their own words, “a new kind of analytics platform–letting everyone in your business make better decisions by getting reliable answers from a tool they can use.” 

As the breadth of AWS products and services continues to grow, customers are able to more easily move their technology stack and core infrastructure to AWS. One of the attractive benefits of AWS is the cost savings. Rather than paying upfront capital expenses for large on-premises systems, customers can instead pay variables expenses for on-demand services. To further reduce expenses AWS users can reserve resources for specific periods of time, and automatically scale resources as needed.

The AWS Cost Explorer is great for aggregated reporting. However, conducting analysis on the raw data using the flexibility and power of SQL allows for much richer detail and insight, and can be the better choice for the long term. Thankfully, with the introduction of Amazon Athena, monitoring and managing these costs is now easier than ever.

In the post, I walk through setting up the data pipeline for cost and usage reports, Amazon S3, and Athena, and discuss some of the most common levers for cost savings. I surface tables through Looker, which comes with a host of pre-built data models and dashboards to make analysis of your cost and usage data simple and intuitive.

Analysis with Athena

With Athena, there’s no need to create hundreds of Excel reports, move data around, or deploy clusters to house and process data. Athena uses Apache Hive’s DDL to create tables, and the Presto querying engine to process queries. Analysis can be performed directly on raw data in S3. Conveniently, AWS exports raw cost and usage data directly into a user-specified S3 bucket, making it simple to start querying with Athena quickly. This makes continuous monitoring of costs virtually seamless, since there is no infrastructure to manage. Instead, users can leverage the power of the Athena SQL engine to easily perform ad-hoc analysis and data discovery without needing to set up a data warehouse.

After the data pipeline is established, cost and usage data (the recommended billing data, per AWS documentation) provides a plethora of comprehensive information around usage of AWS services and the associated costs. Whether you need the report segmented by product type, user identity, or region, this report can be cut-and-sliced any number of ways to properly allocate costs for any of your business needs. You can then drill into any specific line item to see even further detail, such as the selected operating system, tenancy, purchase option (on-demand, spot, or reserved), and so on.

Walkthrough

By default, the Cost and Usage report exports CSV files, which you can compress using gzip (recommended for performance). There are some additional configuration options for tuning performance further, which are discussed below.

Prerequisites

If you want to follow along, you need the following resources:

Enable the cost and usage reports

First, enable the Cost and Usage report. For Time unit, select Hourly. For Include, select Resource IDs. All options are prompted in the report-creation window.

The Cost and Usage report dumps CSV files into the specified S3 bucket. Please note that it can take up to 24 hours for the first file to be delivered after enabling the report.

Configure the S3 bucket and files for Athena querying

In addition to the CSV file, AWS also creates a JSON manifest file for each cost and usage report. Athena requires that all of the files in the S3 bucket are in the same format, so we need to get rid of all these manifest files. If you’re looking to get started with Athena quickly, you can simply go into your S3 bucket and delete the manifest file manually, skip the automation described below, and move on to the next section.

To automate the process of removing the manifest file each time a new report is dumped into S3, which I recommend as you scale, there are a few additional steps. The folks at Concurrency labs wrote a great overview and set of scripts for this, which you can find in their GitHub repo.

These scripts take the data from an input bucket, remove anything unnecessary, and dump it into a new output bucket. We can utilize AWS Lambda to trigger this process whenever new data is dropped into S3, or on a nightly basis, or whatever makes most sense for your use-case, depending on how often you’re querying the data. Please note that enabling the “hourly” report means that data is reported at the hour-level of granularity, not that a new file is generated every hour.

Following these scripts, you’ll notice that we’re adding a date partition field, which isn’t necessary but improves query performance. In addition, converting data from CSV to a columnar format like ORC or Parquet also improves performance. We can automate this process using Lambda whenever new data is dropped in our S3 bucket. Amazon Web Services discusses columnar conversion at length, and provides walkthrough examples, in their documentation.

As a long-term solution, best practice is to use compression, partitioning, and conversion. However, for purposes of this walkthrough, we’re not going to worry about them so we can get up-and-running quicker.

Set up the Athena query engine

In your AWS console, navigate to the Athena service, and click “Get Started”. Follow the tutorial and set up a new database (we’ve called ours “AWS Optimizer” in this example). Don’t worry about configuring your initial table, per the tutorial instructions. We’ll be creating a new table for cost and usage analysis. Once you walked through the tutorial steps, you’ll be able to access the Athena interface, and can begin running Hive DDL statements to create new tables.

One thing that’s important to note, is that the Cost and Usage CSVs also contain the column headers in their first row, meaning that the column headers would be included in the dataset and any queries. For testing and quick set-up, you can remove this line manually from your first few CSV files. Long-term, you’ll want to use a script to programmatically remove this row each time a new file is dropped in S3 (every few hours typically). We’ve drafted up a sample script for ease of reference, which we run on Lambda. We utilize Lambda’s native ability to invoke the script whenever a new object is dropped in S3.

For cost and usage, we recommend using the DDL statement below. Since our data is in CSV format, we don’t need to use a SerDe, we can simply specify the “separatorChar, quoteChar, and escapeChar”, and the structure of the files (“TEXTFILE”). Note that AWS does have an OpenCSV SerDe as well, if you prefer to use that.

 

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE IF NOT EXISTS cost_and_usage	 (
identity_LineItemId String,
identity_TimeInterval String,
bill_InvoiceId String,
bill_BillingEntity String,
bill_BillType String,
bill_PayerAccountId String,
bill_BillingPeriodStartDate String,
bill_BillingPeriodEndDate String,
lineItem_UsageAccountId String,
lineItem_LineItemType String,
lineItem_UsageStartDate String,
lineItem_UsageEndDate String,
lineItem_ProductCode String,
lineItem_UsageType String,
lineItem_Operation String,
lineItem_AvailabilityZone String,
lineItem_ResourceId String,
lineItem_UsageAmount String,
lineItem_NormalizationFactor String,
lineItem_NormalizedUsageAmount String,
lineItem_CurrencyCode String,
lineItem_UnblendedRate String,
lineItem_UnblendedCost String,
lineItem_BlendedRate String,
lineItem_BlendedCost String,
lineItem_LineItemDescription String,
lineItem_TaxType String,
product_ProductName String,
product_accountAssistance String,
product_architecturalReview String,
product_architectureSupport String,
product_availability String,
product_bestPractices String,
product_cacheEngine String,
product_caseSeverityresponseTimes String,
product_clockSpeed String,
product_currentGeneration String,
product_customerServiceAndCommunities String,
product_databaseEdition String,
product_databaseEngine String,
product_dedicatedEbsThroughput String,
product_deploymentOption String,
product_description String,
product_durability String,
product_ebsOptimized String,
product_ecu String,
product_endpointType String,
product_engineCode String,
product_enhancedNetworkingSupported String,
product_executionFrequency String,
product_executionLocation String,
product_feeCode String,
product_feeDescription String,
product_freeQueryTypes String,
product_freeTrial String,
product_frequencyMode String,
product_fromLocation String,
product_fromLocationType String,
product_group String,
product_groupDescription String,
product_includedServices String,
product_instanceFamily String,
product_instanceType String,
product_io String,
product_launchSupport String,
product_licenseModel String,
product_location String,
product_locationType String,
product_maxIopsBurstPerformance String,
product_maxIopsvolume String,
product_maxThroughputvolume String,
product_maxVolumeSize String,
product_maximumStorageVolume String,
product_memory String,
product_messageDeliveryFrequency String,
product_messageDeliveryOrder String,
product_minVolumeSize String,
product_minimumStorageVolume String,
product_networkPerformance String,
product_operatingSystem String,
product_operation String,
product_operationsSupport String,
product_physicalProcessor String,
product_preInstalledSw String,
product_proactiveGuidance String,
product_processorArchitecture String,
product_processorFeatures String,
product_productFamily String,
product_programmaticCaseManagement String,
product_provisioned String,
product_queueType String,
product_requestDescription String,
product_requestType String,
product_routingTarget String,
product_routingType String,
product_servicecode String,
product_sku String,
product_softwareType String,
product_storage String,
product_storageClass String,
product_storageMedia String,
product_technicalSupport String,
product_tenancy String,
product_thirdpartySoftwareSupport String,
product_toLocation String,
product_toLocationType String,
product_training String,
product_transferType String,
product_usageFamily String,
product_usagetype String,
product_vcpu String,
product_version String,
product_volumeType String,
product_whoCanOpenCases String,
pricing_LeaseContractLength String,
pricing_OfferingClass String,
pricing_PurchaseOption String,
pricing_publicOnDemandCost String,
pricing_publicOnDemandRate String,
pricing_term String,
pricing_unit String,
reservation_AvailabilityZone String,
reservation_NormalizedUnitsPerReservation String,
reservation_NumberOfReservations String,
reservation_ReservationARN String,
reservation_TotalReservedNormalizedUnits String,
reservation_TotalReservedUnits String,
reservation_UnitsPerReservation String,
resourceTags_userName String,
resourceTags_usercostcategory String  


)
    ROW FORMAT DELIMITED
      FIELDS TERMINATED BY ','
      ESCAPED BY '\\'
      LINES TERMINATED BY '\n'

STORED AS TEXTFILE
    LOCATION 's3://<<your bucket name>>';

Once you’ve successfully executed the command, you should see a new table named “cost_and_usage” with the below properties. Now we’re ready to start executing queries and running analysis!

Start with Looker and connect to Athena

Setting up Looker is a quick process, and you can try it out for free here (or download from Amazon Marketplace). It takes just a few seconds to connect Looker to your Athena database, and Looker comes with a host of pre-built data models and dashboards to make analysis of your cost and usage data simple and intuitive. After you’re connected, you can use the Looker UI to run whatever analysis you’d like. Looker translates this UI to optimized SQL, so any user can execute and visualize queries for true self-service analytics.

Major cost saving levers

Now that the data pipeline is configured, you can dive into the most popular use cases for cost savings. In this post, I focus on:

  • Purchasing Reserved Instances vs. On-Demand Instances
  • Data transfer costs
  • Allocating costs over users or other Attributes (denoted with resource tags)

On-Demand, Spot, and Reserved Instances

Purchasing Reserved Instances vs On-Demand Instances is arguably going to be the biggest cost lever for heavy AWS users (Reserved Instances run up to 75% cheaper!). AWS offers three options for purchasing instances:

  • On-Demand—Pay as you use.
  • Spot (variable cost)—Bid on spare Amazon EC2 computing capacity.
  • Reserved Instances—Pay for an instance for a specific, allotted period of time.

When purchasing a Reserved Instance, you can also choose to pay all-upfront, partial-upfront, or monthly. The more you pay upfront, the greater the discount.

If your company has been using AWS for some time now, you should have a good sense of your overall instance usage on a per-month or per-day basis. Rather than paying for these instances On-Demand, you should try to forecast the number of instances you’ll need, and reserve them with upfront payments.

The total amount of usage with Reserved Instances versus overall usage with all instances is called your coverage ratio. It’s important not to confuse your coverage ratio with your Reserved Instance utilization. Utilization represents the amount of reserved hours that were actually used. Don’t worry about exceeding capacity, you can still set up Auto Scaling preferences so that more instances get added whenever your coverage or utilization crosses a certain threshold (we often see a target of 80% for both coverage and utilization among savvy customers).

Calculating the reserved costs and coverage can be a bit tricky with the level of granularity provided by the cost and usage report. The following query shows your total cost over the last 6 months, broken out by Reserved Instance vs other instance usage. You can substitute the cost field for usage if you’d prefer. Please note that you should only have data for the time period after the cost and usage report has been enabled (though you can opt for up to 3 months of historical data by contacting your AWS Account Executive). If you’re just getting started, this query will only show a few days.

 

SELECT 
	DATE_FORMAT(from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate),'%Y-%m') AS "cost_and_usage.usage_start_month",
	COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost ), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_unblended_cost",
	COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN (CASE
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'DiscountedUsage' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'RIFee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'Fee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         ELSE 'Non RI Line Item'
        END = 'RI Line Item') THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_reserved_unblended_cost",
	1.0 * (COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN (CASE
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'DiscountedUsage' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'RIFee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'Fee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         ELSE 'Non RI Line Item'
        END = 'RI Line Item') THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0)) / NULLIF((COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost ), 0)),0)  AS "cost_and_usage.percent_spend_on_ris",
	COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN (CASE
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'DiscountedUsage' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'RIFee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'Fee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         ELSE 'Non RI Line Item'
        END = 'Non RI Line Item') THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_non_reserved_unblended_cost",
	1.0 * (COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN (CASE
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'DiscountedUsage' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'RIFee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'Fee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         ELSE 'Non RI Line Item'
        END = 'Non RI Line Item') THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0)) / NULLIF((COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost ), 0)),0)  AS "cost_and_usage.percent_spend_on_non_ris"
FROM aws_optimizer.cost_and_usage  AS cost_and_usage

WHERE 
	(((from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate)) >= ((DATE_ADD('month', -5, DATE_TRUNC('MONTH', CAST(NOW() AS DATE))))) AND (from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate)) < ((DATE_ADD('month', 6, DATE_ADD('month', -5, DATE_TRUNC('MONTH', CAST(NOW() AS DATE))))))))
GROUP BY 1
ORDER BY 2 DESC
LIMIT 500

The resulting table should look something like the image below (I’m surfacing tables through Looker, though the same table would result from querying via command line or any other interface).

With a BI tool, you can create dashboards for easy reference and monitoring. New data is dumped into S3 every few hours, so your dashboards can update several times per day.

It’s an iterative process to understand the appropriate number of Reserved Instances needed to meet your business needs. After you’ve properly integrated Reserved Instances into your purchasing patterns, the savings can be significant. If your coverage is consistently below 70%, you should seriously consider adjusting your purchase types and opting for more Reserved instances.

Data transfer costs

One of the great things about AWS data storage is that it’s incredibly cheap. Most charges often come from moving and processing that data. There are several different prices for transferring data, broken out largely by transfers between regions and availability zones. Transfers between regions are the most costly, followed by transfers between Availability Zones. Transfers within the same region and same availability zone are free unless using elastic or public IP addresses, in which case there is a cost. You can find more detailed information in the AWS Pricing Docs. With this in mind, there are several simple strategies for helping reduce costs.

First, since costs increase when transferring data between regions, it’s wise to ensure that as many services as possible reside within the same region. The more you can localize services to one specific region, the lower your costs will be.

Second, you should maximize the data you’re routing directly within AWS services and IP addresses. Transfers out to the open internet are the most costly and least performant mechanisms of data transfers, so it’s best to keep transfers within AWS services.

Lastly, data transfers between private IP addresses are cheaper than between elastic or public IP addresses, so utilizing private IP addresses as much as possible is the most cost-effective strategy.

The following query provides a table depicting the total costs for each AWS product, broken out transfer cost type. Substitute the “lineitem_productcode” field in the query to segment the costs by any other attribute. If you notice any unusually high spikes in cost, you’ll need to dig deeper to understand what’s driving that spike: location, volume, and so on. Drill down into specific costs by including “product_usagetype” and “product_transfertype” in your query to identify the types of transfer costs that are driving up your bill.

SELECT 
	cost_and_usage.lineitem_productcode  AS "cost_and_usage.product_code",
	COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_unblended_cost",
	COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN REGEXP_LIKE(cost_and_usage.product_usagetype, 'DataTransfer')    THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_data_transfer_cost",
	COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN REGEXP_LIKE(cost_and_usage.product_usagetype, 'DataTransfer-In')    THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_inbound_data_transfer_cost",
	COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN REGEXP_LIKE(cost_and_usage.product_usagetype, 'DataTransfer-Out')    THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_outbound_data_transfer_cost"
FROM aws_optimizer.cost_and_usage  AS cost_and_usage

WHERE 
	(((from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate)) >= ((DATE_ADD('month', -5, DATE_TRUNC('MONTH', CAST(NOW() AS DATE))))) AND (from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate)) < ((DATE_ADD('month', 6, DATE_ADD('month', -5, DATE_TRUNC('MONTH', CAST(NOW() AS DATE))))))))
GROUP BY 1
ORDER BY 2 DESC
LIMIT 500

When moving between regions or over the open web, many data transfer costs also include the origin and destination location of the data movement. Using a BI tool with mapping capabilities, you can get a nice visual of data flows. The point at the center of the map is used to represent external data flows over the open internet.

Analysis by tags

AWS provides the option to apply custom tags to individual resources, so you can allocate costs over whatever customized segment makes the most sense for your business. For a SaaS company that hosts software for customers on AWS, maybe you’d want to tag the size of each customer. The following query uses custom tags to display the reserved, data transfer, and total cost for each AWS service, broken out by tag categories, over the last 6 months. You’ll want to substitute the cost_and_usage.resourcetags_customersegment and cost_and_usage.customer_segment with the name of your customer field.

 

SELECT * FROM (
SELECT *, DENSE_RANK() OVER (ORDER BY z___min_rank) as z___pivot_row_rank, RANK() OVER (PARTITION BY z__pivot_col_rank ORDER BY z___min_rank) as z__pivot_col_ordering FROM (
SELECT *, MIN(z___rank) OVER (PARTITION BY "cost_and_usage.product_code") as z___min_rank FROM (
SELECT *, RANK() OVER (ORDER BY CASE WHEN z__pivot_col_rank=1 THEN (CASE WHEN "cost_and_usage.total_unblended_cost" IS NOT NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END) ELSE 2 END, CASE WHEN z__pivot_col_rank=1 THEN "cost_and_usage.total_unblended_cost" ELSE NULL END DESC, "cost_and_usage.total_unblended_cost" DESC, z__pivot_col_rank, "cost_and_usage.product_code") AS z___rank FROM (
SELECT *, DENSE_RANK() OVER (ORDER BY CASE WHEN "cost_and_usage.customer_segment" IS NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END, "cost_and_usage.customer_segment") AS z__pivot_col_rank FROM (
SELECT 
	cost_and_usage.lineitem_productcode  AS "cost_and_usage.product_code",
	cost_and_usage.resourcetags_customersegment  AS "cost_and_usage.customer_segment",
	COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost ), 0) AS "cost_and_usage.total_unblended_cost",
	1.0 * (COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN REGEXP_LIKE(cost_and_usage.product_usagetype, 'DataTransfer')    THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0)) / NULLIF((COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost ), 0)),0)  AS "cost_and_usage.percent_spend_data_transfers_unblended",
	1.0 * (COALESCE(SUM(CASE WHEN (CASE
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'DiscountedUsage' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'RIFee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         WHEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_lineitemtype = 'Fee' THEN 'RI Line Item'
         ELSE 'Non RI Line Item'
        END = 'Non RI Line Item') THEN cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost  ELSE NULL END), 0)) / NULLIF((COALESCE(SUM(cost_and_usage.lineitem_unblendedcost ), 0)),0)  AS "cost_and_usage.unblended_percent_spend_on_ris"
FROM aws_optimizer.cost_and_usage_raw  AS cost_and_usage

WHERE 
	(((from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate)) >= ((DATE_ADD('month', -5, DATE_TRUNC('MONTH', CAST(NOW() AS DATE))))) AND (from_iso8601_timestamp(cost_and_usage.lineitem_usagestartdate)) < ((DATE_ADD('month', 6, DATE_ADD('month', -5, DATE_TRUNC('MONTH', CAST(NOW() AS DATE))))))))
GROUP BY 1,2) ww
) bb WHERE z__pivot_col_rank <= 16384
) aa
) xx
) zz
 WHERE z___pivot_row_rank <= 500 OR z__pivot_col_ordering = 1 ORDER BY z___pivot_row_rank

The resulting table in this example looks like the results below. In this example, you can tell that we’re making poor use of Reserved Instances because they represent such a small portion of our overall costs.

Again, using a BI tool to visualize these costs and trends over time makes the analysis much easier to consume and take action on.

Summary

Saving costs on your AWS spend is always an iterative, ongoing process. Hopefully with these queries alone, you can start to understand your spending patterns and identify opportunities for savings. However, this is just a peek into the many opportunities available through analysis of the Cost and Usage report. Each company is different, with unique needs and usage patterns. To achieve maximum cost savings, we encourage you to set up an analytics environment that enables your team to explore all potential cuts and slices of your usage data, whenever it’s necessary. Exploring different trends and spikes across regions, services, user types, etc. helps you gain comprehensive understanding of your major cost levers and consistently implement new cost reduction strategies.

Note that all of the queries and analysis provided in this post were generated using the Looker data platform. If you’re already a Looker customer, you can get all of this analysis, additional pre-configured dashboards, and much more using Looker Blocks for AWS.


About the Author

Dillon Morrison leads the Platform Ecosystem at Looker. He enjoys exploring new technologies and architecting the most efficient data solutions for the business needs of his company and their customers. In his spare time, you’ll find Dillon rock climbing in the Bay Area or nose deep in the docs of the latest AWS product release at his favorite cafe (“Arlequin in SF is unbeatable!”).

 

 

 

Turbocharge your Apache Hive queries on Amazon EMR using LLAP

Post Syndicated from Jigar Mistry original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/turbocharge-your-apache-hive-queries-on-amazon-emr-using-llap/

Apache Hive is one of the most popular tools for analyzing large datasets stored in a Hadoop cluster using SQL. Data analysts and scientists use Hive to query, summarize, explore, and analyze big data.

With the introduction of Hive LLAP (Low Latency Analytical Processing), the notion of Hive being just a batch processing tool has changed. LLAP uses long-lived daemons with intelligent in-memory caching to circumvent batch-oriented latency and provide sub-second query response times.

This post provides an overview of Hive LLAP, including its architecture and common use cases for boosting query performance. You will learn how to install and configure Hive LLAP on an Amazon EMR cluster and run queries on LLAP daemons.

What is Hive LLAP?

Hive LLAP was introduced in Apache Hive 2.0, which provides very fast processing of queries. It uses persistent daemons that are deployed on a Hadoop YARN cluster using Apache Slider. These daemons are long-running and provide functionality such as I/O with DataNode, in-memory caching, query processing, and fine-grained access control. And since the daemons are always running in the cluster, it saves substantial overhead of launching new YARN containers for every new Hive session, thereby avoiding long startup times.

When Hive is configured in hybrid execution mode, small and short queries execute directly on LLAP daemons. Heavy lifting (like large shuffles in the reduce stage) is performed in YARN containers that belong to the application. Resources (CPU, memory, etc.) are obtained in a traditional fashion using YARN. After the resources are obtained, the execution engine can decide which resources are to be allocated to LLAP, or it can launch Apache Tez processors in separate YARN containers. You can also configure Hive to run all the processing workloads on LLAP daemons for querying small datasets at lightning fast speeds.

LLAP daemons are launched under YARN management to ensure that the nodes don’t get overloaded with the compute resources of these daemons. You can use scheduling queues to make sure that there is enough compute capacity for other YARN applications to run.

Why use Hive LLAP?

With many options available in the market (Presto, Spark SQL, etc.) for doing interactive SQL  over data that is stored in Amazon S3 and HDFS, there are several reasons why using Hive and LLAP might be a good choice:

  • For those who are heavily invested in the Hive ecosystem and have external BI tools that connect to Hive over JDBC/ODBC connections, LLAP plugs in to their existing architecture without a steep learning curve.
  • It’s compatible with existing Hive SQL and other Hive tools, like HiveServer2, and JDBC drivers for Hive.
  • It has native support for security features with authentication and authorization (SQL standards-based authorization) using HiveServer2.
  • LLAP daemons are aware about of the columns and records that are being processed which enables you to enforce fine-grained access control.
  • It can use Hive’s vectorization capabilities to speed up queries, and Hive has better support for Parquet file format when vectorization is enabled.
  • It can take advantage of a number of Hive optimizations like merging multiple small files for query results, automatically determining the number of reducers for joins and groupbys, etc.
  • It’s optional and modular so it can be turned on or off depending on the compute and resource requirements of the cluster. This lets you to run other YARN applications concurrently without reserving a cluster specifically for LLAP.

How do you install Hive LLAP in Amazon EMR?

To install and configure LLAP on an EMR cluster, use the following bootstrap action (BA):

s3://aws-bigdata-blog/artifacts/Turbocharge_Apache_Hive_on_EMR/configure-Hive-LLAP.sh

This BA downloads and installs Apache Slider on the cluster and configures LLAP so that it works with EMR Hive. For LLAP to work, the EMR cluster must have Hive, Tez, and Apache Zookeeper installed.

You can pass the following arguments to the BA.

ArgumentDefinitionDefault value
--instancesNumber of instances of LLAP daemonNumber of core/task nodes of the cluster
--cacheCache size per instance20% of physical memory of the node
--executorsNumber of executors per instanceNumber of CPU cores of the node
--iothreadsNumber of IO threads per instanceNumber of CPU cores of the node
--sizeContainer size per instance50% of physical memory of the node
--xmxWorking memory size50% of container size
--log-levelLog levels for the LLAP instanceINFO

LLAP example

This section describes how you can try the faster Hive queries with LLAP using the TPC-DS testbench for Hive on Amazon EMR.

Use the following AWS command line interface (AWS CLI) command to launch a 1+3 nodes m4.xlarge EMR 5.6.0 cluster with the bootstrap action to install LLAP:

aws emr create-cluster --release-label emr-5.6.0 \
--applications Name=Hadoop Name=Hive Name=Hue Name=ZooKeeper Name=Tez \
--bootstrap-actions '[{"Path":"s3://aws-bigdata-blog/artifacts/Turbocharge_Apache_Hive_on_EMR/configure-Hive-LLAP.sh","Name":"Custom action"}]' \ 
--ec2-attributes '{"KeyName":"<YOUR-KEY-PAIR>","InstanceProfile":"EMR_EC2_DefaultRole","SubnetId":"subnet-xxxxxxxx","EmrManagedSlaveSecurityGroup":"sg-xxxxxxxx","EmrManagedMasterSecurityGroup":"sg-xxxxxxxx"}' 
--service-role EMR_DefaultRole \
--enable-debugging \
--log-uri 's3n://<YOUR-BUCKET/' --name 'test-hive-llap' \
--instance-groups '[{"InstanceCount":1,"EbsConfiguration":{"EbsBlockDeviceConfigs":[{"VolumeSpecification":{"SizeInGB":32,"VolumeType":"gp2"},"VolumesPerInstance":1}],"EbsOptimized":true},"InstanceGroupType":"MASTER","InstanceType":"m4.xlarge","Name":"Master - 1"},{"InstanceCount":3,"EbsConfiguration":{"EbsBlockDeviceConfigs":[{"VolumeSpecification":{"SizeInGB":32,"VolumeType":"gp2"},"VolumesPerInstance":1}],"EbsOptimized":true},"InstanceGroupType":"CORE","InstanceType":"m4.xlarge","Name":"Core - 2"}]' 
--region us-east-1

After the cluster is launched, log in to the master node using SSH, and do the following:

  1. Open the hive-tpcds folder:
    cd /home/hadoop/hive-tpcds/
  2. Start Hive CLI using the testbench configuration, create the required tables, and run the sample query:

    hive –i testbench.settings
    hive> source create_tables.sql;
    hive> source query55.sql;

    This sample query runs on a 40 GB dataset that is stored on Amazon S3. The dataset is generated using the data generation tool in the TPC-DS testbench for Hive.It results in output like the following:
  3. This screenshot shows that the query finished in about 47 seconds for LLAP mode. Now, to compare this to the execution time without LLAP, you can run the same workload using only Tez containers:
    hive> set hive.llap.execution.mode=none;
    hive> source query55.sql;


    This query finished in about 80 seconds.

The difference in query execution time is almost 1.7 times when using just YARN containers in contrast to running the query on LLAP daemons. And with every rerun of the query, you notice that the execution time substantially decreases by the virtue of in-memory caching by LLAP daemons.

Conclusion

In this post, I introduced Hive LLAP as a way to boost Hive query performance. I discussed its architecture and described several use cases for the component. I showed how you can install and configure Hive LLAP on an Amazon EMR cluster and how you can run queries on LLAP daemons.

If you have questions about using Hive LLAP on Amazon EMR or would like to share your use cases, please leave a comment below.


Additional Reading

Learn how to to automatically partition Hive external tables with AWS.


About the Author

Jigar Mistry is a Hadoop Systems Engineer with Amazon Web Services. He works with customers to provide them architectural guidance and technical support for processing large datasets in the cloud using open-source applications. In his spare time, he enjoys going for camping and exploring different restaurants in the Seattle area.

 

 

 

 

Google Pi Intercom with the AIY Projects kit

Post Syndicated from Janina Ander original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/google-pi-intercom-aiy-projects/

When we released the Google AIY Projects kit with Issue 57 of The MagPi in May, we could hardly wait to see what you in the community would build with it. Being able to add voice interaction to your Raspberry Pi projects opens up a world of possibilities for exciting digital making.

One such project is maker Martin Mander‘s Google Pi Intercom. We love this build for its retro feel and modern functionality, a combination of characteristics shared by many of Martin’s creations.

1986 Google Pi Intercom

This is a 1986 Radio Shack Intercom that I’ve converted into a Google Home style device using a Raspberry Pi and the Google AIY (Artificial Intelligence Yourself) kit that came free with the MagPi magazine (issue 57). It uses the Google Assistant to answer questions and perform actions, using IFTTT to integrate with smart home accessories and other web services.

Inter-com again?

If you’ve paid any attention at all to the world of Raspberry Pi in the last few months, you’ve probably seen the Google AIY Projects kit that came free with The MagPi #57. It includes a practical cardboard housing, but of course makers everywhere have been upgrading their kits, for example by creating a laser-cut wooden box. Martin, however, has taken things to the next level: he’s installed his AIY kit in a wall-mounted intercom from 1986.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

The components of the Google Pi Intercom

It’s all (inter)coming together

Martin already had not one, but three vintage intercoms at home. So when he snatched up an AIY Projects kit, there was no doubt in his mind about how he was going to use it:

The moment I scooped the Google AIY kit, I knew that one of these old units would be a perfect match for it – after all, both were essentially based on a button, microphone, and loudspeaker, just with different technology in between.

Preparing the intercom housing

First, Martin gutted the intercom and ground away some of the excess plastic inside. This was necessary because integrating all the components was going to be a tight fit. To overhaul its look, he then gave the housing a good scrub and a new paint job. For a splash of colour, Martin affixed a strip of paper in the palette of the Google logo.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

BUBBLES!

Building the Google Pi Intercom

The intercom’s speaker wasn’t going to provide good enough sound quality. Moreover, Martin quickly realised that the one included in the AIY kit was too big for this make. He hunted down a small speaker online, and set about wiring everything up.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

Assembling the electronics

Martin wanted the build to resemble the original intercom as closely as possible. Consequently, he was keen to use its tilting bar to activate the device’s voice command function. Luckily, it was easy to mount the AIY kit’s button behind the bar.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

Using the intercom’s tilting bar switch

Finally it was only a matter of using some hot glue and a few screws and bolts to secure all the components inside the housing. Once he’d done that, Martin just had to set up the software of the Google Assistant, and presto! He had a voice-controlled smart device for home automation.

A pretty snazzy-looking build, isn’t it? If you’d like to learn more about Martin’s Google Pi Intercom, head over to the Instructables page for a complete rundown.

Google Pi intercom Martin Mander

Awaiting your command

The AIY Projects Kit

Didn’t manage to snap up an AIY Projects kit? Find out how to get your hands on one over at The MagPi.

Or do you have an AIY kit at home? Lucky you! You can follow our shiny new learning resource to get started with using it. There are also lots of handy articles about the kit in The MagPi #57 – download the PDF version here. If you’re stuck, or looking for inspiration, check out our AIY Projects subforum. Ask your questions, and help others by answering theirs.

What have you built with your AIY Projects kit? Be sure to share your voice-controlled project with us in the comments.

 

The post Google Pi Intercom with the AIY Projects kit appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Analyze OpenFDA Data in R with Amazon S3 and Amazon Athena

Post Syndicated from Ryan Hood original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/analyze-openfda-data-in-r-with-amazon-s3-and-amazon-athena/

One of the great benefits of Amazon S3 is the ability to host, share, or consume public data sets. This provides transparency into data to which an external data scientist or developer might not normally have access. By exposing the data to the public, you can glean many insights that would have been difficult with a data silo.

The openFDA project creates easy access to the high value, high priority, and public access data of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The data has been formatted and documented in consumer-friendly standards. Critical data related to drugs, devices, and food has been harmonized and can easily be called by application developers and researchers via API calls. OpenFDA has published two whitepapers that drill into the technical underpinnings of the API infrastructure as well as how to properly analyze the data in R. In addition, FDA makes openFDA data available on S3 in raw format.

In this post, I show how to use S3, Amazon EMR, and Amazon Athena to analyze the drug adverse events dataset. A drug adverse event is an undesirable experience associated with the use of a drug, including serious drug side effects, product use errors, product quality programs, and therapeutic failures.

Data considerations

Keep in mind that this data does have limitations. In addition, in the United States, these adverse events are submitted to the FDA voluntarily from consumers so there may not be reports for all events that occurred. There is no certainty that the reported event was actually due to the product. The FDA does not require that a causal relationship between a product and event be proven, and reports do not always contain the detail necessary to evaluate an event. Because of this, there is no way to identify the true number of events. The important takeaway to all this is that the information contained in this data has not been verified to produce cause and effect relationships. Despite this disclaimer, many interesting insights and value can be derived from the data to accelerate drug safety research.

Data analysis using SQL

For application developers who want to perform targeted searching and lookups, the API endpoints provided by the openFDA project are “ready to go” for software integration using a standard API powered by Elasticsearch, NodeJS, and Docker. However, for data analysis purposes, it is often easier to work with the data using SQL and statistical packages that expect a SQL table structure. For large-scale analysis, APIs often have query limits, such as 5000 records per query. This can cause extra work for data scientists who want to analyze the full dataset instead of small subsets of data.

To address the concern of requiring all the data in a single dataset, the openFDA project released the full 100 GB of harmonized data files that back the openFDA project onto S3. Athena is an interactive query service that makes it easy to analyze data in S3 using standard SQL. It’s a quick and easy way to answer your questions about adverse events and aspirin that does not require you to spin up databases or servers.

While you could point tools directly at the openFDA S3 files, you can find greatly improved performance and use of the data by following some of the preparation steps later in this post.

Architecture

This post explains how to use the following architecture to take the raw data provided by openFDA, leverage several AWS services, and derive meaning from the underlying data.

Steps:

  1. Load the openFDA /drug/event dataset into Spark and convert it to gzip to allow for streaming.
  2. Transform the data in Spark and save the results as a Parquet file in S3.
  3. Query the S3 Parquet file with Athena.
  4. Perform visualization and analysis of the data in R and Python on Amazon EC2.

Optimizing public data sets: A primer on data preparation

Those who want to jump right into preparing the files for Athena may want to skip ahead to the next section.

Transforming, or pre-processing, files is a common task for using many public data sets. Before you jump into the specific steps for transforming the openFDA data files into a format optimized for Athena, I thought it would be worthwhile to provide a quick exploration on the problem.

Making a dataset in S3 efficiently accessible with minimal transformation for the end user has two key elements:

  1. Partitioning the data into objects that contain a complete part of the data (such as data created within a specific month).
  2. Using file formats that make it easy for applications to locate subsets of data (for example, gzip, Parquet, ORC, etc.).

With these two key elements in mind, you can now apply transformations to the openFDA adverse event data to prepare it for Athena. You might find the data techniques employed in this post to be applicable to many of the questions you might want to ask of the public data sets stored in Amazon S3.

Before you get started, I encourage those who are interested in doing deeper healthcare analysis on AWS to make sure that you first read the AWS HIPAA Compliance whitepaper. This covers the information necessary for processing and storing patient health information (PHI).

Also, the adverse event analysis shown for aspirin is strictly for demonstration purposes and should not be used for any real decision or taken as anything other than a demonstration of AWS capabilities. However, there have been robust case studies published that have explored a causal relationship between aspirin and adverse reactions using OpenFDA data. If you are seeking research on aspirin or its risks, visit organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or the Institute of Medicine (IOM).

Preparing data for Athena

For this walkthrough, you will start with the FDA adverse events dataset, which is stored as JSON files within zip archives on S3. You then convert it to Parquet for analysis. Why do you need to convert it? The original data download is stored in objects that are partitioned by quarter.

Here is a small sample of what you find in the adverse events (/drugs/event) section of the openFDA website.

If you were looking for events that happened in a specific quarter, this is not a bad solution. For most other scenarios, such as looking across the full history of aspirin events, it requires you to access a lot of data that you won’t need. The zip file format is not ideal for using data in place because zip readers must have random access to the file, which means the data can’t be streamed. Additionally, the zip files contain large JSON objects.

To read the data in these JSON files, a streaming JSON decoder must be used or a computer with a significant amount of RAM must decode the JSON. Opening up these files for public consumption is a great start. However, you still prepare the data with a few lines of Spark code so that the JSON can be streamed.

Step 1:  Convert the file types

Using Apache Spark on EMR, you can extract all of the zip files and pull out the events from the JSON files. To do this, use the Scala code below to deflate the zip file and create a text file. In addition, compress the JSON files with gzip to improve Spark’s performance and reduce your overall storage footprint. The Scala code can be run in either the Spark Shell or in an Apache Zeppelin notebook on your EMR cluster.

If you are unfamiliar with either Apache Zeppelin or the Spark Shell, the following posts serve as great references:

 

import scala.io.Source
import java.util.zip.ZipInputStream
import org.apache.spark.input.PortableDataStream
import org.apache.hadoop.io.compress.GzipCodec

// Input Directory
val inputFile = "s3://download.open.fda.gov/drug/event/2015q4/*.json.zip";

// Output Directory
val outputDir = "s3://{YOUR OUTPUT BUCKET HERE}/output/2015q4/";

// Extract zip files from 
val zipFiles = sc.binaryFiles(inputFile);

// Process zip file to extract the json as text file and save it
// in the output directory 
val rdd = zipFiles.flatMap((file: (String, PortableDataStream)) => {
    val zipStream = new ZipInputStream(file.2.open)
    val entry = zipStream.getNextEntry
    val iter = Source.fromInputStream(zipStream).getLines
    iter
}).map(.replaceAll("\s+","")).saveAsTextFile(outputDir, classOf[GzipCodec])

Step 2:  Transform JSON into Parquet

With just a few more lines of Scala code, you can use Spark’s abstractions to convert the JSON into a Spark DataFrame and then export the data back to S3 in Parquet format.

Spark requires the JSON to be in JSON Lines format to be parsed correctly into a DataFrame.

// Output Parquet directory
val outputDir = "s3://{YOUR OUTPUT BUCKET NAME}/output/drugevents"
// Input json file
val inputJson = "s3://{YOUR OUTPUT BUCKET NAME}/output/2015q4/*”
// Load dataframe from json file multiline 
val df = spark.read.json(sc.wholeTextFiles(inputJson).values)
// Extract results from dataframe
val results = df.select("results")
// Save it to Parquet
results.write.parquet(outputDir)

Step 3:  Create an Athena table

With the data cleanly prepared and stored in S3 using the Parquet format, you can now place an Athena table on top of it to get a better understanding of the underlying data.

Because the openFDA data structure incorporates several layers of nesting, it can be a complex process to try to manually derive the underlying schema in a Hive-compatible format. To shorten this process, you can load the top row of the DataFrame from the previous step into a Hive table within Zeppelin and then extract the “create  table” statement from SparkSQL.

results.createOrReplaceTempView("data")

val top1 = spark.sql("select * from data tablesample(1 rows)")

top1.write.format("parquet").mode("overwrite").saveAsTable("drugevents")

val show_cmd = spark.sql("show create table drugevents”).show(1, false)

This returns a “create table” statement that you can almost paste directly into the Athena console. Make some small modifications (adding the word “external” and replacing “using with “stored as”), and then execute the code in the Athena query editor. The table is created.

For the openFDA data, the DDL returns all string fields, as the date format used in your dataset does not conform to the yyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss[.f…] format required by Hive. For your analysis, the string format works appropriately but it would be possible to extend this code to use a Presto function to convert the strings into time stamps.

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE  drugevents (
   companynumb  string, 
   safetyreportid  string, 
   safetyreportversion  string, 
   receiptdate  string, 
   patientagegroup  string, 
   patientdeathdate  string, 
   patientsex  string, 
   patientweight  string, 
   serious  string, 
   seriousnesscongenitalanomali  string, 
   seriousnessdeath  string, 
   seriousnessdisabling  string, 
   seriousnesshospitalization  string, 
   seriousnesslifethreatening  string, 
   seriousnessother  string, 
   actiondrug  string, 
   activesubstancename  string, 
   drugadditional  string, 
   drugadministrationroute  string, 
   drugcharacterization  string, 
   drugindication  string, 
   drugauthorizationnumb  string, 
   medicinalproduct  string, 
   drugdosageform  string, 
   drugdosagetext  string, 
   reactionoutcome  string, 
   reactionmeddrapt  string, 
   reactionmeddraversionpt  string)
STORED AS parquet
LOCATION
  's3://{YOUR TARGET BUCKET}/output/drugevents'

With the Athena table in place, you can start to explore the data by running ad hoc queries within Athena or doing more advanced statistical analysis in R.

Using SQL and R to analyze adverse events

Using the openFDA data with Athena makes it very easy to translate your questions into SQL code and perform quick analysis on the data. After you have prepared the data for Athena, you can begin to explore the relationship between aspirin and adverse drug events, as an example. One of the most common metrics to measure adverse drug events is the Proportional Reporting Ratio (PRR). It is defined as:

PRR = (m/n)/( (M-m)/(N-n) )
Where
m = #reports with drug and event
n = #reports with drug
M = #reports with event in database
N = #reports in database

Gastrointestinal haemorrhage has the highest PRR of any reaction to aspirin when viewed in aggregate. One question you may want to ask is how the PRR has trended on a yearly basis for gastrointestinal haemorrhage since 2005.

Using the following query in Athena, you can see the PRR trend of “GASTROINTESTINAL HAEMORRHAGE” reactions with “ASPIRIN” since 2005:

with drug_and_event as 
(select rpad(receiptdate, 4, 'NA') as receipt_year
    , reactionmeddrapt
    , count(distinct (concat(safetyreportid,receiptdate,reactionmeddrapt))) as reports_with_drug_and_event 
from fda.drugevents
where rpad(receiptdate,4,'NA') 
     between '2005' and '2015' 
     and medicinalproduct = 'ASPIRIN'
     and reactionmeddrapt= 'GASTROINTESTINAL HAEMORRHAGE'
group by reactionmeddrapt, rpad(receiptdate, 4, 'NA') 
), reports_with_drug as 
(
select rpad(receiptdate, 4, 'NA') as receipt_year
    , count(distinct (concat(safetyreportid,receiptdate,reactionmeddrapt))) as reports_with_drug 
 from fda.drugevents 
 where rpad(receiptdate,4,'NA') 
     between '2005' and '2015' 
     and medicinalproduct = 'ASPIRIN'
group by rpad(receiptdate, 4, 'NA') 
), reports_with_event as 
(
   select rpad(receiptdate, 4, 'NA') as receipt_year
    , count(distinct (concat(safetyreportid,receiptdate,reactionmeddrapt))) as reports_with_event 
   from fda.drugevents
   where rpad(receiptdate,4,'NA') 
     between '2005' and '2015' 
     and reactionmeddrapt= 'GASTROINTESTINAL HAEMORRHAGE'
   group by rpad(receiptdate, 4, 'NA')
), total_reports as 
(
   select rpad(receiptdate, 4, 'NA') as receipt_year
    , count(distinct (concat(safetyreportid,receiptdate,reactionmeddrapt))) as total_reports 
   from fda.drugevents
   where rpad(receiptdate,4,'NA') 
     between '2005' and '2015' 
   group by rpad(receiptdate, 4, 'NA')
)
select  drug_and_event.receipt_year, 
(1.0 * drug_and_event.reports_with_drug_and_event/reports_with_drug.reports_with_drug)/ (1.0 * (reports_with_event.reports_with_event- drug_and_event.reports_with_drug_and_event)/(total_reports.total_reports-reports_with_drug.reports_with_drug)) as prr
, drug_and_event.reports_with_drug_and_event
, reports_with_drug.reports_with_drug
, reports_with_event.reports_with_event
, total_reports.total_reports
from drug_and_event
    inner join reports_with_drug on  drug_and_event.receipt_year = reports_with_drug.receipt_year   
    inner join reports_with_event on  drug_and_event.receipt_year = reports_with_event.receipt_year
    inner join total_reports on  drug_and_event.receipt_year = total_reports.receipt_year
order by  drug_and_event.receipt_year


One nice feature of Athena is that you can quickly connect to it via R or any other tool that can use a JDBC driver to visualize the data and understand it more clearly.

With this quick R script that can be run in R Studio either locally or on an EC2 instance, you can create a visualization of the PRR and Reporting Odds Ratio (RoR) for “GASTROINTESTINAL HAEMORRHAGE” reactions from “ASPIRIN” since 2005 to better understand these trends.

# connect to ATHENA
conn <- dbConnect(drv, '<Your JDBC URL>',s3_staging_dir="<Your S3 Location>",user=Sys.getenv(c("USER_NAME"),password=Sys.getenv(c("USER_PASSWORD"))

# Declare Adverse Event
adverseEvent <- "'GASTROINTESTINAL HAEMORRHAGE'"

# Build SQL Blocks
sqlFirst <- "SELECT rpad(receiptdate, 4, 'NA') as receipt_year, count(DISTINCT safetyreportid) as event_count FROM fda.drugsflat WHERE rpad(receiptdate,4,'NA') between '2005' and '2015'"
sqlEnd <- "GROUP BY rpad(receiptdate, 4, 'NA') ORDER BY receipt_year"

# Extract Aspirin with adverse event counts
sql <- paste(sqlFirst,"AND medicinalproduct ='ASPIRIN' AND reactionmeddrapt=",adverseEvent, sqlEnd,sep=" ")
aspirinAdverseCount = dbGetQuery(conn,sql)

# Extract Aspirin counts
sql <- paste(sqlFirst,"AND medicinalproduct ='ASPIRIN'", sqlEnd,sep=" ")
aspirinCount = dbGetQuery(conn,sql)

# Extract adverse event counts
sql <- paste(sqlFirst,"AND reactionmeddrapt=",adverseEvent, sqlEnd,sep=" ")
adverseCount = dbGetQuery(conn,sql)

# All Drug Adverse event Counts
sql <- paste(sqlFirst, sqlEnd,sep=" ")
allDrugCount = dbGetQuery(conn,sql)

# Select correct rows
selAll =  allDrugCount$receipt_year == aspirinAdverseCount$receipt_year
selAspirin = aspirinCount$receipt_year == aspirinAdverseCount$receipt_year
selAdverse = adverseCount$receipt_year == aspirinAdverseCount$receipt_year

# Calculate Numbers
m <- c(aspirinAdverseCount$event_count)
n <- c(aspirinCount[selAspirin,2])
M <- c(adverseCount[selAdverse,2])
N <- c(allDrugCount[selAll,2])

# Calculate proptional reporting ratio
PRR = (m/n)/((M-m)/(N-n))

# Calculate reporting Odds Ratio
d = n-m
D = N-M
ROR = (m/d)/(M/D)

# Plot the PRR and ROR
g_range <- range(0, PRR,ROR)
g_range[2] <- g_range[2] + 3
yearLen = length(aspirinAdverseCount$receipt_year)
axis(1,1:yearLen,lab=ax)
plot(PRR, type="o", col="blue", ylim=g_range,axes=FALSE, ann=FALSE)
axis(1,1:yearLen,lab=ax)
axis(2, las=1, at=1*0:g_range[2])
box()
lines(ROR, type="o", pch=22, lty=2, col="red")

As you can see, the PRR and RoR have both remained fairly steady over this time range. With the R Script above, all you need to do is change the adverseEvent variable from GASTROINTESTINAL HAEMORRHAGE to another type of reaction to analyze and compare those trends.

Summary

In this walkthrough:

  • You used a Scala script on EMR to convert the openFDA zip files to gzip.
  • You then transformed the JSON blobs into flattened Parquet files using Spark on EMR.
  • You created an Athena DDL so that you could query these Parquet files residing in S3.
  • Finally, you pointed the R package at the Athena table to analyze the data without pulling it into a database or creating your own servers.

If you have questions or suggestions, please comment below.


Next Steps

Take your skills to the next level. Learn how to optimize Amazon S3 for an architecture commonly used to enable genomic data analysis. Also, be sure to read more about running R on Amazon Athena.

 

 

 

 

 


About the Authors

Ryan Hood is a Data Engineer for AWS. He works on big data projects leveraging the newest AWS offerings. In his spare time, he enjoys watching the Cubs win the World Series and attempting to Sous-vide anything he can find in his refrigerator.

 

 

Vikram Anand is a Data Engineer for AWS. He works on big data projects leveraging the newest AWS offerings. In his spare time, he enjoys playing soccer and watching the NFL & European Soccer leagues.

 

 

Dave Rocamora is a Solutions Architect at Amazon Web Services on the Open Data team. Dave is based in Seattle and when he is not opening data, he enjoys biking and drinking coffee outside.