Tag Archives: Raspberry Pi 3B+

Global sunrise/sunset Raspberry Pi art installation

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/global-sunrise-sunset-raspberry-pi-art-installation/

24h Sunrise/Sunset is a digital art installation that displays a live sunset and sunrise happening somewhere in the world with the use of CCTV.

Image by fotoswiss.com

Artist Dries Depoorter wanted to prove that “CCTV cameras can show something beautiful”, and turned to Raspberry Pi to power this global project.

Image by fotoswiss.com

Harnessing CCTV

The arresting visuals are beamed to viewers using two Raspberry Pi 3B+ computers and an Arduino Nano Every that stream internet protocol (IP) cameras with the use of command line media player OMXPlayer.

Dual Raspberry Pi power

The two Raspberry Pis communicate with each other using the MQTT protocol — a standard messaging protocol for the Internet of Things (IoT) that’s ideal for connecting remote devices with a small code footprint and minimal network bandwidth.

One of the Raspberry Pis checks at which location in the world a sunrise or sunset is happening and streams the closest CCTV camera.

The insides of the sleek display screen…

Beam me out, Scotty

The big screens are connected with the I2C protocol to the Arduino, and the Arduino is connected serial with the second Raspberry Pi. Dries also made a custom printed circuit board (PCB) so the build looks cleaner.

All that hardware is powered by an industrial power supply, just because Dries liked the style of it.

Software

Everything is written in Python 3, and Dries harnessed the Python 3 libraries BeautifulSoup, Sun, Geopy, and Pytz to calculate sunrise and sunset times at specific locations. Google Firebase databases in the cloud help with admin by way of saving timestamps and the IP addresses of the cameras.

Hardware

The artist stood infront of the two large display screens
Image of the artist with his work by fotoswiss.com

And, lastly, Dries requested a shoutout for his favourite local Raspberry Pi shop Gotron in Ghent.

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Give your voice assistant a retro Raspberry Pi makeover

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/give-your-voice-assistant-a-retro-raspberry-pi-makeover/

Do you feel weird asking the weather or seeking advice from a faceless device? Would you feel better about talking to a classic 1978 2-XL educational robot from Mego Corporation? Matt over at element14 Community, where tons of interesting stuff happens, has got your back.

Watch Matt explain how the 2-XL toy robot worked before he started tinkering with it. This robot works with Google Assistant on a Raspberry Pi, and answers to a custom wake word.

Kit list

Our recent blog about repurposing a Furby as a voice assistant device would have excited Noughties kids, but this one is mostly for our beautiful 1970s- and 1980s-born fanbase.

Time travel

2-XL, Wikipedia tells us, is considered the first “smart toy”, marketed way back in 1978, and exhibiting “rudimentary intelligence, memory, gameplay, and responsiveness”. 2-XL had a personality that kept kids’ attention, telling jokes and offering verbal support as they learned.

Teardown

Delve under the robot’s armour to see how the toy was built, understand the basic working mechanism, and watch Matt attempt to diagnose why his 2-XL is not working.

Setting up Google Assistant

The Matrix Creator daughter board mentioned in the kit list is an ideal platform for developing your own AI assistant. It’s the daughter board’s 8-microphone array that makes it so brilliant for this task. Learn how to set up Google Assistant on the Matrix board in this video.

What if you don’t want to wake your retrofit voice assistant in the same way as all the other less dedicated users, the ones who didn’t spend hours of love and care refurbishing an old device? Instead of having your homemade voice assistant answer to “OK Google” or “Alexa”, you can train it to recognise a phrase of your choice. In this tutorial, Matt shows you how to set up a custom wake word with your voice assistant, using word detection software called Snowboy.

Keep an eye on element14 on YouTube for the next instalment of this excellent retrofit project.

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Self-driving trash can controlled by Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/self-driving-trash-can-controlled-by-raspberry-pi/

YouTuber extraordinaire Ahad Cove HATES taking out the rubbish, so he decided to hack a rubbish bin/trash can -- let’s go with trash can from now on -- to take itself out to be picked up.

Sounds simple enough? The catch is that Ahad wanted to create an AI that can see when the garbage truck is approaching his house and trigger the garage door to open, then tell the trash can to drive itself out and stop in the right place. This way, Ahad doesn’t need to wake up early enough to spot the truck and manually trigger the trash can to drive itself.

Hardware

The trash can’s original wheels weren’t enough on their own, so Ahad brought in an electronic scooter wheel with a hub motor, powered by a 36V lithium ion battery, to guide and pull them. Check out this part of the video to hear how tricky it was for Ahad to install a braking system using a very strong servo motor.

The new wheel sits at the front of the trash can and drags the original wheels at the back along with

An affordable driver board controls the speed, power, and braking system of the garbage can.

The driver board

Tying everything together is a Raspberry Pi 3B+. Ahad uses one of the GPIO pins on the Raspberry Pi to send the signal to the driver board. He started off the project with a Raspberry Pi Zero W, but found that it was too fiddly to get it to handle the crazy braking power needed to stop the garbage can on his sloped driveway.

The Raspberry Pi Zero W, which ended up getting replaced in an upgrade

Everything is kept together and dry with a plastic snap-close food container Ahad lifted from his wife’s kitchen collection. Ssh, don’t tell.

Software

Ahad uses an object detection machine learning model to spot when the garbage truck passes his house. He handles this part of the project with an Nvidia Jetson Xavier NX board, connected to a webcam positioned to look out of the window watching for garbage trucks.

Object detected!

Opening the garage door

Ahad’s garage door has a wireless internet connection, so he connected the door to an app that communicates with his home assistant device. The app opens the garage door when the webcam and object detection software see the garbage truck turning into his street. All this works with the kit inside the trash can to get it to drive itself out to the end of Ahad’s driveway.

There she goes! (With her homemade paparazzi setup behind her)

Check out the end of Ahad’s YouTube video to see how human error managed to put a comical damper on the maiden voyage of this epic build.

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Raspberry Pi Off-World Bartender

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-off-world-bartender/

Three things we like: Blade Runner, robots, and cocktails. That’s why we LOVE Donald Bell‘s Raspberry Pi–packed ‘VK-01 Off-World Bartender‘ cocktail making machine.

This machine was due to be Donald’s entry into the Cocktail Robotics Grand Challenge, an annual event in San Francisco. By the time the event was cancelled, he was too deep into his awesome build to give up, so he decided to share it with the Instructables community instead.

Donald wanted users to get as much interaction and feedback as possible, rather than simply pressing a button and receiving a random drink. So with this machine, the interaction comes in four ways: instructions provided on the screen, using a key card to bypass security, placing and removing a cup on the tray, and entering an order number on the keypad.

In addition to that, feedback is provided by way of lighting changes, music, video dialogue, pump motors whirring, and even the clicks of relays at each stage of the cocktail making process.

Ordering on the keypad

close up of the black keypad

The keypad allows people to punch in a number to trigger their order, like on a vending machine. The drink order is sent to the Hello Drinkbot software running on the Raspberry Pi 3B that controls the pumps.

Getting your cup filled

Inside the cup dispenser sensor showing the switch and LEDs
The switch under the lid and ring of LEDs on the base

In order for the machine to be able to tell when a vessel is placed under the dispenser spout, and when it’s removed, Donald built in a switch under a 3D-printed tray. Provided the vessel has at least one ice cube in it, even the lightest plastic up is heavy enough to trigger the switch.

The RFID card reader

Cocktail machine customers are asked to scan a special ID card to start. To make this work, Donald adapted a sample script that blinks the card reader’s internal LED when any RFID card is detected.

Interactive video screen

close up of the interactive screen on the machine showing Japanese style script

This bit is made possible by MP4Museum, a “bare-bones” kiosk video player software that the second Raspberry Pi inside the machine runs on boot. By connecting a switch to the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO, Donald enabled customers to advance through the videos one by one. And yes, that’s an official Raspberry Pi Touch Display.

Behind the scenes of the interactive screen with the Raspberry Pi wired up
Behind the scenes of the screen with the Raspberry Pi A+ running the show

The Hello Drinkbot ‘bartender’

screen grab of the hello drinkbot web interface

Donald used the Python-based Hello Drinkbot software as the brains of the machine. With it, you can configure which liquors or juices are connected to which pumps, and send instructions on exactly how much to pour of each ingredient. Everything is configured via a web interface.

Via a bank of relays, microcontrollers connect all the signals from the Touch Display, keypad, RFID card reader, and switch under the spout.

Here’s the Fritzing diagram for this beast

Supplies

Donald shared an exhaustive kit list on his original post, but basically, what you’re looking at is…

Pencil sketches of the machine from different angles
Donald’s friend Jim Burke‘s beautiful concept sketches

And finally, check out the Raspberry Pi–based Hello Drinkbot project by Rich Gibson, which inspired Donald’s build.

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Steampunk ‘Help is coming’ Raspberry Pi alert system

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/steampunk-help-is-coming-raspberry-pi-alert-system/

Tom Lee decided to combine his household with his sister-in-law during lockdown so that she could help him make childcare more manageable. The problem was, Tom’s household was a smidge frantic in the mornings, as the family struggled to be up and ready in time for his sister-in-law’s arrival.

Enter this Raspberry Pi–powered tracking device, which tells Tom when the family car is on its way with childcare support. The DIY appliance helps his household manage childcare routines like clockwork.

The magic is in the wooden box, but the light cage and electrical meter are all part of the show

When the family car is moving, a light turns on, and an antique electrical meter points to 30…20…10 to show the estimated minutes until the driver arrives. The movements of the car come in from a cellular Sinotrack OBD2 dongle pointed at a traccar server running on Raspberry Pi 3.

We see you in there, Raspberry Pi…

Tom explains: “I have not found traccar to be the greatest to work with, but you can make it forward everything it decodes to your own script pretty easily.”

Materials:

  • Arduino microcontrollers (ATMega328P & ESP8266 based)
  • Raspberry Pi (Model 1 and 3)
  • Dongle device in car (with SIM card and cellular service)
  • Light device with bulb and solid state relay
  • Antique electrical meter (for the steampunks among you – any similar device will do the job!) 
The light safety cage was rescued from an old workshop

The case (below) is a lasercut design Tom had made by online laser cutting business Ponoko.

Inside there’s a solid state relay and a first-generation Raspberry Pi (hidden under the black cable in the photo below). This Raspberry Pi model doesn’t have wireless connectivity, and Tom found that getting wireless working was a bit tricky for this project.

Tom produced a nice long webinar to show you exactly how this all works. So if you’d like to give this project a try, watch it for yourself.

You’ll learn how to…

Code resources

Oh, and he’s only gone and uploaded every single bit of code you’ll need on GitHub (what an angel):

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Teaching pigeons with Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/teaching-pigeons-with-raspberry-pi/

It’s been a long lockdown for one of our favourite makers, Pi & Chips. Like most of us (probably), they have turned their hand to training small animals that wander into their garden to pass the time — in this case, pigeons. I myself enjoy raising my glass to the squirrel that runs along my back fence every evening at 7pm.

Of course, Pi & Chips has taken this one step further and created a food dispenser including motion-activated camera with a Raspberry Pi 3B+ to test the intelligence of these garden critters and capture their efforts live.

Bird behaviour

Looking into the cognitive behaviour of birds (and finding the brilliantly titled paper Maladaptive gambling by pigeons), Pi & Chips discovered that pigeons can, with practice, recognise objects including buttons and then make the mental leap to realise that touching these buttons actually results in something happening. So they set about building a project to see this in action.

Enter the ‘SmartFrank 3000’, named after the bossiest bird to grace Pi & Chips’s shed roof over the summer.

Steppers and servos

The build itself is a simple combo of a switch and dispenser. But it quickly became apparent that any old servo wasn’t going to be up to the job — it couldn’t move fast enough to open and close a hatch quickly or strongly enough.

The motor setup

Running a few tests with a stepper motor confirmed that this was the perfect choice, as it could move quickly enough, and was strong enough to hold back a fair weight of seed when not in operation.

It took a while to get the timing on the stepper just right to give a pretty consistent delivery of the seed…

A 3D-printed flap for the stepper was also fashioned, plus a nozzle that fits over the neck of a two-litre drinks bottle, and some laser-cut pieces to make a frame to hold it all together.

The switch

Now for the switch that Frank the pigeon was going to have to touch if it wanted any bird seed. Pi & Chips came up with this design made from 3mm ply and some sponge as the spring.

They soldered some wires to a spring clip from an old photo frame and added a bolt and two nuts. The second nut allowed very fine adjustment of the distance to make sure the switch could be triggered by as light a touch as possible.

Behind the scenes

Behind the scenes setup

Behind the scenes there’s a Raspberry Pi 3B+ running the show, together with a motor controller board for the stepper motor. This board runs from its own battery pack, as it needs 12V power and is therefore too heavy for Raspberry Pi to handle directly. A Raspberry Pi Camera Module has also been added and runs this motion detection script to start recording whenever a likely bird candidate steps up to the plate for dinner. Hopefully, we can soon get some footage of Frank the pigeon learning and earning!

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Remote teams ring office bell with Raspberry Pi and Slack

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/remote-teams-ring-office-bell-with-raspberry-pi-and-slack/

Bustling offices… remember those? It feels like we’ve all been working from home forever, and it’s going to be a while yet before everyone is back at their desks in the same place. And when that does happen, if your workplace is anything like Raspberry Pi Towers, there will still be lots of people in your team who are based in different countries or have always worked from home.

This office bell, built by a person called Alex, is powered by a Raspberry Pi 3B+ and is linked to Slack, so when a milestone or achievement is announced on the chat platform by a remote team member, they get to experience ringing the office bell for themselves, no matter where in the world they are working from.

Kit list:

Close-up of the servo wired to the Raspberry Pi pins

Integrating with Slack

To get the Raspberry Pi talking to Slack, Alex used the slackclient module (Python 3.6+ only), which makes use of the Slack Real Time Messaging (RTM) API. This is a websocket-based API that allows you to receive events from Slack in real time and send messages as users.

With the Slack RTM API, you create an RTM client and register a callback function that the client executes every time a specific Slack event occurs. When staff tell the @pibot on Slack it’s ‘belltime’, the Raspberry Pi tells the servo to ring the bell in the office.

Alex also configured it to always respond with an emoji reaction when someone successfully rings the bell, so remote employees get some actual feedback that it worked. Here’s the script for that bit.

Alex also figured out how to get around WiFi connectivity drops: they created a cronjob that runs a bash script every 15 minutes to check if the bell ringer is running. If it isn’t running, the bash script starts it.

At the end of Alex’s original post, they’ve concluded that using a HAT would allow for more control of the servo and avoid frying the Raspberry Pi. They also cleaned up their set-up recently and switched the Raspberry Pi 3B+ out for a Raspberry Pi Zero, which is perfectly capable of this simple job.

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Mini Raspberry Pi Boston Dynamics–inspired robot

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/mini-raspberry-pi-boston-dynamics-inspired-robot/

This is a ‘Spot Micro’ walking quadruped robot running on Raspberry Pi 3B. By building this project, redditor /thetrueonion (aka Mike) wanted to teach themself robotic software development in C++ and Python, get the robot walking, and master velocity and directional control.

Mike was inspired by Spot, one of Boston Dynamics’ robots developed for industry to perform remote operation and autonomous sensing.

What’s it made of?

  • Raspberry Pi 3B
  • Servo control board: PCA9685, controlled via I2C
  • Servos: 12 × PDI-HV5523MG
  • LCD Panel: 16×2 I2C LCD panel
  • Battery: 2s 4000 mAh LiPo, direct connection to power servos
  • UBEC: HKU5 5V/5A ubec, used as 5V voltage regulator to power Raspberry Pi, LCD panel, PCA9685 control board
  • Thingiverse 3D-printed Spot Micro frame

How does it walk?

The mini ‘Spot Micro’ bot rocks a three-axis angle command/body pose control mode via keyboard and can achieve ‘trot gait’ or ‘walk gait’. The former is a four-phase gait with symmetric motion of two legs at a time (like a horse trotting). The latter is an eight-phase gait with one leg swinging at a time and a body shift in between for balance (like humans walking).

Mike breaks down how they got the robot walking, right down to the order the servos need to be connected to the PCA9685 control board, in this extensive walkthrough.

Here’s the code

And yes, this is one of those magical projects with all the code you need stored on GitHub. The software is implemented on a Raspberry Pi 3B running Ubuntu 16.04. It’s composed on C++ and Python nodes in a ROS framework.

What’s next?

Mike isn’t finished yet: they are looking to improve their yellow beast by incorporating a lidar to achieve simple 2D mapping of a room. Also on the list is developing an autonomous motion-planning module to guide the robot to execute a simple task around a sensed 2D environment. And finally, adding a camera or webcam to conduct basic image classification would finesse their creation.

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Raspberry Pi calls out your custom workout routine

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-calls-out-your-custom-workout-routine/

If you don’t want to be tied to a video screen during home workouts, Llum AcostaSamreen Islam, and Alfred Gonzalez shared this great Raspberry Pi–powered alternative on hackster.io: their voice-activated project announces each move of your workout routine and how long you need to do it for.

This LED-lit, compact solution means you don’t need to squeeze yourself in front of a TV or crane to see what your video instructor is doing next. Instead you can be out in the garden or at a local park and complete your own, personalised workout on your own terms.

Kit list:

Raspberry Pi and MATRIX Device

The makers shared these setup guides to get MATRIX working with your Raspberry Pi. Our tiny computer doesn’t have a built-in microphone, so here’s where the two need to work together.

MATRIX, meet Raspberry Pi

Once that’s set up, ensure you enable SSH on your Raspberry Pi.

Click, click. Simple

The three sweet Hackster angels shared a four-step guide to running the software of your own customisable workout routine buddy in their original post. Happy hacking!

1. Install MATRIX Libraries and Rhasspy

Follow the steps below in order for Rhasspy to work on your Raspberry Pi.

2. Creating an intent

Access Rhasspy’s web interface by opening a browser and navigating to http://YOUR_PI_IP_HERE:12101. Then click on the Sentences tab. All intents and sentences are defined here.

By default, there are a few example sentences in the text box. Remove the default intents and add the following:

[Workout]start [my] workout

Once created, click on Save Sentences and wait for Rhasspy to finish training.

Here, Workout is an intent. You can change the wording to anything that works for you as long as you keep [Workout] the same, because this intent name will be used in the code.

3. Catching the intent

Install git on your Raspberry Pi.

sudo apt install git

Download the repository.

git clone https://github.com/matrix-io/rhasspy-workout-timer

Navigate to the folder and install the project dependencies.

cd rhasspy-workout-timernpm install

Run the program.

node index.js

4. Using and customizing the project

To change the workout to your desired routine, head into the project folder and open workout.txt. There, you’ll see:

jumping jacks 12,plank 15, test 14

To make your own workout routine, type an exercise name followed by the number of seconds to do it for. Repeat that for each exercise you want to do, separating each combo using a comma.

Whenever you want to use the Rhasspy Assistant, run the file and say “Start my workout” (or whatever it is you have it set to).

And now you’re all done — happy working out. Make sure to visit the makers’ original post on hackster.io and give it a like.

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Raspberry Pi won’t let your watched pot boil

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-wont-let-your-watched-pot-boil/

One of our favourite YouTubers, Harrison McIntyre, decided to make the aphorism “a watched pot never boils” into reality. They modified a tabletop burner with a Raspberry Pi so that it will turn itself off if anyone looks at it.

In this project, the Raspberry Pi runs facial detection using a USB camera. If the Raspberry Pi finds a face, it deactivates the burner, and vice versa.

There’s a snag, in that the burner runs off 120 V AC and the Raspberry Pi runs off 5 V DC, so you can’t just power the burner through the Raspberry Pi. Harrison got round this problem using a relay switch, and beautifully explains how a relay manages to turn a circuit off and on without directly interfacing with the circuit at the two minute mark of this video.

The Raspberry Pi working through the switchable plug with the burner

Harrison sourced a switchable plug bar which uses a relay to turn its own switches on and off. Plug the burner and the Raspberry Pi into that and, hey presto, you’ve got them working together via a relay.

The six camera setup

Things get jazzy at the four minute 30 second mark. At this point, Harrison decides to upgrade his single camera situation, and rig up six USB cameras to make sure that no matter where you are when you you look at the burner, the Raspberry Pi will always see your face and switch it off.

Inside the switchable plug

Harrison’s multiple-camera setup proved a little much for the Raspberry Pi 3B he had to hand for this project, so he goes on to explain how he got a bit of extra processing power using a different desktop and an Arduino. He recommends going for a Raspberry Pi 4 if you want to try this at home.

Kit list:

  • Raspberry Pi 4
  • Tabletop burner
  • USB cameras or rotating camera
  • Switchable plug bar
  • All of this software
It’s not just a saying anymore, thanks to Harrison

And the last great thing about this project is that you could invert the process to create a safety mechanism, meaning you wouldn’t be able to wander away from your cooking and leave things to burn.

We also endorse Harrison’s advice to try this with an electric burner and most definitely not a gas one; those things like to go boom if you don’t play with them properly.

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This Raspberry Pi–powered setup improves home brewing

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/this-raspberry-pi-powered-setup-improves-home-brewing/

We spied New Orleans–based Raspberry Pi–powered home brewing analysis and were interested in how this project could help other at-home brewers perfect their craft.

Raspberry Pi in a case with fan, neatly tucked away on a shelf in the Danger Shed

When you’re making beer, you want the yeast to eat up the sugars and leave alcohol behind. To check whether this is happening, you need to be able to track changes in gravity, known as ‘gravity curves’. You also have to do yeast cell counts, and you need to be able to tell when your beer has finished fermenting.

“We wanted a way to skip the paper and pencil and instead input the data directly into the software. Enter the Raspberry Pi!”

Patrick Murphy

Patrick Murphy and co. created a piece of software called Aleproof which allows you to monitor all of this stuff remotely. But before rolling it out, they needed somewhere to test that it works. Enter the ‘Danger Shed’, where they ran Aleproof on Raspberry Pi.

The Danger Shed benefits from a fancy light-changing fan for the Raspberry Pi

A Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ spins their Python-based program on Raspberry Pi OS and shares its intel via a mounted monitor.

Here’s what Patrick had to say about what they’re up to in the Danger Shed and why they needed a Raspberry Pi:

The project uses PyCharm to run the Python-based script on the Raspberry Pi OS

“I am the founder and owner of Arithmech, a small software company that develops Python applications for brewers. Myself and a few buddies (all of us former Army combat medics) started our own brewing project called Danger Shed Ales & Mead to brew and test out the software on real-world data. We brew in the shed and record data on paper as we go, then enter the data into our software at a later time.”

Look how neat and out of the way our tiny computer is

“We wanted a way to skip the paper and pencil and instead input the data directly into the software. Enter the Raspberry Pi! The shed is small, hot, has leaks, and is generally a hostile place for a full-size desktop computer. Raspberry Pi solves our problem in multiple ways: it’s small, portable, durable (in a case), and easily cooled. But on top of that, we are able to run the code using PyCharm, enter data throughout the brewing process, and fix bugs all from the shed!”

The Raspberry Pi in its case inc. fan

“The Raspberry Pi made it easy for us to set up our software and run it as a stand-alone brewing software station.”

Productivity may have slowed when Patrick, Philip, and John remembered you can play Minecraft on the Raspberry Pi

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Be a better Scrabble player with a Raspberry Pi High Quality Camera

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/be-a-better-scrabble-player-with-a-raspberry-pi-high-quality-camera/

One of our fave makers, Wayne from Devscover, got a bit sick of losing at Scrabble (and his girlfriend was likely raging at being stuck in lockdown with a lesser opponent). So he came up with a Raspberry Pi–powered solution!

Using a Raspberry Pi High Quality Camera and a bit of Python, you can quickly figure out the highest-scoring word your available Scrabble tiles allow you to play.

Hardware

  • Raspberry Pi 3B
  • Compatible touchscreen
  • Raspberry Pi High Quality Camera
  • Power supply for the touchscreen and Raspberry Pi
  • Scrabble board

You don’t have to use a Raspberry Pi 3B, but you do need a model that has both display and camera ports. Wayne also chose to use an official Raspberry Pi Touch Display because it can power the computer, but any screen that can talk to your Raspberry Pi should be fine.

Software

Firstly, the build takes a photo of your Scrabble tiles using raspistill.

Next, a Python script processes the image of your tiles and then relays the highest-scoring word you can play to your touchscreen.

The key bit of code here is twl, a Python script that contains every possible word you can play in Scrabble.

From 4.00 minutes into his build video, Wayne walks you through what each bit of code does and how he made it work for this project, including how he installed and used the Scrabble dictionary.

Fellow Scrabble-strugglers have suggested sneaky upgrades in the comments of Wayne’s YouTube video, such having the build relay answers to a more discreet smart watch.

No word yet on how the setup deals with the blank Scrabble tiles; those things are like gold dust.

In case you haven’t met the Raspberry Pi High Quality Camera yet, Wayne also did this brilliant unboxing and tutorial video for our newest piece of hardware.

And for more projects from Devscover, check out this great Amazon price tracker using a Raspberry Pi Zero W, and make sure to subscribe to the channel for more content.

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Raspberry Pi-powered wedding memories record player

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-powered-wedding-memories-record-player/

We’re a sentimental bunch and were bowled over by this intricate, musical wedding gift. It’s powered by a Raspberry Pi and has various other bits of geeky goodness under the hood. Honestly, the extra features just keep coming — you’ll see.

This beautifully crafted ‘record player’ plays one pair of newlyweds’ Spotify accounts, and there’s a special visual twist when their ‘first dance’ wedding song plays.

Midway through the build process

First, a little background: the newlyweds, Holly and Dougie, have been sweethearts since early highschool days. Their wedding took place on a farm near the village they grew up in, Fintry in rural Scotland.

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Throughout the wedding day, the phrase “Music is a huge deal” was repeated often, which gave the bride’s older brother Ben Howell the idea for a homemade, Raspberry Pi–powered gift.

Custom tagline laser-cut and spray-painted

He built the couple a neatly finished music box, known as HD-001 (HD for ‘Holly Dougie’ of course) and home to a ‘smart turntable’. It can connect to a wireless network and has a touch screen where the record label would normally sit. When you lift the lid and switch it on, it asks “Hello. Who’s listening?”

Once you tap on the picture of either the bride or groom, it accesses their Spotify account and fetches the album artwork of whatever song it plays.

What’s inside?

The main brain is Raspberry Pi 3 running Raspberry Pi OS. The interface is built as a web page in mostly PHP and JavaScript. It uses the Spotify API to get the ‘now playing’ track of the bride’s or groom’s account, and to fish out the album artwork URL from the return data so it can display this on a rotating panel.

The audio side is a powered by a 50W Bluetooth amplifier, which is entirely independent from the Raspberry Pi computer.

The build details

The enclosure is all custom-designed and built using scrap wood wrapped in green faux leather material. Ben sourced most of the other materials — rubber feet, hinges, switches, metal grille — on Amazon.

The HD-001 also features a hand-built 4-way speaker system and a custom-made speaker grille with that famous phrase “Music is a huge deal” on the front.

The lettering on the grille was laser-cut by a company in Glasgow to order, and Ben spray-painted it metallic grey. The LCD panel and driver board are also from Amazon.

To play and pause music, Ben sourced a tone-arm online and routed cabling from the Raspberry Pi GPIO pins through to a micro-switch where the original needle should sit. That’s how lifting the arm pauses playback, and replacing it resumes the music.

Getting the audio to work

Ben explains: “Essentially, it’s a fancy Bluetooth speaker system disguised as an old-fashioned turntable and designed to behave and work like an old-fashioned turntable (skeuomorphism gone mad!).”

Oh, and our favourite adorable bonus feature? If the first dance song from Holly’s and Dougie’s wedding is played, the album artwork on the LCD panel fades away, to be replaced by a slideshow of photos from their wedding.

And for extra, extra big brother points, Ben even took the time to create a manual to make sure the newlyweds got the most out of their musical gift.

We have it on good authority that Ben will entertain anyone who would like to place a pre-order for the HD-002.

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Meet your new robotic best friend: the MiRo-E dog

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/meet-your-new-robotic-best-friend-the-miro-e-dog/

When you’re learning a new language, it’s easier the younger you are. But how can we show very young students that learning to speak code is fun? Consequential Robotics has an answer…

The MiRo-E is an ’emotionally engaging’ robot platform that was created on a custom PCB  and has since moved onto Raspberry Pi. The creators made the change because they saw that schools were more familiar with Raspberry Pi and realised the potential in being able to upgrade the robotic learning tools with new Raspberry Pi boards.

The MiRo-E was born from a collaboration between Sheffield Robotics, London-based SCA design studio, and Bristol Robotics Lab. The cute robo-doggo has been shipping with Raspberry Pi 3B+ (they work well with the Raspberry Pi 4 too) for over a year now.

While the robot started as a developers’ tool (MiRo-B), the creators completely re-engineered MiRo’s mechatronics and software to turn it into an educational tool purely for the classroom environment.

Three school children in uniforms stroke the robot dog's chin

MiRo-E with students at a School in North London, UK

MiRo-E can see, hear, and interact with its environment, providing endless programming possibilities. It responds to human interaction, making it a fun, engaging way for students to learn coding skills. If you stroke it, it purrs, lights up, move its ears, and wags its tail. Making a sound or clapping makes MiRo move towards you, or away if it is alarmed. And it especially likes movement, following you around like a real, loyal canine friend. These functionalities are just the basic starting point, however: students can make MiRo do much more once they start tinkering with their programmable pet.

These opportunities are provided on MiRoCode, a user-friendly web-based coding interface, where students can run through lesson plans and experiment with new ideas. They can test code on a virtual MiRo-E to create new skills that can be applied to a real-life MiRo-E.

What’s inside?

Here are the full technical specs. But basically, MiRo-E comprises a Raspberry Pi 3B+ as its core, light sensors, cliff sensors, an HD camera, and a variety of connectivity options.

How does it interact?

MiRo reacts to sound, touch, and movement in a variety of ways. 28 capacitive touch sensors tell it when it is being petted or stroked. Six independent RGB LEDs allow it to show emotion, along with DOF to move its eyes, tail, and ears. Its ears also house four 16-bit microphones and a loudspeaker. And two differential drive wheels with opto-sensors help MiRo move around.

What else can it do?

The ‘E’ bit of MiRo-E means it’s emotionally engaging, and the intelligent pet’s potential in healthcare have already been explored. Interaction with animals has been proved to be positive for patients of all ages, but sometimes it’s not possible for ‘real’ animals to comfort people. MiRo-E can fill the gap for young children who would benefit from animal comfort, but where healthcare or animal welfare risks are barriers.

The same researchers who created this emotionally engaging robo-dog for young people are also working with project partners in Japan to develop ‘telepresence robots’ for older patients to interact with their families over video calls.

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Make it rain chocolate with a Raspberry Pi-powered dispenser

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/make-it-rain-chocolate-with-a-raspberry-pi-powered-dispenser/

This fully automated M&M’s-launching machine delivers chocolate on voice command, wherever you are in the room.

A quick lesson in physics

To get our head around Harrison McIntyre‘s project, first we need to understand parabolas. Harrison explains: “If we ignore air resistance, a parabola can be defined as the arc an object describes when launching through space. The shape of a parabolic arc is determined by three variables: the object’s departure angle; initial velocity; and acceleration due to gravity.”

Harrison uses a basketball shooter to illustrate parabolas

Lucky for us, gravity is always the same, so you really only have to worry about angle and velocity. You could also get away with only changing one variable and still be able to determine where a launched object will land. But adjusting both the angle and the velocity grants much greater precision, which is why Harrison’s machine controls both exit angle and velocity of the M&M’s.

Kit list

The M&M’s launcher comprises:

  • 2 Arduino Nanos
  • 1 Raspberry Pi 3
  • 3 servo motors
  • 2 motor drivers
  • 1 DC motor
  • 1 Hall effect limit switch
  • 2 voltage converters
  • 1 USB camera
  • “Lots” of 3D printed parts
  • 1 Amazon Echo Dot

A cordless drill battery is the primary power source.

The project relies on similar principles as a baseball pitching machine. A compliant wheel is attached to a shaft sitting a few millimetres above a feeder chute that can hold up to ten M&M’s. To launch an M&M’s piece, the machine spins up the shaft to around 1500 rpm, pushes an M&M’s piece into the wheel using a servo, and whoosh, your M&M’s piece takes flight.

Controlling velocity, angle and direction

To measure the velocity of the fly wheel in the machine, Harrison installed a Hall effect magnetic limit switch, which gets triggered every time it is near a magnet.

Two magnets were placed on opposite sides of the shaft, and these pass by the switch. By counting the time in between each pulse from the limit switch, the launcher determines how fast the fly wheel is spinning. In response, the microcontroller adjusts the motor output until the encoder reports the desired rpm. This is how the machine controls the speed at which the M&M’s pieces are fired.

Now, to control the angle at which the M&M’s pieces fly out of the machine, Harrison mounted the fly wheel assembly onto a turret with two degrees of freedom, driven by servos. The turret controls the angle at which the sweets are ‘pitched’, as well as the direction of the ‘pitch’.

So how does it know where I am?

With the angle, velocity, and direction at which the M&M’s pieces fly out of the machine taken care of, the last thing to determine is the expectant snack-eater’s location. For this, Harrison harnessed vision processing.


Harrison used a USB camera and a Python script running on Raspberry Pi 3 to determine when a human face comes into view of the machine, and to calculate how far away it is. The turret then rotates towards the face, the appropriate parabola is calculated, and an M&M’s piece is fired at the right angle and velocity to reach your mouth. Harrison even added facial recognition functionality so the machine only fires M&M’s pieces at his face. No one is stealing this guy’s candy!

So what’s Alexa for?

This project is topped off with a voice-activation element, courtesy of an Amazon Echo Dot, and a Python library called Sinric. This allowed Harrison to disguise his Raspberry Pi as a smart TV named ‘Chocolate’ and command Alexa to “increase the volume of ‘Chocolate’ by two” in order to get his machine to fire two M&M’s pieces at him.

       

Drawbacks

In his video, Harrison explaining that other snack-launching machines involve a spring-loaded throwing mechanism, which doesn’t let you determine the snack’s exit velocity. That means you have less control over how fast your snack goes and where it lands. The only drawback to Harrison’s model? His machine needs objects that are uniform in shape and size, which means no oddly shaped peanut M&M’s pieces for him.

He’s created quite the monster here, in that at first, the machine’s maximum firing speed was 40 mph. And no one wants crispy-shelled chocolate firing at their face at that speed. To keep his teeth safe, Harrison switched out the original motor for one with a lower rpm, which reduced the maximum exit velocity to a much more sensible 23 mph… Please make sure you test your own snack-firing machine outdoors before aiming it at someone’s face.

Go subscribe

Check out the end of Harrison’s videos for some more testing to see what his machine was capable of: he takes out an entire toy army and a LEGO Star Wars squad by firing M&M’s pieces at them. And remember to subscribe to his channel and like the video if you enjoyed what you saw, because that’s just a nice thing to do.

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Build a Raspberry Pi laser scanner

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-a-raspberry-pi-laser-scanner/

You really don’t need anything too fancy to build this Raspberry Pi laser scanner, and that’s why we think it’s pretty wonderful.

Rasperry Pi 3D Laser Scanner

Cornell University: ECE 5725 Michael Xiao and Thomas Scavella

Building a Raspberry Pi laser scanner

The ingredients you’ll need to build the laser scanner are:

  • Raspberry Pi
  • Raspberry Pi Camera Module v2
  • Stepper motor and driver
  • Line laser
  • Various LEDs, resistors, and wires
  • Button

To complete the build, access to a 3D printer and laser cutter would come in handy. If you don’t have access to such tools, we trust you to think of an alternative housing for the scanner. You’re a maker, you’re imaginative — it’s what you do.

How does the laser scanner work?

The line laser projects a line an object, highlighting a slice of it. The Raspberry Pi Camera Module captures this slice, recording the shape of the laser line on the object’s surface. Then the stepper motor rotates the object. When the object has completed a full rotation and the camera has taken an image of every slice, the Raspberry Pi processes all the images to create one virtual 3D object.

Instructables user mfx2 has written a wonderful tutorial for the project, which also includes all files needed to build and program your own version.

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Playing The Doors with a door (and a Raspberry Pi)

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/playing-the-doors-with-a-door-and-a-raspberry-pi/

Floyd Steinberg is back with more synthy Raspberry Pi musical magic, this time turning a door into a MIDI controller.

I played The Doors on a door – using a Raspberry PI DIY midi controller and a Yamaha EX5

You see that door? You secretly want that to be a MIDI controller? Here’s how to do it, and how to play a cover version of “Break On Through” by The Doors on a door 😉 Link to source code and the DIY kit below.

If you don’t live in a home with squeaky doors — living room door, I’m looking at you — you probably never think about the musical potential of mundane household objects.

Unless you’re these two, I guess:

When Mama Isn’t Home / When Mom Isn’t Home ORIGINAL (the Oven Kid) Timmy Trumpet – Freaks

We thought this was hilarious. Hope you enjoy! This video has over 60 million views worldwide! Social Media: @jessconte To use this video in a commercial player, advertising or in broadcasts, please email [email protected]

If the sound of a slammed oven door isn’t involved in your ditty of choice, you may instead want to add some electronics to that sweet, sweet harmony maker, just like Floyd.

Trusting in the melodic possibilities of incorporating a Raspberry Pi 3B+ and various sensory components into a humble door, Floyd created The Doors Door, a musical door that plays… well, I’m sure you can guess.

If you want to build your own, you can practice some sophisticated ‘copy and paste’ programming after downloading the code. And for links to all the kit you need, check out the description of the video over on YouTube. While you’re there, be sure to give the video a like, and subscribe to Floyd’s channel.

And now, to get you pumped for the weekend, here’s Jim:

The Doors – Break On Through HQ (1967)

recorded fall 1966 – lyrics: You know the day destroys the night Night divides the day Tried to run Tried to hide Break on through to the other side Break on through to the other side Break on through to the other side, yeah We chased our pleasures here Dug our treasures there But can you still recall The time we cried Break on through to the other side Break on through to the other side Yeah!

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How to set up OctoPrint on your Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/how-to-set-up-octoprint-on-your-raspberry-pi/

If you own a 3D printer, you’ll likely have at least heard of OctoPrint from the ever benevolent 3D printing online community. It has the potential to transform your 3D printing workflow for the better, and it’s very easy to set up. This guide will take you through the setup process step by step, and give you some handy tips along the way.

Octoprint

Before we start finding out how to install OctoPrint, let’s look at why you might want to. OctoPrint is a piece of open-source software that allows us to add WiFi functionality to any 3D printer with a USB port (which is pretty much all of them). More specifically, you’ll be able to drop files from your computer onto your printer, start/stop prints, monitor your printer via a live video feed, control the motors, control the temperature, and more, all from your web browser. Of course, with great power comes great responsibility — 3D printers have parts that are hot enough to cause fires, so make sure you have a safe setup, which may include not letting it run unsupervised.

OctoPrint ingredients

• Raspberry Pi 3 (or newer)
MicroSD card
• Raspberry Pi power adapter
• USB cable (the connector type will depend on your printer)
• Webcam/Raspberry Pi Camera Module (optional)
• 3D-printed camera mount (optional)

Before we get started, it is not recommended that anything less than a Raspberry Pi 3 is used for this project. There have been reports of limited success using OctoPrint on a Raspberry Pi Zero W, but only if you have no intention of using a camera to monitor your prints. If you want to try this with a Pi Zero or an older Raspberry Pi, you may experience unexpected print failures.

Download OctoPi

Firstly, you will need to download the latest version of OctoPi from the OctoPrint website. OctoPi is a Raspbian distribution that comes with OctoPrint, video streaming software, and CuraEngine for slicing models on your Raspberry Pi. When this has finished downloading, unzip the file and put the resulting IMG file somewhere handy.

Next, we need to flash this image onto our microSD card. We recommend using Etcher to do this, due to its minimal UI and ease of use; plus it’s also available to use on both Windows and Mac. Get it here: balena.io/etcher. When Etcher is installed and running, you’ll see the UI displayed. Simply click the Select Image button and find the IMG file you unzipped earlier. Next, put your microSD card into your computer and select it in the middle column of the Etcher interface.

Finally, click on Flash!, and while the image is being burned onto the card, get your WiFi router details, as you’ll need them for the next step.

Now that you have your operating system, you’ll want to add your WiFi details so that the Raspberry Pi can automatically connect to your network after it’s booted. To do this, remove the microSD card from your computer (Etcher will have ‘ejected’ the card after it has finished burning the image onto it) and then plug it back in again. Navigate to the microSD card on your computer — it should now be called boot — and open the file called octopi-wpa-supplicant.txt. Editing this file using WordPad or TextEdit can cause formatting issues; we recommend using Notepad++ to update this file, but there are instructions within the file itself to mitigate formatting issues if you do choose to use another text editor. Find the section that begins ## WPA/WPA2 secured and remove the hash signs from the four lines below this one to uncomment them. Finally, replace the SSID value and the PSK value with the name and password for your WiFi network, respectively (keeping the quotation marks). See the example below for how this should look.

Further down in the file, there is a section for what country you are in. If you are using OctoPrint in the UK, leave this as is (by default, the UK is selected). However, if you wish to change this, simply comment the UK line again by adding a # before it, and uncomment whichever country you are setting up OctoPrint in. The example below shows how the file will look if you are setting this up for use in the US:

# Uncomment the country your Pi is in to activate Wifi in RaspberryPi 3 B+ and above
# For full list see: https://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/ISO_3166-1_alpha-2
#country=GB # United Kingdom
#country=CA # Canada
#country=DE # Germany
#country=FR # France
country=US # United States

When the changes have been made, save the file and then eject/unmount and remove the microSD card from your computer and put it into your Raspberry Pi. Plug the power supply in, and go and make a cup of tea while it boots up for the first time (this may take around ten minutes). Make sure the Raspberry Pi is running as expected (i.e. check that the green status LED is flashing intermittently). If you’re using macOS, visit octopi.local in your browser of choice. If you’re using Windows, you can find OctoPrint by clicking on the Network tab in the sidebar. It should be called OctoPrint instance on octopi – double-clicking on this will open the OctoPrint dashboard in your browser.

If you see the screen shown above, then congratulations! You have set up OctoPrint.

Not seeing that OctoPrint splash screen? Fear not, you are not the first. While a full list of issues is beyond the scope of this article, common issues include: double-checking your WiFi details are entered correctly in the octopi-wpa-supplicant.txt file, ensuring your Raspberry Pi is working correctly (plug the Raspberry Pi into a monitor and watch what happens during boot), or your Raspberry Pi may be out of range of your WiFi router. There’s a detailed list of troubleshooting suggestions on the OctoPrint website.

Printing with OctoPrint

We now have the opportunity to set up OctoPrint for our printer using the handy wizard. Most of this is very straightforward — setting up a password, signing up to send anonymous usage stats, etc. — but there are a few sections which require a little more thought.

We recommend enabling the connectivity check and the plug-ins blacklist to help keep things nice and stable. If you plan on using OctoPrint as your slicer as well as a monitoring tool, then you can use this step to import a Cura profile. However, we recommend skipping this step as it’s much quicker (and you can use a slicer of your choice) to slice the model on your computer, and then send the finished G-code over.

Finally, we need to put in our printer details. Above, we’ve included some of the specs of the Creality Ender-3 as an example. If you can’t find the exact details of your printer, a quick web search should show what you need for this section.

The General tab can have anything in it, it’s just an identifier for your own use. Print bed & build volume should be easy to find out — if not, you can measure your print bed and find out the position of the origin by looking at your Cura printer profile. Leave Axes as default; for the Hotend and extruder section, defaults are almost certainly fine here (unless you’ve changed your nozzle; 0.4 is the default diameter for most consumer printers).

OctoPrint is better with a camera

Now that you’re set up with OctoPrint, you’re ready to start printing. Turn off your Raspberry Pi, then plug it into your 3D printer. After it has booted up, open OctoPrint again in your browser and take your newly WiFi-enabled printer for a spin by clicking the Connect button. After it has connected, you’ll be able to set the hot end and bed temperature, then watch as the real-time readings are updated.

In the Control tab, we can see the camera stream (if you’re using one) and the motor controls, as well as commands to home the axes. There’s a G-code file viewer to look through a cross-section of the currently loaded model, and a terminal to send custom G-code commands to your printer. The last tab is for making time-lapses; however, there is a plug-in available to help with this process.

Undoubtedly the easiest way to set up video monitoring of your prints is to use the official Raspberry Pi Camera Module. There are dozens of awesome mounts on Thingiverse for a Raspberry Pi Camera Module, to allow you to get the best angle of your models as they print. There are also some awesome OctoPrint-themed Raspberry Pi cases to house your new printer brains. While it isn’t officially supported by OctoPrint, you can use a USB webcam instead if you have one handy, or just want some very high-quality video streams. The OctoPrint wiki has a crowdsourced list of webcams known to work, as well as a link for the extra steps needed to get the webcam working correctly.

As mentioned earlier, our recommended way of printing a model using OctoPrint is to first use your slicer as you would if you were creating a file to save to a microSD card. Once you have the file, save it somewhere handy on your computer, and open the OctoPrint interface. In the bottom left of the screen, you will see the Upload File button — click this and upload the G-code you wish to print.

You’ll see the file/print details appear, including information on how long it’ll take for the object to print. Before you kick things off, check out the G-code Viewer tab on the right. You can not only scroll through the layers of the object, but, using the slider at the bottom, you can see the exact pattern the 3D printer will use to ‘draw’ each layer. Now click Print and watch your printer jump into action!

OctoPrint has scores of community-created plug-ins, but our favourite, Octolapse, makes beautiful hypnotic time-lapses. What makes them so special is that the plug-in alters the G-code of whatever object you are printing so that once each layer has finished, the extruder moves away from the print to let the camera take an unobstructed shot of the model. The result is an object that seems to grow out of the build plate as if by magic. You’ll not find a finer example of it than here.

Satisfying 3D Prints TimeLapse episode 7 (Prusa I3 Mk3 octopi)

3D Printing timelapses of models printed on the Prusa i3 MK3! Here’s another compilation of my recent timelapses. I got some shots that i think came out really great and i hope you enjoy them! as always if you want to see some of these timelapses before they come out or want to catch some behind the scenes action check out my instagram!

Thanks to Glenn and HackSpace magazine

This tutorial comes fresh from the pages of HackSpace magazine issue 26 and was written by Glenn Horan. Thanks, Glenn.

To get your copy of HackSpace magazine issue 26, visit your local newsagent, the Raspberry Pi Store, Cambridge, or the Raspberry Pi Press online store.

Fans of HackSpace magazine will also score themselves a rather delightful Adafruit Circuit Playground Express with a 12-month subscription. Sweet!

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Really, really awesome Raspberry Pi NeoPixel LED mirror

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/awesome-neopixel-led-mirror/

Check out Super Make Something’s awesome NeoPixel LED mirror: a 576 RGB LED display that converts images via the Raspberry Pi Camera Module and Raspberry Pi 3B+ into a pixelated light show.

Neopixel LED Mirror (Python, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, 3D Printing, Laser Cutting!) DIY How To

Time to pull out all the stops for the biggest Super Make Something project to date! Using 3D printing, laser cutting, a Raspberry Pi, computer vision, Python, and nearly 600 Neopixel LEDs, I build a low resolution LED mirror that displays your reflection on a massive 3 foot by 3 foot grid made from an array of 24 by 24 RGB LEDs!

Mechanical mirrors

If you’re into cool uses of tech, you may be aware of Daniel Rozin, the creative artist building mechanical mirrors out of wooden panels, trash, and…penguins, to name but a few of his wonderful builds.

A woman standing in front of a mechanical mirror made of toy penguins

Yup, this is a mechanical mirror made of toy penguins.

A digital mechanical mirror?

Inspired by Daniel Rozin’s work, Alex, the person behind Super Make Something, put an RGB LED spin on the concept, producing this stunning mirror that thoroughly impressed visitors at Cleveland Maker Faire last month.

“Inspired by Danny Rozin’s mechanical mirrors, this 3 foot by 3 foot mirror is powered by a Raspberry Pi, and uses Python and OpenCV computer vision libraries to process captured images in real time to light up 576 individual RGB LEDs!” Alex explains on Instagram. “Also onboard are nearly 600 3D-printed squares to diffuse the light from each NeoPixel, as well as 16 laser-cut panels to hold everything in place!”

The video above gives a brilliantly detailed explanation of how Alex made the, so we highly recommend giving it a watch if you’re feeling inspired to make your own.

Seriously, we really want to make one of these for Raspberry Pi Towers!

As always, be sure to subscribe to Super Make Something on YouTube and leave a comment on the video if, like us, you love the project. Most online makers are producing content such as this with very little return on their investment, so every like and subscriber really does make a difference.

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The Nest Box: DIY Springwatch with Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Helen Lynn original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-nest-box-diy-springwatch/

Last week, lots and lots of you shared your Raspberry Pi builds with us on social media using the hashtag #IUseMyRaspberryPiFor. Jay Wainwright from Liverpool noticed the conversation and got in touch to tell us about The Nest Box, which uses Raspberry Pi to bring impressively high-quality images and video from British bird boxes to your Facebook feed.

Jay runs a small network of livestreaming nest box cameras, with three currently sited and another three in the pipeline; excitingly, the new ones will include a kestrel box and a barn owl box! During the spring, all the cameras stream live to The Nest Box’s Facebook page, which has steadily built a solid following of several thousand wildlife fans.

A pair of blue tits feeds their chicks in a woolly nest

The Nest Box’s setup uses a Raspberry Pi and Camera Module, along with a Raspberry Pi PoE HAT to provide both power and internet connectivity, so there’s only one cable connection to weatherproof. There’s also a custom HAT that Jay has designed to control LED lights and to govern the Raspberry Pi Camera Module’s IR filter, ensuring high-quality images both during the day and at night. To top it all off, he has written some Python code to record visitors to the nest boxes and go into live streaming mode whenever the action is happening.

As we can see from this nest box design for swifts, shown on the project’s crowdfunding profile, plenty of thought has evidently been put into the design of the boxes so that they provide tempting quarters for their feathered occupants while also accommodating all the electronic components.

Follow The Nest Box on Facebook to add British birds into your social media mix — whatever you’ve got now, I’ll bet all tomorrow’s coffees that it’ll be an improvement. And if you’re using Raspberry Pi for a wildlife project, or you’ve got plans along those lines, let us know in the comments.

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