Tag Archives: ubuntu

Security updates for Tuesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/741257/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (chromium-browser, evince, pdns-recursor, and simplesamlphp), Fedora (ceph, dhcp, erlang, exim, fedora-arm-installer, firefox, libvirt, openssh, pdns-recursor, rubygem-yard, thunderbird, wordpress, and xen), Red Hat (rh-mysql57-mysql), SUSE (kernel), and Ubuntu (openssl).

Security updates for Friday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/740997/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium and vlc), Debian (erlang), Mageia (ffmpeg, tor, and wireshark), openSUSE (chromium, opensaml, openssh, openvswitch, and php7), Oracle (postgresql), Red Hat (chromium-browser, postgresql, rh-postgresql94-postgresql, rh-postgresql95-postgresql, and rh-postgresql96-postgresql), SUSE (firefox, java-1_6_0-ibm, opensaml, and xen), and Ubuntu (kernel, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-raspi2, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-hwe, linux-lts-trusty, linux-lts-xenial, linux-aws, and rsync).

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 25

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/12/08/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-25/

Welcome to TimeShift

This week, a few of us from Grafana Labs, along with 4,000 of our closest friends, headed down to chilly Austin, TX for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2017. We got to see a number of great talks and were thrilled to see Grafana make appearances in some of the presentations. We were also a sponsor of the conference and handed out a ton of swag (we overnighted some of our custom Grafana scarves, which came in handy for Thursday’s snow).

We also announced Grafana Labs has joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation as a Silver member! We’re excited to share our expertise in time series data visualization and open source software with the CNCF community.


Latest Release

Grafana 4.6.2 is available and includes some bug fixes:

  • Prometheus: Fixes bug with new Prometheus alerts in Grafana. Make sure to download this version if you’re using Prometheus for alerting. More details in the issue. #9777
  • Color picker: Bug after using textbox input field to change/paste color string #9769
  • Cloudwatch: build using golang 1.9.2 #9667, thanks @mtanda
  • Heatmap: Fixed tooltip for “time series buckets” mode #9332
  • InfluxDB: Fixed query editor issue when using > or < operators in WHERE clause #9871

Download Grafana 4.6.2 Now


From the Blogosphere

Grafana Labs Joins the CNCF: Grafana Labs has officially joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). We look forward to working with the CNCF community to democratize metrics and help unify traditionally disparate information.

Automating Web Performance Regression Alerts: Peter and his team needed a faster and easier way to find web performance regressions at the Wikimedia Foundation. Grafana 4’s alerting features were exactly what they needed. This post covers their journey on setting up alerts for both RUM and synthetic testing and shares the alerts they’ve set up on their dashboards.

How To Install Grafana on Ubuntu 17.10: As you probably guessed from the title, this article walks you through installing and configuring Grafana in the latest version of Ubuntu (or earlier releases). It also covers installing plugins using the Grafana CLI tool.

Prometheus: Starting the Server with Alertmanager, cAdvisor and Grafana: Learn how to monitor Docker from scratch using cAdvisor, Prometheus and Grafana in this detailed, step-by-step walkthrough.

Monitoring Java EE Servers with Prometheus and Payara: In this screencast, Adam uses firehose; a Java EE 7+ metrics gateway for Prometheus, to convert the JSON output into Prometheus statistics and visualizes the data in Grafana.

Monitoring Spark Streaming with InfluxDB and Grafana: This article focuses on how to monitor Apache Spark Streaming applications with InfluxDB and Grafana at scale.


GrafanaCon EU, March 1-2, 2018

We are currently reaching out to everyone who submitted a talk to GrafanaCon and will soon publish the final schedule at grafanacon.org.

Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and more.

Get Your Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

Lots of plugin updates and a new OpenNMS Helm App plugin to announce! To install or update any plugin in an on-prem Grafana instance, use the Grafana-cli tool, or install and update with 1 click on Hosted Grafana.

NEW PLUGIN

OpenNMS Helm App – The new OpenNMS Helm App plugin replaces the old OpenNMS data source. Helm allows users to create flexible dashboards using both fault management (FM) and performance management (PM) data from OpenNMS® Horizon™ and/or OpenNMS® Meridian™. The old data source is now deprecated.


Install Now

UPDATED PLUGIN

PNP Data Source – This data source plugin (that uses PNP4Nagios to access RRD files) received a small, but important update that fixes template query parsing.


Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Vonage Status Panel – The latest version of the Status Panel comes with a number of small fixes and changes. Below are a few of the enhancements:

  • Threshold settings – removed Show Always option, and replaced it with 2 options:
    • Display Alias – Select when to show the metric alias.
    • Display Value – Select when to show the metric value.
  • Text format configuration (bold / italic) for warning / critical / disabled states.
  • Option to change the corner radius of the panel. Now you can change the panel’s shape to have rounded corners.

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Google Calendar Plugin – This plugin received a small update, so be sure to install version 1.0.4.


Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Carpet Plot Panel – The Carpet Plot Panel received a fix for IE 11, and also added the ability to choose custom colors.


Update


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We also like to make sure we mention other Grafana-related events happening all over the world. If you’re putting on just such an event, let us know and we’ll list it here.

Docker Meetup @ Tuenti | Madrid, Spain – Dec 12, 2017: Javier Provecho: Intro to Metrics with Swarm, Prometheus and Grafana

Learn how to gain visibility in real time for your micro services. We’ll cover how to deploy a Prometheus server with persistence and Grafana, how to enable metrics endpoints for various service types (docker daemon, traefik proxy and postgres) and how to scrape, visualize and set up alarms based on those metrics.

RSVP

Grafana Lyon Meetup n ° 2 | Lyon, France – Dec 14, 2017: This meetup will cover some of the latest innovations in Grafana and discussion about automation. Also, free beer and chips, so – of course you’re going!

RSVP

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. Carl Bergquist is managing the Cloud and Monitoring Devroom, and we’ve heard there were some great talks submitted. There is no need to register; all are welcome.


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

We were thrilled to see our dashboards bigger than life at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon this week. Thanks for snapping a photo and sharing!


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

Hard to believe this is the 25th issue of Timeshift! I have a blast writing these roundups, but Let me know what you think. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Find an article I haven’t included? Send it my way. Help us make timeShift better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

Security updates for Thursday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/740883/rss

Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox, java-1.7.0-openjdk, kernel, liblouis, qemu-kvm, sssd, and thunderbird), Debian (heimdal and nova), openSUSE (shibboleth-sp), Oracle (java-1.7.0-openjdk), Red Hat (Red Hat OpenShift Enterprise), Scientific Linux (openafs), SUSE (kernel), and Ubuntu (rsync).

About the Amazon Trust Services Migration

Post Syndicated from Brent Meyer original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/ses/669-2/

Amazon Web Services is moving the certificates for our services—including Amazon SES—to use our own certificate authority, Amazon Trust Services. We have carefully planned this change to minimize the impact it will have on your workflow. Most customers will not have to take any action during this migration.

About the Certificates

The Amazon Trust Services Certificate Authority (CA) uses the Starfield Services CA, which has been valid since 2005. The Amazon Trust Services certificates are available in most major operating systems released in the past 10 years, and are also trusted by all modern web browsers.

If you send email through the Amazon SES SMTP interface using a mail server that you operate, we recommend that you confirm that the appropriate certificates are installed. You can test whether your server trusts the Amazon Trust Services CAs by visiting the following URLs (for example, by using cURL):

If you see a message stating that the certificate issuer is not recognized, then you should install the appropriate root certificate. You can download individual certificates from https://www.amazontrust.com/repository. The process of adding a trusted certificate to your server varies depending on the operating system you use. For more information, see “Adding New Certificates,” below.

AWS SDKs and CLI

Recent versions of the AWS SDKs and the AWS CLI are not impacted by this change. If you use an AWS SDK or a version of the AWS CLI released prior to February 5, 2015, you should upgrade to the latest version.

Potential Issues

If your system is configured to use a very restricted list of root CAs (for example, if you use certificate pinning), you may be impacted by this migration. In this situation, you must update your pinned certificates to include the Amazon Trust Services CAs.

Adding New Root Certificates

The following sections list the steps you can take to install the Amazon Root CA certificates on your systems if they are not already present.

macOS

To install a new certificate on a macOS server

  1. Download the .pem file for the certificate you want to install from https://www.amazontrust.com/repository.
  2. Change the file extension for the file you downloaded from .pem to .crt.
  3. At the command prompt, type the following command to install the certificate: sudo security add-trusted-cert -d -r trustRoot -k /Library/Keychains/System.keychain /path/to/certificatename.crt, replacing /path/to/certificatename.crt with the full path to the certificate file.

Windows Server

To install a new certificate on a Windows server

  1. Download the .pem file for the certificate you want to install from https://www.amazontrust.com/repository.
  2. Change the file extension for the file you downloaded from .pem to .crt.
  3. At the command prompt, type the following command to install the certificate: certutil -addstore -f "ROOT" c:\path\to\certificatename.crt, replacing c:\path\to\certificatename.crt with the full path to the certificate file.

Ubuntu

To install a new certificate on an Ubuntu (or similar) server

  1. Download the .pem file for the certificate you want to install from https://www.amazontrust.com/repository.
  2. Change the file extension for the file you downloaded from .pem to .crt.
  3. Copy the certificate file to the directory /usr/local/share/ca-certificates/
  4. At the command prompt, type the following command to update the certificate authority store: sudo update-ca-certificates

Red Hat Enterprise Linux/Fedora/CentOS

To install a new certificate on a Red Hat Enterprise Linux (or similar) server

  1. Download the .pem file for the certificate you want to install from https://www.amazontrust.com/repository.
  2. Change the file extension for the file you downloaded from .pem to .crt.
  3. Copy the certificate file to the directory /etc/pki/ca-trust/source/anchors/
  4. At the command line, type the following command to enable dynamic certificate authority configuration: sudo update-ca-trust force-enable
  5. At the command line, type the following command to update the certificate authority store: sudo update-ca-trust extract

To learn more about this migration, see How to Prepare for AWS’s Move to Its Own Certificate Authority on the AWS Security Blog.

Security updates for Wednesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/740799/rss

Security updates have been issued by CentOS (samba4), Mageia (libxcursor and libxfont/libxfont2), openSUSE (exim, GraphicsMagick, graphviz, pdns, and pdns-recursor), Oracle (firefox and liblouis), Red Hat (java-1.7.0-openjdk), Scientific Linux (java-1.7.0-openjdk), SUSE (firefox, shibboleth-sp, and xen), and Ubuntu (linux-firmware).

Security updates for Tuesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/740721/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (libextractor), Fedora (java-9-openjdk, kernel, python, and qt5-qtwebengine), Oracle (sssd and thunderbird), Red Hat (firefox, liblouis, and sssd), Scientific Linux (firefox, liblouis, and sssd), and Ubuntu (libxml2).

Security updates for Monday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/740605/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (cacti, curl, exim, lib32-curl, lib32-libcurl-compat, lib32-libcurl-gnutls, lib32-libxcursor, libcurl-compat, libcurl-gnutls, libofx, libxcursor, procmail, samba, shadowsocks-libev, and thunderbird), Debian (tor), Fedora (kernel, moodle, mupdf, python-sanic, qbittorrent, qpid-cpp, and rb_libtorrent), Mageia (git, lame, memcached, nagios, perl-Catalyst-Plugin-Static-Simple, php-phpmailer, shadowsocks-libev, and varnish), openSUSE (binutils, libressl, lynx, openssl, tor, wireshark, and xen), Red Hat (thunderbird), Scientific Linux (kernel, qemu-kvm, and thunderbird), SUSE (kernel, ncurses, openvpn-openssl1, and xen), and Ubuntu (curl, evince, and firefox).

Security updates for Friday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/740431/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (curl, libxml2, optipng, and sox), Fedora (kernel, mediawiki, moodle, nodejs-balanced-match, nodejs-brace-expansion, and python-werkzeug), openSUSE (optipng), Oracle (kernel and qemu-kvm), Red Hat (kernel, kernel-rt, qemu-kvm, and qemu-kvm-rhev), SUSE (kernel), and Ubuntu (thunderbird).

timeShift(GrafanaBuzz, 1w) Issue 24

Post Syndicated from Blogs on Grafana Labs Blog original https://grafana.com/blog/2017/12/01/timeshiftgrafanabuzz-1w-issue-24/

Welcome to TimeShift

It’s hard to believe it’s already December. Here at Grafana Labs we’ve been spending a lot of time working on new features and enhancements for Grafana v5, and finalizing our selections for GrafanaCon EU. This week we have some interesting articles to share and a number of plugin updates. Enjoy!


Latest Release

Grafana 4.6.2 is now available and includes some bug fixes:

  • Prometheus: Fixes bug with new Prometheus alerts in Grafana. Make sure to download this version if you’re using Prometheus for alerting. More details in the issue. #9777
  • Color picker: Bug after using textbox input field to change/paste color string #9769
  • Cloudwatch: build using golang 1.9.2 #9667, thanks @mtanda
  • Heatmap: Fixed tooltip for “time series buckets” mode #9332
  • InfluxDB: Fixed query editor issue when using > or < operators in WHERE clause #9871

Download Grafana 4.6.2 Now


From the Blogosphere

Monitoring Camel with Prometheus in Red Hat OpenShift: This in-depth walk-through will show you how to build an Apache Camel application from scratch, deploy it in a Kubernetes environment, gather metrics using Prometheus and display them in Grafana.

How to run Grafana with DeviceHive: We see more and more examples of people using Grafana in IoT. This article discusses how to gather data from the IoT platform, DeviceHive, and build useful dashboards.

How to Install Grafana on Linux Servers: Pretty self-explanatory, but this tutorial walks you installing Grafana on Ubuntu 16.04 and CentOS 7. After installation, it covers configuration and plugin installation. This is the first article in an upcoming series about Grafana.

Monitoring your AKS cluster with Grafana: It’s important to know how your application is performing regardless of where it lives; the same applies to Kubernetes. This article focuses on aggregating data from Kubernetes with Heapster and feeding it to a backend for Grafana to visualize.

CoinStatistics: With the price of Bitcoin skyrocketing, more and more people are interested in cryptocurrencies. This is a cool dashboard that has a lot of stats about popular cryptocurrencies, and has a calculator to let you know when you can buy that lambo.

Using OpenNTI As A Collector For Streaming Telemetry From Juniper Devices: Part 1: This series will serve as a quick start guide for getting up and running with streaming real-time telemetry data from Juniper devices. This first article covers some high-level concepts and installation, while part 2 covers configuration options.

How to Get Metrics for Advance Alerting to Prevent Trouble: What good is performance monitoring if you’re never told when something has gone wrong? This article suggests ways to be more proactive to prevent issues and avoid the scramble to troubleshoot issues.

Thoughtworks: Technology Radar: We got a shout-out in the latest Technology Radar in the Tools section, as the dashboard visualization tool of choice for Prometheus!


GrafanaCon Tickets are Going Fast

Tickets are going fast for GrafanaCon EU, but we still have a seat reserved for you. Join us March 1-2, 2018 in Amsterdam for 2 days of talks centered around Grafana and the surrounding monitoring ecosystem including Graphite, Prometheus, InfluxData, Elasticsearch, Kubernetes, and more.

Get Your Ticket Now


Grafana Plugins

We have a number of plugin updates to highlight this week. Authors improve plugins regularly to fix bugs and improve performance, so it’s important to keep your plugins up to date. We’ve made updating easy; for on-prem Grafana, use the Grafana-cli tool, or update with 1 click if you’re using Hosted Grafana.

UPDATED PLUGIN

Clickhouse Data Source – The Clickhouse Data Source received a substantial update this week. It now has support for Ace Editor, which has a reformatting function for the query editor that automatically formats your sql. If you’re using Clickhouse then you should also have a look at CHProxy – see the plugin readme for more details.


Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Influx Admin Panel – This panel received a number of small fixes. A new version will be coming soon with some new features.

Some of the changes (see the release notes) for more details):

  • Fix issue always showing query results
  • When there is only one row, swap rows/cols (ie: SHOW DIAGNOSTICS)
  • Improve auto-refresh behavior
  • Show ‘message’ response. (ie: please use POST)
  • Fix query time sorting
  • Show ‘status’ field (killed, etc)

Update

UPDATED PLUGIN

Gnocchi Data Source – The latest version of the Gnocchi Data Source adds support for dynamic aggregations.


Update

UPDATED PLUGINS

BT Plugins – All of the BT panel plugins received updates this week.


Upcoming Events:

In between code pushes we like to speak at, sponsor and attend all kinds of conferences and meetups. We have some awesome talks and events coming soon. Hope to see you at one of these!

KubeCon | Austin, TX – Dec. 6-8, 2017: We’re sponsoring KubeCon 2017! This is the must-attend conference for cloud native computing professionals. KubeCon + CloudNativeCon brings together leading contributors in:

  • Cloud native applications and computing
  • Containers
  • Microservices
  • Central orchestration processing
  • And more

Buy Tickets

FOSDEM | Brussels, Belgium – Feb 3-4, 2018: FOSDEM is a free developer conference where thousands of developers of free and open source software gather to share ideas and technology. Carl Bergquist is managing the Cloud and Monitoring Devroom, and we’ve heard there were some great talks submitted. There is no need to register; all are welcome.


Tweet of the Week

We scour Twitter each week to find an interesting/beautiful dashboard and show it off! #monitoringLove

YIKES! Glad it’s not – there’s good attention and bad attention.


Grafana Labs is Hiring!

We are passionate about open source software and thrive on tackling complex challenges to build the future. We ship code from every corner of the globe and love working with the community. If this sounds exciting, you’re in luck – WE’RE HIRING!

Check out our Open Positions


How are we doing?

Let us know if you’re finding these weekly roundups valuable. Submit a comment on this article below, or post something at our community forum. Find an article I haven’t included? Send it my way. Help us make timeShift better!

Follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and join the Grafana Labs community.

Security updates for Wednesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/740233/rss

Security updates have been issued by CentOS (apr and procmail), Debian (curl and xen), Fedora (cacti, git, jbig2dec, lucene4, mupdf, openssh, openssl, quagga, rpm, slurm, webkitgtk4, and xen), Oracle (apr and procmail), Red Hat (apr, java-1.7.1-ibm, java-1.8.0-ibm, procmail, samba4, and tcmu-runner), Scientific Linux (apr, procmail, and samba4), and Ubuntu (curl, openjdk-7, python2.7, and python3.4, python3.5).

Amazon EC2 Update – Streamlined Access to Spot Capacity, Smooth Price Changes, Instance Hibernation

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-ec2-update-streamlined-access-to-spot-capacity-smooth-price-changes-instance-hibernation/

EC2 Spot Instances give you access to spare compute capacity in the AWS Cloud. Our customers use fleets of Spot Instances to power their CI/CD environments & traffic generators, host web servers & microservices, render movies, and to run many types of analytics jobs, all at prices that offer significant savings in comparison to On-Demand Instances.

New Streamlined Access
Today we are introducing a new, streamlined access model for Spot Instances. You simply indicate your desire to use Spot capacity when you launch an instance via the RunInstances function, the run-instances command, or the AWS Management Console to submit a request that will be fulfilled as long as the capacity is available. With no extra effort on your part you’ll save up to 90% off of the On-Demand price for the instance type, allowing you to boost your overall application throughput by up to 10x for the same budget. The instances that you launch in this way will continue to run until you terminate them or if EC2 needs to reclaim them for On-Demand usage. At that point the instance will be given the usual 2-minute warning and then reclaimed, making this a great fit for applications that are fault-tolerant.

Unlike the old model which required an understanding of Spot markets, bidding, and calls to a standalone asynchronous API, the new model is synchronous and as easy to use as On-Demand. Your code or your script receives an Instance ID immediately and need not check back to see if the request has been processed and accepted.

We’ve made this as clean and as simple as possible, with the expectation that it will be easy to modify many current scripts and applications to request and make use of Spot capacity. If you want to exercise additional control over your Spot instance budget, you have the option to specify a maximum price when you make a request for capacity. If you use Spot capacity to power your Amazon EMR, Amazon ECS, or AWS Batch clusters, or if you launch Spot instances by way of a AWS CloudFormation template or Auto Scaling Group, you will benefit from this new model without having to make any changes.

Applications that are built around RequestSpotInstances or RequestSpotFleet will continue to work just fine with no changes. However, you now have the option to make requests that do not include the SpotPrice parameter.

Smooth Price Changes
As part of today’s launch we are also changing the way that Spot prices change, moving to a model where prices adjust more gradually, based on longer-term trends in supply and demand. As I mentioned earlier, you will continue to save an average of 70-90% off the On-Demand price, and you will continue to pay the Spot price that’s in effect for the time period your instances are running. Applications built around our Spot Fleet feature will continue to automatically diversify placement of their Spot Instances across the most cost-effective pools based on the configuration you specified when you created the fleet.

Spot in Action
To launch a Spot Instance from the command line; simply specify the Spot market:

$ aws ec2 run-instances –-market Spot --image-id ami-1a2b3c4d --count 1 --instance-type c3.large 

Instance Hibernation
If you run workloads that keep a lot of state in memory, you will love this new feature!

You can arrange for instances to save their in-memory state when they are reclaimed, allowing the instances and the applications on them to pick up where they left off when capacity is once again available, just like closing and then opening your laptop. This feature works on C3, C4, and certain sizes of R3, R4, and M4 instances running Amazon Linux, Ubuntu, or Windows Server, and is supported by the EC2 Hibernation Agent.

The in-memory state is written to the root EBS volume of the instance using space that is set-aside when the instance launches. The private IP address and any Elastic IP Addresses are also preserved across a stop/start cycle.

Jeff;

Security updates for Tuesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/740133/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (powerdns and powerdns-recursor), CentOS (curl and samba), Debian (ffmpeg and roundcube), Fedora (cacti and samba), openSUSE (thunderbird), Oracle (curl), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-ibm and rh-mysql56-mysql), Scientific Linux (curl), Slackware (samba), SUSE (kernel-firmware and samba), and Ubuntu (exim4, firefox, libxml-libxml-perl, optipng, and postgresql-common).

Ubuntu 17.10: Return of the GNOME (ars technica)

Post Syndicated from corbet original https://lwn.net/Articles/740105/rss

Ars technica reviews
the Ubuntu 17.10 release
. “In light of the GNOME switch, this
release seems like more of a homecoming than an entirely new voyage. But
that said, Ubuntu 17.10 simultaneously feels very much like the start of a
new voyage for Ubuntu. The last few Ubuntu desktop releases have been about
as exciting as OpenSSH releases—you know you need to update, but beyond
that, no one really cares.

Security updates for Wednesday

Post Syndicated from jake original https://lwn.net/Articles/739858/rss

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (roundcubemail), Debian (optipng, samba, and vlc), Fedora (compat-openssl10, fedpkg, git, jbig2dec, ldns, memcached, openssl, perl-Net-Ping-External, python-copr, python-XStatic-jquery-ui, rpkg, thunderbird, and xen), SUSE (tomcat), and Ubuntu (db, db4.8, db5.3, linux, linux-raspi2, linux-aws, linux-azure, linux-gcp, and samba).

How to Enable Caching for AWS CodeBuild

Post Syndicated from Karthik Thirugnanasambandam original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/how-to-enable-caching-for-aws-codebuild/

AWS CodeBuild is a fully managed build service. There are no servers to provision and scale, or software to install, configure, and operate. You just specify the location of your source code, choose your build settings, and CodeBuild runs build scripts for compiling, testing, and packaging your code.

A typical application build process includes phases like preparing the environment, updating the configuration, downloading dependencies, running unit tests, and finally, packaging the built artifact.

Downloading dependencies is a critical phase in the build process. These dependent files can range in size from a few KBs to multiple MBs. Because most of the dependent files do not change frequently between builds, you can noticeably reduce your build time by caching dependencies.

In this post, I will show you how to enable caching for AWS CodeBuild.

Requirements

  • Create an Amazon S3 bucket for storing cache archives (You can use existing s3 bucket as well).
  • Create a GitHub account (if you don’t have one).

Create a sample build project:

1. Open the AWS CodeBuild console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/codebuild/.

2. If a welcome page is displayed, choose Get started.

If a welcome page is not displayed, on the navigation pane, choose Build projects, and then choose Create project.

3. On the Configure your project page, for Project name, type a name for this build project. Build project names must be unique across each AWS account.

4. In Source: What to build, for Source provider, choose GitHub.

5. In Environment: How to build, for Environment image, select Use an image managed by AWS CodeBuild.

  • For Operating system, choose Ubuntu.
  • For Runtime, choose Java.
  • For Version,  choose aws/codebuild/java:openjdk-8.
  • For Build specification, select Insert build commands.

Note: The build specification file (buildspec.yml) can be configured in two ways. You can package it along with your source root directory, or you can override it by using a project environment configuration. In this example, I will use the override option and will use the console editor to specify the build specification.

6. Under Build commands, click Switch to editor to enter the build specification.

Copy the following text.

version: 0.2

phases:
  build:
    commands:
      - mvn install
      
cache:
  paths:
    - '/root/.m2/**/*'

Note: The cache section in the build specification instructs AWS CodeBuild about the paths to be cached. Like the artifacts section, the cache paths are relative to $CODEBUILD_SRC_DIR and specify the directories to be cached. In this example, Maven stores the downloaded dependencies to the /root/.m2/ folder, but other tools use different folders. For example, pip uses the /root/.cache/pip folder, and Gradle uses the /root/.gradle/caches folder. You might need to configure the cache paths based on your language platform.

7. In Artifacts: Where to put the artifacts from this build project:

  • For Type, choose No artifacts.

8. In Cache:

  • For Type, choose Amazon S3.
  • For Bucket, choose your S3 bucket.
  • For Path prefix, type cache/archives/

9. In Service role, the Create a service role in your account option will display a default role name.  You can accept the default name or type your own.

If you already have an AWS CodeBuild service role, choose Choose an existing service role from your account.

10. Choose Continue.

11. On the Review page, to run a build, choose Save and build.

Review build and cache behavior:

Let us review our first build for the project.

In the first run, where no cache exists, overall build time would look something like below (notice the time for DOWNLOAD_SOURCE, BUILD and POST_BUILD):

If you check the build logs, you will see log entries for dependency downloads. The dependencies are downloaded directly from configured external repositories. At the end of the log, you will see an entry for the cache uploaded to your S3 bucket.

Let’s review the S3 bucket for the cached archive. You’ll see the cache from our first successful build is uploaded to the configured S3 path.

Let’s try another build with the same CodeBuild project. This time the build should pick up the dependencies from the cache.

In the second run, there was a cache hit (cache was generated from the first run):

You’ll notice a few things:

  1. DOWNLOAD_SOURCE took slightly longer. Because, in addition to the source code, this time the build also downloaded the cache from user’s s3 bucket.
  2. BUILD time was faster. As the dependencies didn’t need to get downloaded, but were reused from cache.
  3. POST_BUILD took slightly longer, but was relatively the same.

Overall, build duration was improved with cache.

Best practices for cache

  • By default, the cache archive is encrypted on the server side with the customer’s artifact KMS key.
  • You can expire the cache by manually removing the cache archive from S3. Alternatively, you can expire the cache by using an S3 lifecycle policy.
  • You can override cache behavior by updating the project. You can use the AWS CodeBuild the AWS CodeBuild console, AWS CLI, or AWS SDKs to update the project. You can also invalidate cache setting by using the new InvalidateProjectCache API. This API forces a new InvalidationKey to be generated, ensuring that future builds receive an empty cache. This API does not remove the existing cache, because this could cause inconsistencies with builds currently in flight.
  • The cache can be enabled for any folders in the build environment, but we recommend you only cache dependencies/files that will not change frequently between builds. Also, to avoid unexpected application behavior, don’t cache configuration and sensitive information.

Conclusion

In this blog post, I showed you how to enable and configure cache setting for AWS CodeBuild. As you see, this can save considerable build time. It also improves resiliency by avoiding external network connections to an artifact repository.

I hope you found this post useful. Feel free to leave your feedback or suggestions in the comments.

Security updates for Tuesday

Post Syndicated from ris original https://lwn.net/Articles/739746/rss

Security updates have been issued by Debian (ldns and swauth), Fedora (kernel and postgresql), Mageia (botan, krb5, and sssd), and Ubuntu (apport, linux, linux-aws, linux-gke, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-raspi2, linux-hwe, linux-lts-xenial, procmail, and samba).