Tag Archives: Yahoo Mail

Achieving Major Stability and Performance Improvements in Yahoo Mail with a Novel Redux Architecture

Post Syndicated from mikesefanov original https://yahooeng.tumblr.com/post/173062946866

yahoodevelopers:

By Mohit Goenka, Gnanavel Shanmugam, and Lance Welsh

At Yahoo Mail, we’re constantly striving to upgrade our product experience. We do this not only by adding new features based on our members’ feedback, but also by providing the best technical solutions to power the most engaging experiences. As such, we’ve recently introduced a number of novel and unique revisions to the way in which we use Redux that have resulted in significant stability and performance improvements. Developers may find our methods useful in achieving similar results in their apps.

Improvements to product metrics

Last year Yahoo Mail implemented a brand new architecture using Redux. Since then, we have transformed the overall architecture to reduce latencies in various operations, reduce JavaScript exceptions, and better synchronized states. As a result, the product is much faster and more stable.

Stability improvements:

  • when checking for new emails – 20%
  • when reading emails – 30%
  • when sending emails – 20%

Performance improvements:

  • 10% improvement in page load performance
  • 40% improvement in frame rendering time

We have also reduced API calls by approximately 20%.

How we use Redux in Yahoo Mail

Redux architecture is reliant on one large store that represents the application state. In a Redux cycle, action creators dispatch actions to change the state of the store. React Components then respond to those state changes. We’ve made some modifications on top of this architecture that are atypical in the React-Redux community.

For instance, when fetching data over the network, the traditional methodology is to use Thunk middleware. Yahoo Mail fetches data over the network from our API. Thunks would create an unnecessary and undesirable dependency between the action creators and our API. If and when the API changes, the action creators must then also change. To keep these concerns separate we dispatch the action payload from the action creator to store them in the Redux state for later processing by “action syncers”. Action syncers use the payload information from the store to make requests to the API and process responses. In other words, the action syncers form an API layer by interacting with the store. An additional benefit to keeping the concerns separate is that the API layer can change as the backend changes, thereby preventing such changes from bubbling back up into the action creators and components. This also allowed us to optimize the API calls by batching, deduping, and processing the requests only when the network is available. We applied similar strategies for handling other side effects like route handling and instrumentation. Overall, action syncers helped us to reduce our API calls by ~20% and bring down API errors by 20-30%.

Another change to the normal Redux architecture was made to avoid unnecessary props. The React-Redux community has learned to avoid passing unnecessary props from high-level components through multiple layers down to lower-level components (prop drilling) for rendering. We have introduced action enhancers middleware to avoid passing additional unnecessary props that are purely used when dispatching actions. Action enhancers add data to the action payload so that data does not have to come from the component when dispatching the action. This avoids the component from having to receive that data through props and has improved frame rendering by ~40%. The use of action enhancers also avoids writing utility functions to add commonly-used data to each action from action creators.

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In our new architecture, the store reducers accept the dispatched action via action enhancers to update the state. The store then updates the UI, completing the action cycle. Action syncers then initiate the call to the backend APIs to synchronize local changes.

Conclusion

Our novel use of Redux in Yahoo Mail has led to significant user-facing benefits through a more performant application. It has also reduced development cycles for new features due to its simplified architecture. We’re excited to share our work with the community and would love to hear from anyone interested in learning more.

How to Make Your Web App More Reliable and Performant Using webpack: a Yahoo Mail Case Study

Post Syndicated from mikesefanov original https://yahooeng.tumblr.com/post/168508200981

yahoodevelopers:

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By Murali Krishna Bachhu, Anurag Damle, and Utkarsh Shrivastava

As engineers on the Yahoo Mail team at Oath, we pride ourselves on the things that matter most to developers: faster development cycles, more reliability, and better performance. Users don’t necessarily see these elements, but they certainly feel the difference they make when significant improvements are made. Recently, we were able to upgrade all three of these areas at scale by adopting webpack® as Yahoo Mail’s underlying module bundler, and you can do the same for your web application.

What is webpack?

webpack is an open source module bundler for modern JavaScript applications. When webpack processes your application, it recursively builds a dependency graph that includes every module your application needs. Then it packages all of those modules into a small number of bundles, often only one, to be loaded by the browser.

webpack became our choice module bundler not only because it supports on-demand loading, multiple bundle generation, and has a relatively low runtime overhead, but also because it is better suited for web platforms and NodeJS apps and has great community support.

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Comparison of webpack to other open source bundlers


How did we integrate webpack?

Like any developer does when integrating a new module bundler, we started integrating webpack into Yahoo Mail by looking at its basic config file. We explored available default webpack plugins as well as third-party webpack plugins and then picked the plugins most suitable for our application. If we didn’t find a plugin that suited a specific need, we wrote the webpack plugin ourselves (e.g., We wrote a plugin to execute Atomic CSS scripts in the latest Yahoo Mail experience in order to decrease our overall CSS payload**).

During the development process for Yahoo Mail, we needed a way to make sure webpack would continuously run in the background. To make this happen, we decided to use the task runner Grunt. Not only does Grunt keep the connection to webpack alive, but it also gives us the ability to pass different parameters to the webpack config file based on the given environment. Some examples of these parameters are source map options, enabling HMR, and uglification.

Before deployment to production, we wanted to optimize the javascript bundles for size to make the Yahoo Mail experience faster. webpack provides good default support for this with the UglifyJS plugin. Although the default options are conservative, they give us the ability to configure the options. Once we modified the options to our specifications, we saved approximately 10KB.

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Code snippet showing the configuration options for the UglifyJS plugin


Faster development cycles for developers

While developing a new feature, engineers ideally want to see their code changes reflected on their web app instantaneously. This allows them to maintain their train of thought and eventually results in more productivity. Before we implemented webpack, it took us around 30 seconds to 1 minute for changes to reflect on our Yahoo Mail development environment. webpack helped us reduce the wait time to 5 seconds.

More reliability

Consumers love a reliable product, where all the features work seamlessly every time. Before we began using webpack, we were generating javascript bundles on demand or during run-time, which meant the product was more prone to exceptions or failures while fetching the javascript bundles. With webpack, we now generate all the bundles during build time, which means that all the bundles are available whenever consumers access Yahoo Mail. This results in significantly fewer exceptions and failures and a better experience overall.

Better Performance

We were able to attain a significant reduction of payload after adopting webpack.

  1. Reduction of about 75 KB gzipped Javascript payload
  2. 50% reduction on server-side render time
  3. 10% improvement in Yahoo Mail’s launch performance metrics, as measured by render time above the fold (e.g., Time to load contents of an email).

Below are some charts that demonstrate the payload size of Yahoo Mail before and after implementing webpack.

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Payload before using webpack (JavaScript Size = 741.41KB)


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Payload after switching to webpack (JavaScript size = 669.08KB)


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Conclusion

Shifting to webpack has resulted in significant improvements. We saw a common build process go from 30 seconds to 5 seconds, large JavaScript bundle size reductions, and a halving in server-side rendering time. In addition to these benefits, our engineers have found the community support for webpack to have been impressive as well. webpack has made the development of Yahoo Mail more efficient and enhanced the product for users. We believe you can use it to achieve similar results for your web application as well.

**Optimized CSS generation with Atomizer

Before we implemented webpack into the development of Yahoo Mail, we looked into how we could decrease our CSS payload. To achieve this, we developed an in-house solution for writing modular and scoped CSS in React. Our solution is similar to the Atomizer library, and our CSS is written in JavaScript like the example below:

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Sample snippet of CSS written with Atomizer


Every React component creates its own styles.js file with required style definitions. React-Atomic-CSS converts these files into unique class definitions. Our total CSS payload after implementing our solution equaled all the unique style definitions in our code, or only 83KB (21KB gzipped).

During our migration to webpack, we created a custom plugin and loader to parse these files and extract the unique style definitions from all of our CSS files. Since this process is tied to bundling, only CSS files that are part of the dependency chain are included in the final CSS.

Yahoo Mail’s New Tech Stack, Built for Performance and Reliability

Post Syndicated from mikesefanov original https://yahooeng.tumblr.com/post/162320493306

By Suhas Sadanandan, Director of Engineering 

When it comes to performance and reliability, there is perhaps no application where this matters more than with email. Today, we announced a new Yahoo Mail experience for desktop based on a completely rewritten tech stack that embodies these fundamental considerations and more.

We built the new Yahoo Mail experience using a best-in-class front-end tech stack with open source technologies including React, Redux, Node.js, react-intl (open-sourced by Yahoo), and others. A high-level architectural diagram of our stack is below.

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New Yahoo Mail Tech Stack

In building our new tech stack, we made use of the most modern tools available in the industry to come up with the best experience for our users by optimizing the following fundamentals:

Performance

A key feature of the new Yahoo Mail architecture is blazing-fast initial loading (aka, launch).

We introduced new network routing which sends users to their nearest geo-located email servers (proximity-based routing). This has resulted in a significant reduction in time to first byte and should be immediately noticeable to our international users in particular.

We now do server-side rendering to allow our users to see their mail sooner. This change will be immediately noticeable to our low-bandwidth users. Our application is isomorphic, meaning that the same code runs on the server (using Node.js) and the client. Prior versions of Yahoo Mail had programming logic duplicated on the server and the client because we used PHP on the server and JavaScript on the client.   

Using efficient bundling strategies (JavaScript code is separated into application, vendor, and lazy loaded bundles) and pushing only the changed bundles during production pushes, we keep the cache hit ratio high. By using react-atomic-css, our homegrown solution for writing modular and scoped CSS in React, we get much better CSS reuse.  

In prior versions of Yahoo Mail, the need to run various experiments in parallel resulted in additional branching and bloating of our JavaScript and CSS code. While rewriting all of our code, we solved this issue using Mendel, our homegrown solution for bucket testing isomorphic web apps, which we have open sourced.  

Rather than using custom libraries, we use native HTML5 APIs and ES6 heavily and use PolyesterJS, our homegrown polyfill solution, to fill the gaps. These factors have further helped us to keep payload size minimal.

With all the above optimizations, we have been able to reduce our JavaScript and CSS footprint by approximately 50% compared to the previous desktop version of Yahoo Mail, helping us achieve a blazing-fast launch.

In addition to initial launch improvements, key features like search and message read (when a user opens an email to read it) have also benefited from the above optimizations and are considerably faster in the latest version of Yahoo Mail.

We also significantly reduced the memory consumed by Yahoo Mail on the browser. This is especially noticeable during a long running session.

Reliability

With this new version of Yahoo Mail, we have a 99.99% success rate on core flows: launch, message read, compose, search, and actions that affect messages. Accomplishing this over several billion user actions a day is a significant feat. Client-side errors (JavaScript exceptions) are reduced significantly when compared to prior Yahoo Mail versions.

Product agility and launch velocity

We focused on independently deployable components. As part of the re-architecture of Yahoo Mail, we invested in a robust continuous integration and delivery flow. Our new pipeline allows for daily (or more) pushes to all Mail users, and we push only the bundles that are modified, which keeps the cache hit ratio high.

Developer effectiveness and satisfaction

In developing our tech stack for the new Yahoo Mail experience, we heavily leveraged open source technologies, which allowed us to ensure a shorter learning curve for new engineers. We were able to implement a consistent and intuitive onboarding program for 30+ developers and are now using our program for all new hires. During the development process, we emphasise predictable flows and easy debugging.

Accessibility

The accessibility of this new version of Yahoo Mail is state of the art and delivers outstanding usability (efficiency) in addition to accessibility. It features six enhanced visual themes that can provide accommodation for people with low vision and has been optimized for use with Assistive Technology including alternate input devices, magnifiers, and popular screen readers such as NVDA and VoiceOver. These features have been rigorously evaluated and incorporate feedback from users with disabilities. It sets a new standard for the accessibility of web-based mail and is our most-accessible Mail experience yet.

Open source 

We have open sourced some key components of our new Mail stack, like Mendel, our solution for bucket testing isomorphic web applications. We invite the community to use and build upon our code. Going forward, we plan on also open sourcing additional components like react-atomic-css, our solution for writing modular and scoped CSS in React, and lazy-component, our solution for on-demand loading of resources.

Many of our company’s best technical minds came together to write a brand new tech stack and enable a delightful new Yahoo Mail experience for our users.

We encourage our users and engineering peers in the industry to test the limits of our application, and to provide feedback by clicking on the Give Feedback call out in the lower left corner of the new version of Yahoo Mail.