Tag Archives: Public Sector

Building end-to-end AWS DevSecOps CI/CD pipeline with open source SCA, SAST and DAST tools

Post Syndicated from Srinivas Manepalli original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/devops/building-end-to-end-aws-devsecops-ci-cd-pipeline-with-open-source-sca-sast-and-dast-tools/

DevOps is a combination of cultural philosophies, practices, and tools that combine software development with information technology operations. These combined practices enable companies to deliver new application features and improved services to customers at a higher velocity. DevSecOps takes this a step further, integrating security into DevOps. With DevSecOps, you can deliver secure and compliant application changes rapidly while running operations consistently with automation.

Having a complete DevSecOps pipeline is critical to building a successful software factory, which includes continuous integration (CI), continuous delivery and deployment (CD), continuous testing, continuous logging and monitoring, auditing and governance, and operations. Identifying the vulnerabilities during the initial stages of the software development process can significantly help reduce the overall cost of developing application changes, but doing it in an automated fashion can accelerate the delivery of these changes as well.

To identify security vulnerabilities at various stages, organizations can integrate various tools and services (cloud and third-party) into their DevSecOps pipelines. Integrating various tools and aggregating the vulnerability findings can be a challenge to do from scratch. AWS has the services and tools necessary to accelerate this objective and provides the flexibility to build DevSecOps pipelines with easy integrations of AWS cloud native and third-party tools. AWS also provides services to aggregate security findings.

In this post, we provide a DevSecOps pipeline reference architecture on AWS that covers the afore-mentioned practices, including SCA (Software Composite Analysis), SAST (Static Application Security Testing), DAST (Dynamic Application Security Testing), and aggregation of vulnerability findings into a single pane of glass. Additionally, this post addresses the concepts of security of the pipeline and security in the pipeline.

You can deploy this pipeline in either the AWS GovCloud Region (US) or standard AWS Regions. As of this writing, all listed AWS services are available in AWS GovCloud (US) and authorized for FedRAMP High workloads within the Region, with the exception of AWS CodePipeline and AWS Security Hub, which are in the Region and currently under the JAB Review to be authorized shortly for FedRAMP High as well.

Services and tools

In this section, we discuss the various AWS services and third-party tools used in this solution.

CI/CD services

For CI/CD, we use the following AWS services:

  • AWS CodeBuild – A fully managed continuous integration service that compiles source code, runs tests, and produces software packages that are ready to deploy.
  • AWS CodeCommit – A fully managed source control service that hosts secure Git-based repositories.
  • AWS CodeDeploy – A fully managed deployment service that automates software deployments to a variety of compute services such as Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2), AWS Fargate, AWS Lambda, and your on-premises servers.
  • AWS CodePipeline – A fully managed continuous delivery service that helps you automate your release pipelines for fast and reliable application and infrastructure updates.
  • AWS Lambda – A service that lets you run code without provisioning or managing servers. You pay only for the compute time you consume.
  • Amazon Simple Notification Service – Amazon SNS is a fully managed messaging service for both application-to-application (A2A) and application-to-person (A2P) communication.
  • Amazon Simple Storage Service – Amazon S3 is storage for the internet. You can use Amazon S3 to store and retrieve any amount of data at any time, from anywhere on the web.
  • AWS Systems Manager Parameter Store – Parameter Store gives you visibility and control of your infrastructure on AWS.

Continuous testing tools

The following are open-source scanning tools that are integrated in the pipeline for the purposes of this post, but you could integrate other tools that meet your specific requirements. You can use the static code review tool Amazon CodeGuru for static analysis, but at the time of this writing, it’s not yet available in GovCloud and currently supports Java and Python (available in preview).

  • OWASP Dependency-Check – A Software Composition Analysis (SCA) tool that attempts to detect publicly disclosed vulnerabilities contained within a project’s dependencies.
  • SonarQube (SAST) – Catches bugs and vulnerabilities in your app, with thousands of automated Static Code Analysis rules.
  • PHPStan (SAST) – Focuses on finding errors in your code without actually running it. It catches whole classes of bugs even before you write tests for the code.
  • OWASP Zap (DAST) – Helps you automatically find security vulnerabilities in your web applications while you’re developing and testing your applications.

Continuous logging and monitoring services

The following are AWS services for continuous logging and monitoring:

Auditing and governance services

The following are AWS auditing and governance services:

  • AWS CloudTrail – Enables governance, compliance, operational auditing, and risk auditing of your AWS account.
  • AWS Identity and Access Management – Enables you to manage access to AWS services and resources securely. With IAM, you can create and manage AWS users and groups, and use permissions to allow and deny their access to AWS resources.
  • AWS Config – Allows you to assess, audit, and evaluate the configurations of your AWS resources.

Operations services

The following are AWS operations services:

  • AWS Security Hub – Gives you a comprehensive view of your security alerts and security posture across your AWS accounts. This post uses Security Hub to aggregate all the vulnerability findings as a single pane of glass.
  • AWS CloudFormation – Gives you an easy way to model a collection of related AWS and third-party resources, provision them quickly and consistently, and manage them throughout their lifecycles, by treating infrastructure as code.
  • AWS Systems Manager Parameter Store – Provides secure, hierarchical storage for configuration data management and secrets management. You can store data such as passwords, database strings, Amazon Machine Image (AMI) IDs, and license codes as parameter values.
  • AWS Elastic Beanstalk – An easy-to-use service for deploying and scaling web applications and services developed with Java, .NET, PHP, Node.js, Python, Ruby, Go, and Docker on familiar servers such as Apache, Nginx, Passenger, and IIS. This post uses Elastic Beanstalk to deploy LAMP stack with WordPress and Amazon Aurora MySQL. Although we use Elastic Beanstalk for this post, you could configure the pipeline to deploy to various other environments on AWS or elsewhere as needed.

Pipeline architecture

The following diagram shows the architecture of the solution.

AWS DevSecOps CICD pipeline architecture

AWS DevSecOps CICD pipeline architecture

 

The main steps are as follows:

  1. When a user commits the code to a CodeCommit repository, a CloudWatch event is generated which, triggers CodePipeline.
  2. CodeBuild packages the build and uploads the artifacts to an S3 bucket. CodeBuild retrieves the authentication information (for example, scanning tool tokens) from Parameter Store to initiate the scanning. As a best practice, it is recommended to utilize Artifact repositories like AWS CodeArtifact to store the artifacts, instead of S3. For simplicity of the workshop, we will continue to use S3.
  3. CodeBuild scans the code with an SCA tool (OWASP Dependency-Check) and SAST tool (SonarQube or PHPStan; in the provided CloudFormation template, you can pick one of these tools during the deployment, but CodeBuild is fully enabled for a bring your own tool approach).
  4. If there are any vulnerabilities either from SCA analysis or SAST analysis, CodeBuild invokes the Lambda function. The function parses the results into AWS Security Finding Format (ASFF) and posts it to Security Hub. Security Hub helps aggregate and view all the vulnerability findings in one place as a single pane of glass. The Lambda function also uploads the scanning results to an S3 bucket.
  5. If there are no vulnerabilities, CodeDeploy deploys the code to the staging Elastic Beanstalk environment.
  6. After the deployment succeeds, CodeBuild triggers the DAST scanning with the OWASP ZAP tool (again, this is fully enabled for a bring your own tool approach).
  7. If there are any vulnerabilities, CodeBuild invokes the Lambda function, which parses the results into ASFF and posts it to Security Hub. The function also uploads the scanning results to an S3 bucket (similar to step 4).
  8. If there are no vulnerabilities, the approval stage is triggered, and an email is sent to the approver for action.
  9. After approval, CodeDeploy deploys the code to the production Elastic Beanstalk environment.
  10. During the pipeline run, CloudWatch Events captures the build state changes and sends email notifications to subscribed users through SNS notifications.
  11. CloudTrail tracks the API calls and send notifications on critical events on the pipeline and CodeBuild projects, such as UpdatePipeline, DeletePipeline, CreateProject, and DeleteProject, for auditing purposes.
  12. AWS Config tracks all the configuration changes of AWS services. The following AWS Config rules are added in this pipeline as security best practices:
  13. CODEBUILD_PROJECT_ENVVAR_AWSCRED_CHECK – Checks whether the project contains environment variables AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID and AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY. The rule is NON_COMPLIANT when the project environment variables contains plaintext credentials.
  14. CLOUD_TRAIL_LOG_FILE_VALIDATION_ENABLED – Checks whether CloudTrail creates a signed digest file with logs. AWS recommends that the file validation be enabled on all trails. The rule is noncompliant if the validation is not enabled.

Security of the pipeline is implemented by using IAM roles and S3 bucket policies to restrict access to pipeline resources. Pipeline data at rest and in transit is protected using encryption and SSL secure transport. We use Parameter Store to store sensitive information such as API tokens and passwords. To be fully compliant with frameworks such as FedRAMP, other things may be required, such as MFA.

Security in the pipeline is implemented by performing the SCA, SAST and DAST security checks. Alternatively, the pipeline can utilize IAST (Interactive Application Security Testing) techniques that would combine SAST and DAST stages.

As a best practice, encryption should be enabled for the code and artifacts, whether at rest or transit.

In the next section, we explain how to deploy and run the pipeline CloudFormation template used for this example. Refer to the provided service links to learn more about each of the services in the pipeline. If utilizing CloudFormation templates to deploy infrastructure using pipelines, we recommend using linting tools like cfn-nag to scan CloudFormation templates for security vulnerabilities.

Prerequisites

Before getting started, make sure you have the following prerequisites:

Deploying the pipeline

To deploy the pipeline, complete the following steps: Download the CloudFormation template and pipeline code from GitHub repo.

  1. Log in to your AWS account if you have not done so already.
  2. On the CloudFormation console, choose Create Stack.
  3. Choose the CloudFormation pipeline template.
  4. Choose Next.
  5. Provide the stack parameters:
    • Under Code, provide code details, such as repository name and the branch to trigger the pipeline.
    • Under SAST, choose the SAST tool (SonarQube or PHPStan) for code analysis, enter the API token and the SAST tool URL. You can skip SonarQube details if using PHPStan as the SAST tool.
    • Under DAST, choose the DAST tool (OWASP Zap) for dynamic testing and enter the API token, DAST tool URL, and the application URL to run the scan.
    • Under Lambda functions, enter the Lambda function S3 bucket name, filename, and the handler name.
    • Under STG Elastic Beanstalk Environment and PRD Elastic Beanstalk Environment, enter the Elastic Beanstalk environment and application details for staging and production to which this pipeline deploys the application code.
    • Under General, enter the email addresses to receive notifications for approvals and pipeline status changes.

CF Deploymenet - Passing parameter values

CloudFormation deployment - Passing parameter values

CloudFormation template deployment

After the pipeline is deployed, confirm the subscription by choosing the provided link in the email to receive the notifications.

The provided CloudFormation template in this post is formatted for AWS GovCloud. If you’re setting this up in a standard Region, you have to adjust the partition name in the CloudFormation template. For example, change ARN values from arn:aws-us-gov to arn:aws.

Running the pipeline

To trigger the pipeline, commit changes to your application repository files. That generates a CloudWatch event and triggers the pipeline. CodeBuild scans the code and if there are any vulnerabilities, it invokes the Lambda function to parse and post the results to Security Hub.

When posting the vulnerability finding information to Security Hub, we need to provide a vulnerability severity level. Based on the provided severity value, Security Hub assigns the label as follows. Adjust the severity levels in your code based on your organization’s requirements.

  • 0 – INFORMATIONAL
  • 1–39 – LOW
  • 40– 69 – MEDIUM
  • 70–89 – HIGH
  • 90–100 – CRITICAL

The following screenshot shows the progression of your pipeline.

CodePipeline stages

CodePipeline stages

SCA and SAST scanning

In our architecture, CodeBuild trigger the SCA and SAST scanning in parallel. In this section, we discuss scanning with OWASP Dependency-Check, SonarQube, and PHPStan. 

Scanning with OWASP Dependency-Check (SCA)

The following is the code snippet from the Lambda function, where the SCA analysis results are parsed and posted to Security Hub. Based on the results, the equivalent Security Hub severity level (normalized_severity) is assigned.

Lambda code snippet for OWASP Dependency-check

Lambda code snippet for OWASP Dependency-check

You can see the results in Security Hub, as in the following screenshot.

SecurityHub report from OWASP Dependency-check scanning

SecurityHub report from OWASP Dependency-check scanning

Scanning with SonarQube (SAST)

The following is the code snippet from the Lambda function, where the SonarQube code analysis results are parsed and posted to Security Hub. Based on SonarQube results, the equivalent Security Hub severity level (normalized_severity) is assigned.

Lambda code snippet for SonarQube

Lambda code snippet for SonarQube

The following screenshot shows the results in Security Hub.

SecurityHub report from SonarQube scanning

SecurityHub report from SonarQube scanning

Scanning with PHPStan (SAST)

The following is the code snippet from the Lambda function, where the PHPStan code analysis results are parsed and posted to Security Hub.

Lambda code snippet for PHPStan

Lambda code snippet for PHPStan

The following screenshot shows the results in Security Hub.

SecurityHub report from PHPStan scanning

SecurityHub report from PHPStan scanning

DAST scanning

In our architecture, CodeBuild triggers DAST scanning and the DAST tool.

If there are no vulnerabilities in the SAST scan, the pipeline proceeds to the manual approval stage and an email is sent to the approver. The approver can review and approve or reject the deployment. If approved, the pipeline moves to next stage and deploys the application to the provided Elastic Beanstalk environment.

Scanning with OWASP Zap

After deployment is successful, CodeBuild initiates the DAST scanning. When scanning is complete, if there are any vulnerabilities, it invokes the Lambda function similar to SAST analysis. The function parses and posts the results to Security Hub. The following is the code snippet of the Lambda function.

Lambda code snippet for OWASP-Zap

Lambda code snippet for OWASP-Zap

The following screenshot shows the results in Security Hub.

SecurityHub report from OWASP-Zap scanning

SecurityHub report from OWASP-Zap scanning

Aggregation of vulnerability findings in Security Hub provides opportunities to automate the remediation. For example, based on the vulnerability finding, you can trigger a Lambda function to take the needed remediation action. This also reduces the burden on operations and security teams because they can now address the vulnerabilities from a single pane of glass instead of logging into multiple tool dashboards.

Conclusion

In this post, I presented a DevSecOps pipeline that includes CI/CD, continuous testing, continuous logging and monitoring, auditing and governance, and operations. I demonstrated how to integrate various open-source scanning tools, such as SonarQube, PHPStan, and OWASP Zap for SAST and DAST analysis. I explained how to aggregate vulnerability findings in Security Hub as a single pane of glass. This post also talked about how to implement security of the pipeline and in the pipeline using AWS cloud native services. Finally, I provided the DevSecOps pipeline as code using AWS CloudFormation. For additional information on AWS DevOps services and to get started, see AWS DevOps and DevOps Blog.

 

Srinivas Manepalli is a DevSecOps Solutions Architect in the U.S. Fed SI SA team at Amazon Web Services (AWS). He is passionate about helping customers, building and architecting DevSecOps and highly available software systems. Outside of work, he enjoys spending time with family, nature and good food.

Podcast 296: [Public Sector Special Series #5] – Creating Better Educational Outcomes Using AWS | February 6, 2019

Post Syndicated from Simon Elisha original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/podcast-296-public-sector-special-series-5-creating-better-educational-outcomes-using-aws-february-6-2019/

Cesar Wedemann (QEDU) talks to Simon about how they gather Education data and provide this data to teachers and public schools to improve education in Brazil. They developed a free-access portal that offers easy visualization of brazilian Education open data.

Additional Resources

About the AWS Podcast

The AWS Podcast is a cloud platform podcast for developers, dev ops, and cloud professionals seeking the latest news and trends in storage, security, infrastructure, serverless, and more. Join Simon Elisha and Jeff Barr for regular updates, deep dives and interviews. Whether you’re building machine learning and AI models, open source projects, or hybrid cloud solutions, the AWS Podcast has something for you. Subscribe with one of the following:

Like the Podcast?

Rate us on iTunes and send your suggestions, show ideas, and comments to [email protected]. We want to hear from you!

Podcast 294: [Public Sector Special Series #4] – Using AI to make Content Available for Students at Imperial College of London

Post Syndicated from Simon Elisha original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/podcast-294-public-sector-special-series-4-using-ai-to-make-content-available-for-students-at-imperial-college-of-london/

How do you train the next generation of Digital leaders? How do you provide them with a modern educational experience? Can you do it without technical expertise? Hear how Ruth Black (Teaching Fellow at the Digital Academy) applied Amazon Transcribe to make this real.

Additional Resources

About the AWS Podcast

The AWS Podcast is a cloud platform podcast for developers, dev ops, and cloud professionals seeking the latest news and trends in storage, security, infrastructure, serverless, and more. Join Simon Elisha and Jeff Barr for regular updates, deep dives, and interviews.

Rate us on iTunes and send your suggestions, show ideas, and comments to [email protected]. We want to hear from you!

Subscribe with one of the following:

 

Podcast 292: [Public Sector Special Series #3] – Moving to Microservices from an Organisational Standpoint | January 23, 2019

Post Syndicated from Simon Elisha original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/podcast-292-public-sector-special-series-3-microservices/

Jeff Olson (VP & Chief Data Officer at College Board) talks about his experiences in fostering change from an organisational standpoint whilst moving to a microservices architecture.

Additional Resources

About the AWS Podcast

The AWS Podcast is a cloud platform podcast for developers, dev ops, and cloud professionals seeking the latest news and trends in storage, security, infrastructure, serverless, and more. Join Simon Elisha and Jeff Barr for regular updates, deep dives and interviews. Whether you’re building machine learning and AI models, open source projects, or hybrid cloud solutions, the AWS Podcast has something for you. Subscribe with one of the following:

Like the Podcast?

Rate us on iTunes and send your suggestions, show ideas, and comments to [email protected]. We want to hear from you!

#290: [Public Sector Special Series #2] – Using AWS to Power Research with the University of Liverpool and Alces Flight

Post Syndicated from Simon Elisha original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/290-public-sector-special-series-2-using-aws-to-power-research-with-the-university-of-liverpool-and-alces-flight/

Cliff Addison (University of Liverpool) joins with Will Mayers and Cristin Merritt (Alces Flight) to talk about High Performance Computing in the cloud and meeting the needs of researchers.

Additional Resources

About the AWS Podcast

The AWS Podcast is a cloud platform podcast for developers, dev ops, and cloud professionals seeking the latest news and trends in storage, security, infrastructure, serverless, and more. Join Simon Elisha and Jeff Barr for regular updates, deep dives and interviews. Whether you’re building machine learning and AI models, open source projects, or hybrid cloud solutions, the AWS Podcast has something for you. Subscribe with one of the following:

Like the Podcast?

Rate us on iTunes and send your suggestions, show ideas, and comments to [email protected]. We want to hear from you!

How federal agencies can leverage AWS to extend CDM programs and CIO Metric Reporting

Post Syndicated from Darren House original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-federal-agencies-can-leverage-aws-to-extend-cdm-programs-and-cio-metric-reporting/

Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation (CDM), a U.S. Department of Homeland Security cybersecurity program, is gaining new visibility as part of the federal government’s overall focus on securing its information and networks. How an agency performs against CDM will soon be regularly reported in the updated Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act (FITARA) scorecard. That’s in addition to updates in the President’s Management Agenda. Because of this additional scrutiny, there are many questions about how cloud service providers can enable the CDM journey.

This blog will explain how you can implement a CDM program—or extend an existing one—within your AWS environment, and how you can use AWS capabilities to provide real-time CDM compliance and FISMA reporting.

When it comes to compliance for departments and agencies, the AWS Shared Responsibility Model describes how AWS is responsible for security of the cloud and the customer is responsible for security in the cloud. The Shared Responsibility Model is segmented into 3 categories (1) infrastructure services (see figure 1 below), (2) container services, and (3) abstracted services, each having a different level of controls customers can inherit to minimize their effort in managing and maintaining compliance and audit requirements. For example, when designing your workloads in AWS that fall under Infrastructure Services in the Shared Responsibility Model, AWS helps relieve your operational burden, as AWS operates, manages, and controls the components from the host operating system and virtualization layer down to the physical security of the facilities in which the services operate. This also relates to IT controls you can inherit through AWS compliance programs. Before their journey to the AWS Cloud, a customer may have been responsible for the entire control set in their compliance and auditing program. With AWS, you can inherit controls from AWS compliance programs, allowing you to focus on workloads and data you put in the cloud.

Figure 1: AWS Infrastructure Services

For example, if you deploy infrastructure services such as Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) networking and Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instances, you can base your CDM compliance controls on the AWS controls you inherit for network infrastructure, virtualization, and physical security. You would be responsible for managing things like change management for Amazon EC2 AMIs, operating system and patching, AWS Config management, AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), and encryption of services at rest and in transit.

If you deploy container services such as Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) or Amazon EMR that build on top of infrastructure services, AWS manages the underlying infrastructure virtualization, physical controls, and the OS and associated IT controls, like patching and change management. You inherit the IT security controls from AWS compliance programs and can use them as artifacts in your compliance program. For example, you can request a SOC report for one of our 62 SOC-compliant services available from AWS Artifact. You are still responsible for the controls of what you put in the cloud.

Another example is if you deploy abstracted services such as Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) or Amazon DynamoDB. AWS is responsible for the IT controls applicable to the services we provide. You are responsible for managing your data, classifying your assets, using IAM to apply permissions to individual resources at the platform level, or managing permissions based on user identity or user responsibility at the IAM user/group level.

For agencies struggling to comply with FISMA requirements and thus CDM reporting, leveraging abstracted and container services means you now have the ability to inherit more controls from AWS, reducing the resource drain and cost of FISMA compliance.

So, what does this all mean for your CDM program on AWS? It means that AWS can help agencies realize CDM’s vision of near-real time FISMA reporting for infrastructure, container, and abstracted services. The following paragraphs explain how you can leverage existing AWS Services and solutions that support CDM.

1.0 Identify

AWS can meet CDM Asset Management (AM) 1.1 – 1.3 using AWS Config to track AWS resource configurations, use the resource groups tagging API to manage FISMA Classifications of your cloud infrastructure, and automatically tag Amazon EC2 resources.

For AM 1.4, AWS Config identifies all cloud assets in your AWS account, which can be stored in a DynamoDB table in the reporting format required. AWS Config rules can enforce and report on compliance, ensuring all Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) volumes (block level storage) and Amazon S3 buckets (object storage) are encrypted.

2.0 Protect

For CIO metrics 2.1, 2.2, and 2.14, Amazon Inspector uses Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVEs) based on the National Vulnerability Database (NVD) Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS). Using Amazon Inspector, customers can set up continuous golden AMI vulnerability assessments then take the Inspector findings and store them in a CIO metrics DynamoDB table for reporting.

For metrics 2.3 – 2.7, AWS provides federation services with on-premise Active Directory (AD) services, allowing customers to map IAM Roles to AD groups, report on IAM privileged system access, and identify which IAM roles have access to particular services.

To provide reporting for metric 2.10.1, AWS offers FIPS 140-2 validated endpoints for US East/West regions and AWS GovCloud (US).

For metric 2.9, AWS Config provides relationship information for all resources, which means you can use AWS Config relationship data to report on CIO metrics focused on the segmentation of resources. AWS Config can identify things like the network interfaces, security groups (firewalls), subnets, and VPCs related to an instance.

3.0 Detect

For detection that covers 3.3, 3.6, 3.8, 3.9, 3.11, and 3.12, AWS Web Application Firewall (WAF) and Amazon GuardDuty have native automation through Amazon CloudWatch, AWS Step Functions (orchestration), and AWS Lambda (serverless) to provide adaptive computing capabilities such as automating the application of AWS WAF rules, recovering from incidents, mitigating OWASP top 10 threats, and automating the import of third-party threat intelligence feeds.

4.0 Respond

The focus is on you to develop policies and procedures to respond to cyber “incidents.” AWS provides capabilities to automate policies and procedures in a policy driven manner to improve detection times, shorten response times, and reduce attack surface. FISMA defines “incident” as “an occurrence that (A) actually or imminently jeopardizes, without lawful authority, the integrity, confidentiality, or availability of information or an information system; or (B) constitutes a violation or imminent threat of violation of law, security policies, security procedures, or acceptable use policies.”

Enabling GuardDuty in your accounts and writing finding results to a reporting database complies with CIO “Recover” metrics 4.1 and 4.2. Requirement 4.3 mandates you “automatically disable the system or relevant asset upon the detection of a given security violation or vulnerability,” per NIST SP 800-53r4 IR-4(2). You can comply by enabling automation to remediate instances.

5.0 Recover

Responding and recovering are closely related processes. Enabling automation to remediate instances also complies with 5.1 and 5.2, which focus on recovering from incidents. While it is your responsibility to develop an Information System Contingency Plan (ISCP), AWS can enable you to translate that plan into automated machine-readable policy through AWS CloudFormation. The service can use AWS Config to report on the number of HVA systems for which an ISCP has been developed (5.1). For both 5.1 and 5.2, “mean time for the organization to restore operations following the containment of a system intrusion or compromise,” using AWS multi-region architectures, inter-region VPC peering, S3 cross-region replication, AWS Landing Zones, and the global AWS network to enable global networking with services like AWS Direct Connect gateway allows you to develop an architecture (5.1.1) that tracks the number of HVA systems that have an alternate processing site identified and provisioned to enable global recovery in minutes.

Conclusion

There are many ways to report and visualize the data for all the solutions identified. A simple way is to write sensor data to a DynamoDB table. You can enhance your basic reporting to provide advanced analytics and visualization by integrating DynamoDB data with Amazon Athena. You can log all your services directly to an Amazon S3 bucket, use Amazon QuickSight for the dashboard and create custom analyses from your dashboards. You could also enrich your CIO metric dashboard data with other normalized datasets.

The end result is that you can build a new CDM program or extend an existing one using AWS. We are relentlessly focused on innovating for you and providing a comprehensive platform of secure IT services to meet your unique needs. Federal customers required to comply with CDM can use these innovations to incorporate services like AWS Config and AWS Systems Manager to provide assets and software management in AWS and on-premise systems to answer the question, “What is on the network?”

For real time compliance and reporting, you can leverage services like GuardDuty to analyze AWS CloudTrail, DNS, and VPC flow logs in your account so you really know “who is on your network,” and “what is happening on the network.”  VPC, security groups, Amazon CloudFront, and AWS WAF allow you to protect the boundary of your environment, while services like AWS Key Management Service (KMS), AWS CloudHSM, AWS Certificate Manager (ACM) and HTTPS endpoints enable you to “protect the data on the network.”

The services discussed in this blog provide you with the ability to design a cloud architecture that can help you move from ad-hoc to optimized in your CDM reporting. If you want more data, send us feedback and please, let us know how we can help with your CDM journey! If you have feedback about this blog post, submit comments in the Comments section below, or contact AWS Support.

Want more AWS Security news? Follow us on Twitter.

Darren House

Darren is a Senior Solutions Architect at AWS who is passionate about designing business- and mission-aligned cloud solutions that enable government customers to achieve objectives and improve desired outcomes. Outside work, Darren enjoys hiking, camping, motorcycles, and snowboarding.

New guide helps explain cloud security with AWS for public sector customers in India

Post Syndicated from Meng Chow Kang original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/new-guide-helps-explain-cloud-security-with-aws-for-public-sector-customers-in-india/

Our teams are continuing to focus on compliance enablement around the world and now that includes a new guide for public sector customers in India. The User Guide for Government Departments and Agencies in India provides information that helps government users at various central, state, district, and municipal agencies understand security and controls available with AWS. It also explains how to implement appropriate information security, risk management, and governance programs using AWS Services, which are offered in India by Amazon Internet Services Private Limited (AISPL).

The guide focuses on the Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology (Meity) requirements that are detailed in Guidelines for Government Departments for Adoption/Procurement of Cloud Services, addressing common issues that public sector customers encounter.

Our newest guide is part of a series diving into customer compliance issues across industries and jurisdictions, such as financial services guides for Singapore, Australia, and Hong Kong. We’ll be publishing additional guides this year to help you understand other regulatory requirements around the world.

Want more AWS Security news? Follow us on Twitter.

Some quick thoughts on the public discussion regarding facial recognition and Amazon Rekognition this past week

Post Syndicated from Dr. Matt Wood original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/some-quick-thoughts-on-the-public-discussion-regarding-facial-recognition-and-amazon-rekognition-this-past-week/

We have seen a lot of discussion this past week about the role of Amazon Rekognition in facial recognition, surveillance, and civil liberties, and we wanted to share some thoughts.

Amazon Rekognition is a service we announced in 2016. It makes use of new technologies – such as deep learning – and puts them in the hands of developers in an easy-to-use, low-cost way. Since then, we have seen customers use the image and video analysis capabilities of Amazon Rekognition in ways that materially benefit both society (e.g. preventing human trafficking, inhibiting child exploitation, reuniting missing children with their families, and building educational apps for children), and organizations (enhancing security through multi-factor authentication, finding images more easily, or preventing package theft). Amazon Web Services (AWS) is not the only provider of services like these, and we remain excited about how image and video analysis can be a driver for good in the world, including in the public sector and law enforcement.

There have always been and will always be risks with new technology capabilities. Each organization choosing to employ technology must act responsibly or risk legal penalties and public condemnation. AWS takes its responsibilities seriously. But we believe it is the wrong approach to impose a ban on promising new technologies because they might be used by bad actors for nefarious purposes in the future. The world would be a very different place if we had restricted people from buying computers because it was possible to use that computer to do harm. The same can be said of thousands of technologies upon which we all rely each day. Through responsible use, the benefits have far outweighed the risks.

Customers are off to a great start with Amazon Rekognition; the evidence of the positive impact this new technology can provide is strong (and growing by the week), and we’re excited to continue to support our customers in its responsible use.

-Dr. Matt Wood, general manager of artificial intelligence at AWS

Connect, collaborate, and learn at AWS Global Summits in 2018

Post Syndicated from Tina Kelleher original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/big-data/connect-collaborate-and-learn-at-aws-global-summits-in-2018/

Regardless of your career path, there’s no denying that attending industry events can provide helpful career development opportunities — not only for improving and expanding your skill sets, but for networking as well. According to this article from PayScale.com, experts estimate that somewhere between 70-85% of new positions are landed through networking.

Narrowing our focus to networking opportunities with cloud computing professionals who’re working on tackling some of today’s most innovative and exciting big data solutions, attending big data-focused sessions at an AWS Global Summit is a great place to start.

AWS Global Summits are free events that bring the cloud computing community together to connect, collaborate, and learn about AWS. As the name suggests, these summits are held in major cities around the world, and attract technologists from all industries and skill levels who’re interested in hearing from AWS leaders, experts, partners, and customers.

In addition to networking opportunities with top cloud technology providers, consultants and your peers in our Partner and Solutions Expo, you’ll also hone your AWS skills by attending and participating in a multitude of education and training opportunities.

Here’s a brief sampling of some of the upcoming sessions relevant to big data professionals:

May 31st : Big Data Architectural Patterns and Best Practices on AWS | AWS Summit – Mexico City

June 6th-7th: Various (click on the “Big Data & Analytics” header) | AWS Summit – Berlin

June 20-21st : [email protected] | Public Sector Summit – Washington DC

June 21st: Enabling Self Service for Data Scientists with AWS Service Catalog | AWS Summit – Sao Paulo

Be sure to check out the main page for AWS Global Summits, where you can see which cities have AWS Summits planned for 2018, register to attend an upcoming event, or provide your information to be notified when registration opens for a future event.

New – Registry of Open Data on AWS (RODA)

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-registry-of-open-data-on-aws-roda/

Almost a decade ago, my colleague Deepak Singh introduced the AWS Public Datasets in his post Paging Researchers, Analysts, and Developers. I’m happy to report that Deepak is still an important part of the AWS team and that the Public Datasets program is still going strong!

Today we are announcing a new take on open and public data, the Registry of Open Data on AWS, or RODA. This registry includes existing Public Datasets and allows anyone to add their own datasets so that they can be accessed and analyzed on AWS.

Inside the Registry
The home page lists all of the datasets in the registry:

Entering a search term shrinks the list so that only the matching datasets are displayed:

Each dataset has an associated detail page, including usage examples, license info, and the information needed to locate and access the dataset on AWS:

In this case, I can access the data with a simple CLI command:

I could also access it programmatically, or download data to my EC2 instance.

Adding to the Repository
If you have a dataset that is publicly available and would like to add it to RODA , you can simply send us a pull request. Head over to the open-data-registry repo, read the CONTRIBUTING document, and create a YAML file that describes your dataset, using one of the existing files in the datasets directory as a model:

We’ll review pull requests regularly; you can “star” or watch the repo in order to track additions and changes.

Impress Me
I am looking forward to an inrush of new datasets, along with some blog posts and apps that show how to to use the data in powerful and interesting ways. Let me know what you come up with.

Jeff;

 

Newly released guide provides Australian public sector the ability to evaluate AWS at PROTECTED level

Post Syndicated from Oliver Bell original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/newly-released-guide-provides-australian-public-sector-the-ability-to-evaluate-aws-at-protected-level/

Australian public sector customers now have a clear roadmap to use our secure services for sensitive workloads at the PROTECTED level. For the first time, we’ve released our Information Security Registered Assessors Program (IRAP) PROTECTED documentation via AWS Artifact. This information provides the ability to plan, architect, and self-assess systems built in AWS under the Digital Transformation Agency’s Secure Cloud Guidelines.

In short, this documentation gives public sector customers everything needed to evaluate AWS at the PROTECTED level. And we’re making this resource available to download on-demand through AWS Artifact. When you download the guide, you’ll find a mapping of how AWS meets each requirement to securely and compliantly process PROTECTED data.

With the AWS IRAP PROTECTED documentation, the process of adopting our secure services has never been easier. The information enables individual agencies to complete their own assessments and adopt AWS, but we also continue to work with the Australian Signals Directorate to include our services at the PROTECTED level on the Certified Cloud Services List.

Meanwhile, we’re also excited to announce that there are now 46 services in scope, which mean more options to build secure and innovative solutions, while also saving money and gaining the productivity of the cloud.

If you have questions about this announcement or would like to inquire about how to use AWS for your regulated workloads, contact your account team.

AWS Achieves Spain’s ENS High Certification Across 29 Services

Post Syndicated from Oliver Bell original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-achieves-spains-ens-high-certification-across-29-services/

AWS has achieved Spain’s Esquema Nacional de Seguridad (ENS) High certification across 29 services. To successfully achieve the ENS High Standard, BDO España conducted an independent audit and attested that AWS meets confidentiality, integrity, and availability standards. This provides the assurance needed by Spanish Public Sector organizations wanting to build secure applications and services on AWS.

The National Security Framework, regulated under Royal Decree 3/2010, was developed through close collaboration between ENAC (Entidad Nacional de Acreditación), the Ministry of Finance and Public Administration and the CCN (National Cryptologic Centre), and other administrative bodies.

The following AWS Services are ENS High accredited across our Dublin and Frankfurt Regions:

  • Amazon API Gateway
  • Amazon DynamoDB
  • Amazon Elastic Container Service
  • Amazon Elastic Block Store
  • Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud
  • Amazon Elastic File System
  • Amazon Elastic MapReduce
  • Amazon ElastiCache
  • Amazon Glacier
  • Amazon Redshift
  • Amazon Relational Database Service
  • Amazon Simple Queue Service
  • Amazon Simple Storage Service
  • Amazon Simple Workflow Service
  • Amazon Virtual Private Cloud
  • Amazon WorkSpaces
  • AWS CloudFormation
  • AWS CloudTrail
  • AWS Config
  • AWS Database Migration Service
  • AWS Direct Connect
  • AWS Directory Service
  • AWS Elastic Beanstalk
  • AWS Key Management Service
  • AWS Lambda
  • AWS Snowball
  • AWS Storage Gateway
  • Elastic Load Balancing
  • VM Import/Export

Now Open – Third AWS Availability Zone in London

Post Syndicated from Jeff Barr original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/now-open-third-aws-availability-zone-in-london/

We expand AWS by picking a geographic area (which we call a Region) and then building multiple, isolated Availability Zones in that area. Each Availability Zone (AZ) has multiple Internet connections and power connections to multiple grids.

Today I am happy to announce that we are opening our 50th AWS Availability Zone, with the addition of a third AZ to the EU (London) Region. This will give you additional flexibility to architect highly scalable, fault-tolerant applications that run across multiple AZs in the UK.

Since launching the EU (London) Region, we have seen an ever-growing set of customers, particularly in the public sector and in regulated industries, use AWS for new and innovative applications. Here are a couple of examples, courtesy of my AWS colleagues in the UK:

Enterprise – Some of the UK’s most respected enterprises are using AWS to transform their businesses, including BBC, BT, Deloitte, and Travis Perkins. Travis Perkins is one of the largest suppliers of building materials in the UK and is implementing the biggest systems and business change in its history, including an all-in migration of its data centers to AWS.

Startups – Cross-border payments company Currencycloud has migrated its entire payments production, and demo platform to AWS resulting in a 30% saving on their infrastructure costs. Clearscore, with plans to disrupting the credit score industry, has also chosen to host their entire platform on AWS. UnderwriteMe is using the EU (London) Region to offer an underwriting platform to their customers as a managed service.

Public Sector -The Met Office chose AWS to support the Met Office Weather App, available for iPhone and Android phones. Since the Met Office Weather App went live in January 2016, it has attracted more than half a million users. Using AWS, the Met Office has been able to increase agility, speed, and scalability while reducing costs. The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) is using the EU (London) Region for services such as the Strategic Card Payments platform, which helps the agency achieve PCI DSS compliance.

The AWS EU (London) Region has achieved Public Services Network (PSN) assurance, which provides UK Public Sector customers with an assured infrastructure on which to build UK Public Sector services. In conjunction with AWS’s Standardized Architecture for UK-OFFICIAL, PSN assurance enables UK Public Sector organizations to move their UK-OFFICIAL classified data to the EU (London) Region in a controlled and risk-managed manner.

For a complete list of AWS Regions and Services, visit the AWS Global Infrastructure page. As always, pricing for services in the Region can be found on the detail pages; visit our Cloud Products page to get started.

Jeff;

AWS Achieves FedRAMP JAB Moderate Provisional Authorization for 20 Services in the AWS US East/West Region

Post Syndicated from Chris Gile original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-achieves-fedramp-jab-moderate-authorization-for-20-services-in-us-eastwest/

The AWS US East/West Region has received a Provisional Authority to Operate (P-ATO) from the Joint Authorization Board (JAB) at the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) Moderate baseline.

Though AWS has maintained an AWS US East/West Region Agency-ATO since early 2013, this announcement represents AWS’s carefully deliberated move to the JAB for the centralized maintenance of our P-ATO for 10 services already authorized. This also includes the addition of 10 new services to our FedRAMP program (see the complete list of services below). This doubles the number of FedRAMP Moderate services available to our customers to enable increased use of the cloud and support modernized IT missions. Our public sector customers now can leverage this FedRAMP P-ATO as a baseline for their own authorizations and look to the JAB for centralized Continuous Monitoring reporting and updates. In a significant enhancement for our partners that build their solutions on the AWS US East/West Region, they can now achieve FedRAMP JAB P-ATOs of their own for their Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Software as a Service (SaaS) offerings.

In line with FedRAMP security requirements, our independent FedRAMP assessment was completed in partnership with a FedRAMP accredited Third Party Assessment Organization (3PAO) on our technical, management, and operational security controls to validate that they meet or exceed FedRAMP’s Moderate baseline requirements. Effective immediately, you can begin leveraging this P-ATO for the following 20 services in the AWS US East/West Region:

  • Amazon Aurora (MySQL)*
  • Amazon CloudWatch Logs*
  • Amazon DynamoDB
  • Amazon Elastic Block Store
  • Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud
  • Amazon EMR*
  • Amazon Glacier*
  • Amazon Kinesis Streams*
  • Amazon RDS (MySQL, Oracle, Postgres*)
  • Amazon Redshift
  • Amazon Simple Notification Service*
  • Amazon Simple Queue Service*
  • Amazon Simple Storage Service
  • Amazon Simple Workflow Service*
  • Amazon Virtual Private Cloud
  • AWS CloudFormation*
  • AWS CloudTrail*
  • AWS Identity and Access Management
  • AWS Key Management Service
  • Elastic Load Balancing

* Services with first-time FedRAMP Moderate authorizations

We continue to work with the FedRAMP Project Management Office (PMO), other regulatory and compliance bodies, and our customers and partners to ensure that we are raising the bar on our customers’ security and compliance needs.

To learn more about how AWS helps customers meet their security and compliance requirements, see the AWS Compliance website. To learn about what other public sector customers are doing on AWS, see our Government, Education, and Nonprofits Case Studies and Customer Success Stories. To review the public posting of our FedRAMP authorizations, see the FedRAMP Marketplace.

– Chris Gile, Senior Manager, AWS Public Sector Risk and Compliance

AWS EU (London) Region Selected to Provide Services to Support UK Law Enforcement Customers

Post Syndicated from Oliver Bell original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/aws-eu-london-region-selected-to-provide-services-to-support-uk-law-enforcement-customers/

AWS Compliance image

The AWS EU (London) Region has been selected to provide services to support UK law enforcement customers. This decision followed an assessment by Home Office Digital, Data and Technology supported by their colleagues in the National Policing Information Risk Management Team (NPIRMT) to determine the region’s suitability for addressing their specific needs.

The security, privacy, and protection of AWS customers are AWS’s first priority. We are committed to supporting Public Sector, Blue Light, Justice, and Public Safety organizations. We hope that other organizations in these sectors will now be encouraged to consider AWS services when addressing their own requirements, including the challenge of providing modern, scalable technologies that can meet their ever-evolving business demands.

– Oliver