Tag Archives: raspberry pi

Raspberry Pi robot prompts proper handwashing

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-robot-prompts-proper-handwashing/

Amol Dwshmukh from the University of Glasgow got in touch with us about a social robot designed to influence young people’s handwashing behaviour, which the design team piloted in a rural school in Kerala, India.

In the pilot study, the hand-shaped Pepe robot motivated a 40% increase in the quality and levels of handwashing. It was designed by AMMACHI Labs and University of Glasgow researchers, with a Raspberry Pi serving as its brain and powering the screens that make up its mouth and eyes.

How does Pepe do it?

The robot is very easy to attach to the wall next to a handwashing station and automatically detects approaching people. Using AI software, it encourages, monitors, and gives verbal feedback to children on their handwashing, all in a fun and engaging way.

Amol thinks the success of the robot was due to its eye movements, as people change their behaviour when they know they are being observed. A screen displaying a graphical mouth also meant the robot could show it was happy when the children washed their hands correctly; positive feedback such as this promotes learning new skills.

Amol’s team started work on this idea last year, and they were keen to test the Pepe robot with a group of people who had never been exposed to social robots before. They presented their smiling hand-face hybrid creation at the IEEE International Conference on Robot & Human Interactive Communication (see photo below). And now that hand washing has become more important than ever due to coronavirus, the project is getting mainstream media attention as well.

Photo borrowed from the official conference gallery

What’s next?

The team is now planning to improve Pepe’s autonomous intelligence and scale up the intervention across more schools through the Embracing the World network.

Pepe had a promising trial run, as shown by these stats from the University of Glasgow’s story on the pilot study:

  • More than 90% of the students liked the robot and said they would like to see Pepe again after school vacation.
  • 67% of the respondents thought the robot was male, while 33% thought it was female, mostly attributing to the robot’s voice as the reason
  • 60% said it was younger than them, feeling Pepe was like a younger brother or sister, while 33% thought it was older, and 7% perceived the robot to be of the same age
  • 72% of the students thought Pepe was alive, largely due to its ability to talk

The post Raspberry Pi robot prompts proper handwashing appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Raspberry Pi listening posts ‘hear’ the Borneo rainforest

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-listening-posts-hear-the-borneo-rainforest/

These award-winning, solar-powered audio recorders, built on Raspberry Pi, have been installed in the Borneo rainforest so researchers can listen to the local ecosystem 24/7. The health of a forest ecosystem can often be gaged according to how much noise it creates, as this signals how many species are around.

And you can listen to the rainforest too! The SAFE Acoustics website, funded by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), streams audio from recorders placed around a region of the Bornean rainforest in Southeast Asia. Visitors can listen to live audio or skip back through the day’s recording, for example to listen to the dawn chorus.

Listen in on the Imperial College podcast

What’s inside?

We borrowed this image of the flux tower from Sarab Sethi’s site

The device records data in the field and uploads it to a central server continuously and robustly over long time-periods. And it was built for around $305.

Here’s all the code for the platform, on GitHub.

The 12V-to-5V micro USB converter to the power socket of the Anker USB hub, which is connected to Raspberry Pi.

The Imperial College London team behind the project has provided really good step-by-step photo instructions for anyone interested in the fine details.

Here’s the full set up in the field. The Raspberry Pi-powered brains of the kit are safely inside the green box

The recorders have been installed by Imperial College London researchers as part of the SAFE Project – one of the largest ecological experiments in the world.

Screenshot of the SAFE Project website

Dr Sarab Sethi designed the audio recorders with Dr Lorenzo Picinali. They wanted to quantify the changes in rainforest soundscape as land use changes, for example when forests are logged. Sarab is currently working on algorithms to analyse the gathered data with Dr Nick Jones from the Department of Mathematics.

The lovely cross-disciplinary research team based at Imperial College London

Let the creators of the project tell you more on the Imperial College London website.

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Rotary encoders: Raise a Glitch Storm | Hackspace 34

Post Syndicated from Ben Everard original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/rotary-encoders-raise-a-glitch-storm-hackspace-34/

A Glitch Storm is an explosive torrent of musical rhythms and sound, all generated from a single line of code. In theory, you can’t do this with a Raspberry Pi running Python – in this month’s new issue, out now, the HackSpace magazine team lovingly acquired a tutorial from The Mag Pi team to throw theory out the window and show you how.

What is a Glitch Storm

A Glitch Storm is a user-influenceable version of bytebeat music. We love definitions like that here at the Bakery: something you have never heard of is simple a development of something else you have never heard of. Bytebeat music was at the heart of the old Commodore 64 demo scene, a competition to see who could produce the most impressive graphs and music in a very limited number of bytes. This was revived/rediscovered and christened by Viznut, aka Ville-Matias Heikkilä, in 2011. And then JC Ureña of the ‘spherical sound society’ converted the concept into the interactive Glitch Storm.

Figure 1: Schematic for the sound-generating circuit

So what is it?

Most random music generators work on the level of notes; that is, notes are chosen one at a time and then played, like our Fractal Music project in The MagPi #66. However, with bytebeat music, an algorithm generates the actual samples levels that make up the sound. This algorithm performs bitwise operations on a tick variable that increments with each sample. Depending on the algorithm used, this may or may not produce something musically interesting. Often, the samples produced exhibit a fractal structure, which is itself similar on many levels, thus providing both the notes and structure.

Enter the ‘Glitch Storm’

With a Glitch Storm, three user-controlled variables – a, b, and c – can be added to this algorithm, allowing the results to be fine-tuned. In the ‘Algorithms’ box, you can see that the bytebeat algorithms simply run; they all repeat after a certain time, but this time can be long, in the order of hours for some. A Glitch Storm algorithm, on the other hand, contains variables that a user can change in real-time while the sample is playing. This exactly what we can do with rotary encoders, without having the algorithm interrupted by checking the state of them all the time.

Figure 2: Schematic for the control box

What hardware?

In order to produce music like this on the Raspberry Pi, we need some extra hardware to generate the sound samples, and also a bunch of rotary encoders to control things. The samples are produced by using a 12-bit A/D converter connected to one of the SPI ports. The schematic of this is shown in Figure 1. The clock rate for the transfer of data to this can be controlled and provides a simple way of controlling, to some extent, the sample rate of the sound. Figure 2 shows the wiring diagram of the five rotary encoders we used.

Making the hardware

The hardware comes as two parts: the D/A converter and associated audio components. These are built on a board that hangs off Raspberry Pi’s GPIO pins. Also on this board is a socket that carries the wires to the control box. We used an IDC (insulation displacement connector) to connect between the board and the box, as we wanted the D/A connection wires to be as short as possible because they carry a high frequency signal. We used a pentagonal box just for fun, with a control in each corner, but the box shape is not important here.

Figure 3: Front physical layout of the interface board

Construction

The board is built on a 20-row by 24-hole piece of stripboard. Figure 3 and Figure 4 show the physical layout for the front and back of the board. The hole number 5 on row 4 is enlarged to 2.5mm and a new hole is drilled between rows 1 and 2 to accommodate the audio jack socket. A 40-way surface-mount socket connector is soldered to the back of the board, and a 20-way socket is soldered to the front. You could miss this out and wire the 20-way ribbon cable direct to the holes in these positions if you want to economise.

Figure 4: Rear physical layout of the interface board

Further construction notes

Note: as always, the physical layout diagram shows where the wires go, not necessarily the route they will take. Here, we don’t want wires crossing the 20-way connector, so the upper four wires use 30AWG Kynar wire to pop under the connector and out through a track hole, without soldering, on the other side. When putting the 20-way IDC pin connector on the ribbon cable, make sure the red end connector wire is connected to the pin next to the downward-pointing triangle on the pin connector. Figure 5 shows a photograph of the control box wiring

Figure 5: Wiring of the control board

Testing the D/A

The live_byte_beat.py listing on GitHub is a minimal program for trying out a bytebeat algorithm. It will play until stopped by pressing CTRL+C. The variable v holds the value of the sample, which is then transferred to the D/A over SPI in two bytes. The format of these two bytes is shown in Figure 6, along with how we have to manipulate v to achieve an 8-bit or 12-bit sample output. Note that all algorithms were designed for an 8-bit sample size, and using 12 bits is a free bonus here: it does sound radically different, and not always in a good way.

The main software

The main software for this project is on our GitHub page, and contains 24 Pythonised algorithms. The knobs control the user variables as well as the sample rate and what algorithm to use. You can add extra algorithms, but if you are searching online for them, you will find they are written in C. There are two major differences you need to note when converting from C to Python. The first is the ternary operation which in C is a question mark, and the second is the modulus operator with a percent sign. See the notes that accompany the main code about these.

Figure 6: How to program the registers in the D/A converter

Why does this work?

There are a few reasons why you would not expect this to work on a Raspberry Pi in Python. The most obvious being that of the interruptions made by the operating system, regularly interrupting the flow of output samples. Well, it turns out that this is not as bad as you might fear, and the extra ‘noise’ this causes is at a low level and is masked by the glitchy nature of the sound. As Python is an interpreted language, it is just about fast enough to give an adequate sample rate on a Raspberry Pi 4.

Make some noise

You can now explore the wide range of algorithms for generating a Glitch Storm and interact with the sound. On our GitHub page there’s a list of useful links allowing you to explore what others have done so far. For a sneak preview of the bytebeat type of sound, visit magpi.cc/bytebeatdemo; you can even add your own algorithms here. For interaction, however, there’s no substitute for having your own hardware. The best settings are often found by making small adjustments and listening to the long-term effects – some algorithms surprise you about a minute or two into a sequence by changing dramatically.

Get HackSpace magazine issue 34 — out today

HackSpace magazine issue 34: on sale now!

HackSpace magazine is out now, available in print from the Raspberry Pi Press online store, your local newsagents, and the Raspberry Pi Store, Cambridge.

You can also download the directly from PDF from the HackSpace magazine website.

Subscribers to HackSpace for 12 months to get a free Adafruit Circuit Playground, or choose from one of our other subscription offers, including this amazing limited-time offer of three issues and a book for only £10!

If you liked this project, it was first featured in The MagPi Magazine. Download the latest issue for free or subscribe here.

The post Rotary encoders: Raise a Glitch Storm | Hackspace 34 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

International Space Station Tracker | The MagPi 96

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/international-space-station-tracker-the-magpi-96/

Fancy tracking the ISS’s trajectory? All you need is a Raspberry Pi, an e-paper display, an enclosure, and a little Python code. Nicola King looks to the skies

The e-paper display mid-refresh. It takes about three seconds to refresh, but it’s fast enough for this kind of project

Standing on his balcony one sunny evening, the perfect conditions enabled California-based astronomy enthusiast Sridhar Rajagopal to spot the International Space Station speeding by, and the seeds of an idea were duly sown. Having worked on several projects using tri-colour e-paper (aka e-ink) displays, which he likes for their “aesthetics and low-to-no-power consumption”, he thought that developing a way of tracking the ISS using such a display would be a perfect project to undertake.

“After a bit of searching, I was able to find an open API to get the ISS location at any given point in time,” explains Sridhar. I also knew I wouldn’t have to worry about the data changing several times per second or even per minute. Even though the ISS is wicked fast (16 orbits in a day!), this would still be well within the refresh capabilities of the e-paper display.”

The ISS location data is obtained using the Open Notify API – visit magpi.cc/isslocation to see its current position

Station location

His ISS Tracker works by obtaining the ISS location from the Open Notify API every 30 seconds. It appends this data point to a list, so older data is available. “I don’t currently log the data to file, but it would be very easy to add this functionality,” says Sridhar. “Once I have appended the data to the list, I call the drawISS method of my Display class with the positions array, to render the world map and ISS trajectory and current location. The world map gets rendered to one PIL image, and the ISS location and trajectory get rendered to another PIL image.”

The project code is written in Python and can be found on Sridhar’s GitHub
page: magpi.cc/isstrackercode

Each latitude/longitude position is mapped to the corresponding XY co-ordinate. The last position in the array (the latest position) gets rendered as the ISS icon to show its current position. “Every 30th data point gets rendered as a rectangle, and every other data point gets rendered as a tiny circle,” adds Sridhar.

From there, the images are then simply passed into the e-paper library’s display method; one image is rendered in black, and the other image in red.

Track… star

Little wonder that the response received from friends, family, and the wider maker community has been extremely positive, as Sridhar shares: “The first feedback was from my non-techie wife who love-love-loved the idea of displaying the ISS location and trajectory on the e-paper display. She gave valuable input on the aesthetics of the data visualisation.”

Software engineer turned hardwarehacking enthusiast and entrepreneur, Sridhar Rajagopal is the founder of Upbeat Labs and creator of ProtoStax – a maker-friendly stackable, modular,
and extensible enclosure system.

In addition, he tells us that other makers have contributed suggestions for improvements. “JP, a Hackster community user […] added information to make the Python code a service and have it launch on bootup. I had him contribute his changes to my GitHub repository – I was thrilled about the community involvement!”

Housed in a versatile, transparent ProtoStax enclosure designed by Sridhar, the end result is an elegant way of showing the current position and trajectory of the ISS as it hurtles around the Earth at 7.6 km/s. Why not have a go at making your own display so you know when to look out for the space station whizzing across the night sky? It really is an awesome sight.

Get The MagPi magazine issue 96 — out today

The MagPi magazine is out now, available in print from the Raspberry Pi Press online store, your local newsagents, and the Raspberry Pi Store, Cambridge.

You can also download the directly from PDF from the MagPi magazine website.

Subscribers to the MagPi for 12 months to get a free Adafruit Circuit Playground, or choose from one of our other subscription offers, including this amazing limited-time offer of three issues and a book for only £10!

The post International Space Station Tracker | The MagPi 96 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Auto-blow bubbles with a Raspberry Pi-powered froggy

Post Syndicated from Ashley Whittaker original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/auto-blow-bubbles-with-a-raspberry-pi-powered-froggy/

8 Bits and a Byte created this automatic bubble machine, which is powered and controlled by a Raspberry Pi and can be switched on via the internet by fans of robots and/or bubbles.

They chose a froggy-shaped bubble machine, but you can repurpose whichever type you desire; it’s just easier to adapt a model running on two AA batteries.

Raspberry Pi connected to the relay module

Before the refurb, 8 Bits and a Byte’s battery-powered bubble machine was controlled by a manual switch, which turned the motor on and off inside the frog. If you wanted to watch the motor make the frog burp out bubbles, you needed to flick this switch yourself.

After dissecting their plastic amphibian friend, 8 Bits and a Byte hooked up its motor to Raspberry Pi using a relay module. They point to this useful walkthrough for help with connecting a relay module to Raspberry Pi’s GPIO pins.

Now the motor inside the frog can be turned on and off with the power of code. And you can become controller of bubbles by logging in here and commanding the Raspberry Pi to switch on.

A screenshot of the now automated frog in situ as seen on the remo dot tv website

To let the internet’s bubble fans see the fruits of their one-click labour, 8 Bits and a Byte set up a Raspberry Pi Camera Module and connected their build to robot streaming platform remo.tv.

Bubble soap being poured into the plastic frog's mouth
Don’t forget your bubble soap!

Kit list:

The only remaining question is: what’s the best bubble soap recipe?

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Watch wildlife with a Raspberry Pi nature camera| Hackspace 33

Post Syndicated from Rosie Hattersley original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/watch-wildlife-with-a-raspberry-pi-nature-camera-hackspace-33/

The past few months have given us ample opportunity to stare at the creatures that reside outside. In issue 33 of Hackspace Magazine, out today, Rosie Hattersley looks at ways to track them.

It’s been a remarkable spring and early summer, and not just because many of us have had more time than usual to be able to appreciate our surroundings. The weather has been mild, the skies clear, and pollution levels low. As a result, it ought to be a bumper year for plants and wildlife. Unfortunately, the lockdown limited opportunities for embracing unexpectedly good weather while simultaneously making us more aware of the wildlife on our doorsteps.

“It’s a great time to take a fresh look at the world around us”

If you’re the outdoorsy type who likes to get out and stare intently at feathered friends from the comfort of a large shed on the edge of a lagoon, you may have spent the past few months getting to know suburban birds during your exercise walks, rather than ticking off unusual species. As things finally open up, it’s a great time to take a fresh look at the world around us, and some of the projects focused on the creatures we share it with.

Make your own nature cam

Equipped with a Raspberry Pi connected to a camera and USB power bank, we are able to spy on the wildlife in our garden. The Raspberry Pi Camera Module V2 is a good option here (it’s less intrusive than the newer High Quality Camera, though that would make a superb critter-cam). It’s important not to disturb wildlife with lighting, so use an infrared module, such as the NoIR Camera Module, if you want to snap evening or night-time wildlife activity. Connect the Camera Module to the Camera port on Raspberry Pi using the cable provided, then gently pull up the edges of the port’s plastic clip and insert the ribbon cable. Push the clip back into place and the Camera Module will remain attached. Try our ‘Getting started with the Raspberry Pi Camera Module‘.

A Raspberry Pi plus camera is a great solution for web-enabled snapping

Set up your Raspberry Pi and let it perform any OS updates needed. (The Raspberry Pi Imager tool can help)

You’ll need a keyboard and mouse to set up the Raspberry Pi, but you can disconnect them at the end. Insert the updated microSD card and use a regular power supply to start it up (keep your power bank on charge separately while you set things up). Go through the Raspberry Pi setup, making sure you change the default password (since it will be accessible to anyone), and connect to your wireless network. It helps if you can access this network from the garden.

Turn on the interface for the camera, and enable SSH and VNC so you can access Raspberry Pi OS remotely when it’s sitting out in the garden. To do this, open Menu > Preferences > Raspberry Pi Configuration and click on Interface, then set Camera, SSH, and VNC to Enabled (see this documentation). Click Yes when advised that a reboot is needed. 

Next, test the camera. Open a terminal window and enter:

raspistill -o Desktop/image.jpg

A preview window will appear. After a few moments, it will save an image to the Desktop. Double-click the image.jpg file to open it.

You can use Python to take pictures and shoot video. This is handy if you want to create a time-lapse or video camera. This Raspberry Pi Project guide explains how to control the camera with Python.

You can use a USB power bank to run your Raspberry Pi wildlife camera

Note that recording video will quickly fill up your storage space and drain the battery. A better idea is to leave the preview running and use VNC to view the camera remotely. A neater option is to hook up your Raspberry Pi to YouTube (as explained in this Raspberry Pi infrared bird-box project).

Open a web page and go to studio.youtube.com. Sign in, or set up a YouTube account. You will need to enable permission to live-stream. This involves providing YouTube with your phone number. Click Settings, Channel, and ‘Feature eligibility’, expand ‘Features that require phone verification’, and click ‘Verify phone number’. Type in your phone number, then enter the code that YouTube sends you as a text message. For security reasons, it will take 24 hours for YouTube to activate this feature on your account.

Get your key and add to terminal

On the left-hand side of the screen you should see a menu with the My Channel option available:

In the middle of the screen you should see the Video Manager option. On the left you should see a Live Streaming option. Look for and select the ‘Stream now BETA’ option. 

Scroll down to the bottom of the page and you should see the ENCODER SETUP option.

Here there is a Server URL and a Stream name/key. The key is shown as a line of asterisks, until you click the Reveal button. Keep the key secret and don’t share it online. Copy your Stream Key to a text document (password-protect it, ideally).

Open a terminal window and enter this command (replacing <key goes here> with your own key:

raspivid -o - -t 0 -w 1280 -h 720 -fps 25 -b 4000000 -g 50 | ffmpeg -re -ar 44100 -ac 2 -acodec pcm_s16le -f s16le -ac 2 -i /dev/zero -f h264 -i - -vcodec copy -acodec aac -ab 128k -g 50 -strict experimental -f flv rtmp://a.rtmp.youtube.com/live2/<key goes here>

With this running on Raspberry Pi, you can view the stream from your camera on YouTube on any computer. This infrared bird-box project explains more about the command options. 

You’ll want this script to execute on startup. Create a file for your startup script and add the aforementioned raspivid stream command to it:

sudo nano /etc/init.d/superscript

Make the script executable:

sudo chmod 755 /etc/init.d/superscript

And register the script to run at startup:

sudo update-rc.d superscript defaults

You can see details of scripts running at startup here.

Shut down Raspberry Pi and fit the computer and Camera Module inside a case (if you are using one). Position Raspberry Pi in your garden and power it with the USB power bank. It will connect to your wireless network, and run the YouTube streaming key. 

Navigate to your channel on YouTube at any time to see the action taking place in your garden. 

Get HackSpace magazine issue 33 — out today

HackSpace magazine issue 33: on sale now!

HackSpace magazine is out now, available in print from the Raspberry Pi Press online store, your local newsagents, and the Raspberry Pi Store, Cambridge.

You can also download the directly from PDF from the HackSpace magazine website.

Subscribers to HackSpace for 12 months to get a free Adafruit Circuit Playground, or choose from one of our other subscription offers, including this amazing limited-time offer of three issues and a book for only £10!

The post Watch wildlife with a Raspberry Pi nature camera| Hackspace 33 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Post Syndicated from Jason Farber original https://blog.cloudflare.com/deploying-gateway-using-a-raspberry-pi-dns-over-https-and-pi-hole/

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Like many who are able, I am working remotely and in this post, I describe some of the ways to deploy Cloudflare Gateway directly from your home. Gateway’s DNS filtering protects networks from malware, phishing, ransomware and other security threats. It’s not only for corporate environments – it can be deployed on your browser or laptop to protect your computer or your home WiFi. Below you will learn how to deploy Gateway, including, but not limited to, DNS over HTTPS (DoH) using a Raspberry Pi, Pi-hole and DNSCrypt.

We recently launched Cloudflare Gateway and shortly thereafter, offered it for free until at least September to any company in need. Cloudflare leadership asked the global Solutions Engineering (SE) team, amongst others, to assist with the incoming onboarding calls. As an SE at Cloudflare, our role is to learn new products, such as Gateway, to educate, and to ensure the success of our prospects and customers. We talk to our customers daily, understand the challenges they face and consult on best practices. We were ready to help!

One way we stay on top of all the services that Cloudflare provides, is by using them ourselves. In this blog, I’ll talk about my experience setting up Cloudflare Gateway.

Gateway sits between your users, device or network and the public Internet. Once you setup Cloudflare Gateway, the service will inspect and manage all Internet-bound DNS queries. In simple terms, you point your recursive DNS to Cloudflare and we enforce policies you create, such as activating SafeSearch, an automated filter for adult and offensive content that’s built into popular search engines like Google, Bing, DuckDuckGo, Yandex and others.

There are various methods and locations DNS filtering can be enabled, whether it’s on your entire laptop, each of your individual browsers and devices or your entire home network. With DNS filtering front of mind, including DoH, I explored each model. The model you choose ultimately depends on your objective.

But first, let’s review what DNS and DNS over HTTPS are.

DNS is the protocol used to resolve hostnames (like www.cloudflare.com) into IP addresses so computers can talk to each other. DNS is an unencrypted clear text protocol, meaning that any eavesdropper or machine between the client and DNS server can see the contents of the DNS request. DNS over HTTPS adds security to DNS and encrypt DNS queries using HTTPS (the protocol we use to encrypt the web).

Let’s get started

Navigate to https://dash.teams.cloudflare.com. If you don’t already have an account, the sign up process only takes a few minutes.

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Configuring a Gateway location, shown below, is the first step.

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Conceptually similar to HTTPS traffic, when our edge receives an HTTPS request, we match the incoming SNI header to the correct domain’s configuration (or for plain text HTTP the Host header). And when our edge receives a DNS query, we need a similar mapping to identify the correct configuration. We attempt to match configurations, in this order:

  1. DNS over HTTPS check and lookup based on unique hostname
  2. IPv4 check and lookup based on source IPv4 address
  3. Lookup based on IPv6 destination address

Let’s discuss each option.

DNS over HTTPS

The first attempt to match DNS requests to a location is pointing your traffic to a unique DNS over HTTPS hostname. After you configure your first location, you are given a unique destination IPv6 address and a unique DoH endpoint as shown below. Take note of the hostname as you will need it shortly. I’ll first discuss deploying Gateway in a browser and then to your entire network.

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

DNS over HTTPS is my favorite method for deploying Gateway and securing DNS queries at the same time. Enabling DoH prevents anyone but the DNS server of your choosing from seeing your DNS queries.

Enabling DNS over HTTPS in browsers

By enabling it in a browser, only queries issued in that browser are affected. It’s available in most browsers and there are quite a few tutorials online to show you how to turn it on.

BrowserSupports DoHSupports Custom Alternative ProvidersSupports Custom Servers
ChromeYesYesNo
SafariNoNoNo
EdgeYes**Yes**No**
FirefoxYesYesYes
OperaYes*Yes*No*
BraveYes*Yes*No*
VivaldiYes*Yes*No*

* Chromium based browser. Same support as Chrome
** Most recent version of Edge is built on Chromium

Chromium based browsers

Using Chrome as an example on behalf of all the Chromium-based browsers, enabling DNS over HTTPS is straightforward, but as you can see in the table above, there is one issue: Chrome does not currently support custom servers. So while it is great that a user can protect their DNS queries, they cannot choose the provider, including Gateway.

Here is how to enable DoH in Chromium based browsers:

Navigate to chrome://flags and toggle the beta flag to enabled.

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Firefox

Firefox is the exception to the rule because they support both DNS over HTTPS and the ability to define a custom server. Mozilla provides detailed instructions about how to get started.

Once enabled, navigate to Preferences -> General -> Network Security and select ‘Settings’. Scroll to the section ‘Enable DNS over HTTPS’, select ‘Custom’ and input your Gateway DoH address, as shown below:

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Optionally, you can enable Encrypted SNI (ESNI), which is an IETF draft for encrypting the SNI headers, by toggling the ‘network.security.esni.enabled’ preference in about:config to ‘true’. Read more about how Cloudflare is one of the few providers that supports ESNI by default.

Congratulations, you’ve configured Gateway using DNS over HTTPS! Keep in mind that only queries issued from the configured browser will be secured. Any other device connected to your network such as your mobile devices, gaming platforms, or smart TVs will still use your network’s default DNS server, likely assigned by your ISP.

Configuring Gateway for your entire home or business network

Deploying Gateway at the router level allows you to secure every device on your network without needing to configure each one individually.

Requirements include:

  • Access to your router’s administrative portal
  • A router that supports DHCP forwarding
  • Raspberry Pi with WiFi or Ethernet connectivity

There aren’t any consumer routers on the market that natively support DoH custom servers and likely few that natively support DoH at all. A newer router I purchased, the Netgear R7800, does not support either, but it is one of the most popular routers for flashing dd-wrt or open-wrt, which both support DoH. Unfortunately, neither of these popular firmwares support custom servers.

While it’s rare to find a router that supports DoH out of the box, DoH with custom servers, or has potential to be flashed, it’s common for a router to support DHCP forwarding (dd-wrt and open-wrt both support DHCP forwarding). So, I installed Pi-hole on my Raspberry Pi and used it as my home network’s DNS and DHCP server.

Getting started with Pi-hole and dnscrypt-proxy

If your Raspberry Pi is new and hasn’t been configured yet, follow their guide to get started. (Note: by default, ssh is disabled, so you will need a keyboard and/or mouse to access your box in your terminal.)

Once your Raspberry Pi has been initialized, assign it a static IP address in the same network as your router. I hardcoded my router’s LAN address to 192.168.1.2

Using vim:
sudo vi /etc/dhcpcd.conf

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Restart the service.
sudo /etc/init.d/dhcpcd restart

Check that your static IP is configured correctly.
ip addr show dev eth0

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Now that your Raspberry Pi is configured, we need to install Pi-hole: https://github.com/pi-hole/pi-hole/#one-step-automated-install

I chose to use dnscrypt-proxy as the local service that Pi-hole will use to forward all DNS queries. You can find the latest version here.

To install dnscrypt-proxy on your pi-hole, follow these steps:

wget https://github.com/DNSCrypt/dnscrypt-proxy/releases/download/2.0.39/dnscrypt-proxy-linux_arm-2.0.39.tar.gz
tar -xf dnscrypt-proxy-linux_arm-2.0.39.tar.gz
mv linux-arm dnscrypt-proxy
cd dnscrypt-proxy
cp example-dnscrypt-proxy.toml dnscrypt-proxy.toml

Next step is to build a DoH stamp. A stamp is simply an encoded DNS address that encodes your DoH server and other options.

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

As a reminder, you can find Gateway’s unique DoH address in your location configuration.

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

At the very bottom of your dnscrypt-proxy.toml configuration file, uncomment both lines beneath [static].

  • Change  [static.'myserver'] to [static.'gateway']
  • Replace the default stamp with the one generated above

The static section should look similar to this:

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Also in dnscrypt-proxy.toml configuration file, update the following settings:
server_names = ['gateway']
listen_addresses = ['127.0.0.1:5054']
fallback_resolvers = ['1.1.1.1:53', '1.0.0.1:53']
cache = false

Now we need to install dnscrypt-proxy as a service and configure Pi-hole to point to the listen_addresses defined above.

Install dnscrypt-proxy as a service:
sudo ./dnscrypt-proxy -service install

Start the service:
sudo ./dnscrypt-proxy -service start

You can validate the status of the service by running:
sudo service dnscrypt-proxy status or netstat -an | grep 5054:

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole
Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Also, confirm the upstream is working by querying localhost on port 5054:
dig www.cloudflare.com  -p 5054 @127.0.0.1

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

You will see a matching request in the Gateway query log (note the timestamps match):

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Configuring DNS and DHCP in the Pi-hole administrative console

Open your browser and navigate to the Pi-hole’s administrative console. In my case, it’s http://192.168.1.6/admin

Go to Settings -> DNS to modify the upstream DNS provider, which we’ve just configured to be dnscrypt-proxy.

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Change the upstream server to 127.0.0.1#5054 and hit save. If you want to deploy redundancy, add in a secondary address in Custom 2, such as 1.1.1.1 or Custom 3, such as your IPv6 destination address.

Almost done!

In Settings->DHCP, enable the DHCP server:

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Hit save.

At this point, your Pi-hole server is running in isolation and we need to deploy it to your network. The simplest way to ensure your Pi-hole is being used exclusively by every device is to use your Pi-hole as both a DNS server and a DHCP server. I’ve found that routers behave oddly if you outsource DNS but not DHCP, so I outsource both.

After I enabled the DHCP server on the Pi-hole, I set the router’s configuration to DHCP forwarding and defined the Pi-hole static address:

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

After applying the routers configuration, I confirmed it was working properly by forgetting the network in my network settings and re-joining. This results in a new IPv4 address (from our new DHCP server) and if all goes well, a new DNS server (the IP of Pi-hole).

Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole
Deploying Gateway using a Raspberry Pi, DNS over HTTPS and Pi-hole

Done!

Now that our entire network is using Gateway, we can configure Gateway Policies to secure our DNS queries!

IPv4 check and lookup based on source IPv4 address

For this method to work properly, Gateway requires that your network has a static IPv4 address. If your IP address does not change, then this is the quickest solution (but still does not prevent third-parties from seeing what domains you are going to). However, if you are configuring Gateway in your home, like I am, and you don’t explicitly pay for this service, then most likely you have a dynamic IP address. These addresses will always change when your router restarts, intentionally or not.

Lookup based on IPv6 destination address

Another option for matching requests in Gateway is to configure your DNS server to point to a unique IPv6 address provided to you by Cloudflare. Any DNS query pointed to this address will be matched properly on our edge.

This might be a good option if you want to use Cloudflare Gateway on your entire laptop by setting your local DNS resolution to this address. However, if your home router or ISP does not support IPv6, DNS resolution won’t work.

Conclusion

In this blog post, we’ve discussed the various ways Gateway can be deployed and how DNS over HTTPS is one of the next big Internet privacy improvements. Deploying Gateway can be done on a per device basis, on your router or even with a Raspberry Pi.

Build your own weather station with our new guide!

Post Syndicated from Richard Hayler original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/build-your-own-weather-station/

One of the most common enquiries I receive at Pi Towers is “How can I get my hands on a Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station?” Now the answer is: “Why not build your own version using our guide?”

Build Your Own weather station kit assembled

Tadaaaa! The BYO weather station fully assembled.

Our Oracle Weather Station

In 2016 we sent out nearly 1000 Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station kits to schools from around the world who had applied to be part of our weather station programme. In the original kit was a special HAT that allows the Pi to collect weather data with a set of sensors.

The original Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station HAT – Build Your Own Raspberry Pi weather station

The original Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station HAT

We designed the HAT to enable students to create their own weather stations and mount them at their schools. As part of the programme, we also provide an ever-growing range of supporting resources. We’ve seen Oracle Weather Stations in great locations with a huge differences in climate, and they’ve even recorded the effects of a solar eclipse.

Our new BYO weather station guide

We only had a single batch of HATs made, and unfortunately we’ve given nearly* all the Weather Station kits away. Not only are the kits really popular, we also receive lots of questions about how to add extra sensors or how to take more precise measurements of a particular weather phenomenon. So today, to satisfy your demand for a hackable weather station, we’re launching our Build your own weather station guide!

Build Your Own Raspberry Pi weather station

Fun with meteorological experiments!

Our guide suggests the use of many of the sensors from the Oracle Weather Station kit, so can build a station that’s as close as possible to the original. As you know, the Raspberry Pi is incredibly versatile, and we’ve made it easy to hack the design in case you want to use different sensors.

Many other tutorials for Pi-powered weather stations don’t explain how the various sensors work or how to store your data. Ours goes into more detail. It shows you how to put together a breadboard prototype, it describes how to write Python code to take readings in different ways, and it guides you through recording these readings in a database.

Build Your Own Raspberry Pi weather station on a breadboard

There’s also a section on how to make your station weatherproof. And in case you want to move past the breadboard stage, we also help you with that. The guide shows you how to solder together all the components, similar to the original Oracle Weather Station HAT.

Who should try this build

We think this is a great project to tackle at home, at a STEM club, Scout group, or CoderDojo, and we’re sure that many of you will be chomping at the bit to get started. Before you do, please note that we’ve designed the build to be as straight-forward as possible, but it’s still fairly advanced both in terms of electronics and programming. You should read through the whole guide before purchasing any components.

Build Your Own Raspberry Pi weather station – components

The sensors and components we’re suggesting balance cost, accuracy, and easy of use. Depending on what you want to use your station for, you may wish to use different components. Similarly, the final soldered design in the guide may not be the most elegant, but we think it is achievable for someone with modest soldering experience and basic equipment.

You can build a functioning weather station without soldering with our guide, but the build will be more durable if you do solder it. If you’ve never tried soldering before, that’s OK: we have a Getting started with soldering resource plus video tutorial that will walk you through how it works step by step.

Prototyping HAT for Raspberry Pi weather station sensors

For those of you who are more experienced makers, there are plenty of different ways to put the final build together. We always like to hear about alternative builds, so please post your designs in the Weather Station forum.

Our plans for the guide

Our next step is publishing supplementary guides for adding extra functionality to your weather station. We’d love to hear which enhancements you would most like to see! Our current ideas under development include adding a webcam, making a tweeting weather station, adding a light/UV meter, and incorporating a lightning sensor. Let us know which of these is your favourite, or suggest your own amazing ideas in the comments!

*We do have a very small number of kits reserved for interesting projects or locations: a particularly cool experiment, a novel idea for how the Oracle Weather Station could be used, or places with specific weather phenomena. If have such a project in mind, please send a brief outline to [email protected], and we’ll consider how we might be able to help you.

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Protecting coral reefs with Nemo-Pi, the underwater monitor

Post Syndicated from Janina Ander original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/coral-reefs-nemo-pi/

The German charity Save Nemo works to protect coral reefs, and they are developing Nemo-Pi, an underwater “weather station” that monitors ocean conditions. Right now, you can vote for Save Nemo in the Google.org Impact Challenge.

Nemo-Pi — Save Nemo

Save Nemo

The organisation says there are two major threats to coral reefs: divers, and climate change. To make diving saver for reefs, Save Nemo installs buoy anchor points where diving tour boats can anchor without damaging corals in the process.

reef damaged by anchor
boat anchored at buoy

In addition, they provide dos and don’ts for how to behave on a reef dive.

The Nemo-Pi

To monitor the effects of climate change, and to help divers decide whether conditions are right at a reef while they’re still on shore, Save Nemo is also in the process of perfecting Nemo-Pi.

Nemo-Pi schematic — Nemo-Pi — Save Nemo

This Raspberry Pi-powered device is made up of a buoy, a solar panel, a GPS device, a Pi, and an array of sensors. Nemo-Pi measures water conditions such as current, visibility, temperature, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide concentrations, and pH. It also uploads its readings live to a public webserver.

Inside the Nemo-Pi device — Save Nemo
Inside the Nemo-Pi device — Save Nemo
Inside the Nemo-Pi device — Save Nemo

The Save Nemo team is currently doing long-term tests of Nemo-Pi off the coast of Thailand and Indonesia. They are also working on improving the device’s power consumption and durability, and testing prototypes with the Raspberry Pi Zero W.

web dashboard — Nemo-Pi — Save Nemo

The web dashboard showing live Nemo-Pi data

Long-term goals

Save Nemo aims to install a network of Nemo-Pis at shallow reefs (up to 60 metres deep) in South East Asia. Then diving tour companies can check the live data online and decide day-to-day whether tours are feasible. This will lower the impact of humans on reefs and help the local flora and fauna survive.

Coral reefs with fishes

A healthy coral reef

Nemo-Pi data may also be useful for groups lobbying for reef conservation, and for scientists and activists who want to shine a spotlight on the awful effects of climate change on sea life, such as coral bleaching caused by rising water temperatures.

Bleached coral

A bleached coral reef

Vote now for Save Nemo

If you want to help Save Nemo in their mission today, vote for them to win the Google.org Impact Challenge:

  1. Head to the voting web page
  2. Click “Abstimmen” in the footer of the page to vote
  3. Click “JA” in the footer to confirm

Voting is open until 6 June. You can also follow Save Nemo on Facebook or Twitter. We think this organisation is doing valuable work, and that their projects could be expanded to reefs across the globe. It’s fantastic to see the Raspberry Pi being used to help protect ocean life.

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Amazon SageMaker Updates – Tokyo Region, CloudFormation, Chainer, and GreenGrass ML

Post Syndicated from Randall Hunt original https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/sagemaker-tokyo-summit-2018/

Today, at the AWS Summit in Tokyo we announced a number of updates and new features for Amazon SageMaker. Starting today, SageMaker is available in Asia Pacific (Tokyo)! SageMaker also now supports CloudFormation. A new machine learning framework, Chainer, is now available in the SageMaker Python SDK, in addition to MXNet and Tensorflow. Finally, support for running Chainer models on several devices was added to AWS Greengrass Machine Learning.

Amazon SageMaker Chainer Estimator


Chainer is a popular, flexible, and intuitive deep learning framework. Chainer networks work on a “Define-by-Run” scheme, where the network topology is defined dynamically via forward computation. This is in contrast to many other frameworks which work on a “Define-and-Run” scheme where the topology of the network is defined separately from the data. A lot of developers enjoy the Chainer scheme since it allows them to write their networks with native python constructs and tools.

Luckily, using Chainer with SageMaker is just as easy as using a TensorFlow or MXNet estimator. In fact, it might even be a bit easier since it’s likely you can take your existing scripts and use them to train on SageMaker with very few modifications. With TensorFlow or MXNet users have to implement a train function with a particular signature. With Chainer your scripts can be a little bit more portable as you can simply read from a few environment variables like SM_MODEL_DIR, SM_NUM_GPUS, and others. We can wrap our existing script in a if __name__ == '__main__': guard and invoke it locally or on sagemaker.


import argparse
import os

if __name__ =='__main__':

    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()

    # hyperparameters sent by the client are passed as command-line arguments to the script.
    parser.add_argument('--epochs', type=int, default=10)
    parser.add_argument('--batch-size', type=int, default=64)
    parser.add_argument('--learning-rate', type=float, default=0.05)

    # Data, model, and output directories
    parser.add_argument('--output-data-dir', type=str, default=os.environ['SM_OUTPUT_DATA_DIR'])
    parser.add_argument('--model-dir', type=str, default=os.environ['SM_MODEL_DIR'])
    parser.add_argument('--train', type=str, default=os.environ['SM_CHANNEL_TRAIN'])
    parser.add_argument('--test', type=str, default=os.environ['SM_CHANNEL_TEST'])

    args, _ = parser.parse_known_args()

    # ... load from args.train and args.test, train a model, write model to args.model_dir.

Then, we can run that script locally or use the SageMaker Python SDK to launch it on some GPU instances in SageMaker. The hyperparameters will get passed in to the script as CLI commands and the environment variables above will be autopopulated. When we call fit the input channels we pass will be populated in the SM_CHANNEL_* environment variables.


from sagemaker.chainer.estimator import Chainer
# Create my estimator
chainer_estimator = Chainer(
    entry_point='example.py',
    train_instance_count=1,
    train_instance_type='ml.p3.2xlarge',
    hyperparameters={'epochs': 10, 'batch-size': 64}
)
# Train my estimator
chainer_estimator.fit({'train': train_input, 'test': test_input})

# Deploy my estimator to a SageMaker Endpoint and get a Predictor
predictor = chainer_estimator.deploy(
    instance_type="ml.m4.xlarge",
    initial_instance_count=1
)

Now, instead of bringing your own docker container for training and hosting with Chainer, you can just maintain your script. You can see the full sagemaker-chainer-containers on github. One of my favorite features of the new container is built-in chainermn for easy multi-node distribution of your chainer training jobs.

There’s a lot more documentation and information available in both the README and the example notebooks.

AWS GreenGrass ML with Chainer

AWS GreenGrass ML now includes a pre-built Chainer package for all devices powered by Intel Atom, NVIDIA Jetson, TX2, and Raspberry Pi. So, now GreenGrass ML provides pre-built packages for TensorFlow, Apache MXNet, and Chainer! You can train your models on SageMaker then easily deploy it to any GreenGrass-enabled device using GreenGrass ML.

JAWS UG

I want to give a quick shout out to all of our wonderful and inspirational friends in the JAWS UG who attended the AWS Summit in Tokyo today. I’ve very much enjoyed seeing your pictures of the summit. Thanks for making Japan an amazing place for AWS developers! I can’t wait to visit again and meet with all of you.

Randall

MagPi 70: Home automation with Raspberry Pi

Post Syndicated from Rob Zwetsloot original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-70-home-automation/

Hey folks, Rob here! It’s the last Thursday of the month, and that means it’s time for a brand-new The MagPi. Issue 70 is all about home automation using your favourite microcomputer, the Raspberry Pi.

Cover of The MagPi 70 — Raspberry Pi home automation and tech upcycling

Home automation in this month’s The MagPi!

Raspberry Pi home automation

We think home automation is an excellent use of the Raspberry Pi, hiding it around your house and letting it power your lights and doorbells and…fish tanks? We show you how to do all of that, and give you some excellent tips on how to add even more automation to your home in our ten-page cover feature.

Upcycle your life

Our other big feature this issue covers upcycling, the hot trend of taking old electronics and making them better than new with some custom code and a tactically placed Raspberry Pi. For this feature, we had a chat with Martin Mander, upcycler extraordinaire, to find out his top tips for hacking your old hardware.

Article on upcycling in The MagPi 70 — Raspberry Pi home automation and tech upcycling

Upcycling is a lot of fun

But wait, there’s more!

If for some reason you want even more content, you’re in luck! We have some fun tutorials for you to try, like creating a theremin and turning a Babbage into an IoT nanny cam. We also continue our quest to make a video game in C++. Our project showcase is headlined by the Teslonda on page 28, a Honda/Tesla car hybrid that is just wonderful.

Diddyborg V2 review in The MagPi 70 — Raspberry Pi home automation and tech upcycling

We review PiBorg’s latest robot

All this comes with our definitive reviews and the community section where we celebrate you, our amazing community! You’re all good beans

Teslonda article in The MagPi 70 — Raspberry Pi home automation and tech upcycling

An amazing, and practical, Raspberry Pi project

Get The MagPi 70

Issue 70 is available today from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. If you live in the US, head over to your local Barnes & Noble or Micro Center in the next few days for a print copy. You can also get the new issue online from our store, or digitally via our Android and iOS apps. And don’t forget, there’s always the free PDF as well.

New subscription offer!

Want to support the Raspberry Pi Foundation and the magazine? We’ve launched a new way to subscribe to the print version of The MagPi: you can now take out a monthly £4 subscription to the magazine, effectively creating a rolling pre-order system that saves you money on each issue.

The MagPi subscription offer — Raspberry Pi home automation and tech upcycling

You can also take out a twelve-month print subscription and get a Pi Zero W plus case and adapter cables absolutely free! This offer does not currently have an end date.

That’s it for today! See you next month.

Animated GIF: a door slides open and Captain Picard emerges hesitantly

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Randomly generated, thermal-printed comics

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/random-comic-strip-generation-vomit-comic-robot/

Python code creates curious, wordless comic strips at random, spewing them from the thermal printer mouth of a laser-cut body reminiscent of Disney Pixar’s WALL-E: meet the Vomit Comic Robot!

The age of the thermal printer!

Thermal printers allow you to instantly print photos, data, and text using a few lines of code, with no need for ink. More and more makers are using this handy, low-maintenance bit of kit for truly creative projects, from Pierre Muth’s tiny PolaPi-Zero camera to the sound-printing Waves project by Eunice Lee, Matthew Zhang, and Bomani McClendon (and our own Secret Santa Babbage).

Vomiting robots

Interaction designer and developer Cadin Batrack, whose background is in game design and interactivity, has built the Vomit Comic Robot, which creates “one-of-a-kind comics on demand by processing hand-drawn images through a custom software algorithm.”

The robot is made up of a Raspberry Pi 3, a USB thermal printer, and a handful of LEDs.

Comic Vomit Robot Cadin Batrack's Raspberry Pi comic-generating thermal printer machine

At the press of a button, Processing code selects one of a set of Cadin’s hand-drawn empty comic grids and then randomly picks images from a library to fill in the gaps.

Vomit Comic Robot Cadin Batrack's Raspberry Pi comic-generating thermal printer machine

Each image is associated with data that allows the code to fit it correctly into the available panels. Cadin says about the concept behing his build:

Although images are selected and placed randomly, the comic panel format suggests relationships between elements. Our minds create a story where there is none in an attempt to explain visuals created by a non-intelligent machine.

The Raspberry Pi saves the final image as a high-resolution PNG file (so that Cadin can sell prints on thick paper via Etsy), and a Python script sends it to be vomited up by the thermal printer.

Comic Vomit Robot Cadin Batrack's Raspberry Pi comic-generating thermal printer machine

For more about the Vomit Comic Robot, check out Cadin’s blog. If you want to recreate it, you can find the info you need in the Imgur album he has put together.

We ❤ cute robots

We have a soft spot for cute robots here at Pi Towers, and of course we make no exception for the Vomit Comic Robot. If, like us, you’re a fan of adorable bots, check out Mira, the tiny interactive robot by Alonso Martinez, and Peeqo, the GIF bot by Abhishek Singh.

Mira Alfonso Martinez Raspberry Pi

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Recording lost seconds with the Augenblick blink camera

Post Syndicated from Alex Bate original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/augenblick-camera/

Warning: a GIF used in today’s blog contains flashing images.

Students at the University of Bremen, Germany, have built a wearable camera that records the seconds of vision lost when you blink. Augenblick uses a Raspberry Pi Zero and Camera Module alongside muscle sensors to record footage whenever you close your eyes, producing a rather disjointed film of the sights you miss out on.

Augenblick blink camera recording using a Raspberry Pi Zero

Blink and you’ll miss it

The average person blinks up to five times a minute, with each blink lasting 0.5 to 0.8 seconds. These half-seconds add up to about 30 minutes a day. What sights are we losing during these minutes? That is the question asked by students Manasse Pinsuwan and René Henrich when they set out to design Augenblick.

Blinking is a highly invasive mechanism for our eyesight. Every day we close our eyes thousands of times without noticing it. Our mind manages to never let us wonder what exactly happens in the moments that we miss.

Capturing lost moments

For Augenblick, the wearer sticks MyoWare Muscle Sensor pads to their face, and these detect the electrical impulses that trigger blinking.

Augenblick blink camera recording using a Raspberry Pi Zero

Two pads are applied over the orbicularis oculi muscle that forms a ring around the eye socket, while the third pad is attached to the cheek as a neutral point.

Biology fact: there are two muscles responsible for blinking. The orbicularis oculi muscle closes the eye, while the levator palpebrae superioris muscle opens it — and yes, they both sound like the names of Harry Potter spells.

The sensor is read 25 times a second. Whenever it detects that the orbicularis oculi is active, the Camera Module records video footage.

Augenblick blink recording using a Raspberry Pi Zero

Pressing a button on the side of the Augenblick glasses set the code running. An LED lights up whenever the camera is recording and also serves to confirm the correct placement of the sensor pads.

Augenblick blink camera recording using a Raspberry Pi Zero

The Pi Zero saves the footage so that it can be stitched together later to form a continuous, if disjointed, film.

Learn more about the Augenblick blink camera

You can find more information on the conception, design, and build process of Augenblick here in German, with a shorter explanation including lots of photos here in English.

And if you’re keen to recreate this project, our free project resource for a wearable Pi Zero time-lapse camera will come in handy as a starting point.

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Project Floofball and more: Pi pet stuff

Post Syndicated from Janina Ander original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/project-floofball-pi-pet-stuff/

It’s a public holiday here today (yes, again). So, while we indulge in the traditional pastime of barbecuing stuff (ourselves, mainly), here’s a little trove of Pi projects that cater for our various furry friends.

Project Floofball

Nicole Horward created Project Floofball for her hamster, Harold. It’s an IoT hamster wheel that uses a Raspberry Pi and a magnetic door sensor to log how far Harold runs.

Project Floofball: an IoT hamster wheel

An IoT Hamsterwheel using a Raspberry Pi and a magnetic door sensor, to see how far my hamster runs.

You can follow Harold’s runs in real time on his ThingSpeak channel, and you’ll find photos of the build on imgur. Nicole’s Python code, as well as her template for the laser-cut enclosure that houses the wiring and LCD display, are available on the hamster wheel’s GitHub repo.

A live-streaming pet feeder

JaganK3 used to work long hours that meant he couldn’t be there to feed his dog on time. He found that he couldn’t buy an automated feeder in India without paying a lot to import one, so he made one himself. It uses a Raspberry Pi to control a motor that turns a dispensing valve in a hopper full of dry food, giving his dog a portion of food at set times.

A transparent cylindrical hopper of dry dog food, with a motor that can turn a dispensing valve at the lower end. The motor is connected to a Raspberry Pi in a plastic case. Hopper, motor, Pi, and wiring are all mounted on a board on the wall.

He also added a web cam for live video streaming, because he could. Find out more in JaganK3’s Instructable for his pet feeder.

Shark laser cat toy

Sam Storino, meanwhile, is using a Raspberry Pi to control a laser-pointer cat toy with a goshdarned SHARK (which is kind of what I’d expect from the guy who made the steampunk-looking cat feeder a few weeks ago). The idea is to keep his cats interested and active within the confines of a compact city apartment.

Raspberry Pi Automatic Cat Laser Pointer Toy

Post with 52 votes and 7004 views. Tagged with cat, shark, lasers, austin powers, raspberry pi; Shared by JeorgeLeatherly. Raspberry Pi Automatic Cat Laser Pointer Toy

If I were a cat, I would definitely be entirely happy with this. Find out more on Sam’s website.

And there’s more

Michel Parreno has written a series of articles to help you monitor and feed your pet with Raspberry Pi.

All of these makers are generous in acknowledging the tutorials and build logs that helped them with their projects. It’s lovely to see the Raspberry Pi and maker community working like this, and I bet their projects will inspire others too.

Now, if you’ll excuse me. I’m late for a barbecue.

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Enchanting images with Inky Lines, a Pi‑powered polargraph

Post Syndicated from Helen Lynn original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/enchanting-images-inky-lines-pi-powered-polargraph/

A hanging plotter, also known as a polar plotter or polargraph, is a machine for drawing images on a vertical surface. It does so by using motors to control the length of two cords that form a V shape, supporting a pen where they meet. We’ve featured one on this blog before: Norbert “HomoFaciens” Heinz’s video is a wonderfully clear introduction to how a polargraph works and what you have to consider when you’re putting one together.

Today, we look at Inky Lines, by John Proudlock. With it, John is creating a series of captivating and beautiful pieces, and with his most recent work, each rendering of an image is unique.

The Inky Lines plotter draws a flock of seagulls in blue ink on white paper. The print head is suspended near the bottom left corner of the image, as the pen inks the wing of a gull

An evolving project

The project isn’t new – John has been working on it for at least a couple of years – but it is constantly evolving. When we first spotted it, John had just implemented code to allow the plotter to produce mesmeric, spiralling patterns.

A blue spiral pattern featuring overlapping "bubbles"
A dense pink spiral pattern, featuring concentric circles and reminiscent of a mandala
A blue spirograph-type pattern formed of large overlapping squares, each offset from its neighbour by a few degrees, producing a four-spiral-armed "galaxy" shape where lines overlap. The plotter's print head is visible in a corner of the image

But we’re skipping ahead. Let’s go back to the beginning.

From pixels to motor movements

John starts by providing an image, usually no more than 100 pixels wide, to a Raspberry Pi. Custom software that he wrote evaluates the darkness of each pixel and selects a pattern of a suitable density to represent it.

The two cords supporting the plotter’s pen are wound around the shafts of two stepper motors, such that the movement of the motors controls the length of the cords: the program next calculates how much each motor must move in order to produce the pattern. The Raspberry Pi passes corresponding instructions to two motor circuits, which transform the signals to a higher voltage and pass them to the stepper motors. These turn by very precise amounts, winding or unwinding the cords and, very slowly, dragging the pen across the paper.

A Raspberry Pi in a case, with a wide flex connected to a GPIO header
The Inky Lines plotter's print head, featuring cardboard and tape, draws an apparently random squiggle
A large area of apparently random pattern drawn by the plotter

John explains,

Suspended in-between the two motors is a print head, made out of a new 3-d modelling material I’ve been prototyping called cardboard. An old coat hanger and some velcro were also used.

(He’s our kind of maker.)

Unique images

The earlier drawings that John made used a repeatable method to render image files as lines on paper. That is, if the machine drew the same image a number of times, each copy would be identical. More recently, though, he has been using a method that yields random movements of the pen:

The pen point is guided around the image, but moves to each new point entirely at random. Up close this looks like a chaotic squiggle, but from a distance of a couple of meters, the human eye (and brain) make order from the chaos and view an infinite number of shades and a smoother, less mechanical image.

An apparently chaotic squiggle

This method means that no matter how many times the polargraph repeats the same image, each copy will be unique.

A gallery of work

Inky Lines’ website and its Instagram feed offer a collection of wonderful pieces John has drawn with his polargraph, and he discusses the different techniques and types of image that he is exploring.

A 3 x 3 grid of varied and colourful images from inkylinespolargraph's Instagram feed

They range from holiday photographs, processed to extract particular features and rendered in silhouette, to portraits, made with a single continuous line that can be several hundred metres long, to generative images spirograph images like those pictured above, created by an algorithm rather than rendered from a source image.

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HackSpace magazine 7: Internet of Everything

Post Syndicated from Andrew Gregory original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/hackspace-magazine-7-internet-of-everything/

We’re usually averse to buzzwords at HackSpace magazine, but not this month: in issue 7, we’re taking a deep dive into the Internet of Things.HackSpace magazine issue 7 cover

Internet of Things (IoT)

To many people, IoT is a shady term used by companies to sell you something you already own, but this time with WiFi; to us, it’s a way to make our builds smarter, more useful, and more connected. In HackSpace magazine #7, you can join us on a tour of the boards that power IoT projects, marvel at the ways in which other makers are using IoT, and get started with your first IoT project!

Awesome projects

DIY retro computing: this issue, we’re taking our collective hat off to Spencer Owen. He stuck his home-brew computer on Tindie thinking he might make a bit of beer money — now he’s paying the mortgage with his making skills and inviting others to build modules for his machine. And if that tickles your fancy, why not take a crack at our Z80 tutorial? Get out your breadboard, assemble your jumper wires, and prepare to build a real-life computer!

Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7

Shameless patriotism: combine Lego, Arduino, and the car of choice for 1960 gold bullion thieves, and you’ve got yourself a groovy weekend project. We proudly present to you one man’s epic quest to add LED lights (controllable via a smartphone!) to his daughter’s LEGO Mini Cooper.

Makerspaces

Patriotism intensifies: for the last 200-odd years, the Black Country has been a hotbed of making. Urban Hax, based in Walsall, is the latest makerspace to show off its riches in the coveted Space of the Month pages. Every space has its own way of doing things, but not every space has a portrait of Rob Halford on the wall. All hail!

Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7

Diversity: advice on diversity often boils down to ‘Be nice to people’, which might feel more vague than actionable. This is where we come in to help: it is truly worth making the effort to give people of all backgrounds access to your makerspace, so we take a look at why it’s nice to be nice, and at the ways in which one makerspace has put niceness into practice — with great results.

And there’s more!

We also show you how to easily calculate the size and radius of laser-cut gears, use a bank of LEDs to etch PCBs in your own mini factory, and use chemistry to mess with your lunch menu.

Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7
Helen Steer inside HackSpace magazine issue 7
Inside HackSpace magazine issue 7

All this plus much, much more waits for you in HackSpace magazine issue 7!

Get your copy of HackSpace magazine

If you like the sound of that, you can find HackSpace magazine in WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and independent newsagents in the UK. If you live in the US, check out your local Barnes & Noble, Fry’s, or Micro Center next week. We’re also shipping to stores in Australia, Hong Kong, Canada, Singapore, Belgium, and Brazil, so be sure to ask your local newsagent whether they’ll be getting HackSpace magazine.

And if you can’t get to the shops, fear not: you can subscribe from £4 an issue from our online shop. And if you’d rather try before you buy, you can always download the free PDF. Happy reading, and happy making!

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Join us at the Education Summit at PyCon UK 2018

Post Syndicated from Ben Nuttall original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/pycon-uk-2018/

PyCon UK 2018 will take place on Saturday 15 September to Wednesday 19 September in the splendid Cardiff City Hall, just a few miles from the Sony Technology Centre where the vast majority of Raspberry Pis is made. We’re pleased to announce that we’re curating this year’s Education Summit at the conference, where we’ll offer opportunities for young people to learn programming skills, and for educators to undertake professional development!

PyCon UK Education Summit logo

PyCon UK 2018 is your chance to be welcomed into the wonderful Python community. At the Education Summit, we’ll put on a young coders’ day on the Saturday, and an educators’ day on the Sunday.

Saturday — young coders’ day

On Saturday we’ll be running a CoderDojo full of workshops on Raspberry Pi and micro:bits for young people aged 7 to 17. If they wish, participants will get to make a project and present it to the conference on the main stage, and everyone will be given a free micro:bit to take home!

Kids’ tickets at just £6 will be available here soon.

Kids on a stage at PyCon UK

Kids presenting their projects to the conference

Sunday — educators’ day

PyCon UK has been bringing developers and educators together ever since it first started its education track in 2011. This year’s Sunday will be a day of professional development: we’ll give teachers, educators, parents, and coding club leaders the chance to learn from us and from each other to build their programming, computing, and digital making skills.

Educator workshop at PyCon UK

Professional development for educators

Educators get a special entrance rate for the conference, starting at £48 — get your tickets now. Financial assistance is also available.

Call for proposals

We invite you to send in your proposal for a talk and workshop at the Education Summit! We’re looking for:

  • 25-minute talks for the educators’ day
  • 50-minute workshops for either the young coders’ or the educators’ day

If you have something you’d like to share, such as a professional development session for educators, advice on best practice for teaching programming, a workshop for up-skilling in Python, or a fun physical computing activity for the CoderDojo, then we’d love to hear about it! Please submit your proposal by 15 June.




After the Education Summit, the conference will continue for two days of talks and a final day of development sprints. Feel free to submit your education-related talk to the main conference too if you want to share it with a wider audience! Check out the PyCon UK 2018 website for more information.

We’re looking forward to seeing you in September!

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Working with the Scout Association on digital skills for life

Post Syndicated from Philip Colligan original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/working-with-scout-association-digital-skills-for-life/

Today we’re launching a new partnership between the Scouts and the Raspberry Pi Foundation that will help tens of thousands of young people learn crucial digital skills for life. In this blog post, I want to explain what we’ve got planned, why it matters, and how you can get involved.

This is personal

First, let me tell you why this partnership matters to me. As a child growing up in North Wales in the 1980s, Scouting changed my life. My time with 2nd Rhyl provided me with countless opportunities to grow and develop new skills. It taught me about teamwork and community in ways that continue to shape my decisions today.

As my own kids (now seven and ten) have joined Scouting, I’ve seen the same opportunities opening up for them, and like so many parents, I’ve come back to the movement as a volunteer to support their local section. So this is deeply personal for me, and the same is true for many of my colleagues at the Raspberry Pi Foundation who in different ways have been part of the Scouting movement.

That shouldn’t come as a surprise. Scouting and Raspberry Pi share many of the same values. We are both community-led movements that aim to help young people develop the skills they need for life. We are both powered by an amazing army of volunteers who give their time to support that mission. We both care about inclusiveness, and pride ourselves on combining fun with learning by doing.

Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi started life in 2008 as a response to the problem that too many young people were growing up without the skills to create with technology. Our goal is that everyone should be able to harness the power of computing and digital technologies, for work, to solve problems that matter to them, and to express themselves creatively.

In 2012 we launched our first product, the world’s first $35 computer. Just six years on, we have sold over 20 million Raspberry Pi computers and helped kickstart a global movement for digital skills.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation now runs the world’s largest network of volunteer-led computing clubs (Code Clubs and CoderDojos), and creates free educational resources that are used by millions of young people all over the world to learn how to create with digital technologies. And lots of what we are able to achieve is because of partnerships with fantastic organisations that share our goals. For example, through our partnership with the European Space Agency, thousands of young people have written code that has run on two Raspberry Pi computers that Tim Peake took to the International Space Station as part of his Mission Principia.

Digital makers

Today we’re launching the new Digital Maker Staged Activity Badge to help tens of thousands of young people learn how to create with technology through Scouting. Over the past few months, we’ve been working with the Scouts all over the UK to develop and test the new badge requirements, along with guidance, project ideas, and resources that really make them work for Scouting. We know that we need to get two things right: relevance and accessibility.

Relevance is all about making sure that the activities and resources we provide are a really good fit for Scouting and Scouting’s mission to equip young people with skills for life. From the digital compass to nature cameras and the reinvented wide game, we’ve had a lot of fun thinking about ways we can bring to life the crucial role that digital technologies can play in the outdoors and adventure.

Compass Coding with Raspberry Pi

We are beyond excited to be launching a new partnership with the Raspberry Pi Foundation, which will help tens of thousands of young people learn digital skills for life.

We also know that there are great opportunities for Scouts to use digital technologies to solve social problems in their communities, reflecting the movement’s commitment to social action. Today we’re launching the first set of project ideas and resources, with many more to follow over the coming weeks and months.

Accessibility is about providing every Scout leader with the confidence, support, and kit to enable them to offer the Digital Maker Staged Activity Badge to their young people. A lot of work and care has gone into designing activities that require very little equipment: for example, activities at Stages 1 and 2 can be completed with a laptop without access to the internet. For the activities that do require kit, we will be working with Scout Stores and districts to make low-cost kit available to buy or loan.

We’re producing accessible instructions, worksheets, and videos to help leaders run sessions with confidence, and we’ll also be planning training for leaders. We will work with our network of Code Clubs and CoderDojos to connect them with local sections to organise joint activities, bringing both kit and expertise along with them.




Get involved

Today’s launch is just the start. We’ll be developing our partnership over the next few years, and we can’t wait for you to join us in getting more young people making things with technology.

Take a look at the brand-new Raspberry Pi resources designed especially for Scouts, to get young people making and creating right away.

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Raspberry Jam Cameroon #PiParty

Post Syndicated from Ben Nuttall original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-jam-cameroon-piparty/

Earlier this year on 3 and 4 March, communities around the world held Raspberry Jam events to celebrate Raspberry Pi’s sixth birthday. We sent out special birthday kits to participating Jams — it was amazing to know the kits would end up in the hands of people in parts of the world very far from Raspberry Pi HQ in Cambridge, UK.

The Raspberry Jam Camer team: Damien Doumer, Eyong Etta, Loïc Dessap and Lionel Sichom, aka Lionel Tellem

Preparing for the #PiParty

One birthday kit went to Yaoundé, the capital of Cameroon. There, a team of four students in their twenties — Lionel Sichom (aka Lionel Tellem), Eyong Etta, Loïc Dessap, and Damien Doumer — were organising Yaoundé’s first Jam, called Raspberry Jam Camer, as part of the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend. The team knew one another through their shared interests and skills in electronics, robotics, and programming. Damien explains in his blog post about the Jam that they planned ahead for several activities for the Jam based on their own projects, so they could be confident of having a few things that would definitely be successful for attendees to do and see.

Show-and-tell at Raspberry Jam Cameroon

Loïc presented a Raspberry Pi–based, Android app–controlled robot arm that he had built, and Lionel coded a small video game using Scratch on Raspberry Pi while the audience watched. Damien demonstrated the possibilities of Windows 10 IoT Core on Raspberry Pi, showing how to install it, how to use it remotely, and what you can do with it, including building a simple application.

Loïc Dessap, wearing a Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend T-shirt, sits at a table with a robot arm, a laptop with a Pi sticker and other components. He is making an adjustment to his set-up.

Loïc showcases the prototype robot arm he built

There was lots more too, with others discussing their own Pi projects and talking about the possibilities Raspberry Pi offers, including a Pi-controlled drone and car. Cake was a prevailing theme of the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend around the world, and Raspberry Jam Camer made sure they didn’t miss out.

A round pink-iced cake decorated with the words "Happy Birthday RBP" and six candles, on a table beside Raspberry Pi stickers, Raspberry Jam stickers and Raspberry Jam fliers

Yay, birthday cake!!

A big success

Most visitors to the Jam were secondary school students, while others were university students and graduates. The majority were unfamiliar with Raspberry Pi, but all wanted to learn about Raspberry Pi and what they could do with it. Damien comments that the fact most people were new to Raspberry Pi made the event more interactive rather than creating any challenges, because the visitors were all interested in finding out about the little computer. The Jam was an all-round success, and the team was pleased with how it went:

What I liked the most was that we sensitized several people about the Raspberry Pi and what one can be capable of with such a small but powerful device. — Damien Doumer

The Jam team rounded off the event by announcing that this was the start of a Raspberry Pi community in Yaoundé. They hope that they and others will be able to organise more Jams and similar events in the area to spread the word about what people can do with Raspberry Pi, and to help them realise their ideas.

The Raspberry Jam Camer team, wearing Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend T-shirts, pose with young Jam attendees outside their venue

Raspberry Jam Camer gets the thumbs-up

The Raspberry Pi community in Cameroon

In a French-language interview about their Jam, the team behind Raspberry Jam Camer said they’d like programming to become the third official language of Cameroon, after French and English; their aim is to to popularise programming and digital making across Cameroonian society. Neither of these fields is very familiar to most people in Cameroon, but both are very well aligned with the country’s ambitions for development. The team is conscious of the difficulties around the emergence of information and communication technologies in the Cameroonian context; in response, they are seizing the opportunities Raspberry Pi offers to give children and young people access to modern and constantly evolving technology at low cost.

Thanks to Lionel, Eyong, Damien, and Loïc, and to everyone who helped put on a Jam for the Big Birthday Weekend! Remember, anyone can start a Jam at any time — and we provide plenty of resources to get you started. Check out the Guidebook, the Jam branding pack, our specially-made Jam activities online (in multiple languages), printable worksheets, and more.

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Naturebytes’ weatherproof Pi and camera case

Post Syndicated from Helen Lynn original https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/naturebytes-weatherproof-pi-and-camera-case/

Naturebytes are making their weatherproof Wildlife Cam Case available as a standalone product for the first time, a welcome addition to the Raspberry Pi ecosystem that should take some of the hassle out of your outdoor builds.

A robin on a bird feeder in a garden with a Naturebytes Wildlife Cam mounted beside it

Weatherproofing digital making projects

People often use Raspberry Pis and Camera Modules for outdoor projects, but weatherproofing your set-up can be tricky. You need to keep water — and tiny creatures — out, but you might well need access for wires and cables, whether for power or sensors; if you’re using a camera, it’ll need something clear and cleanable in front of the lens. You can use sealant, but if you need to adjust anything that you’ve applied it to, you’ll have to remove it and redo it. While we’ve seen a few reasonable options available to buy, the choice has never been what you’d call extensive.

The Naturebytes case

For all these reasons, I was pleased to learn that Naturebytes, the wildlife camera people, are releasing their Wildlife Cam Case as a standalone product for the first time.

Naturebytes case open

The Wildlife Cam Case is ideal for nature camera projects, of course, but it’ll also be useful for anyone who wants to take their Pi outdoors. It has weatherproof lenses that are transparent to visible and IR light, for all your nature observation projects. Its opening is hinged to allow easy access to your hardware, and the case has waterproof access for cables. Inside, there’s a mount for fixing any model of Raspberry Pi and camera, as well as many other components. On top of all that, the case comes with a sturdy nylon strap to make it easy to attach it to a post or a tree.

Naturebytes case additional components

Order yours now!

At the moment, Naturebytes are producing a limited run of the cases. The first batch of 50 are due to be dispatched next week to arrive just in time for the Bank Holiday weekend in the UK, so get them while they’re hot. It’s the perfect thing for recording a timelapse of exactly how quickly the slugs obliterate your vegetable seedlings, and of lots more heartening things that must surely happen in gardens other than mine.

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